TIME Innovation

Therapy Without the Therapist

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

These are the best ideas of the day.

1. The only thing missing from this surprisingly effective therapy is the therapist.

By Tina Rosenberg in the New York Times Fixes

2. America can’t beat ISIS until we convince Sunnis we care.

By Charles Lister in Markaz by the Brookings Institution

3. This is the best way to make nonprofits and foundations way more effective.

By Tate Williams in Inside Philanthropy

4. If everything has a price, here’s the cost of saving the planet.

By Anna Lieb in Nova Next

5. Here’s how ‘drug courts’ let judges practice medicine without a license.

By Maia Szalavitz in Pacific Standard

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

The Military Is Building This Crazy Star Wars-Style Hoverbike

"There are a lot of advantages of the Hoverbike over a regular helicopter"

The U.S. Defense Department has taken the plunge on hoverbikes, striking a deal with a U.K.-based engineering firm to develop a functioning prototype vehicle that can conduct reconnaissance missions, deliver supplies or even ferry human passengers.

U.K.-based engineering firm Malloy Aeronautics grabbed the Defense Department’s attention with a functioning, small-scale model hoverbike. At three times the size, engineers say the bike could present a safer, cheaper and more portable alternative to the typical helicopter.

“Lots of them can be moved around and deployed in the places that you need them very easily and very quickly,” Malloy Marketing Sales Director Grant Stapleton told Reuters.

Malloy Aeronautics will set up a joint office with U.S.-based defense firm SURVICE Engineering Co. in Maryland, near the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. Still, there’s no guarantee the hoverbike could ever see active duty: a press release stresses the DoD deal is for research and development only at this point.

 

 

TIME Innovation

Building a Military of Hackers and Makers

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. The Pentagon needs a military full of makers and hackers. Here’s how to start.

By Patrick Tucker in Defense One

2. Want to close America’s digital divide? See how Globaloria teaches through games.

By Rebecca Reynolds and Ming Ming Chiu in Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology

3. Misdemeanors are the secret weapon of America’s structural racism.

By Evan Stewart in the Society Pages

4. The government agency that oversees industrial accidents is imploding.

By Dan Vergano in Buzzfeed

5. The “welfare queen” is a myth. Doctors are the true face of Medicare fraud.

By David A. Graham in the Atlantic

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

How the Maker Movement Could Reinvent Baltimore

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

These are today's best ideas

1. How Baltimore’s vacant industrial buildings can spawn a new maker movement.

By Anthony Flint in CityLab

2. “How is it possible…not to think that we have witnessed a lynching?”

By David Remnick in the New Yorker

3. The in-house think tank for Congress costs taxpayers millions every year. Make its reports accessible to all.

By the editorial board of the New York Times

4. This game helps citizens understand the cost — and tradeoffs — of running a city.

By Jay Cassano in Fast Co.Exist

5. Can we afford to let Russia bail out Greece?

By David Francis in Foreign Policy

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

See Why NASA Is Dying to Visit Jupiter’s Moon Europa

"The time has come to seek answers"

A new mission to see if water or life exists beneath the icy surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa has moved from concept to development, NASA announced this week.

“Observations of Europa have provided us with tantalizing clues over the last two decades, and the time has come to seek answers to one of humanity’s most profound questions,” John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, said in a public statement.

An observational spacecraft is slated to launch by the late 2020’s. After several years, the craft will enter Jupiter’s orbit, offering upwards of 45 opportunities to fly within shutter range of Europa, collecting images of the planet’s surface and possibly “tasting” spumes from massive geysers erupting into space. However, the craft won’t actually land on the Europa’s surface.

The spacecraft will have to take only a glancing look, given the intense levels of radiation. “Any mission that goes in the vicinity of Europa gets cooked pretty quickly,” says Europa mission project scientist Robert Pappalardo.

