TIME Hillary Clinton

A Voter Question Helped Inspire Hillary Clinton’s New Drug Abuse Plan

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting on August 28, 2015 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Adam Bettcher—Getty Images Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting on August 28, 2015 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Hillary Clinton’s $10 billion plan to combat drug and alcohol addiction announced Wednesday came about in part due to a simple question from a voter at an early New Hampshire event.

Clinton was doing the second roundtable of her then-new campaign on April 20 when she heard from Pam Livengood, an employee at a local furniture factory. Livengood noted that her grandson’s mother had run into trouble with drugs.

“We need to see more for substance abuse help in our area,” she said. “There’s very limited resources here. We’d like to see something in that respect. Do you have any further ideas?”

Clinton responded that she was “really concerned” about the issue, a standard line from a candidate on the stump. But her campaign then developed a plan to fight drug addiction, announced Wednesday on on Instagram, Facebook, in a New Hampshire op-ed and a white paper, which the Clinton campaign says was largely spurred by questions from voters.

“In state after state, this issue came up again and again — from so many people, from all walks of life, in small towns and big cities,” Clinton wrote Tuesday in an op-ed in the New Hampshire Union-Leader. “It’s time we recognize as a nation that for too long, we have had a quiet epidemic on our hands.”

Experts say the problem is not just anecdotal. Prescription painkiller overdoses more than quadrupled in the U.S. from 1999 to 2011, according to figures by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, while heroin doses more than doubled. With an average of 110 deaths from drug overdoses (about 40,000 a year), deaths from drug abuse outnumber those caused by car accidents. Small towns and rural areas across the country have been particularly hard-hit.

Clinton is not alone in becoming concerned about the issue, either. A bipartisan bill introduced in January by Republican Rob Portman and Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse would expand prevention and treatment programs and widen the use anti-overdose medication called naloxone.

“This issue is not a partisan issue. Both sides of the aisle in Congress are very interested in this because its killing people back home,” said Nick Motu, vice president at the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation’s Institute for Recovery Advocacy. “We’ve seen this huge rapid spike in opioid deaths and heroin deaths. What you’re seeing from Clinton and what you’re seeing from others is that they’ve got to address addiction.”

Clinton’s plan is not a particularly controversial one and it hews to a familiar pattern for her campaign so far of announcing crowd-pleasing policy proposals that are likely to pass in Congress.

Her plan will include a $7.5 billion fund that rewards states with federal dollars for comprehensive plans state plans. States would draw up their own plans for drug education drug programs like after-school activities and mentorship programs as part of prevention efforts, as well as proposals for community-based health centers and greater investment in hospitals and other methods of treating addiction.

Clinton’s plan would also ask states to divert money from the criminal justice system to local treatment programs and to restrict the prescription of opioid painkillers. The federal government would provide $4 for every $1 spent by the state.

At the federal level, Clinton would increase grants for substance abuse treatment by $2.5 billion over 10 years and enforce federal laws that require insurers to provide treatment for addicts.

In the presidential race, several candidates have also raised the issue of addressing drug abuse. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has also called for wider use of naloxone, and Republican contenders Carly Fiorina, Jeb Bush and John Kasich have also said they would make addressing drug abuse a priority.

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley has set a goal of reducing deaths from drug overdoses by 25% by 2020, pointing to his record in Annapolis of increasing drug abuse services and expanding the use of naloxone.

TIME Hillary Clinton

Why the Undercover Clinton Video Doesn’t Sting Much

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting on August 28, 2015 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Adam Bettcher—Getty Images Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting on August 28, 2015 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The latest sting video from conservative provocateur James O’Keefe centers on a pretty small get: $75 spent on some Hillary Clinton swag at her campaign launch.

In an undercover video by O’Keefe’s sting group Project Veritas, an activist for the conservative organization is seen allegedly playing the role of middleman for a foreign donation to the Clinton campaign.

O’Keefe alleges that the money came from a Canadian citizen who, in effect, passed money to the Clinton campaign in violation of federal law. To the Clinton camp, the video shows nothing more than its staff following the law despite an attempt at entrapment.

At least one campaign finance expert said that if the money is indeed the Canadian’s, the video shows wrongdoing by the Clinton camp.

“If the Clinton staffer knew it was the Canadian donor’s money, then the Clinton staffer (and, consequently, the Clinton campaign) also violated the federal law ban on knowingly accepting a contribution in the name of another and accepting a contribution from a foreign national,” Paul Ryan, senior counsel for the Campaign Legal Center said.

Regardless, given the deadlock at the FEC between commissioners and the tiny size of the donation, the case would be unlikely to ever be pursued. Instead, it’s another political Rorschach test, which shows different things to Clinton’s detractors and her supporters.

The sting is the latest move by O’Keefe, who has yet to match the success he had in getting the liberal group ACORN dismantled with videos that appeared to show the group giving advice on avoiding taxes. O’Keefe’s latest undercover sting operations have attempted to catch Clinton staff skirting the rules on camera, including one that O’Keefe claims to show Clinton staff selectively registering only supporters to vote.

Clinton’s staffers “know the ins and outs of the election code, and we’ve shown you, they’re willing to break the law,” O’Keefe says in the latest video, promising more to come. “Next up, we go even deeper inside the Hillary campaign, to show you how election laws and rules are ignored at every level. Stay tuned, Hillary, and check your email.”

The Clinton campaign brushed O’Keefe off as an annoyance who hasn’t proved anything except that they followed the law.

O’Keefe is a longtime political provocateur who has faced legal challenges for his investigations and pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges for entering then-Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu’s office with two allies disguised as repairmen. Critics argue he misrepresents his subjects by heavily editing his videos.

The latest video segment, which plays a little like a camp 60 Minutes expose, begins with a Montreal resident attempting to buy campaign swag. Citing federal law that prohibits donations from foreign nationals, a Clinton campaign official clearly declines the Canadian’s money.

“So, we can’t take contributions from anyone that is not a citizen of the United States,” Erin Tibe, the Clinton campaign compliance manager says in the video. “It’s not my rule; I’m very sorry.”

The Canadian national insists she wants to buy Clinton swag. Then, apparently referring to the Project Veritas employee, the Canadian asks the Clinton staffers, “Can I give her the money? She’s an American citizen, she can buy it for me?” Molly Barker, the Clinton campaign’s director of marketing, appears to respond, “She could make a donation.” The Project Veritas staffer then appears to buy $75 of Clinton campaign swag for the Canadian.

Federal election law prohibits giving and accepting donations by foreign nationals, but it’s unclear from the video whether the $75 belonged to the Canadian or the Project Veritas journalist.

It is legal for an American citizen to buy campaign paraphernalia and give it to a foreign national. But if the money belonged to the Canadian, then Project Veritas could make the case that the Clinton campaign had indirectly accepted a donation from a foreign national, a breach of campaign finance law.

Dan Pollack, a spokesman for Project Veritas, insisted the video shows the Canadian handing money to the Project Veritas employee.

“If you freeze it at the 2:50 mark you can see the cash on the screen being passed over,” Pollack told TIME. “Without question the Canadian passed the money to the Project Veritas journalist.”

The Clinton campaign adamantly denies any wrongdoing. “This video shows a Project Veritas operative yet again unsuccessfully trying to entrap campaigns staffers who very clearly rejected any foreign donation. Our staffers understand and follow the law, as demonstrated even in their selectively edited video,” said Jesse Ferguson, a spokesman for the Clinton campaign.

If the money did belong to the Canadian woman, Project Veritas could be guilty of breaking the same campaign finance law as the Clinton campaign. According to the law, “it shall be unlawful for a foreign national, directly or indirectly, to make a contribution or donation” in connection with any election, and for “a person to solicit, accept, or receive” such donations.

Clinton’s campaign accused Project Veritas of seeking to act illegally to entrap campaign officials while also breaking the law itself on occasion.

“Project Veritas … has been caught trying to commit fraud, falsify identities and break campaign finance law—not surprising, given that their founder has already been convicted for efforts like this,” Ferguson added.

TIME

O’Malley Finds Something to Like in Clinton Emails

Democratic Presidential Candidates Speak At DNC Summer Meeting In Minneapolis
Adam Bettcher—Getty Images Democratic Presidential candidate former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting on August 28, 2015 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

While Jeb Bush and Donald Trump are blasting each other for praising Hillary Clinton in the past, one of Clinton’s rivals is now using her past praise for him to raise money.

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley sent a fundraising email to supporters Tuesday which noted that the former Secretary of State had said nice things about him in the past.

