MONEY College

5 Quick College Diplomas That Can Lead to Good-Paying Jobs

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Blend Images—Getty Images

You don't have to spend four years on a bachelor's degree to get a job that pays at least $40,000 a year. New research from one state identifies several shorter college programs that can lead to lucrative jobs.

Over the long run, people with four-year college degrees and graduate educations earn more on average than workers who spend just a few years in school. But you don’t necessarily have to invest a lot of time and money in a four-year degree to get ahead. In some cases, new research confirms, a quicker education can lead to a good-paying job.

“There are many paths to the middle class, including two-year technical degrees from community colleges,” says Mark Schneider, president of College Measures, who authored a study of recent graduates of Tennessee colleges that was released today.

The findings are based on College Measures’ analysis of earnings data for millions of workers collected from state unemployment insurance offices. So far six states, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia, have allowed researchers to track government-reported earnings after students leave school.

For the latest state report, College Measures tracked five years worth of earnings for all Tennessee workers who earned any kind of college certificate, diploma, or degree in 2006, drilling down to which majors, and which schools, produce the highest earners. The results, says Schneider, “confirms other findings from other states.”

Only a few types of two-year degrees consistently lead to high-paying jobs, however, and there is a wide variation in earnings by college, some of which may have to do with the local labor market. “You do have to be really careful about which degree you get,” Schneider says.

Those with associate’s degrees in electrical engineering earned annual salaries of about $42,000 within a year of leaving school. They typically progressed to more than $61,000 after five years. Those who earned certificates in heavy equipment maintenance made about $35,000 within a year on average and about $42,000 after five years.

Similarly, a 2011 report by Georgetown University’s Center for Education and the Workforce found that 28% of people with associate’s degrees earned more than the average salary reported by those with bachelor’s degrees.

This new data from states is helpful because it identifies exactly which community college and which majors produce students most likely to earn bigger paychecks, says Jeff Strohl, research director for the Georgetown center. “If you are going to roll the dice on a particular school or major,” says Strohl, “the new data will give you an idea of how people end up, earnings-wise.”

According to College Measures’s new report on Tennessee workers, these five programs that don’t take four years can lead to good-paying jobs.

Degree type Subject Avg. earnings in 1st year Avg. earnings in 5th year
1-2 year certificate Precision metal working $33,100 $41,900
1-2 year certificate Heavy equipment maintenance $34,800 $42,600
Associate’s Industrial production $41,400 $46,200
Associate’s Nursing $47,300 $54,300
Associate’s Electrical Engineering $42,000 $61,500

The earnings reports, however, are sobering for those who get associate’s degree in other fields. The average starting salary for Tennesseans with an associate’s in liberal arts was about $28,000. Five years out those folks were earning about $35,000, roughly equal to the pay of those who earned an associate’s in business but less than most workers with technical degrees.

What’s more, students shouldn’t assume they will earn the average earnings published in these kinds of reports, warns Thomas Bailey, director of the Community College Research Center at Columbia University. “A lot of this depends on other factors, such as the local labor market and the student.” In other words, your coursework and workplace performance matters too.

To find four-year colleges that are likely to help you find a good-paying job, you can search Money’s rankings of the best value colleges – colleges across the country with the best combination of net price and high-earning alumni. (College Measures advised Money on the development of the rankings, which used earnings estimates from a 2010 to 2013 national survey of 1.4 million Americans by Payscale.com.)

TIME Workplace & Careers

The Resume Section That Matters More Than You’d Think

Resume
Mark Stahl—Getty Images

themuselogo

This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

By Lily Zhang

What section headings do you have on your resume? Let me guess: “Experience,” “Education,” “Additional Information,” and maybe a “Summary” section. That about covers it, right?

Well, if your resume doesn’t have a “Skills” section, you’re seriously missing out on an opportunity to showcase, you know, your skills. In fact, this is the most straightforward way for you to show to a hiring manager what you can accomplish in the position on day one.

