TIME Kentucky Derby

Kentucky Derby Bans Drones and Selfie Sticks

Kentucky Oaks Day at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky. on May 2, 2014.
Logan Riely—AP Kentucky Oaks Day at Churchill Downs in Louisville, KY on May 2, 2014.

Re-entry on the day of race will not be allowed, either

In a loss for annoying people everywhere, Churchill Downs has banned selfie sticks from the Kentucky Derby and Oaks races.

The triple crown venue will not allow the picture-taking accessories as well as photo drones inside for the 2015 running of the Kentucky Derby, according to The Courier Journal of Louisville.

For the first time ever, fans will also not be permitted re-entry on the day of the race, with track general manager Ryan Jordan telling The Courier-Journal the policy made it too east for counterfeiters to prosper.

“Our previous re-entry policy made it a fairly simple task for ticketed patrons to exit the track and quickly generate copies of their tickets and wristbands for sale outside of our grounds.”

This article originally appeared on SI.com.

 

TIME Horse Racing

California Chrome Set to Race at Belmont for Triple Crown After All

139th Preakness Stakes
Molly Riley—Getty Images California Chrome #3, ridden by Victor Espinoza, head to the finish line enroute to winning the 139th running of the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Course on May 17, 2014 in Baltimore.

Successful colt California Chrome's bid to be the first Triple Crown winner since 1978 is reportedly back on track after New York state officials are said to have informed trainers that the thoroughbred could wear a nasal strip for the Belmont Stakes

Updated 11:30 am ET, May 19

Prize racehorse California Chrome’s bid to win the Triple Crown is apparently back on, after state officials reportedly agreed to let the the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner wear a nasal strip at the Belmont Stakes.

ESPN, citing unnamed sources within the California Chrome camp, reports the colt has been given the go-ahead to wear a nasal strip in the third and final race for the crown by New York Racing Association steward Steve Lewandowski.

California Chrome has worn a nasal strip, which help horses breathe, throughout his recent six-race winning streak. However, New York officials have a history of banning the strips: Back in 2012, horse I’ll Have Another wore nasal strips during its Kentucky and Preakness wins, but was going to be barred from doing so at Belmont. (The point became moot when Another was scratched after a leg injury.)

If California Chrome wins at Belmont, it would make him the first Triple Crown winner since 1978.

[ESPN]

TIME

Pictures of the Week: May 2 – May 9

From deadly landslides in Afghanistan and elections in South Africa, to setting the stage for the World Cup and Eurovision’s beautiful, bearded songstress, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

TIME

The Craziest Hats of the Kentucky Derby

Forget the horses. The large, colorful and often sculptural headwear of the Kentucky Derby's attendees are where the real action's at

TIME Kentucky Derby

Kentucky Derby Favorites Saddle Up

APTOPIX Kentucky Derby Horse Racing
Matt Slocum—AP A horse goes for a workout at Churchill Downs prior to the race, May 3, 2014, in Louisville, Ky.

California Chrome is the runaway favorite to win the 140th Kentucky Derby Saturday, but Wicked Strong and Danza are hot on his heels

The biggest day of the year for horse-racing fans has arrived.

Nineteen horses will gallop out of the stalls for the Kentucky Derby on Saturday evening, with a tough field of jockeys looking to join a list of champions in the first leg of the Triple Crown. The 1.25-mile race at Kentucky’s Churchill Downs features a tight field, but the much-admired California Chrome is the clear betting favorite to win the race after number-two favorite horse Hoppertunity was forced to withdraw due to an issue in his front hoof.

Here’s a list of the top competitors at the 140th Kentucky Derby:

California Chrome may be the first California-bred horse to win the Kentucky Derby in 52 years. The three-year-old chestnut colt has six wins and a second in 10 starts and has a huge hoof up in the betting odds, but was bred from comparatively humble origins. His trainer, Art Sherman, is trying to become the oldest to win the derby at age 77. Victor Espinoza, who as a jockey has already won the Derby before, will ride California Chrome Saturday.

