TIME celebrity

Alicia Keys Pregnant With Her Second Child

The announcement was made on Instagram

Alicia Keys and her husband Swizz Beatz announced via Instagram on Thursday that they’re expecting a second child.

Beatz posted a photo with his clearly pregnant wife with the birthday message: “Happy Anniversary to the love of my life @therealswizzz !! And to make it even sweeter we’ve been blessed with another angel on the way!! 🎊🎉🎊🎉 You make me happier than I have ever known! Here’s to many many more years of the best parts of life! 😍☺️😘”

The couple already has a three-year-old son named Egypt.

TIME Instagram

Instagram Just Unveiled ‘Bolt,’ Its Answer to Snapchat

Instagram

And the already existing Bolt voice call and SMS service is not pleased

The photo-sharing, Facebook-owned social network Instagram on unveiled “Bolt” on Tuesday, a new messaging app that allows users to send short-lived photo and video messages from mobile devices.

Bolt allows users to send quick messages that self-destruct by merely tapping on a user’s photo on a smartphone screen. The service is Instagram’s answer to similar apps like Snapchat, which has a smaller but much more active user base (500 million snaps per day versus 60 million Instagrams), and even Slingshot, which is also owned by Facebook.

For the moment, Bolt can only be used in New Zealand, Singapore and South Africa. “We’re going to other regions soon, but are starting with handful of countries to make sure we can scale the experience,” a spokesperson for Instagram tells the Verge.

At least one group is peeved by the news of Instagram’s announcement — the startup firm Bolt, which since last year has been building technology to replace voice calling and text messaging through traditional cellphone plans. On Monday, as rumors of Instagram’s forthcoming Bolt announcement spread, Bolt publicly implored the Facebook-owned social behemoth to change the name of the service.

“We know it’s a great name, because we chose it last year when we set out to build a better mobile voice and messaging experience,” Bolt said in an open letter to Instagram. “We’ve worked really hard since then building the Bolt brand and technology to where it is today. Please don’t destroy all that effort.”

[The Verge]

TIME psychology

What People Learn About You From Your Selfies

25325925
Woman looking at reflection Vintage Images—www.jupiterimages.com

The pictures you post online could affect the way people treat you in person

According to new research, there are scientific reasons why you judged that girl who posted a selfie on Instagram last night.

It’s no secret that people make snap judgments about each other, but the study, conducted by researchers in the Department of Psychology at the University of York, was able to accurately predict what those judgments would be based on facial measurements such as “eye height” and “eyebrow width.”

Previous studies have shown that first impressions often fall into three categories: approachability, dominance, and attractiveness. The researchers at the University of York took 1,000 photographs from the Internet, analyzed the facial features of the subjects (who were all Caucasian), and studied how people reacted to each photograph. They were then able to develop a statistical model that predicted what the viewer’s impression of the face would be based on the measured facial features.

The findings of this study help illuminate the importance of these impressions in an age of social media, in which pictures of faces proliferate and people meet, talk, and even date online. According to the researchers‘ report, curating the perfect photo for these websites isn’t as trivial as it seems. “Some of the features that are associated with first impressions are linked to changeable properties of the face or setting that are specific to a given image,” they wrote. “So things like expression, pose, camera position, lighting can all in principle contribute alongside the structure of our faces themselves.”

Perhaps the most surprising finding was that snap judgments based on a photo could shape the way we respond to a person even after we’ve met them in person. The researchers explain it this way in the introduction to their report: “Although first impressions are formed rapidly to faces, they are by no means fleeting in their consequences. Instead… facial appearance can affect behavior, changing the way we interpret social encounters and influencing their outcomes.”

Less surprisingly, the research showed that “masculine” faces, determined by factors such as cheekbone structure, eyebrow height and skin texture, were seen as dominant, whereas more feminine faces were perceived as more attractive and youthful.

