TIME Music

Rihanna Teases New Music on Instagram

Rihanna
Rihanna Jordan Strauss—Invision/AP

It's been two years since the last Rihanna album

Rihanna returned to Instagram earlier this month, and now she’s getting ready to return to music. The singer’s upcoming eighth studio album has been the subject of many rumors — will it drop on Black Friday? Or next year? — and she has been mostly mum on details, tweeting Tuesday that “ANY news about #R8 will be delivered directly from me!!!!”

To assure fans that the record is coming, Rihanna posted a quick taste of what she’s up to in the studio on her Instagram. “Ain’t none of this promised,” she sings in a brief clip from a song that may or may not appear on her first record since 2012’s Unapologetic. In a fourth quarter that’s been relatively light on major divas, let’s hope she’s not referring to hopes about a 2014 release date. Check out the preview below:

TIME portfolio

Using Instagram to Open a Window on Everyday Life in North Korea

“My motive has always been to open a window on North Korea,” says David Guttenfelder. “There are so few images coming out of there, and yet there’s so much interest.”

A former chief photographer at Associated Press, Guttenfelder helped open the agency’s first bureau in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) in January 2012. Now, after he resigned from AP to continue his career as a freelance photographer and one of National Geographic’s Photography Fellows, he’s not turning his back on the reclusive country. In September 2014, he quietly launched the Everyday DPRK Instagram account, which features pictures by North Korean residents and photographers.

“We launched Everyday DPRK because a number of photographers who have access to the country are using Instagram,” says Guttenfelder, “but most of them were not getting attention on their own.”

Six photographers, including Guttenfelder, are currently posting on the Everyday DPRK account — @drewkelly, @sunbimari, @andrea_uri, @simonkoryo, @soominee. “None of them are professional photographers,” Guttenfelder recently told Lightbox. “Some of them are avid Instagrammers. We have a university teacher, Drew Kelly. He was one of the first Instagram users in North Korea and had been quietly posting pictures of his life and the students he teaches. He offers an interesting view of the country and has a very thoughtful approach.”

Kelly first visited Pyongyang in June 2012, and he usually spends three to four months a year in the country. “I had come right out of graduate school and learned of an opportunity to teach at a university here in the capital,” he says. “I wanted to do something different, not sit around in the U.S. hoping the ‘right’ job would come along.”

When he’s not teaching English, Kelly is using Instagram to offer an “expat point-of-view” on North Korea and to show that “there are real people living, working and striving for a better life with the cards dealt to them,” he says.

Andrea Lee, another contributor to the Everyday DPRK feed, first visited North Korea in 2003. “I was part of a Korean-American delegation of women seeking peace and reconciliation in the Korean peninsula,” says Lee. “As an ethnic Korean having grown up in South and North America, returning to Korea generally is always a soul-searching experience for me. What I found in North Korea, looking beyond politics, was raw beauty, untouched landscapes and sincere, genuine people. The country has kept me intrigued ever since.”

Lee, now the founder of a travel company that organizes trips to North Korea, welcomed the government’s decision in January 2013 to introduce a mobile 3G Sim Card for foreign visitors. This allowed for the real-time upload of images, but also access to Facebook, Foursquare and, of course, Instagram. “Earlier this year, I was uploading photos when American wrestler Bob Sapp engaged a crowd of North Koreans on the street with arm wrestling, and when Dennis Rodman made his last visit to Pyongyang,” she says. “Through Instagram, even non-journalists can contribute to the public discussion surrounding North Korea in a more meaningful and personal way.”

Lee hopes the feed will help the world see the “humanity that exists in North Korea,” she says. It’s a sentiment Guttenfelder shares. “We want to provide a real and honest view of the country,” he says.

In curating the Everyday DPRK feed, Guttenfelder regularly asks his colleagues to send him images, which he then carefully selects before sharing on Instagram (for other Everyday feeds, all participants are able to upload their images directly to Instagram). “I wanted, at least at the beginning, to sequence the pictures,” the former AP Chief Photographer says. “North Korea is a complicated place to work from, and I wanted to help these photographers. Even though they are not professional photographers, their instinct is the same: they want to tell their stories, they want to show what’s happening there. They know there’s a strong interest, and they want to open the window on this place, just like I was always trying to do myself.”

“What better place” he asks, “to test the power of Instagram, or photography in general, than in North Korea, where there’s little independent photographic coverage?”