The trick is, of course, figuring out what to actually include to illustrate what you bring to the table. While there’s no real go-to list of skills for you to pick and choose from (unfortunately), you can get pretty close by following these three steps.

Step 1: Review the Job Description

The most obvious place to look for the skills that the hiring manager will find exciting and eye-catching is the job description itself. Usually, for any given position, you’ll find minimum qualifications and preferred qualifications. For example, for an app developer position, you might find “programming experience in Java, Objective-C, or C++” listed under minimum qualifications and “deep technical knowledge of mobile application development (either Android or iOS)” under preferred qualifications.

Mine the job description, find all the low-hanging fruit, and, of course, decide for yourself if you feel comfortable listing those skills on your resume. (Obviously, lying won’t get you very far.)

Side note: While you’ll sometimes find soft skills, like organizational or communication skills, listed as qualifications, it’s important to point out that “Skills” sections are usually reserved for hard skills.

Step 2: Do Some Digging on LinkedIn

Next, pop the job title of the position you’re applying to into LinkedIn and have a look at some other professionals who are doing what you want to be doing. Scroll down to their “Skills” sections and look for trends in what’s listed. They might be different from what’s listed on the job description, but if you see them over and over, they’re clearly good to have in the field. Using the same example, for an app developer you might find “data structures,” “graphic design,” or “XML.”

Step 3: Don’t Limit Yourself to Skills

Now that you have a pretty good list of skills going for your target position, consider expanding beyond that. In fact, you don’t have to limit yourself to just a “Skills” section; you can create a “Skills and Projects” section that describes freelance gigs you’ve done or a “Skills and Interests” section that describes some of your relevant professional interests. If it makes sense, you might even want to pop job-related coursework into this section.

Lastly, don’t forget to include skills that you have that are always good to list regardless of the position, like foreign languages or technical certifications.

All in all, you should have two to three lines of skills, ideally broken up into sensible subsections, like “Technical,” “Courses,” and “Languages,” to keep it all tidy. If you have relevant work experience for the positions you’re applying to, place your “Skills” section at the end of your resume. On the other hand, if you’re looking to break into a new field, it makes more sense for you to place this section closer to the top—maybe even before your “Experience” section.

Whatever you decide to go with, your resume will definitely benefit from having a designated place for a hiring manager see what skills you bring to the table quickly.

More from The Muse:

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: September 22

1. A global transformation from a carbon-based economy to a cleaner, more sustainable energy future will create jobs and add wealth.

By Christiana Figueres and Guy Ryder in Project Syndicate

2. Antibiotic resistance causes 23,000 deaths and two million illnesses every year. Concerted government action is necessary to fight the crisis.

By the Editorial Board of the Washington Post

3. China can improve its global standing and U.S. relations by joining the fight against Islamic State.

By Dingding Chen in the Diplomat

4. The economic future of manufacturing is to be an incubator of innovation: “where new ideas become new products.”

By Nanette Byrnes in MIT Technology Review

5. In the future, a book could be a living thing.

By Wendy Smith in Publisher’s Weekly

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

MONEY Millennials

10 Places Millennials Are Moving For Bigger Paychecks

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With 5.1% unemployment and low-priced homes, New Orleans is a top town for millennials. John Coletti—Getty Images

Over the past five years, Gen Yers have decamped for some surprisingly pricey cities in search of a higher-paying job.

Millennials are on the hunt for high-paying jobs, and they’re moving to some unexpected places to find them, according to a new report out today.

Bruised by the rough post-recession job market, Gen-Yers are moving from lower-cost cities to places with a higher cost of living but more plentiful and lucrative jobs, a RealtyTrac analysis of Census data from 2007 through 2013 found.

“Millennials are attracted to markets with good job prospects and low unemployment, but that tend to have higher rental rates and high home-price appreciation,” says Daren Blomquist, vice president of RealtyTrac. “It’s a tradeoff.”

