MONEY identity theft

Here’s What To Do If Your Info Was Stolen from the IRS

150527_FF_IRSStolen
Thomas Northcut—Getty Images

Thieves stole 100,000 past tax returns from the IRS, says the agency.

Criminals using stolen personal data accessed old tax returns of 100,000 people through the Internal Revenue Service’s website, the agency announced Tuesday.

Using Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and other information acquired outside the IRS website, probably from data breaches at other insitutions, the criminals were able to clear a multi-step authentication process and request tax returns and other filings through the IRS’s “Get Transcript” application. The criminals then used the information obtained from those forms to file fraudlent tax returns, the IRS said.

Though the agency has now shut down the “Get Transcript” application, it sent nearly $50 million in refunds to the scammers before detecting the breach.

Later this week, the IRS will begin sending out notification letters to each of the 200,000 taxpayers whose accounts the scammers attempted to access. About 50% of those attempts—some 100,000—were successful, and the IRS will offer free credit monitoring to those taxpayers. Either way, if you are notified by the IRS, there is more you can do to protect yourself.

1. Check In with the IRS

The IRS said it will be “marking taxpayer accounts on our core processing system to flag for potential identity theft to protect taxpayers going forward.” But anyone notified by the IRS—whether your data was successfully stolen or not—should call the IRS Identity Protection Specialized Unit at 800-908-4490 to check that the agency has indeed placed an alert on your account and that the system reflects that your information (and return) has been compromised. You may also want to contact your state revenue agency to be certain a state tax return wasn’t fraudulently filed for you as well. (For your state’s hotline, check out this list.)

Also report the theft to local police and have it documented. While local law enforcement is unlikely to investigate, many government agencies and credit bureaus require an official theft report to help you solve the fall-out.

2. Add Another Layer of Security

If you are a victim of id theft, the IRS should issue you a personal identification number that will provide you with another level of security. You’ll need to submit this PIN along with your Social Security number when you file any tax form going forward so that the IRS knows to carefully check over your account. As an identity theft victim, you’ll get a new PIN every year. If you don’t receive it, request one because this extra step could save you from dealing with fraudulent returns year after year.

3. Alert the Credit Bureaus

“If a thief had enough information about you to file a false tax return, he could have also opened new credit card accounts or taken out a loan in your name,” says CPA Troy Lewis, chairman of the American Institute of CPAs’ tax executive committee.

Set up free fraud alerts with the three major credit reporting bureaus, Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. These alerts, which last 90 days but can be renewed, warn potential creditors or lenders that you are an identity theft victim and that they must verify your identity before issuing credit.

You can go a step further by placing a credit freeze on your files, which instructs the credit agencies to prevent new creditors from viewing your credit score and report. With a police report, it’s free; without one, it can cost as much $10, depending on your state.

A freeze will keep you from accessing instant credit, too. So if you need to apply for a loan, for example, you’ll need to give the agency permission to thaw your data, and in some cases you’ll pay a fee to lift the freeze, which can take a few days.

MONEY advises against paying for credit monitoring services, since you can do the same work yourself for free and the steps above are a better preventative measure. But if the IRS offers it to for free, you may want to sign up for the service.

4. Check Your Credit Report

You are entitled to a free copy of your credit report from each of the three agencies. Check them carefully for unauthorized activity. Look at your history as well as recent activity. Just because you were first alerted to the problem through a false tax return does not mean that’s where the ID theft started.

If you see errors in your report, such as wrong personal information, accounts you didn’t open, or debts you didn’t incur, dispute those errors with each credit agency and the fraud department of the businesses reporting that inaccurate information.

5. Be Patient

The IRS says a typical case of ID theft can take 180 days to resolve. And even after you’ve cleared up this year’s tax mess, tax and credit fraud can be a recurring problem.

When a thief files a false return and beats you to filing, the IRS flags your legit return and processes it manually, meaning your refund could be delayed for months. The IRS will always pay you your refund, regardless of whether it already paid it out to a fraudster. If your tax fraud case hasn’t been resolved and you’re experiencing financial difficulties because of the holdup with your refund, contact the taxpayer advocate service at 877-777-4778.

MONEY Taxes

Thieves Stole $50M in Tax Refunds Using IRS’s Online Tool

The hackers apparently used already-stolen identity information to send phony requests through the IRS's website.