Follow Everyday DPRK on Instagram @EverydayDPRK.

Mikko Takkunen, who edited this photo essay, is an Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.

Olivier Laurent is the editor of TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @olivierclaurent


TIME celebrities

Rihanna Went on an Instagram Spree at the White House

Scandal jokes ensued

Rihanna knows how to make a comeback. After making her welcome return to Instagram in early November following a six-month break, the unapologetic pop star — who gives new meaning to the phrase “no filter” — proved why she’s also a social-media star during a Monday trip to the White House.

She posed in the briefing room, she posed in what looks like the West Wing, but most importantly, she made a couple jokes about Scandal. There’s nothing for Olivia Pope to fix here, though — unless we’re talking about the current lack of a new Rihanna album. Perhaps she can handle that next.

TIME Opinion

The Secret Language of Girls on Instagram

Close up of teenage girl texting on mobile in bedroom
Getty Images

Girls have quietly repurposed the photo-sharing app into a barometer for popularity, friendship status and self-worth. Here's how they're using it.

Secrecy is hardly new on Planet Girl: as many an eye-rolling boy will tell you, girls excel at eluding the prying questions of grown ups. And who can blame them? From an early age, young women learn that to be a “good girl” they must be nice, avoid conflict and make friends with everyone. It’s an impossible ask (and one I’ve studied for over a decade) – so girls respond by taking their true feelings underground.

Enter the Internet, and Instagram: a platform where emotions can run wild – and where insecurities run wilder. The photo-sharing app is social media’s current queen bee: In a survey released earlier this month, three quarters of teens said they were using Instagram as their go-to app.

Instagram lets users share their photos, and “like” and comment on their friends’. The competition for “likes” encourages creativity in young users, who can use filters and other devices to spruce up their images. And its simplicity – it’s just pictures, right? — comforts parents haunted by the cyberbullying they hear about on Facebook and Twitter.

But Instagram’s simplicity is also deceiving: look more closely, and you find the Rosetta Stone of girl angst: a way for tweens and teens to find out what their peers really think of them (Was that comment about my dress a joke or did she mean it?), who likes you (Why wasn’t I included in that picture?), even how many people like them (if you post and get too few likes, you might feel “Instashame,” as one young woman calls it). They can obsess over their friendships, monitoring social ups and downs in extreme detail. They can strategically post at high traffic hours when they know peers are killing time between homework assignments. “Likes,” after all, feel like a public, tangible, reassuring statement of a girl’s social status.

That’s not what the app creators intended, of course, but it does make psychological sense: as they become preteens, research shows that girls’ confidence takes a nosedive. Instagram, then, is a new way for girls to chase the feeling of being liked that eludes so many of them. Instagram becomes an popularity meter and teens learn to manipulate the levers of success.

Here are a few of the ways that girls are leveraging Instagram to do much more than just share photos:

To Know What Friends Really Think Of Them

In the spot where adults tag a photo’s location, girls will barter “likes” in exchange for other things peers desperately want: a “TBH” (or “to be honest”). Translation? If you like a girl’s photo, she’ll leave you a TBH comment. For example: “TBH, ILYSM,” meaning, “To be honest I love you so much.” Or, the more ambivalent: “TBH, We don’t hang out that much.

To Measure How Much a Friend Likes You

In this case, a girl may trade a “like” — meaning, a friend will like her photo — in exchange for another tidbit of honesty: a 1-10 rating, of how much she likes you, your best physical feature, and a numerical scale that answers the question of “are we friends?” and many others. Girls hope for a “BMS,” or break my scale, the ultimate show of affection.

As a Public Barometer of Popularity

Instagram lets you tag your friends to announce that you’ve posted a new photo of them. Girls do the app one better: they take photos of scenes where no person is present – say, a sunset — but still tag people they love and add gushing comments. It’s a kind of social media mating call for BFFs. But girls also do it because the number of tags you get is a public sign of your popularity. “How many photos you’re tagged in is important,” says Charlotte, 12. “No one can see the actual number but you can sort of just tell because you keep seeing their name pop up.”

To Show BFF PDA

That broken heart necklace you gave your bestie? It’s gone the way of dial up. Now, girls use Instagram biographies – a few lines at the top of their page — to trumpet their inner circle. It’s a thrill to be featured on the banner that any visitor to the page will see — but not unusual to get deleted after a fight or bad day, in plain, humiliating sight of all your friends.

