TIME Social Media

Facebook and Instagram Go Down While Twitter Explodes

Facebook Inc. Illustrations Ahead Of Earnings Figures
The Facebook logo is displayed on an Apple iPad Air in this arranged photograph in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 27, 2014 Bloomberg/Getty Images

Users around the world reported that they could not access either site

Social-networking site Facebook went down briefly Tuesday, along with its subsidiary Instagram.

The company issued a statement saying, “Sorry, something went wrong. We’re working on it and we’ll get it fixed as soon as we can,” according to Reuters.

Users across the U.S., Europe, Asia and Australia said they were unable to access either site for upwards of 30 minutes.

Several took to social-media rival Twitter to voice their frustrations.

Rotten Tomatoes took advantage of the moment to make a punning comparison to a cheap Colin Farrell movie.

Fellow sharing website 9gag memed up the whole experience.

And naturally, the MySpace jokes were aplenty.

TIME apps

Now You Can Turn Your Instagrams Into Fake Tattoos

TIME.com stock photos Social Apps iPhone Instagram
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

Picattoo: For people who love their selfies a little too much

Turning your Instagrams into nail art is so passé: There’s now an app that converts your Instas into fake tattoos, because nothing says “I really enjoyed my Crab Cakes Eggs Benedict” like temporarily tattooing it on your forehead.

For $14.99, Picattoo will ship users a 12-pack of “Insta-tats” worldwide. The Netherlands-based service, created by the company Ink361, laser prints users personal Instagrams on temporary tattoo paper. And unless the wearer decides to “scratch it off with rusty nails”—the app’s FAQ section gets a little too real—the product should last up to a week.

For the person who wants to immortalize their cat Instas on more than just their forearms, you can also print your pictures on marshmallows and sneakers.

And after all the time it took for you to pick the perfect filter, your Instagram deserves it.

(h/t: TechCrunch)

TIME apps

You Can Now Follow Prince William and Kate on Instagram

Be warned: It's pretty boring so far

Apparently the young royals made a New Year’s resolution to be more #SocialMediaSavvy.

After joining Twitter Wednesday morning, Instagram informed TIME that Kensington Palace — home to Will, Kate, and Prince Harry — also officially signed up for the popular photo-sharing app.

Although so far, the photos have been relatively… boring.

Don’t Will and Kate know that Insta is a place for selfies and creating #outrage over whether they cropped their baby out of pictures?

Must we tell Harry this medium is best suited for documenting trips to Vegas rather than blasé pictures from benefits?

Hopefully they will learn.

Read next: Here Are The Most Surprising Gifts the British Royal Family Received Last Year

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TIME celebrities

See Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield Photobomb a Sneaky Fan

Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield attend "Magic In The Moonlight" premiere in New York City on July 17, 2014.
Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield attend "Magic In The Moonlight" premiere in New York City on July 17, 2014. Jim Spellman—Getty Images

Stone continues to put her photobombing skills on display

You might call it a Spidey-sense.

Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield gave a fan an extra surprise when she took a picture of the couple during dinner at Lure Fishbar in New York City earlier this week.

Alejandra Garibay attempted to take a discreet shot of Stone, 26, and Garfield, 31, but Stone clearly saw through the fan’s sneaky photo move and decided to strike a funny pose.

“Ok, so . . . either I caught a great moment between #AndrewGarfield & #EmmaStone or I clearly got caught an I am officially FIRED as a paparazzi,” Garibay wrote along with the snap.

She later told the Huffington Post that she didn’t want to interrupt the The Amazing Spider-Man couple’s dinner and decided to take a quick shot instead.

“We just kind of laughed at each other,” Garibay said. “They’re such a good couple, they’re just like little teenagers in love.”

And this isn’t Stone’s first time photobombing. The Magic in the Moonlight actress previously put her skills on display while pranking her boyfriend at the opening-night party for the play Bull.

This article originally appeared on People.com.