MONEY identity theft

Woman Accused of Filing 3,000 False Tax Returns in $7.5 Million Scheme

Tax Refund check
B Christopher—Alamy

Allegedly the government isn't the only victim.

An Alabama woman was arrested May 12 for allegedly filing more than 3,000 false tax returns and defrauding the government of millions of dollars in the process, according to a news release from the Department of Justice. The accused, Talashia Hinton, allegedly worked with others who gave her IRS electronic filing identification numbers (EFINs) and stolen personal information so she could prepare the fraudulent returns.

Hinton was charged with one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States, five counts of wire fraud and five counts of aggravated identity theft, according to the DOJ news release. She is said to have received more than $7.5 million in refunds from the fraudulent returns filed in the 2012 and 2013 tax seasons.

The Internal Revenue Service pays out hundreds of billions of dollars in refunds every year, but a $7.5 million scheme in two years is still noteworthy. It’s not clear from the DOJ information how many people were involved in the alleged fraud operation, but Hinton is accused of securing the money. She allegedly directed the IRS to issue refunds by check and through direct deposit on prepaid debit cards.

Schemes like this have ensnared millions of Americans in the past several years, delaying the refunds they’re entitled to by months or years and often complicating their tax-filing seasons for years to come. Usually, victims of tax identity theft do not discover they’ve become a victim until they try to file their legitimate returns, only to be told a return has already been filed for their Social Security numbers. For people who rely on tax refunds to make necessary purchases or pay down debt, the ensuing delay in refund can be extremely problematic.

You may not want to think about tax season for another several months, but if you want to reduce your chances of becoming a victim of tax identity theft, prepare now to file your 2015 taxes as soon as possible next year. The earlier you file, the smaller chance there is a thief will file a fraudulent return in your name before you do.

Keep in mind this is a difficult crime to prevent. If you’ve ever had your Social Security number compromised, you’re at great risk for experiencing this crime, and even if you don’t think any major personal information of yours has been exposed, it’s still important to monitor your identity and accounts for signs of fraud. Not only is it a headache to deal with identity theft and a delayed tax refund, related issues like a shortage of cash flow or other fraud could damage your credit standing. You can get free annual credit reports under federal law at AnnualCreditReport.com and you can monitor your credit scores for for free every month on Credit.com.

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This article originally appeared on Credit.com.

MONEY identity theft

Why We Need to Kill the Social Security Number

Social Security card with no number
Getty Images

SSNs were never designed to be a secure key to all of our personal data.

While tax season is still producing eye twitches around the nation, it’s time to face the music about tax-related identity theft. Experts project the 2014 tax year will be a bad one. The Anthem breach alone exposed 80 million Social Security numbers, and then was quickly followed by the Premera breach that exposed yet another 11 million Americans’ SSNs. The question now: Why are we still using Social Security numbers to identify taxpayers?

From April 2011 through the fourth quarter of 2014, the IRS stopped 19 million suspicious tax returns and protected more than $63 billion in fraudulent refunds. Still, $5.8 billion in tax refunds were paid out to fraudsters. That is the equivalent of Chad’s national GDP, and it’s expected to get worse. How much worse? In 2012, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration projected that fraudsters would net $26 billion into 2017.

While e-filing and a lackluster IRS fraud screening process are the openings that thieves exploited, and continue to exploit, the IRS has improved its thief-nabbing game. It now catches a lot more fraud before the fact. This is so much the case that many fraudsters migrated to state taxes this most recent filing season because they stood a better chance of slipping fraudulent returns through undetected. Intuit even had to temporarily shut down e-filing in several states earlier this year for this reason. While the above issues are both real and really difficult to solve, the IRS would have fewer tax fraud problems if it kicked its addiction to Social Security numbers and found a new way for taxpayers to identify themselves.

Naysayers will point to the need for better data practices. Tax-related fraud wouldn’t be a problem either if our data were more secure. Certainly this is true. But given the non-stop parade of mega-breaches, it also seems reasonable to say that ship has sailed. No one’s data is safe.

Identity thieves are so successful when it comes to stealing tax refunds (and all stripe of unclaimed cash and credit) because stolen Social Security numbers are so plentiful. Whether they are purchased on the dark web where the quarry of many a data breach is sold to all-comers or they are phished by clever email scams doesn’t really matter.

