TIME celebrities

Kim Kardashian Loses 1.3 Million Followers in the Great Instagram Purge of 2014

Rihanna's 1st Annual Diamond Ball Benefitting The Clara Lionel Foundation (CLF) - Arrivals
TV personality Kim Kardashian at Rihanna's First Annual Diamond Ball on Dec. 11, 2014 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Jason Merritt—Getty Images

After the social media application deleted inactive and spam accounts

While Kim Kardashian was a victim of Thursday’s Instagram Rapture, she also emerged from the purge with an impressive new title: the most-followed Insta-celeb.

In the social media application’s effort to delete inactive and spam accounts, many users saw a drop in their follower count, including Kardashian.

The reality star, who recently tried to break the Internet with her Paper Magazine cover, lost 1.3 million of her 23 million Instagram followers.

She now has more followers than Justin Bieber, who said goodbye to more than 3.5 million of his 23 million Instagram followers.

Kardashian and Bieber weren’t the only celebrities to see a major drop. Ariana Grande was hit hard, losing 1.5 million of her 21 million followers, and Beyoncé lost more than 800,000 of her 22 million followers.

Some celebrities didn’t mind seeing their follower count drop.

This article originally appeared on PEOPLE.com

TIME Culture

How the Cult of Early Success Is Bad for Young People

Photograph by Martin Schoeller for TIME

Taylor Swift and Malala Yousafzai are great role models. They've also set an impossible standard for success

Taylor Swift is on the cover of TIME magazine this week as the new queen of the music industry. She’s been in the business for more than 11 years, but at 24, she’d still have trouble renting a car.

It should be inspiring for young people to see someone so young achieve such phenomenal success. “Other women who are killing it should motivate you, thrill you, challenge you and inspire you rather than threaten you and make you feel like you’re immediately being compared to them,” she told my colleague Jack Dickey. “The only thing I compare myself to is me, two years ago, or me one year ago.”

But despite her best efforts to set a positive example, Swift also represents a generation of super-youth to which normal young people are inevitably compared. “You see someone so young, your age or even younger, being so wildly successful, and you can think ‘they just have it, they have something I don’t have,’” says Dr. Carol Dweck, a professor of Psychology at Stanford University and author of Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. “You think, ‘I’m so young and already I’m doomed.’”

Forget Forbes’s 30-under-30 list: when it comes to “freshness,” 30 is the new 40. At her age, Taylor Swift isn’t even considered precociously successful– she’s just regular successful. In fact, it’s been a banner year for wunderkind, and not just in entertainment (which has always been fixated on the young and beautiful.) 18-year old Saira Blair just became the youngest American lawmaker when she was elected to the West Virginia Legislature. 18-year old fashion blogger Tavi Gevinson took up a second career—as a Broadway star—as her magazine Rookie rakes in 3.5 million hits a month. 17-year old Malala Yousafzai became the youngest person ever to win the Nobel Prize.

As most millennials are moving sluggishly through their twenties, the hyper-visible hotshots are getting younger and younger, whittling away at the maximum age limit at which someone can get their “big break.”

For every young cultural force like Lena Dunham or genius app-creator like Evan Spiegel, there are thousands of other twenty-somethings sitting in their parents’ basements wondering why they haven’t invented an app or started a fashion line. According to a Pew survey, young people today have more debt and less income than their parents and grandparents did at their age, which means we’re the least financially stable generation in recent memory. We’re are making life decisions later than ever, delaying marriage and babies longer than previous generations did (partly because of the cash flow problems), and taking much longer to settle into a career. Yet, thanks to platforms like Youtube and Kickstarter that remove the traditional gatekeepers, there’s a pervasive expectation that young people should be achieving more, faster, younger.

“There’s a lot of attention paid to people who have success very young, like Taylor Swift and Mark Zuckerberg, but the average young person is not coming into their career until later these days,” says Dr. Jean Twenge, author of Generation Me. “Across the board, what you can see is much higher expectations among millennials compared to Boomers and Gen Xers, but a reality which is if anything more difficult than it was for those previous generations when they were young.”

Middle-aged sourpusses have long complained about America’s cultural fixation on youth and to be fair, the Beatles weren’t much older than Taylor Swift. Bill Maher even devoted a whole segment of last Friday’s “Real Time” to ageism, calling it “the last acceptable prejudice in America.” But today, the world is dominated by tech, and tech is dominated by young people. “I want to stress the importance of being young and technical,” Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg said in a speech to a Y Combinator startup at Stanford in 2007. “Younger people are just smarter.”

