TIME Heart Disease

Low-T Drugs and Heart Risk: Here’s the Latest

A new study published Tuesday suggests testosterone drugs for men with low levels of the hormone are not at an increased risk of developing atherosclerosis. However, other studies in the past have suggested an increased cardiovascular risk from using low-T drugs, and in 2015 the FDA finalized a decision that required companies to label their products with the possible risk for heart attack and stroke. So what’s the deal?

“One of the hottest controversies in testosterone therapy is whether it’s associated with cardiovascular risks, and whether there is a higher likelihood for strokes on testosterone,” says Dr. Landon Trost, head of Male Infertility and Andrology at Mayo Clinic, who was not involved in the new study. “Testosterone therapy has a myth and promise of being the fountain of youth, and it’s exploded since 2001. Everyone is trying to address [heart risks] right now.”

MORE: Manopause?! Aging, Insecurity and the $2 Billion Testosterone Industry

The new study, published in the journal JAMA, found that among men with low levels of testosterone, there was no difference in the rate of build up in their artery walls, known as atherosclerosis, between those who used testosterone gel for three years and those who took a placebo. (Ironically, the study authors also found no improvement in overall sexual function, partner intimacy, and health-related quality of life in the men who took low-T drugs, either.)

Still, the case is far from closed. The new research didn’t look at whether testosterone therapy is linked to more heart-related events like strokes, for instance. There is also the reality that many men taking low-T drugs do not, in fact, have clinically low levels of the hormone. What the drugs do in men with normal or high levels of the hormone is unknown.

The new paper also comes with plenty of caveats. It was funded by pharmaceutical companies that sell low-T treatments; one author works for a pharmaceutical company; another consults for Eli Lilly, which makes a low-T drug; and a third scientist has received research and personal fees from pharmaceutical companies, as well as having low-T-drug-related patents pending. (This was all in the mandatory “conflict of interest disclosures” section of study.)

As TIME reported in July 2014, some medical professionals have expressed concern over whether testosterone products are safe or if they even revitalize men like they promise to. Trost, for his part, says he gives patients the evidence and lets them make their own decisions, though he believes the research leans toward safety.

More research is needed.

TIME Food & Drink

Yoga-Pants Maker Lululemon Is Introducing a Beer

Curiosity Lager launches on August 15 in Vancouver

Would you like a lager with your downward dog?

Lululemon—that company of see-through yoga pant infamy that arguably singlehandedly launched the “atheleisure” trend in comfortable, everyday sportswear—is introducing a specialty beer, the Curiosity Lager.

The beer comes in a 500 ml slender can, has 4.6% alcohol, printed with a geometric array of Pacific Northwest motifs: a totem pole, a suspension bridge, evergreen trees, mountains, and water. A limited edition release of 88,000 cans is planned.

Lululemon teamed up with Stanley Park Brewing to launch the lager, flavored with chinook and lemon drop hops for “crisp, cold beer.”

The beer’s August 15 release is timed with the SeaWheeze Half Marathon and Sunset Festival, a popular race in Lululemon’s hometown of Vancouver, British Columbia.

Though seemingly an odd couple at first, beer and yoga have coupled to become a major lifestyle force in the past few years, with boozy sessions becoming increasingly popular, particularly among the prime yuppie female demographic.

But Curiosity Lager is only the latest strategic deviation for the company, which is attempting to make its way into the men’s market.

Doug Devlin, marketing director for Stanley Park Brewing, told the CBC, “I think Lululemon, by extension, is interested in talking to a more male beer-drinking crowd.”

TIME mental health

Study Finds That Women Slip Into Dementia Faster Than Men

Senior woman covering face with her hands
Getty Images

The study has no medical implications quite yet

Women who develop slight memory deficits and mental decline slide faster toward dementia than men, according to a new study presented Tuesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Washington.