But the researchers also found that the shape and size of a person’s mouth directly affected his or her perceived approachability, and that larger eyes tend to predict higher levels of attractiveness.

So it’s time to stop making fun of people who obsess over choosing their profile picture. Richard Vernon, a PhD student who worked on the study, said, “Showing that even supposedly arbitrary features in a face can influence people’s perceptions suggests that careful choice of a photo could make (or break) others’ first impressions of you.”

TIME celebrities

Kim Kardashian, Lady Gaga and Ice Cube Give Their Artistic Fans Some Love on Instagram

Stars love to see their portraits drawn

Celebrities enjoy a good sketch as much as the rest of us do, it seems. Over the past few months, a number of stars, including Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg, Lady Gaga and Sam Smith have uploaded photos on Instagram of sketches their fans have made for them.

Many of the stars, like Lena Dunham, Drake, Lupita Nyongo, Kim Kardashian and others recognized the sketchers in their captions, gracing some talented artists with a sought-after mention. Stars of the dog variety can be painted, too, and the canine Instagram sensation Tuna gave a bark for his own portrait artist, too.

It’s a fun trend that we hope continues. Check out some particularly great sketches with some notable personages here.

  • Lena Dunham

  • Ice Cube

  • Drake

  • Lupita Nyongo

  • Kim Kardashian

  • Sam Smith

  • Lady Gaga

  • Nicki Minaj

  • Reese Witherspoon

  • Snoop

  • Courtney Reed

  • Tuna

TIME celebrity

North West Just Took Her First Steps, Is Now One Step Closer to World Domination

North West Walks With Me

Keeping up with North West just got a little more difficult. Kim Kardashian’s baby North took her first steps Wednesday getting out of a pool after swim lessons. The reality television star posted a photo to Instagram taken by her husband Kanye West with the caption:

Our baby girl finished one week of swimming lessons today then took her 1st steps right when she got out of the pool!!!! Mommy & Daddy are so proud of you!!!! Photo cred: Daddy

She’s walking her way right into E’s next reality television show.

TIME celebrities

Beyoncé Just Posted the Ultimate Feminist Photo

She woke up like this

Well, obviously Beyoncé can do it. The 17-time Grammy winner posted a photo to Instagram Tuesday that mirrors the famous Rosie the Riveter poster, a cultural icon that recognizes the contributions made by women during World War II. Beyonce, a self-described “modern-day feminist,” incorporated ideas often symbolized by Rosie in her most recent album. The photo racked up more than 300,000 likes within half an hour.

Beyoncé is currently on the road with husband Jay Z for their joint “On the Run” tour.

TIME beauty

‘Skinny Girl’ Bethenny Frankel Wears 4-Year-Old’s Clothes

Instagram post was met with a horrified response from her followers

Bethenny Frankel, former reality TV star and owner of the “Skinnygirl” beverages line, has outraged her Instagram followers after posing in her four-year-old daughter’s clothes.

Frankel, 43, who became famous after starring on The Real Housewives of New York City, sparked horror online after dressing in her daughter Bryn’s pajamas.

She posted the photo Sunday morning along with the caption: “This is my daughter’s nightgown and PJ shorts. Think we’re ready to start sharing clothes yet?”

Most people online did not think that. User jenmo2222 wrote: “I’m sorry this isn’t cute…a grown woman shouldn’t be the size of a 4-year-old especially when they have admitted to having an eating disorder in the past…!”

Fellow Instagram user, nonniedidit echoed her sentiments, commenting: “Women shouldn’t brag about being as thin as a small child… Go eat a sandwich.”

Frankel, however, defied her critics on Twitter, tweeting Monday:

In response to a fan who offered their support Frankel wrote:

Frankel, who sold Skinnygirl in March 2011 for a reported $100 million, has admitted to struggling with her weight. In a 2010 interview with People magazine she confessed: “I was owned by dieting. “I hated myself. I was completely obsessed and consumed.”