But even for those of us who happen to be young, a youth-obsessed culture is a pretty raw deal. Because the perception that young people are “smarter” implies they should be getting successful more quickly, and often, they’re not. “In the internet age, the idea that fame is just out of reach has become more common,” says Dr. Twenge, noting that technological advances like YouTube helped launch careers of stars like Justin Bieber. “I think there’s an impression that it’s easier to become famous now, or easier to be discovered… There’s a perception that it’s easier, but that may not be entirely true.”

That expectation that it’s easy to get rich and famous may also contribute to some of the negative stereotypes about millennials, especially the reputation for laziness or entitlement. In other words, next to Lorde, the rest of us look like schlubs.

“I don’t think they’re comparing themselves to those wunderkind necessarily, but maybe their elders are, who are so critical of them,” says Dr. Jeffrey Arnett, who coined the phrase “emerging adult” and says he’s found little evidence to support the claim that millennials are lazy. “I wonder if that’s partly related to the fact that you have these amazingly successful young people, and people are saying ‘well, if Mark Zuckerberg can do this, why can’t you?’”

Of course, none of these comparisons are Taylor Swift’s fault, and she does everything in her power to nix that competitive instinct, especially among other women. But the fact that young superstars seem to have been born fully formed implies that growth and learning aren’t part of the recipe for success. “It not only tells them they don’t have time to grow, it saps them of the motivation to grow,” Dr. Dweck says.

Even Taylor recognizes that her darling days are numbered. “I just struggle to find a woman in music who hasn’t been completely picked apart by the media, or scrutinized and criticized for aging, or criticized for fighting aging,” she said. “It just seems to be much more difficult to be a woman in music and to grow older.”

When politicians proclaim that “young people are the future,” they mean we’ll inherit mountains of debt and a destroyed environment. But when young people think about our own futures, we should look at the way middle-aged and older people are treated—because like it or not, that’s going to be us one day. If young people were really so smart, we wouldn’t forget that.

Read next: The Secret Language of Girls on Instagram

TIME celebrity

See How 11 Celebrities Dressed Up for Halloween

And you thought you had a wild night

Dressing up for Halloween isn’t just for the rest of us. From Kim Kardashian to Justin Bieber, celebrities dressed up as characters spooky, silly and sassy on Friday. And then they dutifully posted photos of themselves on their Instagram accounts.

The best costume award goes to Heidi Klum, though, who dressed as an extremely detailed butterfly. It’s creepy and beautiful at the same time. Check out her and 10 other celebrities’ attire below.

Beyonce

Janet and MJ

A photo posted by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on

Taylor Swift

Cause, darling I'm a nightmare dressed like a PEGACORN. #HappyHalloween!

A photo posted by Taylor Swift (@taylorswift) on

Justin Bieber

A photo posted by Justin Bieber (@justinbieber) on

Zach Braff

I was Kurt Russell in "Big Trouble In Little China." He was Kurt Russell.

A photo posted by Zach Braff (@zachbraff) on

Kim Kardashian

Look #1- Skeleton

A photo posted by Kim Kardashian West (@kimkardashian) on

Lance Bass

Paris Hilton

#BlondesRule 😉

A photo posted by Paris Hilton (@parishilton) on

Katy Perry

IDFWU *drops mic*

A photo posted by KATY PERRY (@katyperry) on

Jessica Alba

#axlandslashforever #welcometothejungle @kellysawyer

A photo posted by Jessica Alba (@jessicaalba) on

Hilary Duff

Heidi Klum

This is how it happens #hkhalloween #behindthecostume @cce_inc @bcorso

A video posted by Heidi Klum (@heidiklum) on

TIME celebrities

Justin Bieber Gets Boxing Lessons from Floyd Mayweather

Mayweather wrote on Twitter that he had a "good time"

Justin Bieber is getting boxing tips from world champion fighter Floyd Mayweather.

The 20-year-old singer posted a shirtless video to his Instagram account, in which he tosses practice punches in Mayweather’s direction and ducks the boxer’s slow returns.

No word on why Bieber is training to fight or why a world champion boxer would give lessons to a pop star, but given the celebrities’ numerous posts to social media, they both seemed to enjoy it. Mayweather wrote on Twitter that he had a “good time.”

A video posted by Justin Bieber (@justinbieber) on

TIME fashion

How Justin Bieber Killed the Mustache

The pop icon's attempt at ironic facial furniture might be the end of the humble lip warmer

RIP, the mustache. Justin Bieber’s decision to sport one in public this week might represent the final nail in the coffin for a facial feature that had already gone from being a symbol of manliness to an ironic punchline. After all, what self-respecting Brooklyn poseur can be proud to comb his lip caterpillar now that the Biebs has one?