In the 10 U.S. counties with the biggest increase in millennials, the average unemployment rate is 5.2%, well below the national average of 6.1%. The average household income is $62,496, vs. $51,058 nationally. The median home price is $406,800 (nearly double the U.S. median of $222,900), while a three-bedroom apartment rents for $1,619 a month on average, just over the national average of $1,550.

Riding the robust job market in the D.C. area, two counties in Northern Virginia with unemployment rates below 3.7% top the list. But not all places that the 69-million-strong millennial generation are flocking to are expensive. New Orleans, where the median home price is $140,000, edged out San Francisco, where tech jobs may be plentiful but the median home price is nearly $1 million.

New Orleans, where the unemployment rate is 5.1%, is a transportation center with one of the busiest and largest ports in the world, as well as tons of jobs related to the local oil refineries. Denver, Nashville, and Portland, Ore., all top 10 areas, offer median home prices below $300,000 and a diversity of jobs in technology, health care, and education.

Perhaps the most surprising millennial magnet: Clarksville, Tenn, the fifth largest city in the state behind Nashville, Memphis, Knoxville, and Chattanooga. Forty five miles north of Nashville, it benefits from spillover from that city’s strong job market, but Clarksville also has its own industrial base, plus nearby Ft. Campbell and Austin Peay State University. The unemployment rate: 4.7%.

Here are RealtyTrac’s top 10 destinations for millennials on the move:

Rank County State Metro Area % Increase in Millennial Population, 2007-2013 Milennials % of Total Population, 2013 Median Home Price, April 2014 Average Monthly Apartment Rent (3 beds), 2014
1 Arlington County Va. Washington, DC 82% 39% $505,000 $1,996
2 Alexandria City Va. Washington, DC 81% 34% $465,000 $1,966
3 Orleans Parish La. New Orleans 71% 30% $140,000 $1,190
4 San Francisco County Calif. San Francisco 68% 32% $950,000 $2,657
5 Denver County Colo. Denver 57% 33% $270,000 $1,409
6 Montgomery County Tenn. Clarksville 46% 31% $128,000 $1,016
7 Hudson County N.J. New York 44% 31% $330,000 $1,643
8 New York County N.Y. New York 43% 32% $850,000 $1,852
9 Multnomah County Ore. Portland 41% 28% $270,000 $1,359
10 Davidson County Tenn. Nashville 37% 29% $160,000 $1,131
MONEY Economy

The Takeaway from the Latest Fed Decision

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen.
Fed chair Janet Yellen says the Fed isn't shifting gears… yet Susan Walsh—AP

Interest rates are going to stay low for a while longer. But the Federal Reserve is thinking about what comes next.

Updated September 17 at 4:40 pm

It’s come to this: The market is obsessed with two magic words and a bunch of tiny dots.

Federal Reserve watchers have long been attuned to the subtlest cues from central bank officials—people used to look at the size of Alan Greenspan’s briefcase for clues—but this has been an unusually big week for minutiae. In anticipation of the Federal Open Market Committee’s 2 p.m. announcement of its latest decisions on monetary policy, markets were waiting to see if the committee would again use the phrase “considerable time” to describe how long it would hold the key short-term interest rate near zero.

They did. Here’s the statement:

The Committee continues to anticipate… that it likely will be appropriate to maintain the current target range for the federal funds rate for a considerable time…

That’s a relatively dovish signal, suggesting that rate hikes aren’t coming soon. Stock investors pushed prices a bit higher in the hours after the announcement, with the Dow closing at a record high of 17,156. But bond prices declined, with the 10-year Treasury bond yield ticking up to 2.164%. (Bond yields rise when prices fall.)

That may be because there was an asterisk to the “considerable time” language. The Fed also released a statement laying out the steps they’ll take to “normalize” interest rates when it’s time. Message: We aren’t doing it yet, we aren’t doing it right away, but we wanted to let you know we’re thinking about it.