A Way to Retaliate

Angry at someone? Don’t tag the girl who is obviously in a picture, crop her out of it entirely, refuse to follow back the one who just tried to follow you, or simply post a photo a girl is not in. These are cryptic messages adults miss but which girls hear loud and clear. A girl may post an image of a party a friend wasn’t invited to, an intimate sleepover or night out at a concert. She never even has to mention the absent girl’s name. She knows the other girl saw it. That’s the beauty of Instagram: it’s the homework you know girls always do.

A Personal Branding Machine

Girls face increasing pressure not only to be smart and accomplished, but girly, sexy and social. In a 2011 survey, 74% of teen girls told the Girl Scout Research Institute that girls were living quasi-double lives online, where they intentionally downplayed their intelligence, kindness and good influence – and played up qualities like fun, funny and social. On Instagram, girls can project a persona they may not have time, or permission, to show off in the classroom: popular, social, sexy. Cultivating a certain look is so important that it’s common for girls to stage ‘photo shoots’ with each other as photographers to produce shots that stand out visually. (Plus a joint photo shoot is more evidence of friendship.)

A Place For Elaborate Birthday Collages

Remember coming to school on your big day, excited to see what you’d find plastered to your locker? Now girls can see who’s celebrating them hours before they get off the bus. Birthday collages on Instagram are elaborate public tributes, filled with inside jokes, short videos, and pictures of memories you may not have been a part of. “There is definitely a ‘I love you the most. I’ve loved you the longest edge to these birthday posts,” one parent told me. Collages that document the intensity or length of a relationship are a chance to celebrate a friend – or prove just how close you are to the birthday girl. Although most girls know to expect something from their closest friends, not getting one is seen as a direct diss, a parent told me. And it can be competitive: another parent told me her daughter’s friend stayed up until midnight just so she could be the first to post.

While girls may seem addicted to their online social lives, it’s not all bad — and they still prefer the company of an offline friend to any love they have to click for. (In a survey that would surely surprise some parents, 92% of teen girls said they would give up all of their social media friends if it meant keeping their best friend.) And, of course, likes aren’t everything. As 13 year-old Leah told me, “Just because people don’t write me a paragraph on Instagram doesn’t mean they don’t like me.”

Rachel Simmons is the co-founder of Girls Leadership Institute and the author of the New York Times bestselling book, “Odd Girl Out: The Hidden Culture of Aggression in Girls” and “The Curse of the Good Girl: Raising Authentic Girls With Courage and Confidence.” Follow her on Twitter @racheljsimmons.

Read next:

TIME Social Media

You Can Finally Edit Captions on Instagram

Editing locations is also available, along with new Explore tab

No more fretting when you use the wrong Emoji to go with your picture. Instagram announced Monday that users will now be able to edit their own captions.

The new editing feature, which also applies to editing locations, was announced by the company along with an update to the Explore feature. The new Explore tab—now represented by an icon of a magnifying glass, instead of a compass—adds the ability to discover people, not just photos, who share similar interests.

The updates are available for free for both iOS and Android today.

TIME Interview

#LightBoxFF: Using Instagram to Help Homeless Veterans

Welcome to this week’s edition of TIME LightBox Follow Friday, a series where we feature the work of photographers using Instagram in new, interesting and engaging ways. Regularly, we introduce you to the person behind the feed through his or her pictures and an interview with the photographer.

This week, LightBox speaks to Pablo Unzueta (@unzueta_), a freelance photographer based in Los Angeles who has been using Instagram to draw attention to the persisting problem of veteran homelessness. TIME LightBox selected Unzueta’s work as part of #TIMEvets, an initiative launched ahead of this year’s Veterans Day to explore the profound effects of war on soldiers and their families. Visit the #TIMEvets page for more information and for details on how to contribute your own images and stories.


LightBox: Tell us about yourself and how you became interested in photography.

Pablo Unzueta: I come from a family of photographers. The person who has influenced me the most was my grandmother who did documentary photography covering the landfills in Central America. She also was a wedding photography in Los Angeles. More often than not, I would find myself in the darkroom watching her develop rolls of film. At the time, I was not aware that I would become an aspiring photojournalist. I was only five or seven years old. Early on at 17, I began to document street life in Los Angeles. There, I began to develop my aesthetics; but also, I became aware that it wasn’t always a happy life for everyone. I felt that no one cared about poverty, war, corruption, etc. I found photography [could be] a source to generate some advocacy.

