MONEY Autos

1 in 5 Drivers Don’t Care About Fancy New Car Tech

Infotainment Apathetic Drivers Automakers
Cunningham, Harold—Getty Images A Mercedes-Benz in-vehicle infotainment screen is seen during the 85th International Motor Show on March 3, 2015 in Geneva, Switzerland.

The most common reason cited for abandoning a tech feature? "Did not find it useful."

Today’s new cars come with all sorts of high-tech systems “infotainment”, parking assistance and heads-up displays, but a recent report from J.D. Power says a significant portion of consumers don’t use them.

On Tuesday, the marketing research firm released its Driver Interactive Vehicle Experience Report, detailing the habits of drivers in the first 90 days of new car ownership. The study found at least 20% of drivers never used 16 of the 33 features in question. Vehicle concierge, mobile routers, automatic parking, heads-up displays, and built-in apps led the list of superfluous automotive tech bogging down the driving experience. Considering the effort automakers put into these technologies, that’s significant money left on the table, especially since unused features may be outdated if and when they arrive at their second owner.

According to Kristin Kolodge, a J.D. Power executive director of driver interaction & HMI research, many drivers would rather use their phones and tech they already know. The most common reason cited for abandoning a tech feature? “Did not find it useful.”

Since many of these consumers told J.D. Power the technology “came as part of a package on my current vehicle and I did not want it,” it’s not just the carmakers that are losing out—a fifth of consumers are paying for these things they just don’t use. It’s costing everybody millions.

TIME drinking

Find Out What Country You Drink Like

See which country most closely matches your drinking behavior from beer and wine to milk and juice

Do you drink wine like a Frenchman or down milk like a Swede? Use the sliders below to see which country matches your drinking preferences for five different kinds of beverages, according to two studies that measured drinking behavior, country by country, across the globe.

A recent study published by PLOS One sheds new light on global consumption patterns.

One lesson: the more a country earns, the more fruit juice its people drink, according to Gitanjali Singh, assistant professor at Tufts University’s Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy and lead author on the paper. Wealth isn’t the only sign of how someone fills her glass. According to the study, young people–and men in particular–are more likely to prefer sugars sweetened beverages.

Similarly, a 2014 World Health Organization report provided a picture of how people consume alcoholic beverages across the globe. The average person 15 years and older drinks 6.2 liters of pure alcohol a year–about one a drink a day–the report said.

For more on the milk, juice and sugar-sweetened beverages study, read here.

For more on the alcohol study, read here.

TIME Television

See What America Would Look Like If It Was Divided by Game of Thrones Houses

Obviously the Night's Watch belongs in Alaska

Unless you’re riding dragons to work or plotting to murder your husband in order to rule over your neighborhood, you probably feel far removed from the fantastical world painted by HBO’s Game of Thrones. The mythical land of Westeros is filled with harrowing beasts around every corner, scheming lords vying for power at whatever the cost, and climates so harsh they last for decades.

But with every new episode on that much anticipated Sunday night, as you sit with your eyes glued to the TV screen (or lay in bed with your laptop), you may start to feel that some of this world hits eerily close to home. Maybe it’s after seeing another passive-aggressive exchange between Margaery and Cersei, or while you watch Jon Snow grapple with tough decisions in the frozen fort of Castle Black. Because while the Game of Thrones characters themselves are fictional, their struggles and desires are not. In fact, they’re very real.

Our data experts at FindTheHome feel the same way. So much so, that they used their company and industry data from Dun & Bradstreet to see where these distinct personalities would live if Westeros were the United States.

First, they separated the country into seven distinct groups: six Houses and the Night’s Watch. Next, they crunched a combination of demographic, geographic, and industry data that is characteristic of each House and its location. Finally, they carefully matched these attributes with those of regions in the United States. So how Greyjoy is your county? How Lannister is New York? Continue to see how each area of the country stacks up.

 

  • House Greyjoy

    Top counties:
    1. St. Mary Parish, LA
    2. Plaquemines Parish, LA
    3. Daggett County, UT

    Characteristics:
    – Iron and steel forging companies
    – Ship building and repairing companies
    – Marina-related companies

    Note: Although a county may score highly for a House, that might not be what it was ultimately classified as overall.

  • House Tyrell

    Top counties:
    1. Glasscock County, TX
    2. New York County, NY
    3. Sully County, SD

    Characteristics:
    – Crop farms
    – High population density

  • House Baratheon

    Top counties:
    1. Kenedy County, TX
    2. Grant County, NE
    3. East Carroll Parish, LA

    Characteristics:
    – Religious organizations per 10k people
    – High average temperatures

  • House Lannister

    Top counties:
    1. New York County, NY
    2. Falls Church City, VA
    3. Loudoun County, VA

    Characteristics:
    – Population with a high median income
    – High population density
    – Banks
    – Political organizations

  • House Targaryen

    Top counties:
    1. Esmeralda County, NV
    2. Harding County, SD
    3. Garfield County, NE

    Characteristics:
    – Fire protection groups
    – Legal services
    – Fortune tellers
    – High average temperature

  • House Stark

    Top counties:
    1. Stanley County, SD
    2. Fairfax City, VA
    3. Sawyer County, WI

    Characteristics:
    – Low average temperatures
    – Low population density
    – Construction companies
    – Pet supply companies (to keep those Direwolves happy)

  • The Night’s Watch

    Top counties:
    1. Lexington City, VA
    2. Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, AK
    3. Northwest Arctic Borough, AK

    Characteristics:
    – Male population
    – Percent of people who have never married
    – Low average temperature
    – National security companies

    This article originally appeared on FindTheBest.com.

    More from FindTheBest:

    Read next: Humming the Game of Thrones Theme Tune Can Have Serious Consequences

    Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Culture

Find Out What Your Name Would Be if You Were Born Today

See the popularity of every name dating back to 1890

The popularity of your name is likely far different today than it was the year you were born. Maybe you’re one of those men born in 1983 and named Michael, the most popular name of the year. Today, if you were given the most popular boy’s name, you’d be named Noah. The following interactive shows you which name had the same popularity in the past year and every decade since 1890 as yours did the year you were born, using newly released baby name data for 2014.

 

Do next: Find out how much time you have wasted on Facebook

Do next: Find out which state best matches your personality

Methodology

Name trends are provided by the Social Security Administration. Whenever names were tied for popularity in a given year or decade, they were assigned the same rank. This tool only searches for names of the same gender as what you entered at the top. Many names have drifted from being associated with boys to being associated with girls over the years, so it can appear as though female names are showing up in the male results.

TIME

Here’s Where You Should Live to Find Your Perfect Match

Find out how big your dating pool actually is in your current city

Looking for love in all the wrong places?

Enter your dating preferences and find out which cities have the highest percentage of people who match them. The results are based on over 15 million individual records from the U.S. Census. You can start with your current city to see how the local single population measures up. Or let fate decide. Your responses never leave your computer and are not monitored.

 

Of course, we all are looking for things in potential mate that go beyond the sort of demographic information that the Census collections. There’s no field for religion, for example, much less for sense of humor or affinity for dogs.

Since the Census Bureau’s annual survey does not ask about sexual preferences, this interactive groups all single people together. Given that the quiz primarily deals with the percent of the single population that matches your specifications, not the raw number, the premise is equally relevant for those seeking same-sex and opposite-sex partners. (This assumes that the gay and straight populations have roughly the same distribution of income and education.)

Like all surveys, things can get wonky when you’re looking for a very specific and uncommon combination of traits. Then again, if you are certain that your perfect mate is a divorced 18-21 year old with a professional degree, your problems dating probably extend beyond statistical aberrations in Census data.

Methodology

The raw data comes from the American Community Survey, the Census Bureau’s annual survey of 1 percent of the population, via the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. To gather a sufficient sample for a granular analysis of the data, this project combines and averages the surveys from 2009-2013.

Source

Steven Ruggles, J. Trent Alexander, Katie Genadek, Ronald Goeken, Matthew B. Schroeder, and Matthew Sobek. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 5.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2010.

TIME

This Is How Far Barack Obama Has Traveled Around the World

President Obama’s meeting in Saudi Arabia Tuesday with its new king marks his 84th visit to a foreign country as president, including repeat visits. By TIME’s estimation, he has now accumulated over 447,000 frequent flyer miles in international travel since January 2009, including flights returning to the United States.

Follow each of those trips below with the arrow buttons and watch those totals accumulate. You can skip to the end by using the left arrow from the first slide.

Methodology

Total miles are calculated as the round-trip distance between Washington, D.C. and a given location. Since the figures don’t account for routes and intermediate stops for refueling, the actual figure is likely to be higher. For trips that include multiple stops, the calculation only factors in the flight from Washington for the first and last leg.