 

TIME celebrity

Drake Was Really Bored on Instagram Last Night

Just a regular guy posting regular memes

Drake was on his worst behavior on Instagram late Monday night. In an apparent fit of boredom, the Grammy-award winning hip hop artist posted a slew of photos, including this gem of his dad:

“Haaaaa. Ok this is it. I’m done. I have no caption. My dad is just wavy.”

Then there were the memes:

“Might slide in ya dm’s like…”

“See you across the club like…”

“Catch you at Starbucks like….”

“Oh you back with your ex huh? Bet.”

Superstar rappers, they’re just like us: clogging your Insta feed when they can’t sleep.

 

TIME Culture

Millennials Are Proud of #Murica Despite Awareness of Its Flaws, MTV Says

MTV study challenges typical notions of young Americans

Search #murica on Instagram and you’ll get an eclectic mix of overtly patriotic content and photos parodying some less flattering perceptions of the United States. So an image of fingernails painted in red, white, and blue may exist right on top of a snarky note about a gas station where you can buy cigarettes, beer and fireworks all at once.

The contradictory way young people use this hashtag offers insight into the way millennials, a term typically used to describe people born in the 1980s, 90s, and early 2000s, think about America, according to new research conducted by MTV.

Of the 2,000 young people (ages 16-24) that MTV reached out to, 86% said they feel “proud to be American,” a fact that the “Millenials & #Merica” study notes contradicts Pew’s “Millennials in Adulthood” study earlier this year, which reported self-proclaimed patriotism to be at 49%. At the same time, MTV found that millennials are conscious of and concerned about the country’s problems.

This dichotomy can in part be attributed to the availability of differing perspectives in the media and online, Vice President of MTV Insights Alison Hillhouse told TIME.

For older generations, “any information was filtered through the nightly news, filtered through newspapers,” she said. “Millennials are so much more exposed to how other people think about the country on a daily basis.”

Nearly 90% of millennials ascribed equality and fairness as values they considered to be “American.” However, 80% said that sometimes the government acts in a way that makes it difficult to feel patriotic, and more than 50% said that the country has let them down personally.

Hillhouse said that the research, which collected data through focus groups, conversation, and other online methods, will help guide MTV programming as well as many of the company’s social initiatives.

This is based on a press release with key findings; the full study has not been released by MTV.

TIME Internet

Study: Teens Aren’t Fleeing Facebook After All

US-FACEBOOK-MENLO PARK
A thumbs up or "Like" icon at the Facebook main campus ROBYN BECK—AFP/Getty Images

Kids are actually using the social network more than they did a year ago

Facebook isn’t dead yet. Far from it, in fact.

In October 2013, Facebook’s CFO admitted that young teens were visiting the social network less frequently. Following that announcement, anecdotal reports and a few different studies suggested that teens—the arbiters of cool—were fleeing Facebook en masse. Even if they kept an account, it wasn’t their primary social network. Teens in the U.S. especially were supposedly opting out of Facebook and into networks like Twitter and Tumblr.

But Facebook is making a comeback. Nearly 80% of U.S. teens still use Facebook and are more active on the social networking site than any other, according to a Forrester Research report. The survey, which polled 4,517 U.S. teens and tweens, found that almost half of the respondents (aged 12 to 17) said they use Facebook more than they did a year ago. And 28% of respondents say they’re on Facebook “all the time” (as opposed to “about once a day” or “at least a few times a day”), a higher percentage than any other service.

The results are actually consistent with a comScore report from earlier this year that found even though there was a three-percentage-point drop in Facebook usage among college-aged adults, 89% of those college kids still use the site. That is, again, better than any other social network is doing in that demographic.

Instagram was runner-up to Facebook in terms of time spent on the network, followed by Snapchat, Twitter, Vine and WhatsApp. That’s great news for Facebook: the company owns Instagram and is in the process of acquiring WhatsApp.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser