TIME Sports

See Boston Marathoners Celebratory Photos

From selfies to colorful costumes, here are the best photographs Boston marathoners and spectators shared on social media today

TIME Terrorism

Cops Shot Too Soon in Boston Bombing Manhunt, Report Finds

"Weapons discipline was lacking" during manhunt and standoff, report says

A long-awaited government report on the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings praised law enforcement for their quick and effective response to the fatal attack, but noted that officers who cornered alleged bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in a boat several days later may have fired on him too soon.

The report is mostly a play-by-play of the bombing and subsequent manhunt from April 15 to 19, 2013. Much of the report details the effective coordination of law enforcement, medical personnel, marathon officials and hospital staff. For example, all the patients who went to the hospital survived their injuries, and medical tents at the finish line of the marathon were instrumental in providing on-site medical care.

But the report also details some areas for improvement, including in how careful police are when firing their guns. The report noted that “weapons discipline was lacking,” both during the firefight with the Tsarnaev brothers and during the standoff with Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in the boat on April 19. In that standoff, police opened fire on the boat after hearing a gunshot that they believed came from Tsarnaev, but actually came from a fellow police officer, who had fired inappropriately, the report found.

There was also an incident when officers fired on a suspicious-looking unmarked black truck that was actually driven by plainclothes officers, who were both unhurt. The report warned that “each of these incidents created a dangerous crossfire situation.”

While many different teams worked quickly and efficiently to keep Boston safe, the report also noted that there was room for improvement in coordination between city agencies, which “created confusion at times.” The report recommended that each city agency have a designated emergency representative to coordinate with other agencies, and that the city develop a more unified emergency response policy for the future.

Another area for improvement was in hospital evidence collection. The report said that hospital personnel were “intimidated” by the heavily armed police officers questioning victims and witnesses, and that there was not a streamlined procedure for gathering evidence from survivors at the hospital.

Also, the interlocking rack barriers that kept spectators from interfering with the marathon proved to be major obstacles for first responders. The report recommends the city look into alternative crowd control techniques that could be more easily disassembled in an emergency situation.

TIME Sports

This Elite Marathon Runner Was Determined to Finish Race No Matter What

In a show of determination, Hyvon Ngetich crawled over finish line to take third place

Hyvon Ngetich turned metaphor into reality when she literally crawled across the finish line at the Austin Marathon on Sunday.

The Kenyan runner was in the lead among the elite women after 23 miles, according to local CBS affiliate KEYE-TV, when she collapsed between there and the finish line. Still, Ngetich persevered, crawling on her hands and knees to cross the finish line. She still finished in third place in spite of her setback.

The race director, John Conley, was apparently so impressed with this triumph of will that he decided to increase her prize money to what she would have won if she came in second place. “You ran the bravest race and crawled the bravest crawl I have ever seen in my life,” he said. “You have earned much honor.”

[KEYE-TV]

TIME U.S.

Man Proposes to His Girlfriend at the Boston Marathon Finish Line

"After last year I realized the people you love and your life can be taken so quickly"

Shortly after completing the Boston Marathon today, runner Greg Picklesimer decided to make the day even more memorable by proposing to his girlfriend at the finish line.

He also completed the marathon last year, just a few hours before the terrorist attack that killed three people and injured dozens more.

“After last year I realized the people you love and your life can be taken so quickly,” Picklesimer told CBS Boston. “I didn’t want to lose that so I decided to come back and seal the deal.”

She said yes, luckily, because wouldn’t that be so awkward if she didn’t?

 

TIME cities

Boston Marathon Winds Down Without a Hitch a Year After Bombings

2014 B.A.A. Boston Marathon
Jim Rogash—Getty Images Rita Jeptoo of Kenya crosses the finish line to win the 118th Boston Marathon on April 21, 2014 in Boston, Ma.

Marathon went smoothly Monday night without incident, amid increased security measures following last year's bombing near the finish line that killed three people and wounded 264 others

Updated 3:00 a.m. ET

The Boston Marathon began winding down Monday night without incident amid heightened security measures after bombings near the finish line of last year’s marathon killed three people and wounded 264 others.

Almost 36,000 people ran in the marathon, the Associated Press reports, in what officials called a powerful display of resilience after last year’s tragedy. In one particularly uplifting scene, an unidentified participant in the day’s race appeared to collapse near the 26th mile marker only to be carried across the finish line by fellow runners.

Marathon officials went to great lengths to prevent another incident, forbidding backpacks and rucksacks, containers with more than one liter of liquid, and costumes that cover the face, CNN reports. Large signs are also banned, and unregistered runners and cyclists were no longer allowed to join the race. Surveillance cameras dotted the course and police officers were perched on rooftops.

Meb Keflezighi won the men’s race in 2:08:37, becoming the first American to win this marathon since 1983, the Boston Globe reports. Defending champion Rita Jeptoo of Kenya won the women’s race in 2:18:55, beating her winning record from last year by over seven minutes. She’s the seventh the-time winner in history, the AP reports.