LightBox: What does Instagram provide you and this project specifically that other platforms don’t?

Pablo Unzueta: Instagram allows me to share with my followers these stories on a personal level. There are no guidelines, no AP style as to how you want to tell the story. It’s just me putting the context with the picture and allowing my followers to decide how they want to react. A lot of people have an account, so it makes it a great source to share stories and opinions, without getting [rejected] by news outlets.

LightBox: What is the purpose of your project?

Pablo Unzueta: The purpose for this project is to make people think critically and question why there are so many war veterans living on the street. More things should be done to prevent poverty rates from growing each year. The stories of these war veterans reflect the loss of hope. Overtime these people accept their lives the way they are. Many believe that shelter programs are “unreliable” and “unsafe”. Eventually, the street life molds into a long-lasting lifestyle. This issue is fairly complex to understand, personally speaking.

Gregory Thomas. November 30, 2013 Alameda St. Los Angeles, Calif.

LightBox: Tell us about your process creating the work. How do you approach these homeless veterans?

Pablo Unzueta: I carry two black trash bags with clothes in the back of my trunk and I drive around looking for homeless residents. If I don’t have clothes to give, I carry food and coins. This gives me a reason to approach them with a camera in hand. I [often] spark conversation with a simple handshake. If they open up to me, I’m usually allowed to take their portrait. Sometimes it takes a few visits for a picture, but that’s what makes the process all worth it. Most of my conversations are recorded on my iPhone, sometimes on a black notebook.

LightBox: Many photographers who started with analog or digital photography find themselves adapting to smartphones and Instagram. You started photographing at 17, and you are now 20. Can you call yourself an Instagram native? Do you find it liberating to be able to produce and distribute work instantaneously?

Pablo Unzueta: I think I can call myself that. I always loved Instagram. When I first started using it, I uploaded photographs from my DSLR. Every once in a while, I do a series with just iPhone photographs. I think it’s easy for someone to call themselves a photographer because of smartphones. But there is much more to it than just taking a picture with a phone. Going beyond your comfort zone and photographing something meaningful that contributes to a good cause automatically separates you from the category of “photographer”. It is important that we have a variety of documentarians in this world who present us with information, so why not use smartphones to illustrate the world with something informative and influential. Instagram is a perfect example of that. I am starting to see more and more Instagramers publish photographs with stories, which inspires others to do the same as well. It’s like a domino effect. Storytelling is imperative.


Pablo Unzueta is a freelance photojournalist in Los Angeles. He has been documenting protests, poverty and homelessness.

Ye Ming is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram.


TIME celebrities

Rihanna Makes Triumphant Return to Instagram After Six-Month Hiatus

Badgirlriri lives to post another picture

Rihanna’s six-month absence from Instagram left a gaping hole in the photo feeds of her more than 12 million followers. Gone were the sultry selfies, the memes and the glamour shots. What was once a daily constant vanished without warning, as though it had never existed at all.

But the hiatus ended yesterday, when the singer posted an upside-down selfie, several photos of herself dressed as a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle, and a drawing of her stick-figure avatar holding hands with the Instagram logo. The drawing appears to be a symbol of her reconciliation with the photo-sharing service, which suspended her account in May after she posted topless photos of herself from the French magazine Lui. Though Instagram quickly reactivated her account (without the Lui photos), Rihanna took down the account and moved the show to Twitter.

The feeling appears to be mutual, as Instagram welcomed her back to the community in a tweet this weekend:

Rihanna’s not the only celebrity to take issue with Instagram’s Community Guidelines, which include the rule, “Keep your clothes on.” Last week, Chelsea Handler protested the removal of a topless photo she posted, calling the move sexist. “If a man posts a photo of his nipples, it’s ok,” she tweeted, “but not a woman?” Despite the criticism, Instagram doesn’t seem likely to budge on its policy, citing a desire to adhere to the App Store’s rules about “nudity and mature content.”

In a roundup of the best rock-star Instagram accounts, Rolling Stone captured the essence of Rihanna’s feed. “When Rihanna’s Instagram isn’t fueling headlines or starting beefs, the account is an engrossing look at the life of a 25-year-old girl who’s having a lot more fun than you are.” Welcome back, Rihanna. We hope you’ll stay awhile.