Wicked Strong, the competition’s early second favorite, was named to honor Boston’s spirit after last year’s marathon bombings. The horse has strong odds, but he was placed on the outside gate, to the disappointment of trainer Jimmy Jerkens. Wicked Strong won the Wood Memorial in New York with a hard kick of the kind often seen at the Kentucky Derby. He’ll be ridden by jockey Rajiv Maragh.

Danza,another favorite of the race who emerged with second-place odds in Saturday betting,is named after Taxi star Tony Danza. The horse has powerful acceleration and won a big victory at the Arkansas Derby closing the last quarter of a mile in just 12 2/5 seconds. Joe Bravo will be Danza’s jockey.

Other top horses include Intense Holiday, ridden by John Velazquez, Samraat, ridden by Jose Ortiz, and Wildcat Red, whose jockey is Luis Saez.

Expect a winning time in the low 2-minute range as competitors push to beat the record 1:59 2/5 seconds winning time The winner will bring home $2 million.

TIME

Pictures of the Week: April 25 – May 2

From tornadoes and floods across the US to the canonization of two popes, to preparations for the Kentucky Derby and witches on a train, TIME presents the best photos of the week.

TIME photo essay

The End of Horse Racing: Photographs by Jehad Nga

In its heyday, horse racing had it all. It was the speed and danger sport before NASCAR came along; movie stars and gangsters rubbed glamorous elbows; and a couple sawbucks on a winning long-shot could put you on Easy Street. Jehad Nga's photographs show that, as with all nostalgia, the reality could never match the legend.

In its heyday, horse racing had it all. It was the speed and danger sport before NASCAR came along; movie stars and gangsters rubbed glamorous elbows; and a couple sawbucks on a winning long-shot could put you on Easy Street.

As with all nostalgia, the reality could never match the legend. But there was a current of excitement and passion around horse racing back in the days of fedoras and two-toned shoes. Perhaps the popularity of racing was as simple as the fact that Americans used to grow up around horses and knew them as personalities.

(MORE: Twilight at the Track)

And they are personalities. Some are born with loads of talent, but won’t do the hard work to become a champion. Some love a challenge, and won’t stop working until they win. Some are playful; some are mean. Some are smart; some aren’t. Such traits seared the names of great racers into the public consciousness as deeply as the names of some presidents and some billionaires: Gallant Fox, War Admiral, Citation, Seabiscuit.

The glory days endured through a golden age of racing in the 1970s, when Affirmed battled Alydar to join Seattle Slew and the incomparable Secretariat as winners of the Triple Crown. Since then, a long twilight has settled over the Sport of Kings. Attendance, wagers, purses, and new foals all are in decline. Such storied tracks as Hialeah in Florida, Bay Meadows in California, and Garden State in New Jersey have padlocked their stables and turned out the lights for good.

The causes are many. Competition for the gambling and entertainment dollar is more intense than ever. But even more damaging is the widespread culture of doping in the racing business, and the high rate of fatal breakdowns that goes with it. As these photographs make clear, amid the fading memories of glamor and excitement, the beating heart of the sport is, and always will be, the horse. Whoever wants to save racing must first care about that.


Jehad Nga is a photographer who lives in New York. LightBox previously featured Nga’s Memories of Libya and his Green Book project.

David Von Drehle is an editor-at-large for TIME, where he has covered politics, breaking news and the Supreme Court since 2007. He is the author of four books, including Abraham Lincoln and America’s Most Perilous Year, published in 2012, and Triangle: The Fire That Changed America.


TIME closeup

Pictures of the Week: May 4 – May 11

From violence in Cairo and France's presidential elections to flash floods in Nepal and the 138th Kentucky Derby, TIME's photo department presents the best images of the week.

From violence in Cairo and France’s presidential elections to flash floods in Nepal and the 138th Kentucky Derby, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

TIME closeup

Pictures of the Week: April 27 – May 4

From rescue operations for a capsized ferry in India and May Day protests to elections in France and preparations for the Kentucky Derby, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

From rescue operations for a capsized ferry in India and May Day protests to elections in France and preparations for the Kentucky Derby, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com