TIME Donald Trump

Trump Suggests Top Clinton Adviser Shared Classified Secrets With Husband

Clinton campaign calls criticism of Huma Abedin "patently false, personal attacks towards a staff member"

Donald Trump is adding a new figure to the list of people he considers a loser: longtime Hillary Clinton adviser Huma Abedin.

During a Friday evening stop at a private picnic near Boston, the Republican White House hopeful and real estate mogul suggested that Abedin had shared classified information with her husband, disgraced ex-Rep. Anthony Weiner. Abedin, one of Clinton’s longest serving aides and now the vice chairman of her presidential campaign, was Clinton’s deputy chief of staff while she was Secretary of State and one of her most trusted advisers.

Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill called Trump’s remarks “patently false, personal attacks towards a staff member.”

While Clinton’s critics are investigating her use of a private email server and whether classified information was sent to non-governmental accounts, no one had before suggested Abedin was passing sensitive materials to anyone who should not have had it. To Trump, Abedin is yet another shady figure involved in the never-ending saga of Clinton’s email practices as the nation’s top diplomat. “It all came through Huma,” whom Trump repeated called “YOU-ma.”

“Who is Huma married to? One of the great sleazebags of our time, Anthony Weiner. She is married to Anthony Weiner. You know, the little bing, bing, bing,” Trump went on.

Weiner resigned from Congress amid a sexting scandal in 2011. Abedin remains married to him and they are raising a 3-year-old son.

“Think about it. So Huma is getting classified secrets. She’s married to Anthony Weiner, who is a pervert. He is. So these are confidential documents,” Trump said, taking his typical asides to add tangential information. “If you think that Huma isn’t telling Anthony—who she is probably desperately in love with, in all fairness to Anthony, because why else would she marry this guy? Can you believe it? She can’t see straight. Think of it.”

Trump said Abedin’s love for her husband likely compelled her to tell him things she should not have.

“Do you think there’s even a 5% chance that she’s not telling Anthony Weiner, now at a public relations firm, what the hell is coming across? Do you think there’s even a little bit of a chance? I don’t think so.”

Trump’s decision to go after one of Clinton’s most loyal advisers was a new move for the real estate mogul, whose brash approach to the campaign has propelled him to the top of the polls.

Abedin started working for Clinton while she was an undergraduate at George Washington University and Clinton was First Lady. She went on to work for Clinton’s Senate office and her 2008 presidential campaign and followed her to this one. She’s a constant presence at Clinton’s side; Clinton has likened Abedin to the second daughter she never had.

Merrill, the Clinton spokesman, said Trump had gone too far: “Donald Trump has spent the summer saying offensive things about women, but there is no place for patently false, personal attacks towards a staff member. He should be ashamed of himself, and others in his own party should take a moment to stand up to him and draw the line for once. It’s embarrassing to watch, frankly.”

TIME 2016 Election

Democratic Contenders Make Their Case to Party Leaders

Democratic Presidential Candidates Speak At DNC Summer Meeting In Minneapolis
Adam Bettcher—Getty Images Hillary Clinton speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting in Minneapolis on Aug. 28, 2015.

Four of the five Democrats running for president spoke at the DNC summer meeting

One candidate wants everyone to relax over those emails. A second is convinced he can start a political revolution. Another demands more debates. The other hopes you remember who he is.

What began as an orderly quorum to rally Democrats for the 2016 general election spiraled on Friday into a chaotic pageant of candidates slamming debate schedules, assuaging fears over emails, lambasting Donald Trump and demanding political revolution.

Four of the five Democratic candidates for president addressed the Democratic National Committee members and leaders at the party’s summer meeting in Minneapolis, each seeking something different.

The three-day confab is a key forum for the Democratic candidates to garner establishment support for their campaigns. Their speeches on Friday evinced tensions within the party and a wide range of interests. But one battle line was clear: there’s the establishment wing of the party, and there’s everyone else.

Here’s what each of the candidates aimed to prove at the DNC summer meeting, in the order that they spoke.

Lincoln Chafee: The former Rhode Island governor and senator, who has the mild demeanor of a mid-level manager, is polling at an unenviable 0.5%.

So Chafee spent most of his brief speech reminding the Democratic Party who he is. He boasted of his qualifications, telling the audience that as a prescient senator from Rhode Island in the early 2000s he voted against the Iraq War, warned of the dangers of climate change and supported a bipartisan immigration bill.

Plus, he has never been accused of a major scandal. “And all through these 30 years of public service, I’ve had no scandal,” Chafee said. “I’m proud of that.”

Hillary Clinton: The Democratic frontrunner, firmly in the lead for the nomination with nearly 50% in an average of recent national polls, aimed to assure the DNC’s leadership that she is the strongest candidate to rebuild the party after bad losses in the 2010 and 2014 midterms.

She vowed on Friday to help rebuild a Democratic Party whose ranks have been thinned by losses at the local and state level, telling top leaders of the Democratic National Committee that her campaign will help Democrats “win up and down the ticket.”

“I’m building an organization in all 50 states with hundreds of thousands of volunteers who will help Democrats win races up and down the ticket, not just the presidential campaign,” Clinton said. “You know, in 2010 Republicans routed us on redistricting, not because they won Congress but because they won state legislatures. It’s time to rebuild our party from the ground up. And if you make me the nominee that’s exactly what I’ll do.”

Meanwhile, her surrogates rounded up super-delegates at the DNC three-day meeting in an effort to build up a bulwark of support before the primary contests next year. Her goal is to assure Democrats uneasy after a rough August of press around her use of a personal email server.