In a widely publicized 2009 study, researchers from Carnegie Mellon had an astonishingly high success rate in figuring out the first five digits for Social Security numbers, especially ones assigned after 1988, when they applied an algorithm to names from the Death Master File. (The Social Security Administration changed the way they assigned SSNs in 2011.) In smaller states where patterns were easier to discern the success rate was astonishing — 90% in Vermont. Why? Because SSNs were not designed to be secure identifiers.

That’s right: Social Security numbers were not intended for identification. They were made to track how much money people made to figure out benefit levels. That’s it. Before 1972, the cards issued by the Social Security Administration even said, “For Social Security purposes. Not for Identification.” The numbers only started being used for identification in the 1960s when the first big computers made that doable. They were first used to identify federal employees in 1961, and then a year later the IRS adopted the method. Banks and other institutions followed suit. And the rest is history.

In fact, according to a Javelin Research study last year, 80% of the top 25 banks and 96% of the top credit card issuers provide account access to a person if they give the correct Social Security number.

There are moves to fix related fraud problems elsewhere in the world, in particular India where, in 2010, there was an attempt to get all 1.2 billion of that nation’s citizens to use biometrics as a form of identification. The program was designed to reduce welfare fraud, and according to Marketwatch, 160 similar biometric ID programs have been instituted in other developing nations.

In 2011, President Obama initiated the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, a program that partnered with private sector players to create an online user authentication system that would become an Internet ID that people could use to perform multiple tasks and aid interactions with the federal and state governments. There may be a solution there — but not yet.

The first Social Security card was designed in 1936 by Frederick Happel. He got $60 for it. It was good enough for what it had to do (and was clear that the card wasn’t a valid form of identification). That is no longer the case. That card is nowhere near good enough. Perhaps one solution is a new card design — one with chip-and-PIN technology. Just how something like that might work — i.e., where readers would be located, who would store the information & support authentication, etc. — would have to be a discussion for another day.

The point is, we need to do something.

This story is an Op/Ed contribution to Credit.com and does not necessarily represent the views of the company or its partners.

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TIME Economy

How April 15 Became Tax Day

Final Day For Filing Taxes
Erik S. Lesser—Getty Images A man deposits his tax return into a mailbox on the final day for filing taxes in 2001 in Atlanta

The April date has been "T-day" for 60 years

Founding Father Benjamin Franklin famously said that the only things certain in this world were death and taxes, but he wasn’t necessarily talking about federal income taxes. The U.S. didn’t institute such a tax until the time of the Civil War, as a temporary measure. The Sixteenth Amendment, ratified in 1913, made it possible for the federal government to tax individuals directly.

But the story of tax day doesn’t end there. In 1954, Congress passed nearly 1,000 pages of revision to the Internal Revenue Code. Though TIME noted back then that the bill didn’t really change the overall structure of the tax code, and that many taxpayers wouldn’t be included in the categories of Americans who would see a decrease in their tax bill due to the change, it did mean one big difference that every single taxpayer would feel: “T-day” would be moved to April 15:

The lawmakers rewrote and in some places tightened many provisions concerning gifts, trusts, partnerships and reorganized or liquidated corporations. They plugged a clutch of minor loopholes that some taxpayers had found profitable. They switched income-tax day from March 15 to April 15, thus giving the taxpayer an extra month to recover from Christmas expenses and sparing him the yearly ordeal of hearing and reading clichés about the ides of March.

But when 1955’s tax day rolled around, it became clear that — even if the extra month did help Americans’ wallets — the new date didn’t mean an end to tired date-based jokes. The Ides of March were no longer financially deadly but April, TIME noted with no hint of irony, is the cruelest month.

Read the full 1954 story, here in the TIME Vault: The New Tax Law

MONEY Taxes

These Are the People Who Are Most Likely to Get Audited

woman on balcony of modern house
Getty Images The uber-rich have the most to fear when it comes to tax audits.

As tax season draws to a close, you may be wondering if you're at risk. (Hint: Probably not.)

If Tax Day has you worrying about an IRS audit, you probably have little reason to be nervous. Last year, the IRS audited less than 1% of all taxpayers—and the federal agency is on track to audit even fewer people this year.