Researchers were quick to note that the study’s findings aren’t reflective of a difference in brain chemistry between genders and have no medical implications just yet. “All we can say at this point is that there appears to be a faster trajectory for women than men” in the direction of dementia, said P. Murali Doraiswamy, a professor of psychiatry at Duke University’s Institute for Brain Sciences and lead author of the study.

The study used cognitive test scores from 398 participants of both genders who were primarily in their 70s. After controlling for outside variables like education and genetics, the researchers found that women’s test scores fell by an average of two points per year, compared to just one point for men. This wasn’t the only negative effect for women: their standard of life—how they performed at home, work, and with family—also fell faster than men.

A vast majority—nearly two-thirds of the five million Americans afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease—are women, which scientists note can be traced to the fact that women live longer, but the reasons for their decline have remained indeterminate.

[New York Times]

 

TIME fashion

Why It Took Americans So Long to Care About Men’s Fashion

Models stand on stage for the Cadet presentation during Men's Fashion Week, in New York
Lucas Jackson / REUTERS Models stand on stage for the Cadet presentation during New York Fashion Week: Men's.

New York Fashion Week: Men’s edition premieres this week. As the name suggests, it’s the men’s version of the women’s event that takes over New York biannually with a stream of models, designers, and outfits being feverishly dissected in media for days on end. The men’s fashion week is at a much smaller scale, but a host of designers, new and old have descended on Gotham hoping that American men will finally pay attention to couture the way their European counterparts have.

So why the sudden focus on men’s fashion? After all, it’s not like men emerged as a new demographic. Men have always needed to get dressed, have always been half the population, and have historically worked in office environments longer than women.

Men’s fashion has been perceived as boringhow many viable ways could you really reconstruct the suit? Ties get skinnier then fatter; colors creep towards pastel then return to bland office-appropriate hues; jackets lose boxiness and hug shoulders more. But we are in the throes of a men’s fashion upheaval. The basics of men’s officewear are getting thrown aside as business casual is becoming the norm: jeans are favored by startup types, ties are restricted to certain sectors, shirts are relaxing their starched collars. Suddenly, there’s a very urgent space for men’s fashion.

Social media has emerged as a key player in the turnaround in not only making fashion more accessible but offering a lens to what dudes around the globe were wearing. Think of early fashion blogs: Most were exclusively for women, but The Sartorialist was one of the first to incorporate men (albeit, focusing mostly on Europeans) into its spreads, creating an ideal of what men’s fashion could besomething that had been sorely lacking. Men, after all, relied mainly on pop culture for inspiration before; now, there lay an entire world of opportunity.

“The men’s industry has [overtaken] women’s in terms of growth over the last couple of years,” says Steven Kolb, chief executive officer of the Council of Fashion Designers of America, or CFDA, the group that organizes New York’s fashion weeks. “I think the ability to shop easily through e-commerce and mobile commerce has made it more within reach of the guy who wants to shop.” For the guy—and girl—who hates going to the mall, sifting through messy hangers with club hits blasting or looking for a more streamlined process, e-commerce has been a blessing in convenience, efficiency, and comfort.

The data supports this: Euromonitor International reported earlier this year that menswear saw an increase of 4.5% in $440 billion in sales in 2014 alone. A 2014 report from Bain showed that men’s luxury accessories have outpaced women’s since 2009, increasing up to 13% per year. Traditionally female designers like Prada, Hermes, and Dolce & Gabbana have launched men’s lines to great success. And men love to shop online for clothes—much more so than for techie gadgets.

A generational difference may also play a role in the changing attitudes toward men’s fashion, Kolb said: Millennials are much more tuned into their smartphones and social media, the prime spots for what’s hot and what’s not. Consider Millennials’ penchant for posting selfies: All of a sudden, what you wear is being broadcast to the world, and what you wear is saying a whole lot more about who you are.

“I think Millennials tend to use the way they dress as a statement,” Kolb said. “You see the public figures that people relate to, like sports figures, musicians—and [the consumer] just has more options.”

