TIME celebrities

Justin Bieber Gets Boxing Lessons from Floyd Mayweather

Mayweather wrote on Twitter that he had a "good time"

Justin Bieber is getting boxing tips from world champion fighter Floyd Mayweather.

The 20-year-old singer posted a shirtless video to his Instagram account, in which he tosses practice punches in Mayweather’s direction and ducks the boxer’s slow returns.

No word on why Bieber is training to fight or why a world champion boxer would give lessons to a pop star, but given the celebrities’ numerous posts to social media, they both seemed to enjoy it. Mayweather wrote on Twitter that he had a “good time.”

TIME fashion

How Justin Bieber Killed the Mustache

The pop icon's attempt at ironic facial furniture might be the end of the humble lip warmer

RIP, the mustache. Justin Bieber’s decision to sport one in public this week might represent the final nail in the coffin for a facial feature that had already gone from being a symbol of manliness to an ironic punchline. After all, what self-respecting Brooklyn poseur can be proud to comb his lip caterpillar now that the Biebs has one?

The pop icon appeared at Paris Fashion Week Wednesday with a wispy dusting of facial frizz atop his lip. He had previously experimented with one at various points in recent months, but it now seems to have gone beyond overgrown bum fluff to an actual grooming choice. No doubt intended to be a hipsterish affectation, the mustache instead made him look like a ripe pubescent whose father hasn’t bought him a razor yet.

But the fact that the nation’s premier former teen idol apparently thinks it giddily ironic to wear a mustache in public vividly illustrates the decline of a male style choice once proudly sported by film stars, political gods and war heroes.

The early 20th century was the mustache’s prime era, when mustachioed leading men like Errol Flynn and Clark Gable ruled Hollywood, and Teddy Roosevelt could be among the manliest of presidents with a veritable slab of hair resting beneath his nose. It was fashionable for U.S. airmen to wear “bulletproof mustaches” as a superstition in WWII and Vietnam — but none was more impervious to attack than that of “triple ace” Robin Olds, whose non-regulation ‘stache became nothing less than a symbol of rebellion. It was, he said, “ the middle finger I couldn’t raise in the PR photographs. The mustache became my silent last word in the verbal battles…with higher headquarters on rules, targets, and fighting the war.”

The mustache as symbol underwent a kind of metamorphosis in the 1970s, however, when it became a signifier of gay culture and, eventually, of pornography. Although it was arguably the mustache’s masculine potency that attracted it to these subcultures, its association with them watered down its appeal to the mainstream. It had something of a resurgence in the 1980s, thanks to the heroic efforts of Tom Selleck and Burt Reynolds, but almost disappeared from popular visibility towards the end of the century, when goatees and sideburns became more en vogue.

By the early 21st century, the mustache had become little more than a costume accessory to most of America — whether they’re dressing as a porn star, as Saddam Hussein, or as Ron Burgundy. The lingering porniness of the ‘stache has also cemented it as the facial furniture of choice of the stereotypical creepy uncle or teacher.

This wane in popularity is a development some have linked to a general decline in American maleness. Here’s Wesley Morris, writing in the Boston Globe in 2009, on how the newly sensitive men of the 2000s, “afraid of seeming too serious about being male,” relegated the mustache to the vintage store bargain bin:

“To be a guy became a kind of adolescent joke – think Jackass and the G4 network – and to be a man, a grownup, meant shaving your upper lip, and possibly maintaining your eyebrows. There are more college-educated American men now that there have ever been, and while education can create self-confidence, it’s also good at creating self-consciousness. You could say that a huge swath of American men have simply misplaced the self-confidence required to wear a single strip of hair on their lips.”

Today, men who wear a mustache do so with a giant pair of inverted commas on either side of it. So firmly has it become a joke that an annual charitable event (“Movember”) now exists daring men to grow one for an entire month each year — as if the act of wearing a mustache was now so hilariously out of fashion, men need to be challenged to do it.

But now that young Bieber has sported a mustache, no doubt in an attempt to co-opt some hipsterish cool for his increasingly fragile personal brand, the irony is almost entirely washed out. It’s too soon to say, but this could be the final death knell for the hipster mustache. And who would wear one then?

Morris, in his excellent 2009 essay, calls for a hero to bring the mustache back into public esteem — but the negative associations may now run too deep for that. This reporter once shaved a beard off into a mustache for a party, and was greeted with cheers, laughter and selfie invitations. But midway through the night, I caught myself in a mirror and realized my mustache was no longer ironic. To most people I encountered, it was just a mustache. I’ve never worn one again.

