TIME apps

Instagram’s New ‘Hyperlapse’ App Lets You Make Super-Smooth Timelapse Video

Get ready to make professional-looking timelapse videos with your iPhone

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Instagram introduced a new video app Tuesday that collapses long, shaky timelapse videos into smooth, professional-looking clips.

The new app, called “Hyperlapse,” uses image stabilizing algorithms to iron out the jolts and tremors that typically mar timelapse smartphone footage, creating what the company calls “a cinematic look, quality and feel—a feat that has previously only been possible with expensive equipment.” Users can set playback speeds at 1 to 12 times the speed of the real world, collapsing prolonged shots into a few speedy seconds.

“From documenting your whole commute in seconds or the preparation of your dinner from start to finish to capturing an entire sunset as it unfolds, we’re thrilled about the creative possibilities Hyperlapse unlocks,” Instagram wrote in its announcement of the new app, which is now live in the iOS App Store for iPhones. An Android version is also in the works.

TIME Parenting

Art or Porn: When Does Posting Nude Photos of a Toddler Cross the Line?

Wyatt Neumann's daughter
Wyatt Neumann's daughter Wyatt Neumann

Maybe there's something slightly tragic to be said about the Internet having conditioned us all to look at things through smut-colored glasses

If you follow any parents on Instagram or Facebook, you’ve seen something like the snapshot Wyatt Neumann posted last year. His 2-year-old daughter, Stella, completely naked, jumps on an unmade motel bed, joy blooming across her face.

You may have even posted a photo just like it of your own kid. Chances are, though, you didn’t get comments like the ones Neumann did: “This guy is a class A d–k.” Or this one: “PEDOS CAN EASILY FIND THESE PICTURES AND JACK OFF TO THEM.”

Or maybe you shared a snapshot of your little one, frolicking outside, lifting her dress — in that unselfconscious way every toddler does. Neumann, a professional photographer, posted these and more on Instagram. Many of the ensuing comments were profanity-laced. One said: “I want to puke. The nude photos are gross and disturbing.”

These photos, and more like them, are the centerpieces of Neumann’s latest solo show at the Safari gallery in Soho, New York, which runs through the end of the week. Titled “I Feel Sorry For Your Children,” the exhibit documents a 12-day road trip he took with Stella last year, from Zion National Park to New York City. He accompanies each photo with his original Instagram caption — usually with the hashtag #dadlife — and a comment from a complete stranger. It is an extreme iteration of the more judgmental and moralistic strains we encounter in modern parenting.

And yet, the photos raise an interesting question about how much we share about our kids on social media. Neumann happens to be an award-winning fine art photographer with commercial clients like Reebok and Visa. But you wouldn’t necessarily have that context if you were to stumble upon his photos online somewhere for the first time. Pictures like the one of his daughter sitting between his legs in a bathtub might trigger a twinge of discomfort for the candidness and intimacy they capture. It’s a beautiful image, but does it belong in a public venue frequented by perverts and prudes alike? Here’s where I land: However uncomfortable a given photo may make me feel, I would be even less comfortable telling someone they can’t post it.

The roadtrip photos — Stella in her carseat; Stella using a portable training potty at a roadside pitstop; Stella eating barbeque — were first posted to his Instagram account. His friend Claire Bidwell Smith, author of the best-selling memoir “The Rules of Inheritance,” told her own Instagram followers to check them out. From there the images made their way to the online message board Get Off My Internets.

And then came the hate: Parenting trolls descended with a vengeance, flagging so many of his pictures that his account was suspended mid-roadtrip — 6,000 photos gone — but not before flooding his posts and inbox with hate speech and insults.

It was clearly too much for some to stomach. I wonder if these people — protected by the anonymity the Internet provides — would have been less quick to assault the parent’s character if it was Stella’s mother who posted the photos. And maybe there is something slightly tragic to be said about the Internet having conditioned us all to look at things through smut-colored glasses. “The Internet is for porn,” goes the famous line from the Tony-winning musical Avenue Q–and most of the time I’m the last person to complain about it. But there are multiple references to pedophiles in the Instagram comments to his photos. In the worst instances, commenters have accused Neumann of trading in kiddie porn.