Male fashion role models are no longer restricted to the stereotypical trifecta of sports, music, and politicians; there’s an entire smorgasbord of types that are all equally as cool and all play into aspects of a man’s personality and lifestyle. Personalization, in other words, has arrived for the American man’s fashion palate, and, combined with the ease and dominance of technology in daily life, has made fashion more accessible.

Plus there’s more wardrobe flexibility in the modern workplace. Combined with alternative male identities that have made it socially acceptable to be fashion conscious and retain a strong sense of masculinity, whether it be gay or straight or transgendered (think: hipster, metrosexual, lumbersexual, gender fluid, androgynous or just nerd), men’s fashion has become a viable concept.

“I think the world’s attitudes towards masculinity have really progressed,” Jeremy Lewis, editor of Garmento, a fashion magazine, told Business of Fashion. “The classic male archetype has been pretty misogynistic, sexist, and slightly fascist and I think that’s broken down quite a bit over the last 20 years. It makes more sense in a world that is becoming less patriarchal that the male identity would shift to allow for something like fashion or style … to be adopted.”

But before American men can fully celebrate the inclusion of a men’s fashion week and how far we’ve come as a society, it’s worth remembering a key fact: The United States is sorely behind in this realm. New York was the last of the great four fashion capitals (the other three being Paris, London, and Milan) to create an exclusively male-centric fashion week. And the week is getting only a fraction of the attention that its sister organization gets.

Kolb realizes the uphill battle the CFDA faces in hosting the week. “It’s a new event and new effort and we’re able to connect to a broader audience differently,” he said, confirming that the show is slated for a repeat next year. “We have a robust marketing campaign, amazing fashion partners, this city, and magazines and newspapers and pretty cool campaigns.”

In other words, there’s no reason why the guys can’t have in on the fun of dressing up.

 

TIME Heart Disease

Cancer Is Now the Number 1 Killer of Men in the UK

TIME.com stock photos Health First Aid Kit Gloves
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

Women are still more likely to die of heart disease than cancer

A new report shows that in the U.K., cancer has surpassed cardiovascular disease as the most common cause of death, but only among men.

The research published in The BMJ looked at the national data on both cancer and heart disease in countries in the U.K. from 2012 to 2013. Among men, fewer were dying of heart-related disease like high blood pressure and stroke than they have been in the past. Thirty-two percent of deaths among men were cancer-related and 29% were from heart disease. For women, 27% of deaths were from cancer and 28% from heart disease.

Overall, in 2012 the researchers reported that the proportion of deaths from cancer was 29% and cardiovascular disease related-deaths came out to 28%. England had the lowest rate of heart conditions and Scotland had the highest.

It’s unclear what precisely is responsible for the drop in heart-related disease, but it’s known that in some cases, heart disease is preventable with lifestyle changes.

TIME Bizarre

Attention Hipster Swimmers, This Beard Cap Is the Answer to Your Prayers

Virgin Trains, official train partner to the Great North Swim, has launched an innovative swim cap for bearded men – the Beard Cap - which will be trialled with customers competing at the Great North Swim, Lake Windermere, June 12 – 14, 2015. Responding to debates on swimming forums about big beards causing drag, Virgin Trains commissioned its own research which revealed that over one in ten men (12 per cent) connected their beard to slower swim times, and nearly a quarter of men feel their beards hinder their sports performance. For swimmers, spectators and supporters planning a weekend away to the Lakes during the Great North Swim, there are exclusive discounts of up to 50%  across Virgin Trains First and Standard Advance Fares. To find out more information and buy tickets to travel to The Great North Swim visit http://www.virgintrains.co.uk/nova/
Mikael Buck—Virgin Trains Virgin Trains has launched an innovative swim cap for bearded men which will be trialled with customers competing at the Great North Swim, Lake Windermere, U.K., on June 12–14, 2015

Talk about shaving a few seconds off your swim time

Facial hair, especially the long unruly kind, can prove a severe impediment to a swimmer’s aquatic aerodynamic ability. A new invention from Virgin Trains called the Beard Cap, however, promises to change that forever.