The praise comes from an email that Clinton sent to her friend Sen. Barbara Mikulski in April 2010, long before the two prepared to run against each other for president, in which Clinton complimented O’Malley profusely ahead of his reelection contest for Maryland governor:

“How’s our friend, Martin, doing?” Clinton said in her note to Mikulski. “I know he has a rematch when he should be reelected by acclamation for steering the ship of state so well. Pls give him my best wishes.”

The Clinton email was released by the State Department Monday as part of a public records request of all of Clinton’s electronic correspondence during her time as Secretary of State.

O’Malley noted Clinton’s praise in his fundraising email, saying he was “flattered,” then switched gears to make his pitch for more debates in the Democratic primary, which have been limited by the Democratic National Committee to six.

“Here’s the thing: I didn’t win in Maryland by acclamation. I won because of supporters like you. I won because we fought for progressive change,” O’Malley wrote. “Democrats are not going to win THIS election by acclamation either. We need more debates to get our positions on the issues in front of voters.”

Read Next: Martin O’Malley Plans Revolt Over Democratic Debate Rules

TIME Hillary Clinton

Learn Hillary Clinton’s Quirky Email Slang

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Charlie Neibergall—AP Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks a news conference at the Des Moines Area Community College on Aug. 26, 2015, in Ankeny, Iowa.

Here's how she talks to close friends and coworkers

The release of thousands of emails from Hillary Clinton’s time as Secretary of State hasn’t just opened a window into her political decisions, it’s also revealed how she talks.

A number of emails from Clinton to her closest staffers show a private lingo, often a form of shorthand to make typing easier on a smartphone but also the kind of personal references people who work closely together develop.

Here’s a short glossary of some common Hillaryisms:

are you awake: Subject line of any email sent past 10 p.m. or so. Nothing else is in the email so that if the recipient is asleep, they don’t feel pressured to respond at 2 a.m.

berry: Clinton’s BlackBerry.

Diane Reynolds: A pseudonym used by Chelsea Clinton when checking into hotels and also for her email address on Hillary Clinton’s homemade server.

hPad: Clinton’s iPad.

HRod: A nickname for Hillary Rodham Clinton, based on one of her email addresses, hrod17@clintonemail.com. Presumably a play on A-Rod, the nickname for New York Yankee Alex Rodriguez.

kidlet: Children. State Department staffer Cheryl Mills often referred to her children as “kidlets” in emails to Clinton.

pls print: A request for a staffer to print out an email, often the text of a longer news story, presumably so that she can read it.

WJC: Hillary Clinton’s husband, former President William Jefferson Clinton. State Department staffers often referred to Bill Clinton by his initials, though Hillary usually just called him Bill.

Read Next: Hillary Clinton’s Lawyer Readies for Email War

TIME Hillary Clinton

7 Fun Things We Learned From Hillary Clinton’s Latest Emails

Not all of the 7,000 emails in Hillary Clinton’s inbox released Monday were serious. A handful of them showed some of the weirder parts of her job or inadvertently revealed her personality.

Here are seven fun things we learned from the latest batch of Clinton emails.

The State Department help desk was confused by her email.

In a Feb. 27, 2010, email, a State Department help desk analyst asked if she could receive email. Clinton’s assistant, Huma Abedin, clarified in a follow-up that the help desk hadn’t recognized Clinton’s private address while troubleshooting.

“They had no idea it was YOU, just some random email address so they emailed,” Abedin wrote.

She was serious about two TV shows.

In a Jan. 3, 2010, email to State Department staffer Monica Hanley, Clinton asked when two shows aired, apparently because she was making them appointment TV: “Parks and Recreation” and “The Good Wife.”

“Can you give me times for two TV shows?” she asked.

She had to ask about her own voting record.

In a Dec. 30, 2010, email to State Department staffer Miguel Rodriguez, Clinton asked about her own voting record as New York Senator and how it might relate to the looming standoff over the debt ceiling.

“Can you pls tell me how many times I voted against raising the debt limit?” she asked. (The answer was three times, plus two times she didn’t vote and one vote for a failed amendment.)

She asked staffers about gefilte fish.

In a March 5, 2010, email to State Department staffers Richard Verma and Jacob Sullivan, Clinton for some reason asked about gefilte fish, the famously controversial Jewish delicacy. (According to Tablet magazine writer Yair Rosenberg, Clinton was asking about a blocked U.S. shipment of carp to Israel.)