“What they wanted me to do was stop posting photos,” he told me at his exhibit which opened last month. “They wanted to take away my ability to do that. The more this conservative, puritanical, fundamentalist ideology starts to permeate our culture [the more] it’s compressing our ability to express ourselves. Rather than retreat, I pushed forward and turned it into a beautiful art show.”

Anyone with a child has hundreds of these kinds of snapshots on a smartphone. I do. We all have our own rules about how much we’ll share of our kids’ lives online. I certainly don’t post any photos of mine undressed or, for that matter, doing anything I think they’d find compromising in the future. But they’re older than Stella. When they were younger I might have shared a bathtub shot or two, or one of them copping a potty-training squat. Harmless stuff. But even then, it would have most likely been on Facebook where at least I am given the illusion that I can control who has access to the pictures.

These days, whenever I take a photo of my kids, ages 6 and 9, they invariably say “Don’t put that on Facebook!” or “Let me choose the filter before you put it on Instagram.” I let them call the shots, most of the time.

Neumann, whose own father died before he could get to know him, errs on the side of openness. He’s creating an archive for his kids and who am I to judge him for sharing it? “I was raised on a hippie commune,” he says. “I grew up naked. My life with my father is something I lived through in photos. I got to know him through the artifacts he left.”

It’s painfully obvious that Neumann not only loves his children, but is also a present, involved and nurturing father. Author Bidwell Smith thought she had made that point when she shared her friend’s pictures.

“People box parenthood into such a small realm of what we’re supposed to be with our children,” she told me. “Wyatt blows that up. His work is brilliant and gorgeous–the way he captures childhood in this fleeting way. Kids are free and magical and not inhibited by the cultural boundaries we all are. It made me sad that that distinction wasn’t made in their minds.”

The photos he shares of Stella are striking in their intimacy and universality. His wife, Jena Cordova, told me that she would feel lucky to have one such picture from her own childhood; Stella and her older brother Takota have thousands. (I am granted an interview with Stella, but she is feeling shy and buries her face into her Dad’s neck. Also, there is a smartphone nearby streaming cartoons.)

Like the comic who says what everyone is thinking but too scared to utter out loud, Neumann makes photographs of his kids as timeless as they are personal: his daughter looking tired, his daughter ecstatic, sultry, bored, human.

“It’s very confusing to me,” says Cordova. “Even when I didn’t have children, my mind wouldn’t have gone there. It makes me sad for a lot of people that it would even cross their minds.”

In that respect Neumann’s photos are something of a Rorschach test: You see in them what you want to see. I see a doting dad who happens to be a photographer with a killer eye — and, yes, a desire to share. Haters, as they say on the Internet and playgrounds everywhere, are gonna hate.

TIME Social Media

Is This Woman the World’s Selfie Queen?

Meet the mysterious Thai woman who's posted more than 12,000 photos of herself

Kim Kardashian’s new book, Selfish, reportedly has 1200 selfies. But a woman from Bangkok, Thailand, makes her look like an amateur. Mortao Maotor, as she calls herself on Instagram, has posted more than 12,000 pictures of herself to the internet, often at a clip of more than 200 a week. She has about 20,000 followers, a not particularly high number, but she more than makes up for it in her dedication to her craft. So we’re wondering: could she be the selfie queen?

By way of comparison, Mr. Pimpgoodgame, the self-proclaimed selfie king from Texas, has 10 times as many followers but has posted a paltry 600 self portraits. Jen Selter, who has garnered more than 4,000,000 followers with pictures of her unusually rounded rump, has posted only 457 shots at last count. And then there’s Ms. K., with her millions of followers–but counting her self-portraits would be as absurd as counting sand. The Kardashians play in a their own selfie league.

Mortao, which is not her real name, defies the stereotype of the selfie-taker. She’s 40-ish, not famous and is married to the owner of Room of Art, an antique store/art gallery in Bangkok at which she takes many of her photos. Mortao doesn’t speak English, but through a woman who answered the phone at the Room of Art and said she was Mortao’s husband’s daughter, she declined to comment on why she posts so many selfies, saying it was “quite personal.” Other posts suggest she has older siblings and loves dogs and desserts.