“The math is pretty simple. There are fewer audits because we have fewer auditors,” IRS commissioner John A. Koskinen told the New York State Bar Association in February. “The IRS lost more than 2,200 revenue agents since 2010. Last year alone, there were 600 fewer auditors, with the total falling to 11,600—the lowest level in more than a decade.”

Still, some Americans are subject to more scrutiny than others. The IRS doesn’t spell out why auditors single out some returns for special treatment, but a look at the agency’s track record provides some clues. Here are the groups that are more likely to get the government’s attention:

1. People who report more than $10 million in income—or none at all

It’s like the old saying about why the bank robber robbed the bank: “Because that’s where the money is.” With limited resources, the IRS takes a harder look at people with the most money (and the most to hide). In 2010, then-commissioner Doug Shulman told the New York State Bar Association targeting the rich was part of a new strategy to “work smarter.”

“This is a game-changing strategy for the IRS,” Shulman said. “Initially, we will be focusing on individuals with tens of millions of dollars of assets or income. Going forward, we will take a unified look at the entire complex web of business entities controlled by a high wealth individual, which will enable us to better assess the risk such arrangements pose to tax compliance.”

In 2014, the IRS audited more than 16% of returns reporting more than $10 million in income. But, as you can see in the table below, single-digit millionaires should take care with their tax returns as well.

Another group with a high-than-average chance of getting audited? People who report no income. If you’re reporting an operating loss on your business, the IRS might double check that you’re being honest. In 2014, the IRS audited 5.3% of the taxpayers who reported no income.

Otherwise, if you—like the majority of American taxpayers—earn between $25,000 and $200,000, you have a better-than-average shot of dodging an IRS audit. Here’s the breakdown:

Returns by Income

Percent of total returns

Percent audited in 2014

All returns 100% 0.86%
No adjusted gross income 1.83% 5.26%
$1 – $24,999 39.08% 0.93%
$25,000 – $49,999 23.32% 0.54%
$50,000 – $74,999 13.12% 0.53%
$75,000 – $99,999 8.33% 0.52%
$100,000 – $199,999 10.70% 0.65%
$200,000 – $499,999 2.87% 1.75%
$500,000 – $1 million 0.48% 3.62%
$1 million – $5 million 0.24% 6.21%
$5 million – $10 million 0.02% 10.53%
Over $10 million 0.01% 16.22%

Source: Internal Revenue Service Data Book, 2014

2. People who file estate tax returns for assets worth more than $5 million

Likewise, a huge estate tax return could raise some eyebrows at the IRS. Overall, 8.5% of estate tax returns were singled out for special scrutiny in 2014, way more than the 0.9% of individual tax returns.

And the bigger the estate, the more likely the IRS flagged the return for an audit. More than 21% of estate tax returns with assets between $5 million and $10 million were audited in 2014, and 27% of returns with assets worth over $10 million were audited.

However, estate tax returns are pretty rare: The IRS received 33,719 in 2013, and only 3,359 of those were for estates worth $10 million or more.

3. People who file international returns

If you’re mailing your return from the Cayman Islands, you can bet that the IRS is onto you. Over the past several years, the IRS has increased scrutiny of international returns.

“On the individual front, we have made putting a big dent in offshore tax evasion a major priority,” Shulman told the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants in 2012. “We view offshore tax evasion as an issue of fundamental fairness. Wealthy people who unlawfully hide their money offshore aren’t paying the taxes they owe, while schoolteachers, firefighters and other ordinary citizens who play by the rules are forced to pick up the slack and foot the bill.”

In 2014, the IRS audited 4.8% of international returns.

But there’s a cost to fewer audits

Law-abiding citizens have little reason to celebrate the limited number of tax audits. Koskinen expects that, thanks to federal budget cuts, the IRS will lose out on at least $2 billion in revenue that auditors would otherwise be able to collect. Plus, sometimes when the government takes a second look at your return, you get more money back: In 2014, the IRS decided 38,029 individual filers had paid too much in taxes and sent them additional refunds.

Related:

MONEY Taxes

450 Billion Reasons Why John Oliver Is Right About the IRS

Last Week Tonight With John Oliver
Eric Liebowitz—HBO/Courtesy Everett Collection

The Last Week Tonight host argues for increasing the IRS's budget. Here's why doing so could save taxpayers money in the long run.