The “innovative swim cap for bearded men,” as the rail company described the device in a press release, is just like a regular swimming cap, except it also extends to cover the wearer’s chin and press the beard closer to the face. The cap, which is “reusable, adjustable and perfect for keeping bushy beards under control,” will be launched at the Great North Swim in England’s Lake Windermere from June 12 to 14.

The invention is even backed by research commissioned by the company, which revealed that over 1 in 10 men attributed their beard to slower swim times, and nearly a quarter of men feel their beards negatively impact sports performance.

“At Virgin Trains we’re passionate about giving our customers the most awesome experience possible, and this extends to their sporting endeavors as they are traveling to the Great North Swim with us,” said Adrian Verma, the company’s senior partnerships and marketing manager. “In addition to the 50% discounted tickets to the event for spectators and competitors, we’re delighted to be offering customers this innovative cap to help them do their best.”

TIME History

United Once Offered Unbelievable ‘Men-Only’ Flights

United Airlines - Super DC
Bill Peters—Denver Post via Getty Images United Airlines - Super DC

It operated these exclusive routes until 1970

Mad Men might have aired its final episode, but don’t worry — all you need to get your fix of jaw-dropping sexism is to open an aviation history book.

Take for instance this find over at the blog Boarding Area, which recently dug up some old ads from between 1953 through 1970. That’s when United Airlines offered flights for “men only,” where wealthy businessmen could enjoy complimentary cigars, cocktails and a full-course steak dinner in the exclusive company of other men (besides the stewardesses, of course).

According to Boarding Area, these flights were operated in two routes, New York to Chicago and Los Angeles and San Francisco. Flights would leave at 5 p.m. in each of the four cities, six days per week, excluding Saturdays.

Here’s how United’s ad copy pitched it:

Relax after a busy day on this special DC-6 mainliner flight. You’ll enjoy the informal, club-like atmosphere. Smoke your pipe or cigar, if you wish, and make yourself more comfortable by using the pair of slippers provided . . . take off your coat, and stretch out in a deep, soft Mainliner seat. Or, enjoy congenial company in the lounge.

Take advantage of may special services on this flight. Closing market quotations are available and you favorite business magazines. If you’d like do some some work, your stewardess will arrange a table for you.

Eat your heart out, Don Draper.

 

 

TIME work

U.N. Report: Women May Need ‘Different Treatment’ to Achieve Economic Equality

2015 International Women's Day March
Mark Sagliocco—Getty Images Assistant Secretary General Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka attends the 2015 International Women's Day March at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza in New York City on March 8, 2015.

It's just like Sheryl Sandberg said: paid leave and affordable child care would help achieve gender equality on a global level

Equal opportunity is not enough to ensure gender equality, according to a groundbreaking new report from U.N. Women. Instead, governments must commit to social policies that treat women differently in order to help them achieve economic parity with men.

“We must go beyond creating equal opportunities to ensure equal outcomes,” the report says. “‘Different treatment’ may be required to achieve real equality in practice.” This report, called Progress of the World’s Women 2015–2016, is one of the first major international reports to acknowledge that legal equality for women does not translate into actual equality, and that governments must make substantial social-policy changes that enable the redistribution of domestic duties in order for women to play a truly equal role in society.

It’s the global version of what Sheryl Sandberg has been saying all along with Lean In — women will never be equal unless workplace policies adjust to fit their needs, and men need to step up to help at home. The report highlights the gap between the laws that protect equal rights for women and the realities of inequality in most of the world. The way to close that gap, according to the report, is by implementing social policies that provide paid work opportunities for women, protect domestic workers, provide affordable child care and establish paid leave for working mothers. Removing legal barriers to female employment is not enough, the report says, noting that “we also need measures that free up women’s time.”