“Where are we on this?” she asked.

She joked about a bank robber who wore a Hillary Clinton mask.

In a December 2010 email thread, Clinton, staffer Cheryl Mills and lawyer David Kendall joked about a news story about a man who robbed a bank wearing a Hillary mask.

“Should I be flattered? Even a little bit?” Clinton asked. Mills dug into it and found 11 times bank robbers wore Richard Nixon masks “perhaps not surprisingly.”

She had high praise for one of her Democratic opponents.

In an April 25, 2010, email to Maryland Sen. Barb Mikulski, Clinton asked about then-Gov. Martin O’Malley, who is now running against her for the presidential nomination.

“How’s our friend, Martin, doing?” she wrote. “I know he has a rematch when he should be reelected by acclamation for steering the ship of state so well. Pls give him my best wishes.”

Harvey Weinstein lobbied her to watch “The King’s Speech.”

In an Aug. 20, 2010, email to a State Department staffer, movie producer Harvey Weinstein pushed for Clinton to watch “The King’s Speech,” his Oscar-bait film about how King George overcame his stuttering problem.

“It’s a fun movie that is much in the tradition of SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE, again I think you would both like it (and Hillary would approve because it’s PG-13 with not too many swear words,” he wrote.

Read next: Hillary Clinton Sides With Liberals on Anti-Lobbying Bill

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TIME Hillary Clinton

New Hillary Clinton Email Release Contains 150 Now Deemed Classified

The State Department released 7,000 emails from Hillary Clinton’s private server on Monday night, including 150 containing information now deemed to be classified.

The email dump, the third since Clinton handed over the work-related emails on her private server to the State Department, is the largest batch released so far.

None of the emails were classified at the time they were sent, a State Department spokesman told reporters.

Clinton has repeatedly insisted that she did not send emails marked as classified from her private server during her time as Secretary of State. Much of the content on her server has been labeled as classified after the fact, including two that have been called “top secret.”

Two inspectors general concluded that two of Clinton’s emails contained material that was classified at the time they were sent.

“I did not send or receive material marked as classified,” Clinton repeated last week at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting in Minneapolis.

MORE: Hillary Clinton’s Lawyer Readies for Email War

A federal judge has ordered the State Department to release Clinton’s 55,000 work-related emails in monthly batches as they scan emails to ensure nothing publicly released contains sensitive information.

Clinton’s use of a private email server has weighed heavily on her candidacy, hurting her trustworthiness among voters and stirring up doubts among Democratic Party leaders. Her campaign has sought to frame the controversy over classified material on her server as an interagency battle over classification, insisting that Clinton followed State Department protocol at the time.

The FBI is now analyzing Clinton’s use of a private server to ensure they were handled securely, but there is no criminal investigation into her use of a server.

Read Next: The Legal Question Over Hillary Clinton’s Secret Emails

TIME Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton Sides With Liberals on Anti-Lobbying Bill

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting on August 28, 2015 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Adam Bettcher—Getty Images Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting on August 28, 2015 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Hillary Clinton on Monday endorsed a lobbying regulation proposal beloved by the Democratic left, marking a significant win for progressive groups as they seek to shape the Democratic presidential primary.

Introduced by Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin, the bill is aimed at slowing the so-called revolving door between Wall Street and government regulatory positions and controlling the influence of lobbyists on Capitol Hill.

In an op-ed in the Huffington Post, Clinton and Baldwin acknowledged that “Americans’ trust in government is eroding.”

“The American people need to be able to trust that every single person in Washington—from the President of the United States all the way down to agency employees—is putting the interests of the people first,” they wrote.

The bill strengthens the wall between the private sector and government employees, with the goal of making it more difficult for the private sector to influence their former colleagues in government.

Clinton won immediate praise from progressive groups including Democracy for America, the Progressive Change Campaign Committee, American Family Voices and CREDO Action.

Her endorsement of the Baldwin bill comes just six weeks after Sen. Elizabeth Warren called for all the presidential candidates to endorse it. Warren’s move was widely seen as specifically targeting Clinton.

MORE: Elizabeth Warren Sends Hillary Clinton a Message

Clinton’s main Democratic competitors have endorsed the bill as well. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has long supported limiting the influence of lobbyists in Washington, and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley has set specific anti-lobbying measures, some of which go even further than Baldwin calls for.