Investors were also closely watching the “dot plot,” a chart showing where different Fed officials think interest rates will land in the coming years and over the long run. The dots didn’t change in a big way since June—most Fed officials want to keep interest rates where they are this year, but see them rising in 2015 as (presumably) the economy improves. Slightly more officials see 2015 as the “lift-off” date for rates than did in June.

The real story is how strongly opinions differ—those dots are pretty spread out after 2014. Fed chair Janet Yellen is widely considered to favor stimulative monetary policy, but this shows that she has to work with a much more hawkish group within the Fed that wants tighter money sooner, to prevent a surprise return of inflation. Right now, though, inflation is below the Fed’s 2% target.

Screen Shot 2014-09-17 at 2.07.46 PM
SOURCE: Federal Reserve

These little signs have taken on outsized importance for two reasons. First, the Fed has played an unusually large role in supporting the (not-so-strong) recovery, by keeping short-term rates as low as they can go since the crisis days of late 2008, and then by buying up trillions of dollars worth of bonds as part of its unusual “quantitative easing” program. Second, investors in both stocks and bonds have been betting that this status quo is only going to change at a measured pace. This seems to have been confirmed.

This story was updated to reflect the market reaction to the Fed announcement.

MONEY Economy

The Real Reason Jobs Are So Slow to Come Back

Garden snail
Daly and Newton—Getty Images

It's not tax rates, or too much regulation, or college kids majoring in art history instead of computer science. This is a global slowdown.

Jobs growth has been frustratingly slow in this recovery. The headline unemployment rate is down to 6.1%, but there’s still a lot of slack in the labor market. Wages are stagnant, long-term unemployment is strikingly high, and an unusually large number of Americans are so discouraged about their prospects that they’ve stopped looking for work.

So what’s holding us back from a full recovery? Maybe taxes are too high. Or perhaps regulation is holding us back. Or too many people are going on disability. Or maybe—this theory is especially popular now—there’s something wrong with the workforce we have. Too many liberal arts majors, not enough welders and truckers and computer scientists.

The problem with those theories is that they are way too local. The jobs shortfall isn’t just an American thing—it’s global. Earlier this week, the World Bank released a report on jobs in the “G20″ group of major world economies. Missing jobs and stagnant wages is a story all around the world. Here’s a snapshot from the report, showing how far below the pre-crisis trend jobs growth has been:

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SOURCE: World Bank

So what is it that’s holding almost everyone back? The World Bank chalks it up to a weak “aggregate demand”—but that only gets us halfway to an answer. What’s harder and more controversial is figuring out why demand for goods and services, which is what ultimately convinces employers to hire, has been so sluggish. One possibility is that consumers are too nervous to kick-start a virtuous cycle, where they buy more and thus spur more production and more hiring. The report notes that consumers around the world found themselves mired in debt after the crash, and that the growth in their income has been disappointing. In advanced economies, the share of GDP that goes to employee pay and benefits has declined substantially.

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SOURCE: World Bank

But to bring the story back home to U.S., at least, the anxious consumer alone isn’t a good enough answer anymore. As economist Brad DeLong points out here, consumption in the U.S. isn’t actually down by that much. What is down, he says, is construction and government spending. And on government spending, what’s true in the U.S. has been true with a vengeance in Europe, where policymakers have pursued government austerity policies.

Rethinking education, or how we train the workforce, or tax policy, or regulations might very well help economic growth in the long run. Finding some way to boost the mood of consumers couldn’t hurt, either. But the big-picture view suggests a deeper problem. The economic crisis blew a massive hole in the global economy. And more than five years later, the evidence is mounting that governments around the world just did too little, too late to help mend the gap.

MONEY Jobs

The 15 Highest-Paying Jobs That Don’t Require a College Degree

A bush plane performs take off in Alaska with Chugach Mountains in the Background.
You don't need a college degree to make this your workplace. Chris Boswell—Alamy

Not every lucrative job demands years of study. For these, a high school diploma (and some training) will do.