“Governments should take actionable steps to reduce the burden of unpaid care work — which is carried by women — and create an industry of jobs and employment for services,” U.N. Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka tells TIME. “Child care is an issue in every country, but more often than not borne by mothers. Government policy should work to professionalize this industry as much as possible, and make it affordable and accessible to all.”

Lack of resources like these may explain why 77% of working-age men are in the global workforce, compared with only half of working-age women. Globally, women earn 24% less than men, yet do 2.5 times as much child care and domestic labor as men. In developing regions, 75% of women’s employment is insecure, unprotected and poorly paid, if they’re employed at all. Only 5% of women in South Asia have formal work, and only 11% in sub-Saharan Africa.

The U.N. is calling for more “decent work” for women, which they define as a job that is well paid, secure and “compatible with women’s and men’s shared responsibility” for children and housework. The report also says redistributing household duties is “critical” for achieving substantive equality worldwide.

Child care is the thorny problem that’s hampering women’s economic advancement, both at the individual level and on a global scale. Forty-four percent of mothers in poor countries raise their young children almost entirely on their own, compared with only 29% of mothers in rich countries. In poor countries, 18% of mothers entrust child care to a female child, while in rich countries, 15% of moms have hired help and 10% have access to organized child care or a nursery. The study found that in every country, women were less likely to work when they had small children, which helps contribute to the global pay gap.

And the income women lose can have repercussions throughout their lifetimes. Lack of money often translates into lack of control over their own health decisions: 69% of women in Senegal, 48% in Pakistan and 27% in Haiti say they do not make the final decisions about their own health care. And in most countries, women are less likely to receive pensions — in Egypt, 62% of men get pensions, compared with 8% of women. That’s partly because of legal constraints, but also because women have different labor patterns then men (i.e., they’re more likely to work in informal settings), they contribute less (because they’re paid less) and they live longer. That means women make up the majority of the 73% of the world’s population with little or no social protection in old age.

And all that income women are losing to child care or domestic work adds up to a lot of money. The time women spend on unpaid work amounts to 39% of India’s GDP, 31% of Nicaragua’s GDP and 10% of Argentina’s GDP. Gender equality and economic growth are like squares and rectangles: gender equality leads to economic growth, but growth doesn’t always lead to equality.

The need for paid leave and affordable child care is well-trod ground in North America and Europe, leading to charges that those kinds of social policies are more for rich women than for poor ones. But this report is one of the first to link female-friendly workplace policies like those to gender equality in the developing world. Rich or poor, policies that help working mothers help elevate all women.

MONEY wage gap

The 25 Careers in Which Women Are Most Underpaid

equal pay day wage gap women
Michael Hanson—Aurora Photos Female farmers, on average, earn just 60% of what their male counterparts do.

Females in financial services suffer some of the biggest pay gaps—but farmers don't have it great either.

On this Equal Pay Day, let’s take a moment to acknowledge where the greatest strides have yet to be made.

While gals make 78¢ to the dollar that guys do on average, the differential in some professions is much greater. Female securities and financial services sales agents, for example, are the most underpaid professionals compared with their male peers, getting a mere 55¢ per $1 of their counterparts’ compensation.

The Census bureau tracks earnings by gender for more than 500 occupational categories; the table below shows 25 fields where, based on 2013 data, the difference in what she makes and what he makes is the biggest.

(You can discover what each of these fields entails by typing in the category listed at O*Net Online, and find your own field’s pay differential via this Census table.)

Nearly half the jobs on this list are in financial fields. It’s also worth noting that 17 out of 25 are majority male in makeup, compared with half of the fields where the pay gap for women is the smallest.

Need a pick-me-up after this list? Check out The 25 Careers with the Smallest Wage Gaps for Women. And read up on how to reduce the pay gap for yourself, no matter where your own field falls.

