TIME History

Watch: The Forgotten Genius Who Figured Out How the Heart Works

A video from the World Science Festival tells the story of William Harvey, a forgotten pioneer in human anatomy

In the 17th-century, William Harvey, an English physician, worked to debunk the misconceptions that phlegm and bile were at the root of all health problems.

He was a leading figure in cardiology at the time, and it is to him that we owe the discovery of blood circulation. Almost forgotten now, Harvey was a trailblazer back then, or as the World Science Festival sees it, “he ruffled a lot of feathers, but eventually became a major influence on modern medicine.”

Watch the video above for more on his controversial, and until now overlooked, legacy.

TIME medecine

The Hot New App That’s Full of Really Gross Photos

Courtesy of Figure 1

It's not what you think...

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This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

A word of warning: the photographs found on the mobile application Figure 1 may make your stomach turn. They include—and you should skip to the next paragraph if descriptions of medical injuries will nauseate you—a swollen bloody thumb, recently reconstructed after a fireworks injury; a 17 year-old’s foot charred black by an electrical burn; and a worm pulled from a patient’s anus. Yes, really.

This is the stuff that medical professionals don’t see everyday, which is exactly why they’re flocking to this photo-sharing app. Though tiny, it has proven extremely popular since it launched two years ago. The app now counts an audience of 125,000, and its parent company, which shares its name, estimates that 15% of medical students in the United States use it. Which may be one reason why investors are interested: on August 6, the Toronto-based startup will announce that it raised $4 million in funding led by Union Square Ventures.

Figure 1 essentially offers a visual shorthand for healthcare professionals looking to compare notes. In my opening essay for Fortune‘s The Future of the Image series, I made the case for the rise of visual literacy as people increasingly substitute photos for text. This trend will have a huge impact on business. As pictures replace words, tools that allow professionals to take and compare photos have an increasingly important role to play in the enterprise.

Already, a host of software applications are emerging to support this. Architizer invites architects to uplioad and share projects, for example. FoKo offers a secure, private enterprise photo-sharing app designed for companies and counts Whole Foods as a customer.

For the rest of the story, go to Fortune.com.

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