Europa first captivated NASA scientists in the late 1990’s, when the Hubble telescope returned images of the planet’s icy crust. Scientists theorized that an ocean might lay beneath the crust, holding twice as much water as large as all of Earth’s oceans combined. NASA hopes to gain a deep enough understanding of the water’s composition to see if it contains signs of life or life-sustaining nutrients.

“That would mean the origin of life must be pretty easy throughout the galaxy and beyond,” Pappalardo says.

TIME Innovation

Skype’s Real-Time Translator Is Learning Even More Languages

Microsoft

Willkommen, bienvenue, welcome

Microsoft’s Skype on Thursday expanded its real-time translation service to include French and German, adding two new languages to a roster that already includes English, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese and Italian.

Even more intriguing is the pace at which the program is acquiring new language skills. Skype Translator launched with support for two languages last December, adding two more by April and another two by June. In other words, its language skills are accelerating, acquiring new tongues at a rate that a United Nations interpreter would envy. However, it still has a long way to go toward matching the fluency of a human interpreter.

Read More: Microsoft Is Getting Close to Perfecting a Universal Communicator

Interested users can give the new languages a whirl by downloading a free preview version of Skype Translator to Windows 8.1 devices.

TIME Innovation

Why It’s Time to Kill the Performance Review

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

These are today's best ideas

1. It’s time to kill the performance review.

By Melissa Dahl in the Science of Us

2. Give communities a valuable summertime resource: Open school grounds for play.

By the editorial board of the Fresno Bee

3. Could we outlaw street harassment?

By Daniel Serrano in Vice

4. We should be able to answer this simple question: How many people die in police custody?

By the editorial board of Bloomberg View

5. Here’s an Internet roadmap for a more equal society. (Hint: it’s got broadband and free wifi everywhere.)

By Ron Klain in Democracy

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Watch the Navy Blast a Helpless Car Off an Aircraft Carrier

New catapult uses electromagnetic power, rather than steam, to fling fighter jets from the runway

The U.S. Department of Defense has awarded a $737 million contract to the maker of a new aircraft catapult system after conducting a successful and eye-catching test run aboard the carrier Gerald R. Ford.

The Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System, designed by General Atomics, flings aircraft into the sky using electromagnetic power, a significant improvement over the steam-powered catapults currently in use by the Navy, according to defense officials.

The catapult allows for smoother acceleration and can launch a wider range of vehicles, such as lightweight drones. “It gives us a lot of flexibility from a warfighting standpoint,” Rear Adm. Michael Manazir told USNI News.

TIME Innovation

Why the International Criminal Court Is Broken

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

These are today's best ideas

1. The International Criminal Court is broken.

By Elizabeth Peet in Wilson Quarterly

2. Stop giving away public land for pocket change.

By Jayni Foley Hein in the Washington Post

3. While Syria burns next door, Lebanon’s fabric is fraying.

By Mohamad Bazzi at Reuters

4. Beat the flu — by not targeting the flu.

By Michael Byrne at Motherboard

5. The rise of Africa’s super vegetables.

By Rachel Cernansky in Nature

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

This Ambitious Startup Plans to 3D Print a Bridge in Amsterdam

"This bridge will show how 3D printing finally enters the world of large-scale, functional objects"

A robotic 3D printer that exudes cords of molten steel will soon trace out the scaffolding for the world’s first 3D printed bridge, according to the Amsterdam-based inventors of the device.

The project was conceived by Dutch 3D printing company, MX3D, along with the engineering software giant, Autodesk, in order to showcase a new generation of 3D printers that can trace out sturdy yet graceful lines of steel in midair.

“This bridge will show how 3D printing finally enters the world of large-scale, functional objects and sustainable materials while allowing unprecedented freedom of form,” said bridge designer Joris Laarman.

An artist’s rendering shows the robotic printers inching along a partially constructed span, while gradually tracing out the path ahead. Construction will take place over two fateful months in 2017, the designers told Fast Company.

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