On last night’s Last Week Tonight, John Oliver made news with an argument he acknowledged many viewers might find hard to believe: The Internal Revenue Service, the most maligned of all government organizations, needs more money, not less.

The whole segment is worth watching. (Mostly safe for work, depending on where you work. Maybe use headphones.) But the key point is that the IRS has had its funding cut by about 10% in the last five years, and by nearly 20% if you adjust for inflation. In that same time period, the IRS has also significantly cut enforcement staff.

 

So what if enforcement is weaker? It may mean more people are getting away with paying less than they owe. Every five years, the IRS calculates what’s known as the “tax gap”—the amount of taxes owed minus what is actually paid—and the results are a pretty ugly. The most recent report, produced in 2012 for tax year 2006, puts the tax gap at $450 billion dollars. (The gap shrinks to “only” $385 billion once you take into account late payments and money recouped through enforcement.) Think of it like this: Every dollar someone gets out of paying ultimately has to be made up by the rest of us taxpayers, in the form of higher taxes.

It’s important to note that closing this entire tax gap is likely impossible. The U.S. tax system is build on voluntary compliance, and a very large portion of the government’s losses come from people underreporting their incomes from sources that are hard to verify, such as a self-employed person understating profits.

Detractors have argued the IRS shouldn’t get more funding until it improves its performance. The agency has been rocked by allegations that it targeted conservative non-profit groups in delaying their tax exempt status, and Republicans, like Senator Rob Portman, still harbor deep mistrust toward the agency.

That said, the Treasury Department estimates a $1 investment in the IRS’s enforcement ability returns $6 in revenue, and that’s not counting the deterrent effect on potential cheats, which Treasury says may be three times higher. Finding a way to close just a small portion of the tax gap would save the public huge amounts of money.

Read Next: 3 Ideas That Could Make the Tax System Work Better for Everyone

TIME Television

Watch John Oliver Get Michael Bolton to Sing an Ode to the IRS

Spare the IRS your ire

Tax day is nigh and John Oliver used his Last Week Tonight platform to urge taxpayers not to blame the IRS for their tax day woes — and instead save that ire for Congress.

“The fact is, blaming the IRS because you hate paying your taxes is like slapping the checkout clerk because the price of eggs has gone up,” said Oliver. He noted that if people are angry about the amount of tax they pay, they should blame Congress, who are also responsible for setting the tax rate and for making frequent, confusing changes in the tax code.

Oliver believes that the IRS is unfairly vilified by taxpayers, and their status as the universal scapegoat, gives Congress leeway to cut the agency’s budget, which results in fewer services and longer lines. To encourage people to spare the IRS, Oliver conscripted Michael Bolton to sing a stirring ode to the most maligned agency in the U.S. government.

Read next: Here’s What to Do If You Can’t Finish Your Taxes On Time

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

MONEY Taxes

Here’s What to Do If You Can’t Finish Your Taxes On Time

working father with two kids
Paul Bradbury—Getty Images Too busy to finish up your taxes in the next week? No worries.

The April 15 tax-filing deadline is here. If you're not going to be done by Wednesday night, relax. You have options.

Tax Day is upon us. If you haven’t pulled your documents together or made real progress on your tax return yet, filing for an extension by April 15 sounds like a pretty good idea. That’s what about 12 million people do each year, according to the IRS.

Getting more time isn’t as simple as it sounds. Here are seven things you should know if you can’t make the deadline.

1. You still have to act by April 15. Anyone can file for an automatic extension, but the paperwork is still due on April 15. Filling out Form 4868 will give you another six months to finish, though you can file your taxes any time before October 15. You can file for an extension for free through IRS Free File. Check with your state to see if you need to file a separate application for an extension.

2. If you owe money, you have to pay up. Just because you’re getting an extension, you don’t get more time to pay your taxes. You’ll need to fill out enough of your tax return to come up with a rough estimate of what you owe. Use a tax estimator like the one the IRS provides. Fail to pay, and you’ll be hit with a penalty of 0.5% to 1% of what you owe for each month or part of a month your bill is outstanding.

