TIME Innovation

Watch Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit in 72 Seconds

This short video will sum up the entire trilogy in about 1/400th of the time

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

If you really can’t afford to spend 8+ hours watching all of Peter Jackson’s Hobbit films, you can just buy the books and take your time reading through them… or you can watch 72 seconds of The Hobbit and be caught up with the entire story. Kinda.

Brought to you by the Brotherhood Workshop, this version is around 33,000 seconds shorter than the films and without the budget to hire actors or a costume department, or even space to film this condensed version of The Hobbit, the guys used Legos instead. Watching this short video will sum up the entire trilogy in about 1/400th of the time. Start watching!

(via The Awesomer)

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: November 7

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Reimagining a Pentagon for the future in pictures: Group personnel by skills, streamline leadership, dump outdated regional commands.

By Shawn Brimley and Paul Scharre with Valerio Pellegrini in Foreign Policy

2. Innovators should cater new wearable tech to those who need it most: older and chronically ill people.

By J.C. Herz in Wired

3. Add kids football to the list of cultural dividers in America.

By David Leonhardt in the Upshot

4. “We live in a world of evolutionary state disorder.” We must upgrade our global institutions or risk a future with no rules.

By Mark Malloch Brown at Project Syndicate

5. In resisting the law of supply and demand, law schools are saddling students with debt and aggravating income inequality.

By Jeffrey Toobin in the New Yorker

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

This Artist Uses Makeup to Transform Into Pop Culture Characters

Lucia Pittalis morphs into these famous faces by skillfully applying makeup

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Remember that Filipino TV host who made the Internet go wild with his makeup skills that transformed him into female celebrities? If not, let me help you here.

Well, in a case of “anything you can do I can do better,” artist and painter Lucia Pittalis proves she can also transform herself into famous male and female characters. Some of the personalities she’s morphed into are Rocky Balboa, Rambo, Walter White, Keith Richards, Marlon Brando, and Iggy Pop.

Check out her Instagram account for more of her makeup magic.

(via Design Taxi)

TIME Innovation

These Tiny Cubes Are Actually Rubber Bands

The geometrical shapes make the bands easy to find in a drawer and easy to pick up

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Some items around the house have remained pretty much the same, serving us the same function over and over again. Take the humble rubber band, for instance. They have been around since the 1600s and were patented in England way back in 1845. And they have always been circular. But not anymore.

Tokyo and Milan-based design firm Nendo have designed a quirky cube of a rubber band. Oki Sato, the lead designer, said, “The geometrical shapes make the bands easy to find in a drawer and easy to pick up.” But there’s a price to pay for such style in something so utilitarian. A pack of three is sold for 1080 yen (US $10).

(via Spoon & Tamago)

TIME Gadgets

Amazon Unveils Siri-Like Speaker You Control With Your Voice

A plug-in personal assistant on your service 24/7

Amazon announced on Thursday its latest product, a voice-controlled smart speaker called Amazon Echo.

The Siri-like personal assistant which plugs in to a wall outlet can be left powered-on 24/7 and responds to commands like “will it rain tomorrow?” or “play music by Bruno Mars,” according to Amazon. Amazon Echo connects to Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and the cloud, enabling it to perform commands like stream music on Spotify, add an item to a shopping list, or search online for the most recent information about a question.

The roughly 3 in. by 9 in. cylindrical device isn’t listening and responding to everything it hears, though: in order to activate the device, users must use a “wake word,” a name or term preceding the voice command.

Amazon Echo retails at $199, but for a limited time only it will cost only $99 for Amazon Prime members. Customers must request an invitation for more details, including when the smart speaker will become available.

 

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: November 6

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. How do you frighten political strongmen? Teach journalism.

By Thomas Fiedler in the Conversation

2. Far from policing free will, taxes on sugary drinks make sense in the context of subsidies for corn syrup and the Medicaid and Medicare expense of 29 million Americans with diabetes.

By Kenneth Davis and Ronald Tamler in the Huffington Post

3. Palm oil production has a devastating impact on the environment, but smart science and better farming could reduce the harm.

By Michael Kodas in Ensia

4. We shouldn’t let Ebola panic squelch civil liberties.

By Erwin Chemerinsky in the Orange County Register

5. What we learn from video games: Giving military robots controls like “Call of Duty” could save lives on the (real) battlefield.

By Patrick Tucker in Defense One

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

This Artist Digitally Manipulates Images of Animals Into Shapes of Fruit

Food for thought

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Vegetarians, look away now. In her bizarre photo series “Animal Food,” artist Sarah DeRemer digitally manipulated images of animals to look like chopped up pieces of fruits and vegetables. Some of her animals include the Hippotato, the Frovocado, the Limon, and of course, the Kiwi.

The series gives us food for thought (no pun intended) about the ethics of eating meat. If you can’t stomach the thought of eating a cute Orange Chicken, how can you stand eating the poor blood-soaked, lifeless body of the real thing?

(via Mashable)

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: November 5

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Beyond PTSD: Returning soldiers struggle to recover from the ‘moral injury’ of war.

By Jeff Severns Guntzel in On Being

2. On climate and so many other scientific issues, the way we communicate polarizes audiences. We can do better.

By Paul Voosen in the Chronicle of Higher Education

3. Entrepreneurs and educators need to observe students in school if they want to make real change.

By Alex Hernandez in EdSurge

4. Lifesaving ultrasound technology may soon come to a device the size of an iPhone. The applications for medicine in the developing world are massive.

By Antonio Regalado in MIT Technology Review

5. Many Arab governments are fueling the very extremism they purport to fight and are looking for U.S. cover. Washington should play the long game.

By Michele Dunne and Frederic Wehrey at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: November 4

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Peer-to-peer sharing of experiences could transform health care.

By Susannah Fox in Iodine

2. A technological and analytical arms race is producing the best athletes in history. Can those advances be applied to education?

By James Surowiecki in the New Yorker

3. In South Bronx, startups are ‘onshoring’ technology jobs and trying to spark a revolution.

By Issie Lapowsky in Wired

4. ‘Sister City’ relationships foster cross-border collaboration and spur economic development.

By Nehemiah Rolle in Next City

5. Colleges and universities should focus on student success beyond graduation.

By Karen Gross and Ivan Figueroa at Inside Higher Ed

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

This Artist Paints Hyperrealistic Scenes of People Swimming

Check out Venezuela-based Gustavo Silva Nuñez's work

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Venezuela-based artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a hyperrealistic painter whose oil paintings of watery subjects seem so real you may just want to take the plunge with them too. He teases you one step further by posing with his completed works in a very interactive manner, “grabbing” the swimmers by their limbs as they “swim” pass him. Such “spontaneity” makes his canvases come alive and shows how incredibly talented the man is.

(via MY MODERN MET)

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