TIME Innovation

Watch a Snake Robot Turn Its Head and Tail Into Legs… And Walk

Yikes

(via IEEE Spectrum)

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: October 3

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. With 3D printing, prosthetic technology is poised to change millions of lives.

By Tom McKay in Mic

2. Dysfunctional oversight of the Department of Homeland Security undermines its mission.

By Daniel Kaniewski in The Hill

3. The web isn’t killing newspapers. Print readership has been in decline for 20 years.

By Whet Moser in Chicago Magazine

4. Skyrocketing drug traffic has deeply affected life on Indian reservations at the US-Mexico border.

By Shannon Mizzi in Wilson Quarterly

5. With Chinese elites joining the movement, the protests in Hong Kong could yield a partial win.

By Zack Beauchamp in Vox

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Google Reportedly Working on Giant TV Screens

Visitors stand in front of a screen showing the most popular Google searches in Germany at that moment in the company's offices on Aug. 21, 2014 in Berlin.
Visitors stand in front of a screen showing the most popular Google searches in Germany at that moment in the company's offices on Aug. 21, 2014 in Berlin. Adam Berry—Getty Images

The idea is to be able to seamlessly connect smaller screens

Google is developing technology to allow users to integrate multiple screens to create giant television-like screens of variable shapes and sizes, sources familiar with the matter told the Wall Street Journal.

Former Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Mary Lou Jepsen is leading the project, which is being developed in secret and has not been disclosed to the public. Jepsen previously led the project to create a cheap laptop that could be distributed widely in the developing world, an effort that failed to meet the high hopes surrounding it.

The ability to combine small screens to create larger ones would disrupt a market where prices increase dramatically with size. A 32-inch screen can retail for less than $1,000. A 110-inch screen, the largest manufactured, requires a custom order and can reportedly cost more than $100,000.

[WSJ]

TIME Innovation

A Piece of Cardboard Is Helping Transform India’s Schools

These desks cost only 20 cents to produce and are making a huge difference for schoolchildren

lost-at-e-minor_logo

This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

A single sheet of cardboard can’t do much, right? Wrong! In India, many children go to school but don’t have the luxury of sitting behind a desk. To address this issue, the nonprofit organization Aarambh created a necessity out of a single sheet of cardboard: a school desk. The Bombay-based nonprofit worked with designers to come up with the desk design from a simple sheet of cardboard.
They transformed that cardboard into a modern-looking backpack for kids to carry all their school supplies, but when folded out, the briefcase then turns into a work desk.

What’s brilliant about this eco-friendly design is that it costs just 20 cents to produce and each desk is cut in a way so all the student needs to do is fold it together—nothing more is required. This makes education and school supplies even more accessible for families everywhere.

Building the cardboard desks
Courtesy of Aarambh
Students using cardboard desks
Courtesy of Aarambh
Completed cardboard desk
Courtesy of Aarambh
TIME Innovation

Can a Mind-Reading Headset Teach You To Deal With Stress?

Learn how to unwind with the latest from wearable technology.

lost-at-e-minor_logo

This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

To different people, meditation can mean different things. When some of us hear the ‘m-word’ we think of cross-legged yogis contededly humming to themselves while levitating off the ground, to others with a slightly clearer understanding it signifies an attempt to still the relentless rushing off the mind and to find a sense of peace, however temporary.

In recent years and in the Western world in particular, meditation and meditation-related practices like yoga have become incredibly popular. It’s likely that this is a direct response to the rushing madness and stress-filled days that make up the typical life of a western city-dweller. Everybody has their own way of coping, and for many meditation is a lifeline in a sea of anxiety and stress.

It shouldn’t be surprising therefore, that in our time of wearable technology entrepreneurial companies are producing devices that work towards the same goals as meditation. Introducing the Muse, a lightweight headset that works in a very similar way to EEG machines in hospitals. The main difference is that Muse costs $299 rather than $10,000.

Muse connects to your smartphone or tablet and trains you to calm your mind through the a very simple ‘game’. The headset monitors your brain activity and your phone plays the sounds of gentle waves, giving the impression of a tropical beach when you are in a calm state. The longer you remain calm the more details are added to the soundscape, such as birds singing. If your mind becomes restless and you begin to stress however, then heavy gusts of wind blow across the beach and the soundscape becomes more turbulent to match your mental state.

