TIME Companies

Sony Wants to Change the Way You Watch TV

First Edition Of Madrid Games Week
A man plays on a Playstation 4 at Madrid Games Week in IFEMA on November 9, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez—Getty Images

PlayStation Vue is a combination of cable TV, Netflix and Hulu Plus

Sony on Thursday unveiled the PlayStation Vue, a new cloud-based TV service that combines live shows and on-demand content for delivery over Sony’s PlayStation gaming consoles.

The PlayStation Vue will also make popular new episodes available three days past their original air date so users don’t have to schedule recording, Sony said. A user interface additionally offers “unprecedented personalization and simplicity,” while keeping viewers connected to what’s popular or trending, Sony wrote in a press release announcing the new service.

“Everyday TV is about to become extraordinary with our new cloud-based TV service, PlayStation Vue,” said Andrew House, President and Group CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment, in that release.

Sony also aims to disrupt traditional subscription TV payment models by offering PlayStation Vue on a month-to-month plan with no cancellation fee. There are no equipment or installation fees if users already have broadband Internet and a PlayStation 3 or PlayStation 4 console.

The PlayStation Vue will be available for invite-only beta preview during November for select PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4 owners in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and Los Angeles, Sony said. The beta preview will then roll-out on other Sony and non-Sony devices, including Apple’s iPad tablets.

PlayStation Vue’s commercial launch is scheduled for the first quarter of 2015. Pricing has not yet been announced.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: November 12

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. “Seven years after returning from Iraq, I’m finally home.” One veteran reflects on how service after his time at war changed his life.

By Chris Miller in Medium

2. Humanity’s gift for imitation and iteration is the secret to our innovation and survival.

By Kat McGowan in Aeon

3. Amid news of a groundbreaking climate agreement, it’s clear the China-U.S. relationship will shape the global future.

By Natalie Nougayrède in the Guardian

4. Lessons a year after Typhoon Haiyan: The pilot social safety net in place before Haiyan struck the Philippines helped the country better protect families after the disaster.

By Mohamad Al-Arief at the World Bank Group Social Protection and Labor Global Practice

5. A handful of simple policy reforms — not requiring new funding — can set the table for breaking the cycle of multigenerational poverty.

By Anne Mosle in the Huffington Post

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

These Carpets Map Out Different Countries’ Aerial Landscapes

USA, Bahamas and Netherlands—as seen from the sky

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Have you ever marveled at how flat, two-dimensional and generally neat landscapes look when you’re peering out the window of a plane at 30,000 feet? Florian Pulcher certainly has. Ever since he was little, he has been drawn to the segmentation of land and how neat and pleasing it is to view from above.

Based in Beijing, the Austrian architect always tries to secure himself a window seat on planes and even avoids flying at night so as to gaze down at as many landscapes as possible.

Motivated by this passion he has now created Landcarpet, a collection of rugs inspired by aerial shots of distant fields, hills, waterways and cities. Pulcher uses online mapping services to source his images, and has developed quite an eye for distinguishing aerial details.

“Some countries are very easily recognizable through their methods of farming and that has always intrigued me. Furthermore, as an architect and master planner, I constantly get to see and look through site surveys, aerial images and city plans which have further sharpened my eye for distinguishable patterns and different layers.”

The limited-edition handmade carpets are available for purchase here.

(via Colossal)

TIME Innovation

Check Out This Creative Doorbell

Guitdoorbell plays a single chord

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Instead of settling for a doorbell with that irritating chime sound, you should definitely switch it up and order a Guitdoorbell! It’s just what it sounds like—a guitar mounted over the doorway with a plectrum striker attached to the swinging door.

When the door is opened or closed, the plectrum passes across the strings and plays a single chord. You won’t get a guitar solo out of it but it’s definitely a unique alternative to the regular tune we’ve been hearing for years.

(via Toxel)

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: November 10

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Food touches everything in our lives. Yet we have no national food policy. That must change.

By Mark Bittman, Michael Pollan, Ricardo Salvador and Olivier De Schutter in the Washington Post

2. Electronic Medical Records should focus more on patient care and less on meeting the needs of insurance companies and billing departments.