Conventional wisdom holds that earning a bachelor’s degree is the best path to a stable job that provides a livable income, but not every high-paying job requires a four-year college education.

In fact, 345 out of the 787 occupations listed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in their 2012 to 2022 employment projections report require only a high school diploma. In 45 of the fields, the median wage is above the national median of $51,058 a year, according to an analysis by the research engine FindTheBest.

However, while many jobs don’t demand a bachelor’s degree, a number of the best-paying ones call for additional training. Elevator installers and repairers, for example, earn a median income of $76,650 a year but have to complete an apprenticeship before entering the field full-time. Commercial pilots who handle charters, rescue operations, and aerial photography flights need a license from the Federal Aviation Administration. Nuclear power reactor operators must be licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

What’s more, many of the best-paid positions are growing more slowly than the average 11% growth rate for all occupations for 2012 to 2022—or even shrinking. Postal workers, for example, earn a median of $53,100 a year, but the number of mail carriers, mail sorters, and clerks is forecast to decline by 28% by 2022.

But for a handful of these professions, the outlook is healthy. That includes elevator installers and repairers, who are expected to increase their numbers by nearly 25% by 2022, and transportation inspectors and construction and building inspectors, all fields that are forecast to grow at double-digit rates.

Here are 15 professions you can enter with a high school diploma and still earn above the median U.S. income. You can use FindTheBest’s tool to sort through more jobs by projected growth, median pay, and education required.

Rank Job Category Median Annual Pay Projected Job Growth, 2012 to 2022
1 Supervisors/Managers of Police and Detectives $78,270 4.9%
2 Elevator Installers and Repairers $76,650 24.6%
3 Nuclear Power Reactor Operators $74,990 0.5%
4 Detectives and Criminal Investigators $74,300 2.0%
5 Commercial Pilots $73,280 9.4%
6 Power Distributors and Dispatchers $71,690 -0.9%
7 Supervisors/Managers of Non-Retail Sales Workers $70,060 -0.8%
8 Media and Communication Equipment Workers $68,810 -1.5%
9 Power Plant Operators $66,130 -10.8%
10 Business Operations Specialists $65,120 7.4%
11 Transportation Inspectors $63,680 11.2%
12 Electrical Power Line Installers and Repairers $63,250 8.9%
13 Subway and Streetcar Operators $62,730 6.5%
14 Petroleum, Refinery and Pump System Operators and Gaugers $61,850 -5.1%
15 Gas Plant Operators $61,140 -8.8%

 

MONEY best and worst jobs

The 10 Worst-Paying Jobs that Require a Master’s Degree

Librarian helping patron with book question
Hill Street Studios—Getty Images

Thinking about going back to grad school to pursue one of these careers? You might want to think again.

More education doesn’t always translate into more money.

Research engine FindTheBest recently analyzed median pay for hundreds of jobs in the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics employment projections report, and found that a master’s degree is no guarantee of high pay.

In fact, in a handful of professions that typically require a master’s degree, average salaries are below the U.S. median income of $51,058.

Figuring in the cost of a graduate education, it’s questionable whether entering these low-pay professions that typically require a graduate degree makes economic sense. Here are the 10 worst paying jobs that typically require a master’s degrees, according to FindTheBest:

1. Rehabilitation Counselors

Median Pay: $33,880

What They Do: Help people manage and overcome mental and physical disabilities so they can work and live independently. Counselors work in many settings, including schools, prisons, independent living facilities, rehabilitation agencies and private practice. Note: Though employment of rehabilitation counselors is expected to grow faster than average for all occupations, pay isn’t keeping up.

2. Mental Health Counselors

Median Pay: $40,080

What They Do: Help clients develop strategies to manage emotional disorders and improve their overall wellbeing. In addition to a master’s degree, counselors typically need a license to practice.