TIME psychology

Kanye West: Narcissist of the Day

Oh, sit down: Kanye in Sydney, where everyone must stand
Oh, sit down: Kanye in Sydney, where everyone must stand Mark Metcalfe; Getty Images

Jeffrey Kluger is Editor at Large for TIME.

Insisting that your audience members stand before you'll perform is just bad form—especially when some of them can't stand

Memo to Kanye West: The “O” in “standing O” doesn’t stand just for ovation; it also stands for optional. That’s worth remembering the next time you insist that your entire audience—every single one of them—stand up before you’ll even begin a song, especially if, as is often the case, there are people in that same audience who, you know, can’t stand up.

Precisely that unseemly scene played out over the weekend in Sydney, Australia, when West stopped his show and informed the crowd—who had, as is the custom, paid money to see him perform—that, “I decided I can’t do this song, I can’t do the rest of the show until everybody stands up.” There would, he allowed, be exceptions: “Unless you got a handicap pass and you get special parking and sh*t.”

So everyone stood up, except for two people who, as it turned out, did have “special parking and sh*t.” One was in a wheelchair; the other had a prosthetic limb, which initially did not stop the crowd from booing them and chanting, “Stand up, stand up, stand up,” as West egged them on. “This is the longest I’ve had to wait to do a song,” he griped. “It’s unbelievable!”

Finally, the woman removed her prosthesis and waved it over her head and West polled the people around the wheelchair-bound man: “Now if he is in a wheelchair, that’s fine. He in a wheelchair, there? Only if he’s in a wheelchair.” At last, the fabulously rich entertainer agreed to perform for the disabled audience members.

Yes, there is cellphone camera footage of this; yes, West surely knew there would be. And no, he didn’t give a fig.

This is, as I write in my book The Narcissist Next Door, the same Kanye West who famously interrupted Taylor Swift’s acceptance speech at the 2009 MTV awards to announce that Beyonce should have won the award; the West who responded on his blog to the B+ score Entertainment Weekly had given one of his concerts with this blast: “What’s a B+ mean? I’m an extremist, its either pass or fail! A+ or F-! You know what, f**k you and the whole f*****g staff!” And the West who had this to say (in the third person, of course) about, well, Kanye West: “I think what Kanye West is going to mean is something similar to what Steve Jobs means. I am undoubtedly, you know, Steve of Internet, downtown, fashion, culture. Period. By a long jump.”

West is hardly the entertainment world’s only raging narcissist. Indeed, it’s an industry-wide affliction. Narcissism is measured by the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, a 40-question survey with a theoretical bottom score of 0 and high score of 40. But only a few points either way can make a difference. The average American weighs in at about 15.5, depending on age, gender and a few other variables. Inmates convicted of violent crimes score from 21.5 to 23. Celebrities don’t fall far shy of those stratospheric highs, coming in at 18.27, according to one study of 200 stars by pop psychologist Drew Pinsky.

But just which kind of celeb you are makes a difference. Reality show stars—no surprise—top the list at 19.45, followed by comedians at 18.89, actors at 18.45 and musicians at 16.67. That last, comparatively low figure makes sense because, as University of Georgia psychologist Keith Campbell told me, “If you’re a musician, you’ve got to play in a band.” Subsuming the individual into the group—the me into The Who, say—is not something the most florid narcissists would permit.

The musician rule is less applicable, of course, if you’re an individual performer like Miley Cyrus, Justin Bieber or West, because you are the sole—or at least central—star on the stage. West’s star was surely tarnished by his stunt in Sydney—judging at least by the Internet blowback it’s received. But will he care? No he won’t. Will he change? Not a bit. Audiences, of course, could respond on their own, choosing to remain seated—or better yet, not showing up at all. Even a narcissist would notice an empty hall—and, worse, an empty till.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Music

Troye Sivan: ‘Pop Music Is In Such an Exciting Place Right Now’

Troye Sivan
Actor Troye Sivan attends the 4th Annual Streamy Awards presented by Coca-Cola on Sept. 7, 2014 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Kevin Winter—DCP/Getty Images

The 19-year-old YouTube sensation talks about his new EP

Troye Sivan is on the cusp of mainstream superstardom: the 19-year-old South African-Australian pop star is making a name for himself with the release of his latest EP, TRXYE, which quickly topped the iTunes Charts in 58 countries upon its release. Sivan built an ardent fanbase on YouTube, where his channel has more than 3 million followers; he signed with EMI Australia shortly after releasing a song and video inspired by the book The Fault in Our Stars. Not only did he garner the attention of fellow lovers of Fault, but author (and fellow YouTube star) John Green became a fan, too.

“I know it sounds cheesy,” Sivan says. “But the book genuinely changed my life. I didn’t know what to do besides go to my piano and try to write something about it.” All proceeds from the song have been donated to Princess Margaret Hospital for children in Perth, which is still benefiting from its sales.

Sivan’s first major-label EP features dark pop that marries intimate lyrics with electronic sounds. TIME caught up with him to hear more about what’s next for the up-and-comer.

TIME: Has your career felt like a whirlwind recently?

Troye Sivan: I didn’t expect this at all — it’s been crazy!

Your song meant a lot to “The Fault in Our Stars” fans. As a fan yourself, were you pleased with the movie?

I think they nailed it, and I’m super proud of John Green. He’s always been such a big supporter and I know that he even tried to get the song in the movie. He’s such a nice guy and it feels really cool that we both came from YouTube, and his creative work changed my life.

Where else do you find your inspiration?

When I got signed and started to write for the EP, I didn’t know what it was going to be. I feel like part of getting better at writing is knowing where to find that inspiration. Right after something happens to me, the first thing I’ll do is go write when those feelings are really, really fresh. I’ll hum a tune into my phone sometimes.

Speaking of your phone, you’re very active on social media — what does it take to get your attention on Twitter?

The ones that I tend to notice will be people who are funny. I love, love, love how I have a witty and funny audience so when they’re funny, I can’t help but respond and get involved.

Do you like being called the next Justin Bieber?

I don’t mind it — it’s flattering. I get it because we both came from YouTube and I’m super proud of what he’s done professionally. I think that the music is a little different, but I’ll let people be the judge of that.

What is some of your favorite music right now?

I’m listening to a lot of Broods, a band from New Zealand. And Wet is a band from New York that I’m really loving. I think pop music is in such an exciting place right now and I do kind of credit that to Lorde with “Royals.” I think that song changed everything in the pop scene. All of the sudden, alternative pop music became pop music.

TIME Crime

Justin Bieber Charged With Assault, Dangerous Driving in Canada

Chris Brown Hosts VMA Pre-Party
Justin Bieber attends a VMA Pre-Party on August 23, 2014 in Los Angeles. Araya Diaz—Getty Images

Allegedly got into a fight after car crash

Now Canada can join the list of countries where Justin Bieber has gotten into trouble with the law. The 20-year-old pop sensation was arrested Friday in his native country after he allegedly got into a fight after a car crash.

Bieber got into a “physical altercation” with an occupant of the other car after a collision near Perth, Ontario, according to the police report, which resulted in charges for assault and dangerous driving. He’s scheduled to appear in court on Sept 29.

The 20-year-old’s brushes with the law have become more frequent in recent months. He was accused of attempted robbery of a cell phone in May, and pled no contest to vandalism charges in July after egging a neighbor’s home. He made a large donation to charity in August as part of a settlement for his DUI charge in Miami.

TIME celebrities

Justin Bieber Won’t Go to Jail on That Miami DUI Charge

Justin Bieber
This Jan. 23, 2014 file photo made available by the Miami Beach Police Dept., shows Justin Bieber at the police station in Miami Beach, Fla. AP

But he's not out of legal hot water yet

Justin Bieber is basically off the hook for engaging in what looked like an illegal drag race through Miami this past winter. On Wednesday, he will plead guilty to two misdemeanor charges — careless driving and resisting arrest without violence — as part of a court deal to avoid the initial driving-under-the-influence charge that could have yielded more serious legal consequences.

He won’t be serving any jail time, to the relief of Beliebers everywhere. Instead, he’ll make a charitable donation of $50,000 and take an anger-management course, Variety reports.

Police in Miami Beach pulled him over after midnight on Jan. 23 for driving at excessive speeds — as fast as 130 m.p.h. at one point — in a rented Lamborghini. Reports say he had marijuana and Xanax in his system at the time.

Bieber has had his fair deal of legal trouble recently. Last month, he paid more than $80,000 in damages after egging a neighbor’s house in Los Angeles. In his hometown of Toronto, meanwhile, he faces charges of assaulting a limo driver last December, though his attorneys — who will appear in his stead in court on Wednesday — insist he’s innocent.

TIME Internet

These Are the 10 Most Popular Music Videos on YouTube

PSY pretty much blows everyone else out of the water

You know which music videos you like to watch incessantly — but what about the rest of the world? YouTube has put together a playlist compiling its 10 most-viewed music videos ever to pay homage to the artists racking up the heftiest numbers of streams.

Here are the winners, along with the amount of views provided by YouTube. Of course, those stats are likely to continue climbing.

1. PSY – Gangnam Style

2,052,142,296 views

2. Justin Bieber ft. Ludacris – Baby

1,060,638,016 views

3. Jennifer Lopez ft. Pitbull – On The Floor

767,272,725 views

4. Eminem ft. Rihanna – Love The Way You Lie

716,231,316 views

5. LMFAO ft. Lauren Bennett, GoonRock – Party Rock Anthem

713,191,153 views

6. Miley Cyrus – Wrecking Ball

685,767,350 views

7. Lady Gaga – Bad Romance

594,483,912 views

8. Carly Rae Jepsen – Call Me Maybe

570,877,802 views

9. Don Omar ft. Lucenzo – Danza Kuduro

575,283,830 views

10. Macklemore & Ryan Lewis ft. Wanz – Thrift Shop

554,588,442 views

 

TIME celebrities

Justin Bieber Must Complete Anger Management, Pay Fine for Egging Incident

The pop star pleaded no contest to one count of vandalism

Updated at 8:45 p.m. ET

Justin Bieber pleaded no contest on Wednesday to one count of vandalism for egging a neighbor’s house earlier this year. As a part of his plea deal, CNN reports, the Canadian popstar will have to pay $80,900 in restitution. He will also be on probation for two years and is will be required to complete 12 weekly anger management courses and five days of community service.

Bieber’s neighbor claimed that he caught the “Baby” singer throwing eggs at his house on tape in January. On Wednesday, Bieber was ordered to stay 100 yards away from the victim family. Earlier this year, authorities searched the 19-year-old’s home for surveillance footage of the incident and subsequently arrested Bieber’s rapper friend 20-year-old Lil Za.

Lil Za was charged with felony possession of Ectasy and oxycodone and faces up to nine years in prison.

TIME celebrities

Here’s Another Video of Justin Bieber Being Racist

amfAR Gala - 67th Cannes Film Festival
Canadian singer Justin Bieber attends the Cinema Against AIDS amfAR gala 2014 held at the Hotel du Cap, Eden Roc in Cap d'Antibes, France, 22 May 2014. Hubert Boesl—dpa/AP

The singer replaces "girl" with the n-word.

A video emerged Wednesday showing a young Justin Bieber singing a racist parody of his popular song “One Less Lonely Girl,” the second time in the last week the pop star has been depicted making racist comments.

The video, published by TMZ, shows a 14-year-old Bieber sitting in a chair and giggling as he croons the tune while replacing the word “girl” with the n-word.

“One less lonely n—-r,” Bieber sings. “If I kill you, I’d be a part of the KKK, and there’s gonna be one less lonely n—-r.”

Bieber was reportedly singing a parody of his song he had seen on YouTube. Bieber apologized last Sunday after a video emerged that showed him telling a racist joke. He said that at the time of the video’s creation, he “thought it was OK to repeat hurtful and jokes.”

“I didn’t realize at the time that it wasn’t funny and that in fact my actions were continuing the ignorance,” he said in a statement to the Associated Press.

“I’m very sorry,” Bieber said. “I take all my friendships with people of all cultures very seriously and I apologize for offending or hurting anyone with my childish and inexcusable behavior.”

TMZ reports that Bieber and his representatives wanted the video released so he can take responsibility for his actions.

TIME celebrity

SNL’s Kate McKinnon Shares the Secret to a Flawless Justin Bieber Impression

File this advice away for the next time you want to go as the Biebs for Halloween

When Kate McKinnon plays Justin Bieber on Saturday Night Live, she somehow manages to simultaneously nail it while also completely overdoing it. The result is always delightful and ridiculous. When she appeared on Conan last night, he decided to ask just how she manages to pull it off.

“What’s the key to inhabiting Justin Bieber?” Conan asks. “How do you become Justin Bieber?”

She ponders this question for a moment, then thoughtfully replies, “It’s looking like a puppy who just piddled and is sort of sorry about it.”

McKinnon has also had the privilege of meeting him in real life, so she’s gotten a chance to absorb his essence. “He’s very beautiful to look at,” the SNL performer says. “He has the swagger of a gang leader with the face of a member of the Sistine Chapel.”

In case you’ve yet to see her Bieber impression, check out this clip about four minutes in:

 

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