The pop icon appeared at Paris Fashion Week Wednesday with a wispy dusting of facial frizz atop his lip. He had previously experimented with one at various points in recent months, but it now seems to have gone beyond overgrown bum fluff to an actual grooming choice. No doubt intended to be a hipsterish affectation, the mustache instead made him look like a ripe pubescent whose father hasn’t bought him a razor yet.

But the fact that the nation’s premier former teen idol apparently thinks it giddily ironic to wear a mustache in public vividly illustrates the decline of a male style choice once proudly sported by film stars, political gods and war heroes.

The early 20th century was the mustache’s prime era, when mustachioed leading men like Errol Flynn and Clark Gable ruled Hollywood, and Teddy Roosevelt could be among the manliest of presidents with a veritable slab of hair resting beneath his nose. It was fashionable for U.S. airmen to wear “bulletproof mustaches” as a superstition in WWII and Vietnam — but none was more impervious to attack than that of “triple ace” Robin Olds, whose non-regulation ‘stache became nothing less than a symbol of rebellion. It was, he said, “ the middle finger I couldn’t raise in the PR photographs. The mustache became my silent last word in the verbal battles…with higher headquarters on rules, targets, and fighting the war.”

The mustache as symbol underwent a kind of metamorphosis in the 1970s, however, when it became a signifier of gay culture and, eventually, of pornography. Although it was arguably the mustache’s masculine potency that attracted it to these subcultures, its association with them watered down its appeal to the mainstream. It had something of a resurgence in the 1980s, thanks to the heroic efforts of Tom Selleck and Burt Reynolds, but almost disappeared from popular visibility towards the end of the century, when goatees and sideburns became more en vogue.

By the early 21st century, the mustache had become little more than a costume accessory to most of America — whether they’re dressing as a porn star, as Saddam Hussein, or as Ron Burgundy. The lingering porniness of the ‘stache has also cemented it as the facial furniture of choice of the stereotypical creepy uncle or teacher.

This wane in popularity is a development some have linked to a general decline in American maleness. Here’s Wesley Morris, writing in the Boston Globe in 2009, on how the newly sensitive men of the 2000s, “afraid of seeming too serious about being male,” relegated the mustache to the vintage store bargain bin:

“To be a guy became a kind of adolescent joke – think Jackass and the G4 network – and to be a man, a grownup, meant shaving your upper lip, and possibly maintaining your eyebrows. There are more college-educated American men now that there have ever been, and while education can create self-confidence, it’s also good at creating self-consciousness. You could say that a huge swath of American men have simply misplaced the self-confidence required to wear a single strip of hair on their lips.”

Today, men who wear a mustache do so with a giant pair of inverted commas on either side of it. So firmly has it become a joke that an annual charitable event (“Movember”) now exists daring men to grow one for an entire month each year — as if the act of wearing a mustache was now so hilariously out of fashion, men need to be challenged to do it.

But now that young Bieber has sported a mustache, no doubt in an attempt to co-opt some hipsterish cool for his increasingly fragile personal brand, the irony is almost entirely washed out. It’s too soon to say, but this could be the final death knell for the hipster mustache. And who would wear one then?

Morris, in his excellent 2009 essay, calls for a hero to bring the mustache back into public esteem — but the negative associations may now run too deep for that. This reporter once shaved a beard off into a mustache for a party, and was greeted with cheers, laughter and selfie invitations. But midway through the night, I caught myself in a mirror and realized my mustache was no longer ironic. To most people I encountered, it was just a mustache. I’ve never worn one again.

TIME psychology

Kanye West: Narcissist of the Day

Oh, sit down: Kanye in Sydney, where everyone must stand
Oh, sit down: Kanye in Sydney, where everyone must stand Mark Metcalfe; Getty Images

Jeffrey Kluger is Editor at Large for TIME.

Insisting that your audience members stand before you'll perform is just bad form—especially when some of them can't stand

Memo to Kanye West: The “O” in “standing O” doesn’t stand just for ovation; it also stands for optional. That’s worth remembering the next time you insist that your entire audience—every single one of them—stand up before you’ll even begin a song, especially if, as is often the case, there are people in that same audience who, you know, can’t stand up.

Precisely that unseemly scene played out over the weekend in Sydney, Australia, when West stopped his show and informed the crowd—who had, as is the custom, paid money to see him perform—that, “I decided I can’t do this song, I can’t do the rest of the show until everybody stands up.” There would, he allowed, be exceptions: “Unless you got a handicap pass and you get special parking and sh*t.”