TIME Opinion

Instagram Is Right to Censor Chelsea Handler

2014 Kennedy Center's Mark Twain Prize For American Humor Honoring Jay Leno
Chelsea Handler at the 2014 Kennedy Center's Mark Twain Prize For Americacn Humor at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on October 19, 2014 in Washington, DC. Kris Connor--Getty Images) Kris Connor—Getty Images

Allowing nudity on Instagram would hurt more women than it would help

It’s Halloween, which means it’s the perfect time to stir up a smoking hot gender-politics brouhaha in the Internet cauldron. This time, it’s over comedian Chelsea Handler’s nipples, and whether she should be able to post pictures of them on Instagram.

The drama started Thursday night, when Handler posted a topless photo of herself riding a horse on Instagram, to mock Vladimir Putin’s topless horseback selfie from 2009. Her photo was accompanied with the caption, “Anything a man can do, a woman has the right to do better. #kremlin.” But Instagram took the photo down, citing its Community Guidelines, which prohibit sharing of “nudity or mature content.” Handler posted the notice that her post had been removed, with the caption “If a man posts a photo of his nipples, it’s ok, but not a woman? Are we in 1825?” She then took to Twitter, calling the removal “sexist.”

Breastfeeding moms have voiced similar outrage at social networks like Facebook and Instagram, complaining that their nursing photos have been taken down for being too revealing. And pro-nudity movements like the Free the Nipple campaign have argued that nudity laws policies like this amount to “female oppression.”

Yes, in an ideal world, women’s nipples would seem just as unsexy and random as men’s. But we don’t live in that world, and Instagram is right to censor Handler and other women who post topless pictures. Not because there’s anything wrong with female nudity, but because that kind of monitoring helps keep revenge porn and child porn off of the network. It’s not that kids on Instagram need to be protected from seeing naked photos of Chelsea Handler–it’s they need to be protected from themselves.

See, kids love taking nude selfies, and they have notoriously bad judgement when it comes to putting stuff on the Internet. A study in June by Drexel University found that 28% of undergrads said they had sent photographic sexts while underage. Another study, published in Pediatrics in September, also found that 28% of surveyed teens admitted to sending naked photos, and 57% said they’d been asked for a sext. At the same time, Instagram is quickly eclipsing Facebook as the social network of choice for young teens. According to a survey by investment banking company Piper Jaffray, 76% of teens say they use Instagram, while only 59% use Twitter and 45% use Facebook. So if Instagram didn’t have its nudity policy, it stands to reason that teens might just start posting their naked selfies there.

The nudity policy also keeps Instagram from being a revenge porn destination. A 2013 study by McAfee security company found that 13% of adults have had their personal content leaked without their permission, and 1 in 10 say they’ve had exes threaten to post personal photos. Of those who threatened to leak photos, 60% followed through. Without their policy, Instagram would be a destination for revenge porn as well.

To be fair, Instagram doesn’t have a share mechanism, so it would be harder for porn to go viral. But on the other hand, Instagram profiles can also contain personal details about users’ immediate surroundings, which could make teens or potential revenge porn victims even more vulnerable.

This is also a question of practicality. Ideally, Instagram would be able to distinguish between a naked 13-year old and a breastfeeding mom. In reality, it would be unrealistic to expect Instagram to comb through their content, keeping track of when every user turns 18, whether the user is posting photos of themselves or of someone else, and whether every naked photo was posted with consent. And even if they could do that, would you really want Instagram calling you up to verify you knew about that whipped-cream photo your ex posted? It would be creepy.

This kind of policy is what makes Instagram different than Tumblr, which has fewer restrictions and much more porn. Granted, Tumblr has recently made that content harder to find on its site, but it’s still a destination for revenge porn. And as Maureen O’Connor wrote for New York Magazine, the process of getting revenge porn taken down can be humiliating: victims have to send Tumblr a picture of themselves holding a piece of paper with their full name, to verify they’re the person in the pictures.

So which is more important: the rights of a few bold comedians or breastfeeding moms to feel validated by their Facebook followers, or the privacy of people who might have their private photos posted without consent? I would side with the latter any day of the week.

TIME Internet

29 Colorful Instagrams That Perfectly Capture the Essence of Fall

So much foliage.