By Scott Hensley at National Public Radio

3. Anonymous social media often hosts vicious harassment targeting women and minorities. A new plan to monitor threats online is working for a solution.

By Barbara Herman in International Business Times

4. “You can’t wear a Band-Aid for long, particularly when the wound keeps bleeding.” Two years after Hurricane Sandy, New York is far from stormproof.

By Lilah Raptopoulos in the Guardian

5. China and the U.S. should take aim at a new “grand bargain” to head off tensions and mistrust in their relationship.

By Wei Zongyou in the Diplomat

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Watch Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit in 72 Seconds

This short video will sum up the entire trilogy in about 1/400th of the time

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

If you really can’t afford to spend 8+ hours watching all of Peter Jackson’s Hobbit films, you can just buy the books and take your time reading through them… or you can watch 72 seconds of The Hobbit and be caught up with the entire story. Kinda.

Brought to you by the Brotherhood Workshop, this version is around 33,000 seconds shorter than the films and without the budget to hire actors or a costume department, or even space to film this condensed version of The Hobbit, the guys used Legos instead. Watching this short video will sum up the entire trilogy in about 1/400th of the time. Start watching!

(via The Awesomer)

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: November 7

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Reimagining a Pentagon for the future in pictures: Group personnel by skills, streamline leadership, dump outdated regional commands.

By Shawn Brimley and Paul Scharre with Valerio Pellegrini in Foreign Policy

2. Innovators should cater new wearable tech to those who need it most: older and chronically ill people.

By J.C. Herz in Wired

3. Add kids football to the list of cultural dividers in America.

By David Leonhardt in the Upshot

4. “We live in a world of evolutionary state disorder.” We must upgrade our global institutions or risk a future with no rules.

By Mark Malloch Brown at Project Syndicate

5. In resisting the law of supply and demand, law schools are saddling students with debt and aggravating income inequality.

By Jeffrey Toobin in the New Yorker

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

This Artist Uses Makeup to Transform Into Pop Culture Characters

Lucia Pittalis morphs into these famous faces by skillfully applying makeup

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Remember that Filipino TV host who made the Internet go wild with his makeup skills that transformed him into female celebrities? If not, let me help you here.

Well, in a case of “anything you can do I can do better,” artist and painter Lucia Pittalis proves she can also transform herself into famous male and female characters. Some of the personalities she’s morphed into are Rocky Balboa, Rambo, Walter White, Keith Richards, Marlon Brando, and Iggy Pop.

Check out her Instagram account for more of her makeup magic.

(via Design Taxi)

TIME Innovation

These Tiny Cubes Are Actually Rubber Bands

The geometrical shapes make the bands easy to find in a drawer and easy to pick up

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Some items around the house have remained pretty much the same, serving us the same function over and over again. Take the humble rubber band, for instance. They have been around since the 1600s and were patented in England way back in 1845. And they have always been circular. But not anymore.

Tokyo and Milan-based design firm Nendo have designed a quirky cube of a rubber band. Oki Sato, the lead designer, said, “The geometrical shapes make the bands easy to find in a drawer and easy to pick up.” But there’s a price to pay for such style in something so utilitarian. A pack of three is sold for 1080 yen (US $10).

(via Spoon & Tamago)

TIME Gadgets

Amazon Unveils Siri-Like Speaker You Control With Your Voice

A plug-in personal assistant on your service 24/7

Amazon announced on Thursday its latest product, a voice-controlled smart speaker called Amazon Echo.

The Siri-like personal assistant which plugs in to a wall outlet can be left powered-on 24/7 and responds to commands like “will it rain tomorrow?” or “play music by Bruno Mars,” according to Amazon. Amazon Echo connects to Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and the cloud, enabling it to perform commands like stream music on Spotify, add an item to a shopping list, or search online for the most recent information about a question.

The roughly 3 in. by 9 in. cylindrical device isn’t listening and responding to everything it hears, though: in order to activate the device, users must use a “wake word,” a name or term preceding the voice command.

Amazon Echo retails at $199, but for a limited time only it will cost only $99 for Amazon Prime members. Customers must request an invitation for more details, including when the smart speaker will become available.

 

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