TIME interactive

Inside the Secrets of Hollywood’s Calendar

Superheroes save June. Princesses reign in May. And Nazis usually invade in February. Here's a visual guide to strange patterns that populate the big screen

What do you call a thong-clad scientist paired with a chainsaw-toting cheerleader? Answer: the perfect summer movie.

It’s no secret that the movies follow an unofficial calendar: Summer is for action heroes and explosions, while dark themes and delicate plots visit in the winter, readying for the Oscars. But what about some of the less familiar patterns that popular Hollywood seasons? To study the secrets of the cinema calendar, TIME gathered data on the 8,298 movies in IMDB that made at least $100,000 in inflation-adjusted dollars, all the way back to 1913. By correlating the keywords for each movie to the month that it was released, we were able to find highly seasonal topics for each month of the year.

For all the highs and lows of the Hollywood calendar, check out this chart.

Some of the more surprising highlights: People are saddest in January. The tag “melancholy” is most popular in the beginning of the year. See “Sideways” and “The Hours.” February is a great month for World War II. “Nazis” too. Drug lords come out in the summer. August to be specific. In fact, the second-highest grossing movie of the moment is Lucy, in which a woman (Scarlet Johansson) works as a mule for a Korean drug kingpin.December is lethal for main characters. That’s when they die most often. See “Titanic.”

Methodology

The keywords on IMDB are submitted by users so the data is not perfectly consistent, but across thousands of movies one sees clear and sensible pattern. Each keyword was measured according to the total number of movies it appeared in each month of the calendar year, regardless of which year the movie appeared. These figures where then converted to percentages according to the keyword’s total volume. Since movies come out in different volumes in different months–October is a particularly popular type to release a film regardless of topic, for example–the data was then normalized according to the total number of films released in a given month.

TIME

How to Predict Future Criminals

An interactive demonstration of how the justice system uses data to determine the length of prison sentences

When deciding how long to send someone to jail, many states currently use statistical models to determine whether offenders risk committing a future crime if they are let out on probation or parole. In the past several years, researchers have been able to demonstrate that factors like drug and alcohol problems, family life and education can help them predict the likelihood of recidivism.

In a speech before the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers Friday, Attorney General Eric Holder warned that this increasingly popular use of data-based methods in determining prison sentences “may run the risk of imposing drastically different punishments for the same crimes.” As Holder told TIME this week, he fears that the statistical methods that punish for factors like education will disproportionately affect minority and poor offenders.

Below, you’ll find a demonstration of the kind of kind calculator many states use to predict odds of recidivism. Change the responses in the following interactive to see how the odds of re-arrest change with the offender’s circumstances. In many states, these odds are being used to determine sentencing lengths.

 

The actual use of this “post conviction risk assessment” varies widely. This method, developed by criminal justice researcher Christopher T. Lowenkamp and colleagues, is an area of ongoing study. Using standard statistical models, the researchers were able to study a large population of offenders to determine which factors can predict a person’s likelihood of future offense and which cannot. Notably, a person’s race–left in this interactive for demonstration purposes–has almost no predictive power over future behavior when all other factors are held constant. In other words, a white offender and black offender with the same answers to the above questions are almost equally likely to commit a future crime.

TIME interactive

How the World Sees America Now

Russia's approval for the United States plummeted in 2014. So did Brazil's. China and France increased in their affection for the country. This map shows the rise and fall in esteem for the United States around the world in recent years

Russians’ disapproval for the United States has hit new lows, according to the latest figures released by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project. In 2013, 51 percent of Russians said they had a favorable view of the United States–the fourth straight year that a majority of those polled gave the U.S. a thumbs up. This year, with discord rising between American and Russian leaders, Russian approval of the U.S. plummeted 28 percentage points.

The following interactive allows you to compare any two different years back to 2002 to see how global opinion has changed. Not every country was polled every year.

 

Note: Clicking on the green hyperlinks updates the interactive map in the article.

