TIME Innovation

Google’s Ultra-Cheap Virtual Reality Now Works With iPhones

Google Cardboard iPhone VR
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images An attendee inspects Google Cardboard during the 2015 Google I/O conference on May 28, 2015 in San Francisco, Calif.

The headset costs around $20

Google released Cardboard for iOS to the App Store on Friday, officially bringing the company’s ultra-cheap virtual reality to iPhones.

The free app, which works in conjunction with a DIY mount costing about $20, is available for the iPhone 5 and above, and early reviews report a smooth experience. Google also unveiled at the annual I/O 2015 developer’s conference this week several other new changes to Cardboard, including supporting phones sized up to six inches.

Cardboard, unveiled last year at I/O 2014, was originally designed for Android phones and available on only Google Play — though that didn’t stop iPhone users from coming up with creative ways to use Cardboard with their iPhones.

TIME Innovation

Why We Need More Nurses

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

These are today's best ideas

1. We need more nurses.

By Alexandra Robbins in the New York Times

2. Is containing China more important than discouraging modern slavery?

By Akbar Shahid Ahmed, Ryan Grim and Laura Barron-Lopez in the Huffington Post

3. This is how you fix a space robot 140 million miles away from the nearest mechanic.

By the Los Alamos National Laboratory

4. A robot might not take your job, but self-driving trucks will take the jobs of three million truckers.

By Scott Santens in Basic Income on Medium

5. A special bacteria in your yogurt could diagnose liver cancer.

By Vijee Venkatraman in Beta Boston

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

How the Food We Waste Could Feed Millions

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

These are today's best ideas

1. The food we waste could feed millions.

By Lizzie Dearden in the Independent

2. How a genetically-modified herpes virus ‘cures’ skin cancer.

By Sarah Knapton in the Telegraph

3. Who provides most of America’s mental health care? Our prisons.

By Newt Gingrich and Van Jones in CNN

4. This ‘smart apartment’ will monitor the activity, mobility and even blood pressure of its residents.

By Traci Peterson in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

5. Movies make the best journalism.

By Richard Gehr in the Columbia Journalism Review

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Watch: This Robot Cockroach Is Surprisingly Mesmerizing

It runs extremely fast

Artificial cockroaches have come a long way since Joe’s Apartment.

Researchers at the University of California at Berkeley’s Biomimetic Millisystems Lab have created a tiny, cockroach-like robot that can run around fast enough to launch a second, partner robot into flight.

The lab aims to mimic the ways animals sense the world around them and move about in very small robots, a.k.a. millibots. The so-called VelociRoACH above is strapped to a harness carrying another bot, the H2Bird, which it tosses into the air after a running start. (Another version of the robo-roach, dubbed the X2-VelociRoACH, is the fastest robot relative to size, according to the researches, and can reach running speeds of about 11 miles per hour.)

It’s simply cool to look at. But researchers say the system shows the benefits of getting multiple robots with different capabilities (ground speed in one, flight in another) to work together. This allows both to be more efficient. Or as the lab puts it:

Placing the H2Bird on top of the VelociRoACH decreases the cost of transport of the VelociRoACH by approximately 16 percent. This decrease in the cost of transport would be useful in a situation where the VelociRoACH and the H2Bird had to both reach a point 80 meters away and the H2Bird had to fly 20 meters in the air, where the VelociRoACH cannot reach…In situations such as these, cooperative locomotion would be more efficient than independent locomotion.

The lab’s website says, at the moment, the tiny bots are remote controlled. The next step? Making both autonomous.

TIME Carly Fiorina

Carly Fiorina Says the Chinese ‘Don’t Innovate’

Republican presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina speaks at TechCrunchÕs Disrupt conference on May 5, 2015 in New York City.
Andrew Burton—Getty Images Republican presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina speaks at TechCrunchÕs Disrupt conference on May 5, 2015 in New York City.

The presidential hopeful explained 'that is why they are stealing our intellectual property'.

Former Hewlett-Packard CEO and current Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina apparently doesn’t think very highly of the Common Core education policy or of China’s ability to innovate.

How are those two things related? Well, Fiorina has criticized proponents of Common Core who think the policy will help U.S. students compete with Chinese students in subjects like math and science. The 2016 presidential hopeful told Iowa political video blog Caffeinated Thoughts earlier this year that the U.S. education system should not be modeled after China’s. Chinese students may test well, she said, but they fall short when it comes to innovation.

BuzzFeed pulled this quote from Fiorina’s video interview, in which she cited her years of business experience in China:

‘I have been doing business in China for decades, and I will tell you that yeah, the Chinese can take a test, but what they can’t do is innovate,’ she said. ‘They are not terribly imaginative. They’re not entrepreneurial, they don’t innovate, that is why they are stealing our intellectual property.’