Introduced along with Rep. Elijah Cummings, the legislation prohibits so-called “golden parachutes,” or bonuses for private sector employees who take government jobs, a tool seen as encouraging employees to help private companies gain a potentially influential foothold in government.

It also lengthens the period in which government employees and members of Congress can lobby the government after quitting their posts from one to two years. Under the bill, federal examiners would be prohibited from accepting employment with financial institutions they oversaw for two years.

The bill also requires financial regulators to recuse themselves from actions that would benefit former employers for two years, instead of one.

Finally, it tightens the legal definition of lobbying, clamping down on former government officials who exploit loopholes in lobbying rules.

Last week, progressive groups called on Clinton to ban golden parachutes and endorse Baldwin’s bill. Democracy for America was quick to claim credit along with other progressive that have put pressure on Clinton recently, with a spokesman calling it a “pretty clear response to the letter.”

“Secretary Clinton deserves real praise for listening to Elizabeth Warren wing Democrats and taking this vitally important first step in slowing down the revolving door between Wall Street and Washington,” Charles Chamberlain, executive director of DFA said in a statement.

Baldwin is campaigning for Clinton in Iowa on Monday.

TIME Election 2016

State Department to Release 7,000 Pages of Hillary Clinton Emails

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Charlie Neibergall—AP Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks a news conference at the Des Moines Area Community College on Aug. 26, 2015, in Ankeny, Iowa.

About 150 of the released pages are censored for classified information

(WASHINGTON) — The State Department will release roughly 7,000 pages of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s emails Monday, including about 150 emails that have been censored because they contain information that is now deemed classified.

Department officials said the redacted information was classified in preparation for the public release of the emails and not identified as classified at the time Clinton sent or received the messages. All the censored material in the latest group of emails is classified at the “confidential” level, not at higher “top secret” or compartmentalized levels, they said.

“It’s somewhere around 150 that have been subsequently upgraded” in classification, State Department spokesman Mark Toner told reporters.

Still, the increasing amounts of blacked-out information from Clinton’s email history as secretary of state will surely prompt additional questions about her handling of government secrets while in office and that of her most trusted advisers. The Democratic presidential front-runner now says her use of a home email server for government business was a mistake, and government inspectors have pointed to exchanges that never should have been sent via unsecured channels.

Toner insisted that nothing encountered in the agency’s review of Clinton’s documents “was marked classified.”

Government employees are instructed not to paraphrase or repeat in any form classified material in unsecured email.

Monday evening’s release will amount to more pages of email than released in the previous three months combined. Once public, it will mean roughly a quarter of all of the correspondence Clinton qualified as “work emails” has been published. Clinton provided the State Department some 30,000 pages of documents late last year, while deleting a similar amount from her server because she said they were personal in nature.

TIME Donald Trump

Trump Suggests Top Clinton Adviser Shared Classified Secrets With Husband

Clinton campaign calls criticism of Huma Abedin "patently false, personal attacks towards a staff member"

Donald Trump is adding a new figure to the list of people he considers a loser: longtime Hillary Clinton adviser Huma Abedin.

During a Friday evening stop at a private picnic near Boston, the Republican White House hopeful and real estate mogul suggested that Abedin had shared classified information with her husband, disgraced ex-Rep. Anthony Weiner. Abedin, one of Clinton’s longest serving aides and now the vice chairman of her presidential campaign, was Clinton’s deputy chief of staff while she was Secretary of State and one of her most trusted advisers.

Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill called Trump’s remarks “patently false, personal attacks towards a staff member.”

While Clinton’s critics are investigating her use of a private email server and whether classified information was sent to non-governmental accounts, no one had before suggested Abedin was passing sensitive materials to anyone who should not have had it. To Trump, Abedin is yet another shady figure involved in the never-ending saga of Clinton’s email practices as the nation’s top diplomat. “It all came through Huma,” whom Trump repeated called “YOU-ma.”

“Who is Huma married to? One of the great sleazebags of our time, Anthony Weiner. She is married to Anthony Weiner. You know, the little bing, bing, bing,” Trump went on.

Weiner resigned from Congress amid a sexting scandal in 2011. Abedin remains married to him and they are raising a 3-year-old son.