TIME

Growth of Muslim Populations in Europe Map

 

The recent terrorist attacks in Paris have brought new attention to the small number of European Muslims who turn to violent extremism. Fears center around the number of Europeans who have fought in Iraq and Syria and could return to the continent. Amid tensions over terrorism and intolerance in France, the Muslim population there is projected to grow steadily in the coming years in comparison to non-Muslim populations and in many other European counties. Demographic changes, including lower birthrates for non-Muslim Europeans, are contributing to the changing face of Europe’s religious and ethnic make-up. The above map shows historical data and projections for the growth of Muslim populations in Europe in 2030.

Methodology
Population estimates from Pew Research Religion and Public Life Project. According to the methodology in the organization’s report, the 1990 figure for France and several other countries maybe be artificially low. Estimates for the number of fighters in Iraq and Syria come from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation in London.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: December 12

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Eel drones are the future of undersea warfare.

By Patrick Tucker in Defense One

2. This interactive map points the way to breaking gridlock in Washington and reconnecting Americans to the policy conversation.

By the Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative

3. Fear of terrorism has radically changed America’s public spaces.

By Susan Silberberg in The Conversation

4. By dividing Muslims, ISIS might be sowing the seeds of its own destruction.

By Mark Mardell in BBC

5. Yesterday, the FCC boosted access to free, high-quality internet at America’s public libraries, opening the door to digital opportunity for all.

By Reed Hundt in the Aspen Idea

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME interactive

This Chart Shows How Much Americans Love Divided Government

Since the origins of the Republican Party, more than 150 years ago, rival powers tend to occupy the Senate and Oval Office

Senators wishing for a long career in Washington would do well to root against their party when it comes to presidential elections.

A two-term president commonly loses seats in Congress in the sixth year of his presidency. In fact, pretty much any election is bad for the president’s party, at least as far as the Senate goes. Even with only a third of the seats up for election every cycle, the president’s party is about twice as likely to lose seats in the upper chamber as it is to gain them.

 

Tuesday’s elections were no exception to the rule. Even if Republicans take Alaska and Louisiana this year, for a 9 seat gain, seven elections in the 20th century saw higher seat turnovers. In 1980, Republicans picked up 12 seats to take control of the Senate as Ronald Reagan won the presidency–only to lose it again six years later. In 1866, Republicans saw the largest gain in history with 18 seats, but this was largely due to Southern states rejoining the Union. Democrats came close to breaking that record when they picked up 16 seats in 1958, by snagging 13 from Republicans and gaining three seats with the addition of Alaska and Hawaii.

For all the hand-wringing over partisan gridlock in Washington, Americans seem intent on preventing one party from controlling both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue.

Source: Senate.gov

TIME interactive

Are You a J. Crew Democrat or a Pizza Hut Republican?

Check out this chart and search tool to see the political leanings of the places that Starbucks, Walmart, and 2,700 other companies call home

If you live near a Ben & Jerry’s or a few Dunkin’ Donuts outposts, odds are good that your Congressional district elected a Democrat on Tuesday. More familiar with the inside of a Pizza Hut or a Long John Silver’s? Chances are you’ll be represented next year by a Republican.

The following chart places 49 common brands on a political spectrum based on the percentage of their brick-and-mortar stores that are located in Democratic or Republican districts. To do this, TIME matched nearly 2 million store locations provided by the research company AggData to their corresponding Congressional district and then tallied them by that district’s vote in 2014 midterms. Of the 139 American Apparel stores, for example, 83 percent are in blue districts. Nearly nine in 10 Belk department stores, meanwhile, can be found in red districts. All the other brands on the chart fall somewhere in between. You can look for any store you like in the search tool below the graphic.

There is no evidence, of course, that a regular infusion of banana ice cream and fudge chunks inspires a person toward liberalism. Because two-thirds of the Ben & Jerry’s in the United States are found in Democratic districts, however, the mere presence of a store in a district raises the statistical odds that its residents are people who vote for Democrats.

While stores like Whole Foods or Hobby Lobby might already conjure partisan stereotypes, the vast majority of America’s brands do not. Even so, where these stores are located tells us a tremendous amount about who their shoppers are sending to Washington.

Methodology

The list of retail locations was provided by AggData. Stores were matched to Congressional district by comparing their longitude and latitude to the Census definitions of districts. The results do not include the 14 Congressional races that have yet to be resolved as of 6:00 AM on Nov. 6, 2014.

Read next: How the World Sees America Now

Correction: The interactive chart originally linked the incorrect record for Armani Exchange when the user clicked the icon in the chart. It has since been updated.

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