3. Survey Researchers

Median Pay: $45,050

What They Do: Design surveys and collect and analyze data to understand people’s opinions and beliefs. Survey researchers work for research firms, polling organizations, nonprofits, corporations, colleges and universities and government agencies. Some survey researchers only have a bachelor’s degree but more technical positions require a master’s.

4. Marriage and Family Therapists

Median Pay: $46,670

What They Do: Provide counseling to couples and families, and treat mental health and substance abuse problems. Most have a master’s degree and must have at least two years of clinical experience and a state license.

5. Curators

Median Pay: $49,590

What They Do: Manage a collection of items for an institution. Most commonly, they work with art or historical items for museums, but curators can also work in galleries, zoos, and botanical gardens. Most curators have an advanced degree in their field of specialty.

6. Archivists

Median Pay: $47,340

What They Do: Collect, organize and manage items that have historical value. Archivists commonly work (not surprisingly) in archives as well as libraries. Most have a master’s degree in the field related to their work.

7. Healthcare Social Workers

Median Pay: $49,830

What They Do: Work with individuals and families to provide support for coping with chronic, acute and terminal illnesses. They work in clinics, hospitals, senior living facilities and mental health institutions. Though most social workers only need a bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree, at least two years practical experience and state licensing is required to work in a clinical setting.

8. Historians

Median Pay: $52,480

What They Do: Research, analyze and interpret past events by studying historical information. Historians work in government agencies, museums, historical societies, research organizations, nonprofits and even consulting firms. Most positions require a master’s degree, but some research positions also require a doctorate.

9. School and Career Counselors

Median Pay: $53,610

What They Do: Help students develop social skills and succeed in school. Career counselors focus on helping students make career or educational program decision. School counselors work in public and private schools. Career counselors work in colleges, government agencies, career centers and private practices.

10. Librarians

Median Pay: $55,370

What They Do: Help people find information and conduct research for personal and professional use. Librarians work for local government, colleges and universities, companies and elementary and secondary schools. Most librarians have a master’s degree in library science, but some positions require a teaching credential or a degree in the field they specialize in.

MONEY Workplace

5 High-Paying Jobs That Will Make You Miserable

Hand in medical glove with thumbs down
Don Bayley—Getty Images

If you think that a fat salary is all you need to be happy, think again. Many high-paid professions are also high-stress—and highly likely to lead to misery.

Physician
In the new memoir Doctored: The Disillusionment of an American Physician, Sandeep Jauhur does a lot more than trace his own dissatisfaction with the medical profession. The cardiologist makes the case that doctors, once the proud, well-paid, contented pillars of communities around the country, are deeply unhappy with what’s been happening in the field of medicine—and that many regret going into the profession. He points to data such as a survey in which only 6% of physicians described morale on the job as positive, and in an excerpt recently published in the Wall Street Journal, Jauhur references the quotes of other doctors venting their frustrations with their choice of career:

I feel like a pawn in a moneymaking game for hospital administrators. There are so many other ways I could have made my living and been more fulfilled. The sad part is we chose medicine because we thought it was worthwhile and noble, but from what I have seen in my short career, it is a charade.

At least it’s a highly paid charade. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, physicians dominate the nation’s top 20 highest-paying occupations, with median pay over $150,000 per year for a wide range of medical specialties. (Anesthesiologists seem to do the best of all, with median salaries of $431,977.) Even so, the majority of doctors say their pay has been flat or on the decline for years. More importantly, they’re unhappy.

As Jauhur puts it, “American doctors are suffering from a collective malaise,” for reasons ranging from bureaucratic hassles to increased pressure to see more and more patients. Hence surveys showing that up to 40% of current doctors would choose a different career if they had to do it all over again, and even more say they would try to talk their kids out of a career in medicine. Physicians also tend to have unusually high suicide rates. According to the American Society for Suicide Prevention, male physicians commit suicide at a 70% higher rate compared with other professions, and female physicians die by their own hands at shocking clip that’s 250% to 400% higher than women in other lines of work.