“Think about it. So Huma is getting classified secrets. She’s married to Anthony Weiner, who is a pervert. He is. So these are confidential documents,” Trump said, taking his typical asides to add tangential information. “If you think that Huma isn’t telling Anthony—who she is probably desperately in love with, in all fairness to Anthony, because why else would she marry this guy? Can you believe it? She can’t see straight. Think of it.”

Trump said Abedin’s love for her husband likely compelled her to tell him things she should not have.

“Do you think there’s even a 5% chance that she’s not telling Anthony Weiner, now at a public relations firm, what the hell is coming across? Do you think there’s even a little bit of a chance? I don’t think so.”

Trump’s decision to go after one of Clinton’s most loyal advisers was a new move for the real estate mogul, whose brash approach to the campaign has propelled him to the top of the polls.

Abedin started working for Clinton while she was an undergraduate at George Washington University and Clinton was First Lady. She went on to work for Clinton’s Senate office and her 2008 presidential campaign and followed her to this one. She’s a constant presence at Clinton’s side; Clinton has likened Abedin to the second daughter she never had.

Merrill, the Clinton spokesman, said Trump had gone too far: “Donald Trump has spent the summer saying offensive things about women, but there is no place for patently false, personal attacks towards a staff member. He should be ashamed of himself, and others in his own party should take a moment to stand up to him and draw the line for once. It’s embarrassing to watch, frankly.”

TIME 2016 Election

Democratic Contenders Make Their Case to Party Leaders

Democratic Presidential Candidates Speak At DNC Summer Meeting In Minneapolis
Adam Bettcher—Getty Images Hillary Clinton speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting in Minneapolis on Aug. 28, 2015.

Four of the five Democrats running for president spoke at the DNC summer meeting

One candidate wants everyone to relax over those emails. A second is convinced he can start a political revolution. Another demands more debates. The other hopes you remember who he is.

What began as an orderly quorum to rally Democrats for the 2016 general election spiraled on Friday into a chaotic pageant of candidates slamming debate schedules, assuaging fears over emails, lambasting Donald Trump and demanding political revolution.

Four of the five Democratic candidates for president addressed the Democratic National Committee members and leaders at the party’s summer meeting in Minneapolis, each seeking something different.

The three-day confab is a key forum for the Democratic candidates to garner establishment support for their campaigns. Their speeches on Friday evinced tensions within the party and a wide range of interests. But one battle line was clear: there’s the establishment wing of the party, and there’s everyone else.

Here’s what each of the candidates aimed to prove at the DNC summer meeting, in the order that they spoke.

Lincoln Chafee: The former Rhode Island governor and senator, who has the mild demeanor of a mid-level manager, is polling at an unenviable 0.5%.

So Chafee spent most of his brief speech reminding the Democratic Party who he is. He boasted of his qualifications, telling the audience that as a prescient senator from Rhode Island in the early 2000s he voted against the Iraq War, warned of the dangers of climate change and supported a bipartisan immigration bill.

Plus, he has never been accused of a major scandal. “And all through these 30 years of public service, I’ve had no scandal,” Chafee said. “I’m proud of that.”

Hillary Clinton: The Democratic frontrunner, firmly in the lead for the nomination with nearly 50% in an average of recent national polls, aimed to assure the DNC’s leadership that she is the strongest candidate to rebuild the party after bad losses in the 2010 and 2014 midterms.

She vowed on Friday to help rebuild a Democratic Party whose ranks have been thinned by losses at the local and state level, telling top leaders of the Democratic National Committee that her campaign will help Democrats “win up and down the ticket.”

“I’m building an organization in all 50 states with hundreds of thousands of volunteers who will help Democrats win races up and down the ticket, not just the presidential campaign,” Clinton said. “You know, in 2010 Republicans routed us on redistricting, not because they won Congress but because they won state legislatures. It’s time to rebuild our party from the ground up. And if you make me the nominee that’s exactly what I’ll do.”

Meanwhile, her surrogates rounded up super-delegates at the DNC three-day meeting in an effort to build up a bulwark of support before the primary contests next year. Her goal is to assure Democrats uneasy after a rough August of press around her use of a personal email server.