It’s not all that surprising that Thailand, a country which reportedly has more mobile phone subscribers than it has people, might be the home of world’s most dogged selfie taker. During the coup in May, some locals even took selfies with the soldiers enforcing martial law. The country’s Ministry of Health was moved to issue a warning that taking and posting selfies was not helpful to the self-esteeem of young Thais.

Not all of Mortao’s pictures are of her face. She also likes to shoot her legs and her iced drinks or meals (many of her pictures are taken from a Bangkok Starbucks or an After You cafe.) But the overwhelming majority of them are classic selfies. She has fondness for shots taken in apparently the same bathroom mirror, perhaps the one in the Pantip Plaza in Ngam Wong Wan near Bangkok, which is often geolocated in the photos. While her photos often draw risque comments, and some are suggestive, none of her images are pornographic, and she only replies to the clean remarks, with unfailing politeness.

Mortao, whose account was first brought to our attention by the social media analysts at Nitrogram (now called Totems), is an impressive candidate for the biggest Practitioner of Selfie Taking Extraordinarily Regularly (POSTER), but we’d be willing to entertain others.

TIME celebrities

The Rock’s Mother Survived a Car Crash and He Posted Pictures of It

Says they were hit "head on by a drunk driver"

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson posted an image of the car wreck that nearly killed his mother and cousin to Instagram on Sunday. The wrestler-turned-actor also tweeted about the incident, saying his family had been hit “head on by a drunk driver.”

The picture, above, included the caption, “My mom & cousin @linafanene were struck head on by a drunk driver this week – they lived. First reaction is to find the person who did this and do unrelenting harm to them. But then you realize the most important thing is my family lived thru this and we can hug each other that much tighter these days. Hug your own family tighter today and be grateful you can tell them you love them.”

It wasn’t immediately clear whether Johnson’s cousin, WWE NXT Diva Lina Fanene, or his mother, Ata Johnson, sustained any injuries in the accident.

TIME Music

Watch a Weird Snippet From Kanye West’s Unreleased ‘RoboCop’ Video

Featuring a nude Amber Rose doll, because sure

Back when Kanye released 808s & Heartbreak nearly six years ago, viewers were supposed to get a music video directed by Hype Williams for “RoboCop” — but it was never released. But this week, for some reason, the world has been granted a very brief glimpse into what could have been. Behold, a strange little snippet which leaked on Instagram:

The clip comes via Shihan Barbee, a CG modeler who was involved in the video’s production, as XXL reports. The 13-second stop-motion clip features the head of Kanye’s then-girlfriend Amber Rose digitally inserted onto the body of a naked doll. She basically just jerks around while Ye stands there.

Alas, the full video may never surface — but here are some behind-the-scenes interviews with West and Williams:

Man, now seeing the full video feels more urgent than ever. Pretty please, Yeezy?

TIME Social Media

Here’s Barbra Streisand’s First Instagram Post

Welcome to social media, Babs

The world welcomed the one and only Barbra Streisand to Instagram on Wednesday. The 72-year-old singer-songwriter/actress/producer/director/national treasure shared the pic below with her 1,699 followers, and we’re already thinking it’s time to start calling her posts Babstagrams.

TIME celebrity

Alicia Keys Pregnant With Her Second Child

The announcement was made on Instagram

Alicia Keys and her husband Swizz Beatz announced via Instagram on Thursday that they’re expecting a second child.

Beatz posted a photo with his clearly pregnant wife with the birthday message: “Happy Anniversary to the love of my life @therealswizzz !! And to make it even sweeter we’ve been blessed with another angel on the way!! 🎊🎉🎊🎉 You make me happier than I have ever known! Here’s to many many more years of the best parts of life! 😍☺️😘”

The couple already has a three-year-old son named Egypt.

TIME Instagram

Instagram Just Unveiled ‘Bolt,’ Its Answer to Snapchat

Instagram

And the already existing Bolt voice call and SMS service is not pleased

The photo-sharing, Facebook-owned social network Instagram on unveiled “Bolt” on Tuesday, a new messaging app that allows users to send short-lived photo and video messages from mobile devices.

Bolt allows users to send quick messages that self-destruct by merely tapping on a user’s photo on a smartphone screen. The service is Instagram’s answer to similar apps like Snapchat, which has a smaller but much more active user base (500 million snaps per day versus 60 million Instagrams), and even Slingshot, which is also owned by Facebook.