Doctors are hardly the only workers whose high salaries are perhaps offset by a high-pressure environment and general discontent in the field. Here are four other well-paid professions in which practitioners are likely to be unhappy.

Junior Investment Banker
In his new book, Young Money, author Kevin Roose follows eight recent college grads through their first years in investment banking. What he found isn’t pretty.

“It’s a terrible labor practice, and the banks are getting wise to that,” Roose told Vox, referring to the 120-hour weeks new bankers are forced to work. The load is so unbearable that even high salaries—base starting around $75,000, with bonuses that could double that, and the potential to make millions down the line—aren’t attracting the number of recruits banks are used to. This January, institutions like Credit Suisse and Citigroup moved to limit some employees’ hours, and other banks have raised junior bankers’ pay to compensate for their grueling schedules.

“The banks had this social contract with young people: Give us two years of your lives, don’t see your friends, chain yourself to your desk, but we will give you this glorious life where you’re making many times what you could ever imagine,” Roose said. “But now that contract is being broken.”

What advice does he have for prospective finance workers looking to make a fast buck? “I’d tell them first that it will make them truly miserable, the kind of miserable it could take years to recover from, and that it also no longer has that imprimatur. It can actually hinder you.”

Sales Manager
Being in sales in hard. Being in charge of sales is even harder. That’s why, despite its high average paycheck—$123,150 a year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics—sales managers still landed on Forbes’ Unhappiest Jobs of 2014 list, which used self-reported job reviews from CareerBliss. What’s the problem? Complaints run the gamut from constant pressure to feelings of boredom and emptiness. That’s not a great combination.

Dentist & Lawyer
The median annual salary for dentists is around $155,000. First-year law associates command salaries of around $160,000 in big cities like New York and Chicago. In both cases, however, the money doesn’t seem to correlate to happiness. The consensus of research usually puts dentists at or near the top of the list for professions with the highest suicide rates (though some question the data). Lawyers, known for high suicide rates themselves, were found to have the highest rate of depression among 100 professions included in a much-cited Johns Hopkins study. In fact, attorneys are 3.6 times more likely than average to be depressed.

In 2013, associate attorneys topped Forbes’ “Unhappiest Jobs” list, just ahead of (or below?) much lower-paying gigs like customer service associate and store clerk. Whereas those poorly paid workers are most unhappy with limited growth potential and unexciting workplace cultures, associate attorneys say they are most frustrated by long hours, the pressure to constantly be billing clients during those long hours, and pay that’s paltry compared to partners in their law firms.

Dentists are often unhappy because they graduate with huge student loans (often around $200,000), and their jobs largely come with all the pressures—but not as much prestige—of running your own medical practice. It can’t help either of these career fields that everybody jokes about lawyers, and about how much they hate dentists.

TIME Economy

A Global Jobs Crisis Is Coming, Says World Bank

And a new report says there’s no immediate solution in sight for the problem

We are heading for a global jobs crisis, says the World Bank, warning that 600 million new jobs would have to be created by the year 2030 just to keep up with current levels of population growth.

A study released by the organization Tuesday at the G-20 Labor and Employment Ministerial Meeting in Australia indicates there are currently over 100 million people unemployed and around 447 million that live on less than $2 per day across G-20 member nations, reports Agence France-Presse.

“As this report makes clear, there is a shortage of jobs — and quality jobs,” said Nigel Twose, the World Bank’s senior director for jobs. He warns that although progress had been made in emerging economies like Brazil, China and South Africa, wage and income inequality continues to widen in several G-20 countries.

“There is no magic bullet to solve this jobs crisis, in emerging markets or advanced economies,” Twose said, adding that the creation of enough jobs to sustain the growing population calls for “a whole of government approach cutting across different ministries, and of course the direct and sustained involvement of the private sector.”

[AFP]

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