Clinton also told reporters after her speech that the obsession with her emails is a passing fad. “I’m not frustrated,” she said in response to a reporter’s question, who asked her how she is feeling about a kerfuffle that has damaged her trustworthiness among voters. “I’m just trying to explain for people who have never had to follow this before that is is complicated. There’s nothing unique about [the] process being conducted around my emails.”

Clinton, whose Priorities USA super PAC was trailing behind Jeb Bush’s fundraising efforts by nearly $100 million as of June, compared high-dollar fundraisers to the wealthy industrial magnates of old. “The robber barons of the late-19th century handed public officials bags of cash,” Clinton said. “Now we have secret unaccountable money that distorts our elections and drowns out the voices of everyday Americans.”

The Republican Party, Clinton said, is scrambling over itself to look backwards. “The party of Lincoln has become the party of Trump,” she said.

The Democrats, on the other hand: “We’re building something that will last long after next November,” she said.

Martin O’Malley: O’Malley, the former governor of Maryland, has had the most trouble gaining momentum in the race despite months of campaigning and 15 years as an executive first in Baltimore and then in the Annapolis statehouse.

What’s more, the governor’s impassioned calls in primetime national television interviews for more Democratic debates have gone entirely unheeded. DNC chair Debbie Wasserman-Schultz has repeatedly defended the debate rules, which limit the number of debates to six and prohibit candidates from participating in any others.

That may explain why O’Malley delivered a barn-burning speech attacking the Democratic establishment for limiting the number of debates.

“The Republicans stand before the nation, malign our President’s record of achievements, denigrate women and immigrant families, double-down on trickle-down, and tell their false story,” O’Malley said. “We respond with crickets, tumbleweeds, and a cynical move to delay and limit our own Party debates.”

And then—with Wasserman-Schultz standing feet away from O’Malley—the kicker.

“This is totally unprecedented in our party,” O’Malley continued. “This sort of rigged process has never been attempted before. Whose decree is it? Where did it come from? To what end? For what purpose? What national or party interest does this decree serve?”

The Sanders section of the crowd roared their enthusiasm.

“We are the Democratic Party, not the undemocratic Party,” O’Malley continued. “Our party must not cower from this debate, we must engage the debate.”

When the speech was over, Wasserman-Schultz gave O’Malley a terse handshake. “Thank you, Governor O’Malley,” she said.

Bernie Sanders: The Vermont Senator has convinced much of the Democratic base that he’s the strongest candidate for the job. The next big step for his campaign began on Friday, with the Independent from Vermont aiming to convince the Democratic leadership that he is the best candidate for the Democratic nomination.

At the heart of Sanders’ message: Clinton can’t win the same grassroots support he can.

“Democrats will not retain the White House—will not regain the Senate or the U.S. House of Representatives, will not be successful in dozens of governors races all across this country—unless we generate excitement and momentum and produce a huge voter turnout,” Sanders said.

Sanders offered somber advice for the party heads. But he was more polite than O’Malley. “With all due respect, and I do not mean to insult anyone here, that turnout—that enthusiasm—will not happen with politics as usual.”

He also aimed some subtle jabs at Hillary Clinton, reminding his audience that he voted against the Iraq War (Clinton voted for it), and he opposes the Keystone Pipeline and the Trans Pacific Partnership (which Clinton has declined to take a stance on).

Jim Webb: The former senator for Virginia, who is at 1% in national polls, was the only candidate to skip the DNC meeting. Chair Debbie Wasserman-Schultz explained that Webb is “taking his daughter to college.”

Webb’s campaign, however, added another perspective. “His daughter off to college, yes,” spokesman Craig Crawford in an email to TIME. “But also think, just my opinion, you don’t have to read Machiavelli in his native language to understand that the DNC has picked their nominee. The DNC/HRC [Hillary Rodham Clinton] hookup is a shotgun wedding with no need for bullets.”

Also, Crawford told the IJReview that Webb talking to the DNC is “about as useful as sticking one’s hand into a wood chipper.”

By July 2016, the party will have chosen its candidate for president, and the DNC hopes that the losing candidates will fall in line. To hear the DNC leadership tell it, that won’t be a problem. “We are very happy with the cooperation and thank the candidates for the cooperation that we’ve seen from them to date,” Wasserman-Schultz said at the end of her prepared remarks Friday morning. “On to victory in 2016, my fellow Democrats, thank you so much!”

Read next: History Indicates That Donald Trump’s Campaign Could Be Trouble for the Left

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