So everyone stood up, except for two people who, as it turned out, did have “special parking and sh*t.” One was in a wheelchair; the other had a prosthetic limb, which initially did not stop the crowd from booing them and chanting, “Stand up, stand up, stand up,” as West egged them on. “This is the longest I’ve had to wait to do a song,” he griped. “It’s unbelievable!”

Finally, the woman removed her prosthesis and waved it over her head and West polled the people around the wheelchair-bound man: “Now if he is in a wheelchair, that’s fine. He in a wheelchair, there? Only if he’s in a wheelchair.” At last, the fabulously rich entertainer agreed to perform for the disabled audience members.

Yes, there is cellphone camera footage of this; yes, West surely knew there would be. And no, he didn’t give a fig.

This is, as I write in my book The Narcissist Next Door, the same Kanye West who famously interrupted Taylor Swift’s acceptance speech at the 2009 MTV awards to announce that Beyonce should have won the award; the West who responded on his blog to the B+ score Entertainment Weekly had given one of his concerts with this blast: “What’s a B+ mean? I’m an extremist, its either pass or fail! A+ or F-! You know what, f**k you and the whole f*****g staff!” And the West who had this to say (in the third person, of course) about, well, Kanye West: “I think what Kanye West is going to mean is something similar to what Steve Jobs means. I am undoubtedly, you know, Steve of Internet, downtown, fashion, culture. Period. By a long jump.”

West is hardly the entertainment world’s only raging narcissist. Indeed, it’s an industry-wide affliction. Narcissism is measured by the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, a 40-question survey with a theoretical bottom score of 0 and high score of 40. But only a few points either way can make a difference. The average American weighs in at about 15.5, depending on age, gender and a few other variables. Inmates convicted of violent crimes score from 21.5 to 23. Celebrities don’t fall far shy of those stratospheric highs, coming in at 18.27, according to one study of 200 stars by pop psychologist Drew Pinsky.

But just which kind of celeb you are makes a difference. Reality show stars—no surprise—top the list at 19.45, followed by comedians at 18.89, actors at 18.45 and musicians at 16.67. That last, comparatively low figure makes sense because, as University of Georgia psychologist Keith Campbell told me, “If you’re a musician, you’ve got to play in a band.” Subsuming the individual into the group—the me into The Who, say—is not something the most florid narcissists would permit.

The musician rule is less applicable, of course, if you’re an individual performer like Miley Cyrus, Justin Bieber or West, because you are the sole—or at least central—star on the stage. West’s star was surely tarnished by his stunt in Sydney—judging at least by the Internet blowback it’s received. But will he care? No he won’t. Will he change? Not a bit. Audiences, of course, could respond on their own, choosing to remain seated—or better yet, not showing up at all. Even a narcissist would notice an empty hall—and, worse, an empty till.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Music

Troye Sivan: ‘Pop Music Is In Such an Exciting Place Right Now’

Troye Sivan
Actor Troye Sivan attends the 4th Annual Streamy Awards presented by Coca-Cola on Sept. 7, 2014 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Kevin Winter—DCP/Getty Images

The 19-year-old YouTube sensation talks about his new EP

Troye Sivan is on the cusp of mainstream superstardom: the 19-year-old South African-Australian pop star is making a name for himself with the release of his latest EP, TRXYE, which quickly topped the iTunes Charts in 58 countries upon its release. Sivan built an ardent fanbase on YouTube, where his channel has more than 3 million followers; he signed with EMI Australia shortly after releasing a song and video inspired by the book The Fault in Our Stars. Not only did he garner the attention of fellow lovers of Fault, but author (and fellow YouTube star) John Green became a fan, too.

“I know it sounds cheesy,” Sivan says. “But the book genuinely changed my life. I didn’t know what to do besides go to my piano and try to write something about it.” All proceeds from the song have been donated to Princess Margaret Hospital for children in Perth, which is still benefiting from its sales.

Sivan’s first major-label EP features dark pop that marries intimate lyrics with electronic sounds. TIME caught up with him to hear more about what’s next for the up-and-comer.

TIME: Has your career felt like a whirlwind recently?

Troye Sivan: I didn’t expect this at all — it’s been crazy!

Your song meant a lot to “The Fault in Our Stars” fans. As a fan yourself, were you pleased with the movie?

I think they nailed it, and I’m super proud of John Green. He’s always been such a big supporter and I know that he even tried to get the song in the movie. He’s such a nice guy and it feels really cool that we both came from YouTube, and his creative work changed my life.