Authorities accused brothers Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev of the 2013 bombings. Tamerlan was killed days later after a shootout with police ended with Dzhokhar running over his brother with his car. Dzhokhar is awaiting trial.

On the one-year anniversary of the marathon attack last Tuesday, police arrested a performance artist who wore a veil and screamed as he carried two rice cookers in backpacks to the site of the original explosion last year. Kevin Edson, who has a history of hospitalization and mental health issues, was arrested and held on $100,000 bail before he was sent to a mental hospital.

TIME boston strong

Boston Is Ready to Run Again: Stories of Resilience One Year Later

A year after tragedy hit their hometown streets, survivors of the Boston Marathon bombings plan to run again

This week, survivors, first responders and family members of those killed came together to mark the anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings.

The events that unfolded starting at 2:49 p.m. on April 15, 2013, nearly three hours after the race’s winners crossed the finish line, altered lives forever.

In this gripping video feature, survivors and runners who were at the finish line remember the frantic moments of that deadly day.

A year after two bombs claimed three lives and injured more than 260 people, their stories of survival are a testament to Boston’s resilient spirit in the aftermath of the bombings. Their resolution to run again on Monday, the day the race takes place this year, comes from the determination to continue to rebuild, drawing strength from the heroics they saw that day.

 

TIME North Korea

North Korea Marathon Opens to Foreign Amateurs

The annual marathon in Pyongyang opened to recreational foreign runners for the first time on April 13, allowing another brief look into the Hermit Kingdom that typically remains off-limits to those born outside the country

Organizers of the Mangyongdae Prize International Marathon, recognized as a bronze-label event by the International Association of Athletics Federations and held for the past 27 years, told the Associated Press they opted to allow the new recreational runners in an effort to more boldly celebrate the birthday of their nation’s founder, Kim Il Sung, on April 15. Officials said the race, which typically has featured elite foreigners, included 225 amateurs and runners from 27 countries. The course, a largely flat path of four loops around the center of the city, had to be completed within four hours so roads could be reopened. A half marathon and a 10-kilometer run were also held as thousands of North Koreans lined the streets to cheer the participants.

TIME gender

Woman Bests Men In an L.A. Marathon With One Caveat

Asics LA Marathon
Harry How / Getty Images Amane Gobena of Ethiopia reacts as she crosses the finish line to win the women's elite class of the Los Angeles Marathon on March 9, 2014 in Santa Monica, California.

Amane Gobena won $50,000 for beating the men.

Ethiopian runner Amane Gobena past the finish line of the Los Angeles Marathon Sunday, taking home a $50,000 prize for beating her male counterparts in the race’s “gender challenge.”

The only caveat was that Gobena didn’t have the fastest time. Women were given a 17:41 head start in the co-ed race. Gobena ran the 26.2 mile race in 2 hours 27 minutes and 37 seconds, crossing the finish line 41 seconds ahead of Gebo Burka who finished in 2 hours 10 minutes and 37 seconds.

Gobena and Burka, both Ethopian, won $25,000 each for winning the men and women’s portions of the race.

[LA Times]

TIME the backstory

Capturing the Real Face of Terror: Photographing Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

In one of the first interviews since he retired, Sgt. Sean Murphy visited TIME to discuss the photographs he made during the dramatic capture of suspected Boston Marathon Bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on April 19, 2013.

In one of the first interviews since he retired, Sgt. Sean Murphy visited TIME to discuss the photographs he made during the dramatic capture of suspected Boston Marathon Bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on April 19, 2013.

Five tense days in Boston ended in a boat stored in a yard in Watertown, Mass., 7 1⁄2 miles from a Boston Marathon finish line still disarrayed and deserted.

As a photographer for the Massachusetts State Police, Sergeant Sean Murphy deployed with hundreds of officers assigned to capture Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a suspect, along with his brother Tamerlan, in the Boston Marathon bombings, an attack which killed three and injured hundreds.

On the evening of April 19, police received the tip that brought them to this northwestern suburb. As police surrounded the area, Murphy, about 75 feet away, photographed Tsarnaev as he emerged from the boat with his hands up and in the sights of nearby snipers.

“It was surreal,” Murphy says. “This was the guy who had executed a police officer. This was the guy who set the bombs off at the finish line of the marathon. This was the guy who had hurt Boston.”

Murphy’s photos would likely have remained unseen if not for Rolling Stone’s decision to put Tsarnaev on the cover months later, leading some to complain that he was being glamorized. “I knew the image I had of the bad guy in the boat was the real face of terror,” says Murphy, who felt compelled to share his photos with Boston magazine without authorization.

Murphy later retired with an honorable discharge, but he doesn’t regret what he did. “Sometimes, doing what’s wrong is the right thing to do,” he says.

6:02.14 p.m.:  Tactical Police Officers converge on the house where 19-year-old Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was hiding at the time of his in Watertown, Mass.

See more of Sgt. Murphy’s incredible photographs.


Josh Sanburn is a writer/reporter for TIME in New York. Follow him on Twitter @joshsanburn.


Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com