TIME celebrities

See Emilia Clarke Cry with Laughter at Kristen Wiig’s Khaleesi Impression

The Mother of Dragons is amused

Emilia Clarke had the best reaction to watching Kristen Wiig appear on The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon Wednesday night as the Mother of Dragons.

Clarke, who plays the blonde-haired bad-ass queen Daenerys Targaryen on HBO’s smash hit show Game of Thrones, posted a photo of herself crying with laughter to her Instagram.

Kristen Wiig appeared on Jimmy Fallon dressed as the dragon queen complete with blue dress, blonde wig and a plastic dragon perched on her shoulder and hilariously answered questions while pretending to be the Khaleesi. (TIME suspects she’s not a GoT devotee.)

TIME movies

See Lana Condor and Sophie Turner Go Real 80s on the Set of X-Men: Apocalypse

The film hits theaters in May 2016

X-Men director Bryan Singer shared a new photo of the upcoming film’s newest cast members.

Fun second day with @sophie_789 @lanacondor #JeanGrey #Jubilee #XMEN #XMenApocalypse

A photo posted by Bryan Singer (@bryanjaysinger) on

In a photo uploaded to Instagram on Thursday, Singer offered a first real glimpse at Jubilee and Jean Grey in X-Men Apocalypse. Fans will have to wait a little over a year to see the new cast members—played Lana Condor and Game of Thrones’ Sophie Turner—on the big screen.

X-Men Apocalypse, which is set in the 1980s, will hit theaters in May 2016.

TIME Social Media

Instagram Wants to Find Your Next Favorite Band

FRANCE-US-IT-INTERNET-TELECOM-INSTAGRAM
Lionel Bonadventure—AFP/Getty Images The Instagram logo is displayed on a smartphone on December 20, 2012 in Paris.

With a new official @music account

When you think of Instagram, you probably think about photos and — maybe — video, not audio. Now the Facebook-owned company wants to change that with the launch of an official @music account, which will feature concert photography, behind-the-scenes shots of your favorite artists, and more.

“Each week, we’ll take a look at the musical experience on Instagram,” Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom wrote Wednesday. “That means showing you a different side of artists you know and love, like Questlove, and introducing you to up-and-coming talents from around the world, like Tricot. It means highlighting music photographers, album illustrators, instrument makers and, of course, fans.”

While the new @music account’s first two uploads are still images, Instagram could tap into its video functionality in interesting ways to deliver concert and in-studio footage. It could also feature sneak preview clips of upcoming musical releases.

TIME How-To

How to Automatically Post Instagram Photos to Twitter

TIME.com stock photos Social Apps iPhone Twitter
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

Here's an easy fix to a frustrating problem

Once upon a time, it was easy to share your Instagram photos via Twitter. But these days, sharing your Instagram images directly to Twitter just tweets out a boring old link, not that fav-worthy snapshot you just took.

No worries — there’s an easy fix.

IFTTT, short for “If This Then That,” is a program that lets you create “triggers” for your various apps. IFTTT has lots of great applications, but one of them is sharing Instagram images natively on Twitter once again.

To do so, you can create a recipe—IFTTT’s name for its triggers—for posting an image to Twitter every time you take a photo with Instagram.

First, visit IFTTT’s website and create an account. Then, visit this link and activate the recipe. You’ll then be asked to activate your Twitter and Instagram accounts, which you should go ahead and do. Then, the service will essentially link those two accounts, sending out a tweet every time you post a new photo to Instagram.

A few caveats: This setup can be a little slow, so fret not if your photos don’t show up on Twitter immediately after you post them on Instagram. And if you want to temporarily turn off the auto-posting, download IFTTT’s mobile app, which lets you turn recipes on and off on a whim.

 

TIME Behind the Photos

Meet the Amateur Photographer Covering Baltimore’s Protests

Devin Allen's photos, shared on Instagram, have gone viral

Devin Allen, a 26-year-old amateur photographer with aspirations to make a career out of his work, has become a viral sensation. This week, his images of protests in Baltimore have amassed thousands of likes and have been shared by international media organizations around the world.

Read how Allen’s photographs ended up on the cover of TIME.

Allen grew up in West Baltimore, just five minutes away from where Freddie Gray’s encounter with the police left him with a fatal spinal injury. The police have denied using force against the 25-year-old, but one of the family’s attorneys said Gray’s spine was 80% “severed at the neck.”

“When I first saw the news of what happened to [Freddie Gray], I knew I was going to cover it,” says Allen, who usually shares his street photography on Instagram. “But I never thought it would get this big. My city kind of has a bad rap, but I thought if we can come together peacefully, it [would] be epic for this city, and it was my goal to capture that.”

The protests, which were peaceful for most of the weekend, devolved into scenes of rioting, arson and looting after Gray’s funeral, leaving more than a dozen police officers injured and prompting the declaration of a state of emergency as reinforcements arrived to restore order.

The Great Divide ::: #blacklivesmatter #Baltimore #ripfreddiegray :::: #DVNLLN

A photo posted by KnownNobody ◼️◾️▪️ (@bydvnlln) on

“[It’s] not been a surprise,” says Allen. “I know my city. With all the frustration with the city, the mayor, the economy, the pot has been boiling.” But that has not changed Allen’s resolve to show exactly what’s been happening in his streets. “I went in thinking I would show the good, the bad and the ugly,” he says. “Of course, since I’m a black man, I understand the frustration, but at the same time, I’m a photographer. I’m not going to lie to you. I’m going to tell you exactly what happened. That was the goal.”

My people are tired and are fighting back in a rage :::: #Baltimore #ripfreddiegray #blacklivesmatter #prayforbaltimore :::: #DVNLLN

A photo posted by KnownNobody ◼️◾️▪️ (@bydvnlln) on

His images, which capture the intensity of the protests, have gone viral. On April 27, Rihanna shared one of them to her 17.7 million followers on Instagram. “I’m still in awe of it all,” says the photographer who first picked a camera in 2013 and has drawn inspiration from the work of photographers like Gordon Parks and artists like Andy Warhol.

The most widely shared of his photographs of the protests shows a man running away from a pack of charging policemen. “When I shot that, I thought it was a good picture, so I uploaded [from my camera] to my phone,” he says. “By the time I’d done that, the police was all around me. I was in the middle of it.”

We are sick & tired ::: #Baltimore #ripfreddiegray | #DVNLLN

A photo posted by KnownNobody ◼️◾️▪️ (@bydvnlln) on

And it took several hours for Allen to realize the photograph had gone viral. “I was still shooting, still snapping till the sun went down,” he says.

Today, Allen will be covering the aftermath of last night’s violent protests. “When you called me, I was getting my stuff ready,” he says. “I’m going to try to make it into town and catch what’s happening.”

TIME Social Media

This App Will Flag Your Offensive Tweets Before Your Future Employer Sees Them

Hey Clear Ethan Czahor Jeb Bush
Hey Clear

It was created by a man who lost his dream job with the Jeb Bush campaign.

Ethan Czahor’s dreams collapsed on the national stage earlier this year. The 31-year-old age digital whiz had spent years positioning himself to work in politics and earlier this year Jeb Bush’s campaign came calling, hiring Czahor as its chief technology officer.

He lasted 36 hours, done in by a history of offensive tweets and blog posts that was uncovered by reporters and opposition researchers after TIME broke the news of his hire.

Now, two months later, he is looking to make his comeback, turning lemons into lemonade with Clear, an app designed to keep what happened to him from happening to anyone else.

“Why wasn’t I smart enough to take care of this before it happens,” Czahor asked himself for weeks after the controversy, he told TIME. Now he’s set about making sure people can manage potentially damaging social media histories.

The app, releasing publicly Monday, scours a user’s Twitter, Facebook and Instagram histories for potentially inflammatory or damaging posts, and makes their removal a breeze. It’s designed for the next generation in the workforce, who grew up sharing vast amounts of information online, some of which may become a liability in their future careers.

“This could happen to anyone in any field—it doesn’t have to be politics—every millennial is now entering the workforce, and maybe even a senior position, and everything that they’ve said online for the last 10 years is still there, and that’s a new thing for this generation,” Czahor said.

Already, there’s a long history of political aides being done in by their social media postings. Last month, GOP operative Liz Mair was forced to resign from a top digital post for Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker after old tweets surfaced showing her criticizing the first-in-the-nation caucus state of Iowa. Benjamin Cole, a senior aide to disgraced Rep. Aaron Schock was forced to resign after racist Facebook posts were dug up. In 2008, former Obama speechwriter Jon Favreau was forced to apologize after a photo emerged of him groping a life-sized cut-out of then-Sen. Hillary Clinton.

The app works by flagging postings that contain watchwords: the obvious four letter ones, as well as “gay,” “Americans” and “black.” Posts are also subjected to sentiment analysis, using IBM’s Watson supercomputer, to try to flag additional negative messages. The app’s algorithms are far from perfect, but it errs on the side of caution. The Clear analysis of this reporter’s Twitter, Facebook and Instagram accounts scored a -2,404—a record low in the private beta—from the app’s proprietary grading system which calculates the potential liability of a person’s social media history.

It will soon be converted to a traditional 0-100 scale, Czahor said, with higher scores meaning safer profiles. (One reason for this reporter’s low rating: quotes from presidential candidates frequently scored as negative, while words on the watch list triggered alerts.)

“The most challenging part of this is determining which tweets are actually offensive, and that’s something that will take a while to get really good at,” Czahor said.

Czahor, who moved to California after college to test his hand at improv comedy at The Groundlings while working at Internet start ups, maintained that the offending comments that cost him the Bush job were meant to be good-natured. “I was telling jokes with my friends and they were completely tongue-in-cheek and completely harmless,” he said. “But years later after I had forgotten about them, they’d been pulled out of context and it looked terrible.”

“Most people don’t know that halloween is German for ‘night that girls with low self-esteem dress like sluts,'” one, now-deleted tweet read. “When I burp in the gym I feel like it’s my way of saying, ‘sorry guys, but I’m not gay,'” said another.

Clear is purely a defensive weapon, and can’t be used the growing class of opposition researchers against whom Czahor is looking to protect. The app requires that users grant access to their social media accounts, meaning, that a third party can’t review a user’s history without their consent.

Czahor said he believes that racist and other offensive postings should be held to account, saying Clear was designed for the universe of embarrassing messages that can simply be taken out of context months or years later.

While some messages, if public, may be captured in public archives and thus out of the reach of the app’s delete feature, Czahor said he believes the awareness alone of what a person tweeted or posted years ago is a valuable resource. “When this was happening,” Czahor added, “there were all of these emails asking how I felt about this statement or that statement, and I remember thinking ‘did I even write this?’”

Czahor said the next step would be to expand the app’s reach to emails, personal blogs, and search results, pointing to the embarrassing leaks from last year’s Sony hack as another potential use-case.

“You as a person exist in a lot of places on the Internet, and I just feel that you have the right to at least know what’s out there, and to take care of it.”

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: April 16

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Go ahead and start a new career in your fifties. It’s easier than you think.

By Donna Rosato in Money

2. This is what sex-ed would look like if it took place entirely on social media.

By Kate Hakala in Mic

3. Here’s why the FDA doesn’t really know what’s in our food.

By Erin Quinn and Chris Young at the Center for Public Integrity

4. What critical resource helps the sharing economy make billions? People trusting people.

By the editorial board of the Christian Science Monitor

5. Could a continent-wide CDC for Africa stop the next Ebola outbreak?

By Jim Burress at National Public Radio

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME celebrities

Miley Cyrus Wants You to Know the Tabloids Are Wrong and She Is Not Pregnant

The "Wrecking Ball" singer is keeping her sense of humor

And by the same man we mean @justinbieber

A photo posted by Miley Cyrus (@mileycyrus) on

Miley Cyrus has a message to the gossip magazines: #GETITRIGHT. After a recent issue of Life & Style claimed the “Wrecking Ball” singer and fellow pop star Selena Gomez were once “pregnant by the same man,” Cyrus decided to shoot down a silly rumor was with even sillier response: “And by the same man we mean @justinbieber,” she captioned a photo of the cover story in question.

Gomez hasn’t joked about the rumors on social media herself, but maybe because — as someone who actually dated the Biebz for a long time — she probably doesn’t find headlines about “the desperate decisions that changed their lives” quite as funny.

TIME celebrities

Did Nicki Minaj Just Get Engaged to Meek Mill?

Because that's no ordinary ring

Rap star Nicki Minaj fueled rumors Wednesday night that she and rapper Meek Mill are now engaged by taking to social media to flash some serious bling on her ring finger.

Neither Mill’s nor Minaj’s camp has confirmed any engagement, but it is not every day a woman is given a gigantic, heart shaped, diamond-encrusted ring that E!News estimated would retail for approximately $500,000.

💛💎💍😍😍😍😍😍🙌🙈 💛

A photo posted by Nicki Minaj (@nickiminaj) on

To break it down, the drama began Tuesday night when fans and journalists alike pointed out that Minaj was sporting the rock from an Instagram photo she posted of the couple in Miami.

Those Miami nights 🌴

A photo posted by Nicki Minaj (@nickiminaj) on

Minaj did her part to encourage speculation by posting a cryptic message on Twitter the next day.

And she delivered a few hours later, posting the close-up photo of her stunning iced-out ring.

For his part, Mill acknowledged the relationship (but not any engagement) by replying “I am!” via Twitter when a user pointed out how lucky he is.

Rumors of the relationship started in February after Minaj shared a picture of Mill kissing her on the cheek and the couple has been spotted together numerous times since.

TIME Body Image

Chrissy Teigen Gives Instagram a Refreshing Look at Her Stretch Marks

"Stretchies say hi!"

We typically don’t turn to supermodels for a healthy perspective on body acceptance. But Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition model Chrissy Teigen has taken to Instagram to spread body positivity.

Usually tabloids are the only ones flaunting celebrity stretch marks, but on Monday night, Teigen posted a photo with the caption, “Bruises from bumping kitchen drawer handles for a week. Stretchies say hi!”

Social media often gets a bad reputation for fostering feelings of fo-mo, wanderlust and other insecurities. And that’s why it’s so refreshing when public figures like Teigen — or, recently, Amy Schumer — offer an unfiltered look at supposed flaws.

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