Where else do you find your inspiration?

When I got signed and started to write for the EP, I didn’t know what it was going to be. I feel like part of getting better at writing is knowing where to find that inspiration. Right after something happens to me, the first thing I’ll do is go write when those feelings are really, really fresh. I’ll hum a tune into my phone sometimes.

Speaking of your phone, you’re very active on social media — what does it take to get your attention on Twitter?

The ones that I tend to notice will be people who are funny. I love, love, love how I have a witty and funny audience so when they’re funny, I can’t help but respond and get involved.

Do you like being called the next Justin Bieber?

I don’t mind it — it’s flattering. I get it because we both came from YouTube and I’m super proud of what he’s done professionally. I think that the music is a little different, but I’ll let people be the judge of that.

What is some of your favorite music right now?

I’m listening to a lot of Broods, a band from New Zealand. And Wet is a band from New York that I’m really loving. I think pop music is in such an exciting place right now and I do kind of credit that to Lorde with “Royals.” I think that song changed everything in the pop scene. All of the sudden, alternative pop music became pop music.

TIME Crime

Justin Bieber Charged With Assault, Dangerous Driving in Canada

Chris Brown Hosts VMA Pre-Party
Justin Bieber attends a VMA Pre-Party on August 23, 2014 in Los Angeles. Araya Diaz—Getty Images

Allegedly got into a fight after car crash

Now Canada can join the list of countries where Justin Bieber has gotten into trouble with the law. The 20-year-old pop sensation was arrested Friday in his native country after he allegedly got into a fight after a car crash.

Bieber got into a “physical altercation” with an occupant of the other car after a collision near Perth, Ontario, according to the police report, which resulted in charges for assault and dangerous driving. He’s scheduled to appear in court on Sept 29.

The 20-year-old’s brushes with the law have become more frequent in recent months. He was accused of attempted robbery of a cell phone in May, and pled no contest to vandalism charges in July after egging a neighbor’s home. He made a large donation to charity in August as part of a settlement for his DUI charge in Miami.

TIME celebrities

Justin Bieber Won’t Go to Jail on That Miami DUI Charge

Justin Bieber
This Jan. 23, 2014 file photo made available by the Miami Beach Police Dept., shows Justin Bieber at the police station in Miami Beach, Fla. AP

But he's not out of legal hot water yet

Justin Bieber is basically off the hook for engaging in what looked like an illegal drag race through Miami this past winter. On Wednesday, he will plead guilty to two misdemeanor charges — careless driving and resisting arrest without violence — as part of a court deal to avoid the initial driving-under-the-influence charge that could have yielded more serious legal consequences.

He won’t be serving any jail time, to the relief of Beliebers everywhere. Instead, he’ll make a charitable donation of $50,000 and take an anger-management course, Variety reports.

Police in Miami Beach pulled him over after midnight on Jan. 23 for driving at excessive speeds — as fast as 130 m.p.h. at one point — in a rented Lamborghini. Reports say he had marijuana and Xanax in his system at the time.

Bieber has had his fair deal of legal trouble recently. Last month, he paid more than $80,000 in damages after egging a neighbor’s house in Los Angeles. In his hometown of Toronto, meanwhile, he faces charges of assaulting a limo driver last December, though his attorneys — who will appear in his stead in court on Wednesday — insist he’s innocent.

TIME Internet

These Are the 10 Most Popular Music Videos on YouTube

PSY pretty much blows everyone else out of the water

You know which music videos you like to watch incessantly — but what about the rest of the world? YouTube has put together a playlist compiling its 10 most-viewed music videos ever to pay homage to the artists racking up the heftiest numbers of streams.

Here are the winners, along with the amount of views provided by YouTube. Of course, those stats are likely to continue climbing.

1. PSY – Gangnam Style

2,052,142,296 views

2. Justin Bieber ft. Ludacris – Baby

1,060,638,016 views

3. Jennifer Lopez ft. Pitbull – On The Floor

767,272,725 views

4. Eminem ft. Rihanna – Love The Way You Lie

716,231,316 views

5. LMFAO ft. Lauren Bennett, GoonRock – Party Rock Anthem

713,191,153 views

6. Miley Cyrus – Wrecking Ball

685,767,350 views

7. Lady Gaga – Bad Romance

594,483,912 views

8. Carly Rae Jepsen – Call Me Maybe

570,877,802 views

9. Don Omar ft. Lucenzo – Danza Kuduro

575,283,830 views

10. Macklemore & Ryan Lewis ft. Wanz – Thrift Shop

554,588,442 views

 

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