For the moment, Bolt can only be used in New Zealand, Singapore and South Africa. “We’re going to other regions soon, but are starting with handful of countries to make sure we can scale the experience,” a spokesperson for Instagram tells the Verge.

At least one group is peeved by the news of Instagram’s announcement — the startup firm Bolt, which since last year has been building technology to replace voice calling and text messaging through traditional cellphone plans. On Monday, as rumors of Instagram’s forthcoming Bolt announcement spread, Bolt publicly implored the Facebook-owned social behemoth to change the name of the service.

“We know it’s a great name, because we chose it last year when we set out to build a better mobile voice and messaging experience,” Bolt said in an open letter to Instagram. “We’ve worked really hard since then building the Bolt brand and technology to where it is today. Please don’t destroy all that effort.”

[The Verge]

TIME psychology

What People Learn About You From Your Selfies

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Woman looking at reflection Vintage Images—www.jupiterimages.com

The pictures you post online could affect the way people treat you in person

According to new research, there are scientific reasons why you judged that girl who posted a selfie on Instagram last night.

It’s no secret that people make snap judgments about each other, but the study, conducted by researchers in the Department of Psychology at the University of York, was able to accurately predict what those judgments would be based on facial measurements such as “eye height” and “eyebrow width.”

Previous studies have shown that first impressions often fall into three categories: approachability, dominance, and attractiveness. The researchers at the University of York took 1,000 photographs from the Internet, analyzed the facial features of the subjects (who were all Caucasian), and studied how people reacted to each photograph. They were then able to develop a statistical model that predicted what the viewer’s impression of the face would be based on the measured facial features.

The findings of this study help illuminate the importance of these impressions in an age of social media, in which pictures of faces proliferate and people meet, talk, and even date online. According to the researchers‘ report, curating the perfect photo for these websites isn’t as trivial as it seems. “Some of the features that are associated with first impressions are linked to changeable properties of the face or setting that are specific to a given image,” they wrote. “So things like expression, pose, camera position, lighting can all in principle contribute alongside the structure of our faces themselves.”

Perhaps the most surprising finding was that snap judgments based on a photo could shape the way we respond to a person even after we’ve met them in person. The researchers explain it this way in the introduction to their report: “Although first impressions are formed rapidly to faces, they are by no means fleeting in their consequences. Instead… facial appearance can affect behavior, changing the way we interpret social encounters and influencing their outcomes.”

Less surprisingly, the research showed that “masculine” faces, determined by factors such as cheekbone structure, eyebrow height and skin texture, were seen as dominant, whereas more feminine faces were perceived as more attractive and youthful.

But the researchers also found that the shape and size of a person’s mouth directly affected his or her perceived approachability, and that larger eyes tend to predict higher levels of attractiveness.

So it’s time to stop making fun of people who obsess over choosing their profile picture. Richard Vernon, a PhD student who worked on the study, said, “Showing that even supposedly arbitrary features in a face can influence people’s perceptions suggests that careful choice of a photo could make (or break) others’ first impressions of you.”

TIME celebrities

Kim Kardashian, Lady Gaga and Ice Cube Give Their Artistic Fans Some Love on Instagram

Stars love to see their portraits drawn

Celebrities enjoy a good sketch as much as the rest of us do, it seems. Over the past few months, a number of stars, including Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg, Lady Gaga and Sam Smith have uploaded photos on Instagram of sketches their fans have made for them.

Many of the stars, like Lena Dunham, Drake, Lupita Nyongo, Kim Kardashian and others recognized the sketchers in their captions, gracing some talented artists with a sought-after mention. Stars of the dog variety can be painted, too, and the canine Instagram sensation Tuna gave a bark for his own portrait artist, too.

It’s a fun trend that we hope continues. Check out some particularly great sketches with some notable personages here.

  • Lena Dunham

  • Ice Cube

  • Drake

  • Lupita Nyongo

  • Kim Kardashian

  • Sam Smith

  • Lady Gaga

  • Nicki Minaj

  • Reese Witherspoon

  • Snoop

  • Courtney Reed

  • Tuna

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