Occupational Category % Women in Field Median Earnings, Men Median Earnings, Women % Women’s Earnings to Men’s % Margin of Error
1. Securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents 30% $93,795 $51,284 54.7 5.7
2. Financial specialists, all other 55% $81,859 $48,869 59.7 7.5
3. Morticians, undertakers, and funeral dirs. 20% $51,129 $31,023 60.7 10.5
4. Farmers, ranchers,agricultural mgrs. 11% $41,691 $25,310 60.7 5.0
5. Personal financial advisors 31% $98,126 $60,359 61.5 5.5
6. Financial clerks, all other 61% $67,732 $42,122 62.2 5.8
7. Financial analysts 32% $100,081 $63,424 63.4 7.9
8. Financial managers 54% $90,278 $57,406 63.6 2.0
9. Supervisors housekeeping/janitorial 33% $41,180 $26,860 65.2 2.4
10. Production, planning, and expediting clerks 57% $56,437 $37,246 66.0 1.6
11. Credit counselors and loan officers 54% $69,726 $46,394 66.5 4.2
12. Insurance sales agents 45% $61,639 $41,250 66.9 1.4
13. Photographic process and processing machine workers 45% $31,888 $21,348 66.9 14.0
14. Jewelers and precious stone and metal workers 30% $36,494 $24,657 67.6 17.5
15. Driver/sales workers and truck drivers 4% $40,865 $27,657 67.7 3.8
16. Dentists 24% $151,071 $102,460 67.8 9.3
17. Tax preparers 52% $70,641 $47,997 67.9 7.1
18. Artists and related workers 36% $54,669 $37,261 68.2 9.0
19. Photographers 40% $44,513 $30,455 68.4 7.0
20. Welders, solderers, and brazers 5% $39,281 $26,893 68.5 3.6
21. Tax examiners, collectors, and agents 65% $66,754 $45,704 68.5 9.5
22. Economists 29% $120,076 $82,427 68.6 10.1
23. Credit authorizers, checkers, and clerks 73% $50,853 $35,037 68.9 10.9
24. Physicians and surgeons 33% $202,533 $140,036 69.1 4.0
25. Cutting workers 20% $31,113 $21,516 69.2 3.5

More from Money.com on equal pay:

The 25 Careers with the Smallest Wage Gaps for Women

5 Ways Women Can Close the Pay Gap for Themselves

The Single Best Thing Women Can Do to Help Themselves in Salary Negotiations

MONEY wage gap

The 25 Careers With the Smallest Wage Gaps for Women

wage gap careers equal pay day
Robert J. Ross—Getty Images On average, female media producers and directors outearn men.

Plus, 9 fields where women actually earn more

Tuesday is Equal Pay Day, intended to raise awareness of the fact that women still earn less than their male counterparts. That’s 22¢ to the dollar less on average, in case you haven’t been paying attention.

This date was not chosen randomly: Equal Pay Day is purposely held in April to illustrate the fact that it takes four months into the year for the average woman to catch up to the average man’s earnings from the last year. And it’s on a Tuesday to show how long into the week it takes to match a man’s previous-week earnings.

Of course, in some fields, getting up to par is quicker than others.

The Census bureau tracks earnings by gender for more than 500 occupational categories; the table below shows 25 fields where, based on 2013 data, the difference in what she makes and what he makes is the smallest. (You can find out what each of these fields entails by typing in the category listed at O*Net Online, and find your own field’s pay differential via this Census table.)

As you’ll see, there are nine fields where the average woman actually outearns her male counterpart, though the margins of error on these are high enough as to possibly undo the findings. Also worth noting: Half of the professions in the top 25 are made up of a majority of women, vs. only six of the bottom 25.

Some have argued that if women simply went into higher paying fields they could eliminate a wage discrepancy, but the data argue against that. After all, physicians and surgeons—who take home very healthy paychecks—suffer among the greatest pay discrepancies, with women in these fields making 69% of what men do.

Instead, Harvard economist Claudia Goldin, author of Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women, attributes a higher salary differential to the fact that some fields disproportionately incentivize people to work long hours and certain hours. That punishes women who take time out from their careers and require some flexibility in their work lives to raise children.

In aggregate, earnings between men and women are not that different until women enter child-bearing years, Goldin says. “But in some occupations, there isn’t a large penalty for time out of the workforce or shorter hours,” she notes.

What often separates those fields, she says, is that another person with a similar title can take over to serve as a perfect substitute. It’s easier for a woman to leave at 5 p.m. to pick up her kids if information systems or a standardization of product makes handing off her duties costless.

Goldin gives the example of a pharmacist (a profession in which women earn a high 93% of what men do). In that role, a computer system provides access to standard data about the customer, so that the customer needn’t always see the same person.

Okay, good to know, but if your field doesn’t allow this flexibility you likely won’t be able to make changes overnight. Nor are you probably interested in changing industries now just to gain the greater equality offered by the jobs below.

So what can you do? Advocating for yourself and asking the right people to advocate for you can help around the edges.

And Goldin suggests that you might work toward getting the men in your company to work less. The less willing they are to put in long hours without phenomenally more money, she notes, the more likely companies will be to put in place systems that allow workers to be more interchangeable.

“Ironically, rather than women leaning in,” she says, “it’s about getting men to start leaning out.”

 

Occupational Category % Women in Field Median Earnings, Men Median Earnings, Women % Women’s Earnings to Men’s % Margin of Error
1. Media producers and directors 37% $62,368 $66,226 106.2 10.3
2. Cleaners of vehicles and equip. 14% $23,605 $24,793 105.0 9.6
3. Wholesale and retail buyers 49% $41,619 $42,990 103.3 5.9
4. Transportation security screeners 36% $40,732 $41,751 102.5 4.4
5. Social and human service assistants 79% $34,967 $35,766 102.3 11.6
6. Special education teachers 85% $46,932 $47,378 101.0 3.5
7. Transportation, storage, and distrib. mgrs. 18% $52,017 $52,259 100.5 5.5
8. Dishwashers 16% $17,302 $17,332 100.2 7.4
9. Counselors 70% $42,299 $42,369 100.2 2.2
10. Industrial truck/tractor operators 7% $31,002 $30,981 99.9 2.9
11. Massage therapists 76% $29,272 $29,240 99.9 11.1
12. Counter and rental clerks 47% $27,449 $27,194 99.1 19.6
13. Biological scientists 48% $57,653 $57,107 99.1 9.8
14. Tellers 89% $25,564 $25,222 98.7 3.0
15. Musicians, singers, and related 20% $42,988 $42,279 98.4 13.7
16. Misc. personal appearance workers 79% $22,047 $21,632 98.1 4.0
17. Meeting and event planners 81% $47,876 $46,973 98.1 12.7
18. Security/surveillance guards 22% $30,546 $29,883 97.8 4.1
19. Computer network architects 8% $96,549 $94,445 97.8 5.7
20. Social workers 80% $42,821 $41,795 97.6 3.9
21. Computer occupations, all other 23% $66,971 $65,329 97.5 5.0
22. Nonfarm animal caretakers 69% $25,025 $24,401 97.5 9.4
23. Dietitians and nutritionists 88% $49,001 $47,717 97.4 7.7
24. Postal service clerks 50% $54,166 $52,574 97.1 1.5
25. Hotel, motel, and resort desk clerks 65% $21,995 $21,329 97.0 4.8

More from Money.com on equal pay:

The 25 Careers in Which Women are Most Underpaid Relative to Men

5 Ways Women Can Close the Pay Gap for Themselves

The Single Best Thing Women Can Do to Help Themselves in Salary Negotiations

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