Isn’t there something so magical about fall, something that just makes you want to sip a pumpkin spice latte in a meadow? Though many regions are still a few weeks away from Peak Leaf, plenty of deep reds, bright yellows and vivid oranges have already popped up around the world. And, of course, dedicated photographers have made sure to document these changing colors on Instagram using the hashtag #foliage.

Here, a look at some of the best #foliage photos we’ve seen so far. (Note: we did not account for the fact that some of these photos are heavily filtered. Nature is incredible, yes, but keep in mind that sometimes nature is even more incredible when you really up the contrast.)

 

TIME Interview

#LightBoxFF: Balazs Gardi, From Afghanistan to California

May. 29, 2014.The unmistakable pattern of fracking sites on the border of New Mexico and West Texas.

Welcome to this week’s edition of TIME LightBox Follow Friday, a series where we feature the work of photographers using Instagram in new, interesting and engaging ways. Each week we introduce you to the person behind the feed through his or her pictures and an interview with the photographer.

This week, LightBox speaks to photographer Balazs Gardi (@balazsgardi), a freelance photographer who has been using social networks and the power of the internet to widely distribute work that he felt was often overlooked. From Afghanistan to Burning Man, Gardi’s vivid and evocative images tell stories of their own without distracting from the core of the issue, the event, or the atmosphere.


LB: Why did you join Instagram? And what does Instagram provide for you, that other platforms don’t?

BG: Direct access to curious, like-minded people. Instagram gives everyone the chance to build and directly talk with their audience.

For years I struggled to publish work that meant a lot to me. I remember how frustrated I was when I couldn’t push an extremely important, often under-reported story through editors but now I can share those discoveries without the bottleneck.

To deal with this issue, four years ago, around the time Instagram was born I joined a handful of colleagues and followed a battalion of US Marines through their deployment in Afghanistan’s southern frontline. Basetrack was our experiment to see how far we could take our own work. Besides a customized website we used Facebook to share and discuss our content with the ones who cared about the troops the most, their family members and loved ones. Had we known about Instagram and had the access to the internet the way we have today, Instagram would have taken our effort so much further.

LB: Do you differentiate between your Instagram work and your other photography ?

BG: I don’t believe in holding back the good stuff and publishing ‘B-roll’ only on Instagram, a practice a ton of photographers still do. To freely share your prime work is an easy decision when you operate independently but luckily more and more editors get it and allow me to do the same with the assigned work on-the-go even if they only publish them with a slight delay.

Feb. 15, 2014. Turkana herdsmen scout the Todonyang plains before they drive their herd to drink water from Lake Turkana near the Ethiopian border in northwest Kenya. The Turkana and the Daasanach lived side-by-side for centuries and learned to adapt to the harsh conditions of their arid environment. However with the changing climate the rains aren’t predictable anymore and the size of the pasture is rapidly shrinking creating fierce competition for survival between the rival ethnic groups.

LB: Are you taking photos with your phone?

BG: The iPhone became my primary camera over the past four years. I find these images are often way more interesting than the ones I take with ‘traditional’ gear. I spent a decade photographing with a wide array of unconventional choices from panoramic and large format to toy cameras, but the camera trapped in my phone’s body is a natural fit. On those rare occasions I publish photos I’ve taken with other cameras I mostly share pre-Instagram era work.

LB: Which post inspired the most audience feedback and engagement through likes and comments? Why do you think that photo got people’s attention, and do you agree with it?

BG: Perhaps it doesn’t come as a surprise, the more beautiful the photo is, the more ‘likes’ it usually gets. An aerial photograph of the the temporary settlement of nearly 70,000 festival goers at Burning Man was a huge favorite.

So far a photograph of displaced Turkana children provoked the most reaction. Earlier this year, I used Instagram to post dispatches from one of the most cruel front lines of Climate Change. The fight over the remaining pasture, watering holes and access to fishing grounds between two neighboring tribes forced this Kenyan community to flee from the deadly raids coming from across the Ethiopian border.

That photo helped thousands see how real Climate Change is. I think if photographers joined forces with their audiences eventually we can do even better. I hope to see platforms like Instagram not only help to raise awareness of struggling people but to also raise funds and directly change their lives for the better.


Balazs Gardi is a freelance photographer and creator of Azdarya, an online magazine dedicated to water and water conservation issues around the world.

Richard Conway is reporter/producer for LightBox.

Krystal Grow is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow her on Twitter and Instgram @kgreyscale


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