Following Barack Obama’s election in 2008, many countries saw spikes in favorability toward the United States in 2009, and in many cases those bumps in approval have since waned. Germany greeted the new White House administration with a 33 point bump in approval, for example, but has since dropped 13 points to a 51 percent favorability rating. France and China, meanwhile, has bucked the trend, with growing support for the U.S. since last year.

TIME Arts

Here’s How the World’s Most Creative People Organize Their Daily Routines

From Maya Angelou to Beethoven to Picasso

Never sure how to budget your time each day to maximize your productivity and enhance your creativity? Well, perhaps you should take a cue from some of history’s most successful and prolific artists, writers, musicians and thinkers. This interactive tool created by Podio compares the daily schedules of some of history’s most famous creative types.

(View full-size. via Podio).

So if you’re looking to create some new daily habits, allow these folks to be your inspiration.

TIME

A Visual Guide to Every World Cup Match

Methodology Data for market value and performance taken from Transfermarkt. Market values are converted at $1.67 per pound. All flags: Getty Images.

TIME

The 450 Companies That Still Have Indian Mascots

A federal agency has ruled that the Washington Redskins' name disparages Native Americans. Hundreds of other companies use Native American images to sell their wares. Here's what their logos look like

The Washington Redskins lost their trademark (pending appeal) on Wednesday after a federal agency ruled that the football team’s name is “disparaging to Native Americans.”

While the team will no longer have exclusive rights to its name, it is far from the last business to use Native American imagery in its merchandise. The United States Patent and Trademark Office categorizes all logos by the images they contain. Those records include over 600 active trademarks for insignia that feature Native American men and women, registered to 450 different companies. In most cases, no one is accusing these companies of disparagement. If faced with an action the agency evaluates whether trademarks were disparaging at the time of their registration.

Here’s a look at all the Native American imagery trademarked in the U.S. from the now-defunct Redskins logo to Land O’Lakes butter and American Spirit cigarettes.

Tap or mouse over a logo to see the owner and description.

 

TIME

Will Your Baseball Team Make the Playoffs?

Last updated June 25.

As a Phillies fan, I’ve become adept at constructing outlandish scenarios for how the team can pull it together. For the millions of fans who root for struggling baseball teams, it’s this faith in baseball miracles that keeps us hanging on. The chart above is your guide to how often those miracles actually happen.

In mid-May, when the Phils were still dog paddling around a .500 record, I started to wonder how many teams in their same position at that point in the season went on to make the playoffs. Using Retrosheet.org, I pulled the box scores for the 43,404 regular season games that have been played since 1996, the first full season after Major League Baseball went to a three-round playoff system with eight teams.

By the morning of June 8, for example, the Phillies were carrying a 25-35 record. As it happens, 18 teams since 1996 have had that same record after 60 games. Only one of them, the 2005 Houston Astros, made the playoffs. Judging by history, in other words, the 2014 Phillies had only a 6 percent chance of seeing the postseason on June 8. (The list at the bottom of this article has always-current standings based on these odds.)

Of course, every season is different, and to make the postseason a ball club is competing against the other teams in the league, not other teams in history. Flukes and miracles do happen. (Recall that the Padres won the NL West in 2005 with an 82-80 record.) Judging by history, however, teams like the Phillies have virtually no chance whatsoever to turn things around. It’s over long before it’s over.

Methodology

The information used here was obtained free of charge from and is copyrighted by Retrosheet. Interested parties may contact Retrosheet. The data does not include tie-breaker games played among wild card contenders or the small handful of tie games that have occurred since 1996.

TIME

How Often Does Your College Report Sexual Assaults?

High numbers of reported assaults are often a sign a college is doing a better job addressing the issue. See the interactive below to compare schools' reporting

The prevalence of sexual assault on college campuses is often masked by low levels of reporting, as Eliza Gray reported in a recent TIME cover story. Despite the troubles with reporting, comparing the number of incidents that are recorded on campuses can be instructive. In the interactive below, you can search for your school to see how many sexual assaults it reported between 2006 and 2012.