3. Failing to file is worse than failing to pay. If you simply ignore tax day and don’t file or apply for an extension—and you owe taxes—you’ll be hit with a failure-to-file penalty, which is usually 5% of the unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month your return is late, up to 25% of your bill.

4. Your bank may be kinder than Uncle Sam. You may want to pay your taxes with a credit card if you don’t have the cash on hand. The interest and fees you’ll pay with plastic (roughly 2% of your tax bill) may be less than the interest and penalties you’d face on a late tax payment.

5. You may not need an extension. If you’re asking for an extension just because can’t come up with the money (not because you don’t have your paperwork in order), you’re better of filing your return and paying what you can. You can request a short extension of 60 to 120 days to pay. You will still pay penalties and interest, but at a lower rate.

The IRS also offers installment agreements when you can’t pay your taxes on time. You’ll have to pay a fee to set up the plan—use Form 9465-FS—and you’ll be billed monthly. The IRS must approve the plan, and you can’t stretch out the payments for more than three years.

6. If you are owed a refund, you won’t be penalized for not filing. Of course, you won’t get your refund until you file your return. So why let Uncle Sam hold on to your money any longer than necessary?

7. If you’re a chronic procrastinator, the IRS won’t issue your refund. If you don’t do your taxes three years running, even if you’re owed a refund, the IRS will keep your money.

Related: Watch for the Obamacare tax scam targeting last-minute filers

MONEY Taxes

Is Your Tax Refund Too Big?

massive amount of cash in pocket
William Howell—iStock

Getting a big check from the IRS is exciting, but it might not be the best for your long-term financial health.

Taxpayers getting back money from the government this year have received an average refund of $2,893 so far, according to March 26 data from the Internal Revenue Service. That’s a nice bump up in cash flow, and a lot of people look forward to it as a chance to splurge, pay down debt or add to their savings.

But those people could have had that money all year, had they withheld less of their paycheck. Getting a big refund means you essentially gave the government an interest-free loan, when you could have put the money in a savings or retirement account to earn interest. You may see that money as a windfall, but you should really see it as the government making good on a year-long IOU.

There’s no right or wrong answer to how much of a refund you should aim to get, because it’s very much a matter of personal preference, and it can also be tricky to estimate. No matter how you choose to deal with your taxes, it’s worthwhile to regularly evaluate your withholdings. Here’s why.

Your Life Changes

About 82% of taxpayers receive refunds, but even if you’ve consistently gotten one, a significant life change may affect how much you receive or if you get one at all. Marriage, divorce, the birth or adoption of a child, or a drastic income change should trigger a review of how much you have withheld from your paycheck.

You Should Look for Patterns

Beyond re-evaluating your tax situation in the wake of a noteworthy life event, your tax-filing history will give you a good idea of when you should consider changing how much is withheld from your paycheck. It can be a difficult thing to estimate, because as much as you want may want to avoid owing the Internal Revenue Service in April, getting too much in return may not be the best for your long-term financial health.

“A good place to be is owing a little bit or getting a little bit back,” said Elliott Freirich, a certified public accountant in Chicago. But where exactly is that “good place”? “There’s no right answer. It’s a gray area, but I would tell people if they could kind of keep (their refund) under $1,000. … It’s not like it would go away and they would never have it if they reduce their withholding.”

Know Your Own Saving/Spending Habits

Some people feel that way — that they wouldn’t be disciplined enough to set aside the money they would otherwise get from a large refund.

“It’s sort of like forced savings,” said Jorie Johnson, a certified financial planner in New Jersey. She said she suggests her clients re-evaluate their withholding if their refund exceeds $5,000. “I encourage them to use half of their refund toward their IRA, if they haven’t already maxed it out, and the other half on themselves, as a reward — that’s assuming they don’t have any debt.”

Consider the big picture: Do you look forward to a large tax refund but struggle to meet your savings goals on a monthly basis? If you’re trying to work your way out of debt or regularly find yourself financing your lifestyle while also getting a large refund check every tax season, that’s a sign you need to revisit your withholding (you might need to re-evaluate your spending habits, too).

Remember that withholding is just an estimate of what you’ll owe, and it may take you a few years of consistent tax outcomes to confidently adjust that estimate to meet your tax needs without owing or receiving a large sum come tax time.

More from Credit.com

This article originally appeared on Credit.com.

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