Fiorina has broached this subject before, arguing in her book, Rising to the Challenge: My Leadership Journey, that China’s educational model is “too homogenized and controlled to encourage imagination and risk taking.”

The former HP [fortune-stock symbol=”HPQ”] chief executive’s political experience is limited to her failed 2010 U.S. Senate bid. Fiorina’s tenure as HP CEO ended in 2005, when the company’s board forced her to resign following years of stagnant profits and a massive, ill-advised merger with Compaq.

TIME Innovation

Lab-Grown Burgers Could Get $330,000 Cheaper

Developer Of First Cultivated Beef Burger Mark Post
Simon Dawson—Bloomberg /Getty Images Mark Post, a Dutch scientist, poses for a photograph while holding the world's first beef burger created from stem cells harvested from a living cow following a Bloomberg Television interview in London, U.K., on Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013.

"I do think that in 20, 30 years from now we will have a viable industry producing alternative beef."

Cattle farmers are wringing their hands over a staggering drop in the price of lab-grown beef, with cost estimates plummeting from more than a quarter million dollars a patty to as little as $12.

Dutch professor Mark Post, who developed the world’s first “frankenburger” in 2012, will discuss the latest breakthroughs in lab-grown beef to a gathering of cattle farmers in Darwin (yes, Darwin) Australia, according to Australian broadcaster ABC News. The price drop, first spotted by Fast Company, could bring artificial beef within the same cost bracket of natural beef within one year, Post estimates.

However, the Maastricht University professor also estimated that the patty was still 20 to 30 years away from being served up on a mass scale. And early taste tests suggests it’s still a distant second to the natural beef patty. Still, that hasn’t stopped Google co-founder Sergey Brin from becoming an early investor in the alternative meat.

TIME Innovation

How Technology Can Help Shame Water Wasters in California

These are today's best ideas

1. To fight water waste, apps are helping Californians “droughtshame” their neighbors.

By Sam Sanders at NPR

2. Punish NFL teams when they sign domestic abusers.

By Nancy Armour in USA Today

3. Bitcoin might be a massive game-changer in the half trillion dollar remittances market.

By Florian Graillot at TechCrunch

4. Want to defeat ISIS? Break up Iraq.

By David Apgar in the Globalist

5. Crowdsourcing help for depression could save lives.

By Larry Hardesty at the MIT News Office

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Innovation

Watch: This Real-Life Hoverboard Is Almost Impossible to Believe

But it's real, according to the Guinness Book of World Records

Eat your heart out Marty McFly.

According to the Guinness World Record organization, this video shows the furthest recorded flight ever made on a overboard. (You know, in real life as opposed to in the movies.) This “astonishing world record,” according to Guinness, was set by Canadian inventor Catalina Alexandru Duru.

In the video above, Duru rises 16 feet in the air and then flies forward 905 feet and 2 inches. Under him, only air and a lake. To set the Guinness World Records title, Duru had to achieve a distance of more than 50 meters. The inventor travelled over five times that distance.

“I wanted to showcase that a stable flight can be achieved on a hoverboard and a human could stand and control with their feet,” he told Guinness.

TIME Innovation

How to Fix the World Health Organization

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

These are today's best ideas

1. Before the next Ebola strikes, we need to fix the World Health Organization.

By Julia Belluz and Steven Hoffman in Vox

2. Family leave isn’t just about caring for babies.

By Gillian B. White in the Atlantic

3. Someone should buy Yelp and use it to revive local news.

By Ken Doctor in Nieman Lab

4. What makes one of America’s oldest big cities perfect for bike-commuting?

By Sarah Goodyear in CityLab

5. How to make Twitter better.

By Marc Anthony Rosa in Medium

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Google

Google Wants to Patent its Creepiest Idea Ever

"The anthropomorphic device may aim its gaze at the source of the social cue"

Google is working towards a patent for a sweet-looking toy with eyes that can track your movement and ears that can perk up when you speak, according to a new patent filing spotted by SmartUp Thursday.

The submission to the United States Patent and Trademark Office shows diagrams of an ordinary toy rabbit or teddy bear equipped with cameras behind its eyes and microphones in its ears.

“Upon reception or a detection of a social cue,”the form reads, “such as movement and/or a spoken word or phrase, the anthropomorphic device may aim its gaze at the source of the social cue.”

The theoretical toy could take verbal commands and send them to “media devices” like TVs. Of course, just because Google is seeking a patent doesn’t mean the product will come to light.

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