The purpose of the Muse and its app are to help people learn how to calm their minds, especially in times of stress. It can be used for as little as 3 minutes a day and still have positive effects. Read a more detailed review of Muse and other similar products here.

Whether or not you think this product is for you, there’s little doubt that a big part of the future of wearable technology lies in the ability to monitor and respond to the wearer’s brain activity. Imagine being able to turn on the lights with a thought, or send a text with your mind!

(via Fastcoexist)

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: October 2

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. A global competition could prime the pump for development of disease-fighting treatments.

By James Surowiecki in New Yorker

2. Cancer detecting yogurt? New technology could make diagnosing colon cancer as simple as taking a pregnancy test.

By Kevin Bullis at the MIT Technology Review

3. Youth-targeted networks are leading a surge in LGBT-friendly television programming.

By Joanna Robinson in Vanity Fair

4. California’s massive expansion of teledentistry could revolutionize delivery of oral hygiene to underserved areas.

By Daniela Hernandez in Kaiser Health News

5. The climate change movement desperately needs diversity and corporate leadership.

By Caitlin Colegrove in conversation with M. Sanjayan in the Aspen Idea

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: October 1

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. More face time, less screen time: To survive adolescence, kids need to put down their phones and practice interacting with each other.

By Cory Turner at National Public Radio

2. History texts may perpetuate stereotypes and deepen ethnic divides. The History Project is fighting bias with facts.

By the creators of the History Project

3. “Controlling wheat brings power.” Islamic State has carefully targeted farms and mills to tighten their grip in Iraq.

By Maggie Fick in Reuters

4. Because of innovative provisions in the $17 billion settlement facing Bank of America for its role in the housing crisis, families could get genuine much-needed relief.

By Ellen Seidman at the Urban Institute

5. The nation’s largest pension fund just pulled out of hedge funds, choosing transparency and accountability instead.

By Dean Baker at Al Jazeera America

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: September 30

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. China’s real battle is for the hearts and minds of Hong Kong. And China is losing.

By Rachel Lu in Foreign Policy

2. California’s new ‘Yes means yes’ consent law is an important first step toward ending America’s campus sexual assault epidemic.

By Robin Wilson in the Chronicle of Higher Education

3. The English language makes it harder for students to learn math.

By Sue Shellenbarger in the Wall Street Journal

4. Long lines at polling places dampen turnout and disproportionately hit poor and minority communities. States must devote the resources to making voting work.

By Chris Kromm in Facing South

5. To direct financial aid where it is most needed, colleges should focus on first-generation students.

By Tomiko Brown-Nagin in TIME

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

See Drones Draw Shapes in the Night Sky

Recently, we saw drones dance with Cirque du Soleil. In this video, you can watch drones paint the sky with light. Ars Electronica Futurelab calls them “Spaxels”:

Spaxels (a portmanteau word from space pixels) are LED-equipped quadcopters. They make up a drone swarm that can “draw” three-dimensional figures in midair. They create an extraordinary visual experience and open up an unprecedented new dimension of aesthetic expression.

According to the website: “Swarm size for outdoor performances starts with 30 Spaxels, larger swarms on request.”

(via Flowing Data)

 

 

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: September 29

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Although Bahrain has joined the coalition against Islamic State, the U.S. should hold the tiny Gulf kingdom accountable for its recent anti-democratic moves and budding partnership with Russia.

By Brian Dooley in Defense One

2. After a summer of strife, one solution to America’s racial divide: More black candidates.

By Theodore R. Johnson III in the Root

3. Rather than forming ad hoc coalitions against each crisis, the world should muster the political will to restore and strengthen our multilateral institutions.

By Javier Solana at Project Syndicate

4. An affordable, crowdfunded, DIY, learn-to-code computer kit could open the door to a new generation of hacker kids.

By Natasha Lomas in TechCrunch

5. Everything-sharing in Seoul, new parks overnight in Johannesburg, market-pricing for parking in L.A. – here are some bold ideas from CityLab 2014.

By the Editors of CityLab

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

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