TIME viral

People Thought Ricky Martin Was Dead So He Did This

The singer's response to a hoax video was perfect

A YouTube video released Saturday suggested singer Ricky Martin had died in a car accident. The video was a hoax, but many fans lamented over the “Livin’ La Vida Loca” star’s faux passing on social media.

In a response, Martin posted an Instagram photo of a beach, writing “hello from #heaven.”

Hello from #heaven.

A photo posted by Ricky (@ricky_martin) on

He later sent out another photo of himself enjoying a sunset.

#Sunset in #heaven

A photo posted by Ricky (@ricky_martin) on

Good thing he has a sense of humor.

Read next: 50 Smartest Celebrities on Twitter

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Behind the Photos

Ways of Seeing: The Growth of the Everyday Everywhere Movement

As 2014 draws to a close, we take a look back at the photographic trends that defined 2014

Whether through digital channels, print or on exhibit, the impact, influence and reach of the still image has never been greater. But with so many images fighting for our attention, how do photographers make work that most effectively stands out and connects with an audience. In this seven-part series, TIME looks back over the past 12 months to identify some of the ways of seeing—whether conceptually, aesthetically or through dissemination—that have grabbed our attention and been influential in maintaining photography’s relevance in an ever shifting environment, media landscape, and culture now ruled by images.

Everyday Everywhere

There is little doubt that when Everyday Africa was launched by photographer Peter DiCampo and writer Austin Merrill in 2012, it offered a welcome and refreshingly positive take on a continent that was so often portrayed through strife, turmoil, war and famine. The project—made with smartphones and disseminated through social media platforms including Tumblr and Instagram—concentrated on showing the mundane and incidental aspects of everyday life to reveal a side of Africa that was often overlooked. Everyday Africa’s subsequent expansion from its two founder members to a wider network of contributing photographers established the model that this year became a franchise and spread Everyday’s reach across the globe, from Everyday Asia and Everyday Latin America to Everyday Bronx.

One of the most interesting developments came when David Guttenfelder (TIME’s Instagram Photographer of the Year 2013), Matt Black (TIME’s Instagram Photographer of the Year 2014) and a collective of talented documentary photographers—and equally innovative Instagram users—launched Everyday USA, not only to record offbeat moments but to bring awareness to off-the-radar issues here at home. This year, TIME gave the group its first commission for #TIMEvets, a multi-platform project coinciding with Veterans Day. Alongside Everyday USA, Guttenfelder somehow found time in his busy newfound freelance career (this year, he parted ways with the Associated Press after 20 years) to initiate Everyday DPRK to continue his work from inside North Korea through the lenses of the country’s homegrown photographic talent.

Over the past two years, DiCampo has helped guide photographers interested in developing their own outshoots – with Everyday Asia and Everyday Latin America drawing on his input to shape their message. And this year, the Everyday project matured when the “owners” of some of the most successful Everyday accounts met for the first time in New York to coincide with an exhibition of their work. “I think we have a voice to talk about what cell phone photography is and to try, in some way, to lead the discussion on rights, usage and [the like],” DiCampo told TIME in September last year. The meeting resulted in the creation of the Everyday Everywhere project, which has the ambitious goal of changing “the way we see the world”.

While 2014 saw the explosion in the number of Everyday feeds on Instagram, 2015 could be a make-or-break year for many of them. The original purpose of Everyday Africa was to combat the stereotypical imagery that emerged from the continent. There are other places that could benefit from a similar approach, but only the most rigorous of practitioners – with well thought-out plans – will be able to sustain their followers’ interest in the long-run. The risk is that the multiplication of such feeds – Everyday Climate Change launched on Jan. 1 with a staggering number of participating photographers – will dilute their importance, bringing to an end one of the most interesting photographic experiments we’ve seen in years.

Read Part 1 – Direct to Audience.

Read Part 2 – Documentary Still Life.

Read Part 3 – The Portrait Series.

Read Part 4 – The Contemporary Photo Essay.

Read Part 5 – From Stills to Motion.