Counterintuitive though it may seem, a higher number of reports from an institution is often a good sign, because it means the school is doing a better job than others at addressing the issue. According to research from the Department of Health and Human Services [pdf], nearly one in five women is the victim of sexual assault or an attempted assault while attending college. Reporting levels for all schools are well below that number.

All schools that receive federal funding must submit annual security reports to the Department of Education, and the White House recently pressured universities to address the problem more proactively.

In 2012, the most recent full year on record, 4-year non-for-profit and public institutions averaged 1.8 reported assaults. The 55 schools currently facing Title IX sexual assault investigations averaged 12 reported assaults in 2012. The ten schools with the highest number of reported assaults average 27.9 in 2012. As the chart shows, the number of reported assaults is on the rise at many institutions.

Here are the top-ten schools with the highest cumulative reports of sexual assault from 2006 to 2012. Again, high reports don’t necessarily mean the highest levels of the crime.

  • Ohio State University-Main Campus, 248
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, 208
  • University of California-Davis, 206
  • University of California-Los Angeles, 168
  • Harvard University, 152
  • Indiana University-Bloomington, 149
  • University of California-Berkeley, 143
  • Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus, 136
  • Dartmouth College, 125
  • Princeton University, 122

Numbers show on-campus and off-campus forcible and non-forcible sexual assaults.

Methodology

Forcible and non forcible sexual assaults are available from 2006 to 2012 from the Department of Education’s annual security reports. This includes on-campus security reports, such as dormitories and school buildings, and non-campus security reports like Greek housing. Schools are filtered by four-year private not-for-profit schools and public schools.

TIME

What Country Do You Drink Like?

Use the sliders below to see which country most closely matches your alcohol consumption

The average person 15 years and older consumes 6.2 liters of pure alcohol a year, the World Health Organization reported last week. That comes out to about one drink a day.

The figures for each country in the response do not include those who have never consumed alcohol, which is sometimes a majority of the population. For example, in Chad, the Central African country of 10 million people, fully 73.7 percent of the population are lifetime abstainers. Those who do drink there partake in great excess: 33.9 liters of pure alcohol a year, or five drinks a day. You can click the name of the country in the response to see the WHO’s detailed report on that nation’s habits.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, men are at risk for alcohol-related problems if their consumption exceeds 14 drinks per week or four drinks per day; women are at risk if they exceed seven drinks per week or four drinks per day.

Methodology

A drink of any kind is assumed to have 0.6 fluid ounces of pure alcohol, as specified by the NIAAA, which comes out to 0.017 liters. Populations with a lifetime abstention rate of over 75 percent are not included in this interactive.

TIME Arts

This Interactive Chart Compares the Vocal Ranges of the World’s Greatest Singers

See which of your favorite singers can hit the highest and lowest notes

When it comes to determining who the best singers are, we’re all bound to disagree at least a little bit. You may acknowledge that, say, Bruce Springsteen is a talented musician, but you just don’t get why your dad wants to listen to him all the time. Or you might like the sound of Beyoncé’s voice, but she’s simply not your favorite. (Though be careful with that one, because the Beygency might come after you.)

But for a more objective look at what makes a singer great, try using this handy interactive tool, created by ConcertHotels.com, to compare the ranges of the world’s most famous vocalists. They chose artists from Rolling Stone’s list of the 100 greatest singers of all time, and then, to include more contemporary voices, also threw in some of the nominees for top male and female artists from this year’s Billboard Music Awards.

Once they settled on a list, the ConcertHotels team turned to The Range Place to gather data on each singer’s vocal abilities. Check out the results below , which you can sort by range, highest note or lowest note.

Who knew that when it came to pure vocal range, Axl Rose and Mariah Carey would blow everybody else out of the water?

 

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