Read Part 6 – Books Within Books.

Phil Bicker is a Senior Photo Editor at TIME.

Olivier Laurent is the editor of TIME LightBox. Follow him onTwitter and Instagram @olivierclaurent

TIME celebrities

Selena Gomez Bares Ankles in Mosque, Deletes Photo After Sparking Outrage

The snapshot has spurred comments from detractors, who decried it as being inappropriate

Selena Gomez and her group of friends were careful to cover their heads when they paid a sightseeing visit to an Abu Dhabi mosque earlier this week.

But Gomez sparked controversy when she posted an Instagram photo showing her flashing her bare ankles in the mosque, which critics labeled as disrespectful.

That photo has since been deleted, but not before being widely circulated online.

The pop star, 22, however, has kept another Instagram photo of her visit, showing her and her crew smiling and mugging it up for the camera.

The snapshot has spurred comments from detractors, who decried it as being inappropriate.

“As tourists they should still respect the fact they are in a holy place,” one Instagram commenter wrote.

Other followers stepped up to defend the group: “Clearly, she’s a tourist & she isn’t purposely disrespecting the religion or the mosque.”

Gomez traveled to the United Arab Emirates to celebrate the new year along with pals Kendall Jenner and Cody Simpson, where they toured the Abu Dhabi’s famed Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque early in the week before spending New Year’s Eve in Dubai.

This article originally appeared on People.com

Read next: Watch Taylor Swift Give Her Fans Christmas Gifts for ‘Swiftmas’

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TIME Behind the Photos

Ways of Seeing: The Contemporary Photo Essay

As 2014 draws to a close, we take a look back at the photographic trends that defined 2014

Whether through digital channels, print or on exhibit, the impact, influence and reach of the still image has never been greater. But with so many images fighting for our attention, how do photographers make work that most effectively stands out and connects with an audience. In this seven-part series, TIME looks back over the past 12 months to identify some of the ways of seeing—whether conceptually, aesthetically or through dissemination—that have grabbed our attention and been influential in maintaining photography’s relevance in an ever shifting environment, media landscape, and culture now ruled by images.

The Contemporary Photo Essay

We live in an age where the volume of photographic output has never been greater. Yet the propensity is for images to be conceived, received digested and regurgitated in an isolated, singular form—and without further context. Against this backdrop, a generation of committed photographers are working passionately to iterate on, and further develop the traditions for long form story telling, and in so doing, draw attention to their subject matter through new powerful, innovative and resourceful ways.

On Aug. 31 this year, the New York Times Magazine published a photo essay that interweaved the images of two Magnum photographers working on each side of the Israeli, Palestinian conflict—Paolo Pellegrin (in Gaza) and Peter van Agtmael (in Israel). The essay was not only a creative and effective way of balancing a delicate and sensitive story, it was also, as Editor-in-Chief Jake Silverstein explained in a note about the project, conceived in part as a reaction to “the prevalence of cellphone cameras and social media [that had] led to many more images of Gaza than in previous iterations of this long-running conflict.”

“As powerful as these photos were,” he wrote, “the speed and fervor of their dissemination tended to bring them to us isolated from context.” The Times Magazine story was a considered attempt to have Pellegrin and van Agtmael slow things down and in Silversteins words “try to capture a deeper and more narrative sense of the texture of life on the ground.” The resultant essay, that intentionally combines two aesthetically different bodies of work emphasizes “that the fates of average Israelis and Palestinians are intertwined.”

Photographer Matt Black has subverted the prevalent philosophy of Instagram for his project The Geography of Poverty. Although using Instagram as one of the primary platforms for the work, Black has maintained a thematic and aesthetic cohesion to produce a dedicated feed—devoid of distraction or interference—that builds image by image, to deliver an investigation on poverty that is essayistic and closer to that of a traditional photo essay. On the website—exclusively dedicated to the project—Black explores the potential of geo-tagging to extend the project and map the images (for this project, Black was selected as TIME’s Instagram Photographer of the Year in 2014)

Photographers such as Diana Markosian with her work made in Beslan, Russia and Carolyn Drake in Turkistan have embraced different types of media and photographic approaches–including still life, documentary, portraiture as well as writing and drawing. They have also actively encouraged their subjects to contribute to the artistic process and tell their own stories through notated recollections narratives and artwork, which is at times directly applied to the photographic print. As Drake says of her project Wild Pigeon that documents the lives of the Uyghur people: “I started looking for meaning at the intersection of our views, and find ways to bring the people I was meeting into the creative process. Traveling with a box of prints, a pair of scissors, a container of glue, colored pencils, and a sketchbook, I asked willing collaborators to draw on, re-assemble, and use their own tools on my photographs. I hoped that the new images would bring Uyghur perspectives into the work and facilitate a new kind of dialogue with the people I met, one that was face-to-face and tactile, if mostly without words.”

In Ukraine a generation of young, predominantly European, freelance photographers including Maria Turchenkova, Ross McDonnell and Capucine Granier-Deferre committed themselves to documenting the searing violence and the disquieting consequences of the year-long conflict—building long-term photo essays that contextualize news events through more in-depth and nuanced perspectives.

One of the most important and powerful bodies of work was produced by Daniel Berehulak, who spent more than 14 weeks covering the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. His work, made on assignment for The New York Times, shows that long-term commitment to a story can reap astounding returns. And a powerful continuum of work, can raise awareness and deeply affect its audience.

In an age when we’re saturated with an omnivorous barrage of distracting and singular imagery, there is still a role for subtleties embodied within the traditions of long form storytelling. Through innovative, full screen photo-centric web designs and effective digital dissemination, these photo essays are drawing our attention—in different and often more meaningful ways—to important issues that we otherwise would ignore or at best feel we had seen too many times before.

Read Part 1 – Direct to Audience.

Read Part 2 – Documentary Still Life.

Read Part 3 – The Portrait Series.

Read Part 5 – From Stills to Motion.

Phil Bicker is a Senior Photo Editor at TIME

TIME Behind the Photos

Ways of Seeing: Direct to Audience

As 2014 draws to a close, we take a look back at the photographic trends that defined 2014

Whether through digital channels, print or on exhibit, the impact, influence and reach of the still image has never been greater. But with so many images fighting for our attention, how do photographers make work that most effectively stands out and connects with an audience. In this seven-part series, TIME looks back over the past 12 months to identify some of the ways of seeing—whether conceptually, aesthetically or through dissemination—that have grabbed our attention and been influential in maintaining photography’s relevance in an ever shifting environment, media landscape, and culture now ruled by images.

Direct to Audience

2014 saw an increase in independent photographers cutting out the middle man and going direct to audience. Facebook, Twitter and particularly Instagram have been instrumental in building online communities and growing audiences for photographers for some time. But this year saw the monetization of these platforms through various print sale initiatives by photo agencies—Magnum and VII—and individual photographers including Aaron Huey who as well as his own project also worked with Grayson Shaffer, a Senior Editor at Outside magazinefor a good cause, the Sherpas Fund—raising close to $500,000 for the families of the Sherpa guides killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest in April. These time-limited campaigns, advertised through Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, identified a demand for affordable un-editioned prints.

This year also saw an unprecedented growth in high-quality independent book publishing, with some of the year’s best titles coming in short runs from independent sources. Without the cost margins and restrictions imposed by major publishers, photographers producing their own photobooks not only had more control over the finished product but could also sell their high quality books at a lower price point. Highlights included Peter van Agtmael‘s Disco Nights Sept. 11 (independently published by Redhook editions) which was singled out for a special mention in TIME’s Best Photobooks of the Year selection.

Raising awareness was a consideration for going direct to audience in 2014 for Dysturb a French photo collective. Frustrated by the lack of opportunities for photojournalists to get their work out effectively through established media channels, Dysturb turned to the street—wheat pasting large format prints by both emerging and established documentary photographers on disused city walls. The participant network quickly grew from the first postings in Paris with work soon appearing on the streets of Sarajevo and New York. The group’s goal now is to develop a network of like-minded photographers and photography enthusiasts that will allow, in the future, to mount worldwide pasting campaigns on short notice. And judging from the enthusiastic New York crowd, the need for an alternative way to show news images is shared by many more people than Dysturb’s founders imagined when they launched the collective in early 2014.

And while the naysayers will continue to lament today’s changing business practices, we can expect to see a lot more photographers adopt the direct-to-audience model in 2015.

Read Part 2 – Documentary Still Life.

Read Part 3 – The Portrait Series.

Read Part 4 – The Contemporary Photo Essay.

Read Part 5 – From Stills to Motion.

Phil Bicker is a Senior Photo Editor at TIME.

Olivier Laurent is the editor of TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @olivierclaurent

TIME celebrities

See How Celebrities Are Spending Christmas

Rihanna
Rihanna arrives at the 1st Annual Diamond Ball on Thursday, Dec. 11, 2015 in Los Angeles. Jordan Strauss—Invision/AP

Justin Bieber played beer pong and Britney Spears put her family in matching pajamas

It’s the time of year for big trees, a sneaky kiss with Santa, and Christmas traditions that prove celebrities are just, but also not at all, like us.

Some celebs were generous to the wee ones:

And to those in need:

And to themselves:

It’s the time of year for a bit of nostalgia:

And family bonding:

Wishing everyone a happy and healthy Christmas!

A photo posted by Britney Spears (@britneyspears) on

Yeeeeaaaaahh! #godaddy #gopats ❤️❤️❤️❤️

A photo posted by Gisele Bündchen (@giseleofficial) on

https://twitter.com/arianagrande

Don’t forget canine bonding:

Fa la la la la, la la la la! #MerryChristmas #Chaplin #carols

A photo posted by Jessica Chastain (@chastainiac) on

Plus some endearing family cooky-ness:

😘🌲

A photo posted by Cara Delevingne (@caradelevingne) on

Some did the sexy Christmas thing

All I want for Christmas ❤️😘❤️#itsthattimeoftheyear #christmas #holiday

A photo posted by alessandraambrosio (@alessandraambrosio) on

Some did it cute:

Merry Christmas Eve. Oh the things I find online.

A photo posted by Lucy Hale (@lucyhale) on

Or silly:

https://twitter.com/zacefron

Others just mystified us:

turnt up elfie

A photo posted by Miley Cyrus (@mileycyrus) on

Some had trees:

A photo posted by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on

Others had bigger trees:

Uh oh Look what I did.

A photo posted by Taylor Swift (@taylorswift) on

There were those who reminded us that they are celebrities for a reason: they have superior decorating abilities:

smurfette couture @mdollas11

A photo posted by badgalriri (@badgalriri) on

And that fame has a nice perk: a personal audience with Santa:

A very personal one:

Santa….I have been naughty !! Heidi….Me too !! 🙀🙀

A photo posted by Heidi Klum (@heidiklum) on

With more than one Santa:

🎅🎅🎅 I guess I'm getting lots of gifts this year !!! #hohoho #FelizNatal #MerryChristmas #Erechim

A photo posted by alessandraambrosio (@alessandraambrosio) on

Some caught up on their reading:

Christmas morning, Rossum style. Mom always gets me books. #JamesEllroy #MyDarkPlaces #RobynObrien #UnhealthyTruth

A photo posted by Emmy Rossum (@emmyrossum) on

Others were feeling the Christmas spirit:

The theme of our Christmas. #parksandrec #donna #wisdom #christmas

A photo posted by John Green (@johngreenwritesbooks) on

Celebrities, they’re just like us — they help clear the snow:

Valiant effort Dad. #justletitsnow #christmasissues Merry Christmas peeps!🎄

A photo posted by January Jones (@januaryjones) on

 

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