Clinton also told reporters after her speech that the obsession with her emails is a passing fad. “I’m not frustrated,” she said in response to a reporter’s question, who asked her how she is feeling about a kerfuffle that has damaged her trustworthiness among voters. “I’m just trying to explain for people who have never had to follow this before that is is complicated. There’s nothing unique about [the] process being conducted around my emails.”

Clinton, whose Priorities USA super PAC was trailing behind Jeb Bush’s fundraising efforts by nearly $100 million as of June, compared high-dollar fundraisers to the wealthy industrial magnates of old. “The robber barons of the late-19th century handed public officials bags of cash,” Clinton said. “Now we have secret unaccountable money that distorts our elections and drowns out the voices of everyday Americans.”

The Republican Party, Clinton said, is scrambling over itself to look backwards. “The party of Lincoln has become the party of Trump,” she said.

The Democrats, on the other hand: “We’re building something that will last long after next November,” she said.

Martin O’Malley: O’Malley, the former governor of Maryland, has had the most trouble gaining momentum in the race despite months of campaigning and 15 years as an executive first in Baltimore and then in the Annapolis statehouse.

What’s more, the governor’s impassioned calls in primetime national television interviews for more Democratic debates have gone entirely unheeded. DNC chair Debbie Wasserman-Schultz has repeatedly defended the debate rules, which limit the number of debates to six and prohibit candidates from participating in any others.

That may explain why O’Malley delivered a barn-burning speech attacking the Democratic establishment for limiting the number of debates.

“The Republicans stand before the nation, malign our President’s record of achievements, denigrate women and immigrant families, double-down on trickle-down, and tell their false story,” O’Malley said. “We respond with crickets, tumbleweeds, and a cynical move to delay and limit our own Party debates.”

And then—with Wasserman-Schultz standing feet away from O’Malley—the kicker.

“This is totally unprecedented in our party,” O’Malley continued. “This sort of rigged process has never been attempted before. Whose decree is it? Where did it come from? To what end? For what purpose? What national or party interest does this decree serve?”

The Sanders section of the crowd roared their enthusiasm.

“We are the Democratic Party, not the undemocratic Party,” O’Malley continued. “Our party must not cower from this debate, we must engage the debate.”

When the speech was over, Wasserman-Schultz gave O’Malley a terse handshake. “Thank you, Governor O’Malley,” she said.

Bernie Sanders: The Vermont Senator has convinced much of the Democratic base that he’s the strongest candidate for the job. The next big step for his campaign began on Friday, with the Independent from Vermont aiming to convince the Democratic leadership that he is the best candidate for the Democratic nomination.

At the heart of Sanders’ message: Clinton can’t win the same grassroots support he can.

“Democrats will not retain the White House—will not regain the Senate or the U.S. House of Representatives, will not be successful in dozens of governors races all across this country—unless we generate excitement and momentum and produce a huge voter turnout,” Sanders said.

Sanders offered somber advice for the party heads. But he was more polite than O’Malley. “With all due respect, and I do not mean to insult anyone here, that turnout—that enthusiasm—will not happen with politics as usual.”

He also aimed some subtle jabs at Hillary Clinton, reminding his audience that he voted against the Iraq War (Clinton voted for it), and he opposes the Keystone Pipeline and the Trans Pacific Partnership (which Clinton has declined to take a stance on).

Jim Webb: The former senator for Virginia, who is at 1% in national polls, was the only candidate to skip the DNC meeting. Chair Debbie Wasserman-Schultz explained that Webb is “taking his daughter to college.”

Webb’s campaign, however, added another perspective. “His daughter off to college, yes,” spokesman Craig Crawford in an email to TIME. “But also think, just my opinion, you don’t have to read Machiavelli in his native language to understand that the DNC has picked their nominee. The DNC/HRC [Hillary Rodham Clinton] hookup is a shotgun wedding with no need for bullets.”

Also, Crawford told the IJReview that Webb talking to the DNC is “about as useful as sticking one’s hand into a wood chipper.”

By July 2016, the party will have chosen its candidate for president, and the DNC hopes that the losing candidates will fall in line. To hear the DNC leadership tell it, that won’t be a problem. “We are very happy with the cooperation and thank the candidates for the cooperation that we’ve seen from them to date,” Wasserman-Schultz said at the end of her prepared remarks Friday morning. “On to victory in 2016, my fellow Democrats, thank you so much!”

Read next: History Indicates That Donald Trump’s Campaign Could Be Trouble for the Left

TIME 2016 Election

Democrats Obtain Key Obama Campaign Email Lists

US-VOTE-2012-ELECTION-OBAMA
Jim Watson—AFP/Getty Images US President Barack Obama celebrates re-election on stage in Chicago on Nov. 7, 2012.

Obama used the list to raise $690 million online in 2012

The Democratic National Committee has inherited the most prized voter email list on the market: President Obama’s 2012 reelection campaign email data.

The Obama 2012 campaign list, which the DNC obtained this month and includes details about the amount donors gave and how they prefer to be contacted, will be a key tool in winning the 2016 election. With it, the Democratic nominee next year will gain access to a trove of millions of names and likely donors.

“The email list will help the DNC expand its reach online, build support for a new generation of leadership, and test new tactics for activating Democratic voters in future elections,” said DNC digital director Matt Compton. “Email is critically important tool for fundraising, grassroots engagement in support of key issues, and setting the record straight about the Republican candidates as well.”

The Obama 2012 campaign used its extensive, highly targeted email list to bring in small-dollar donations. The campaign raised $690 million online, and $214.3 million from donors giving less than $200.

The email list is the second strategic victory the DNC announced on Thursday: earlier, the Democratic party said it had concluded an agreement with Hillary Clinton that allows the party frontrunner to raise money for the DNC, to be allocated for a general election contest.

Obama’s turnout models and voter information were handed over to the Democratic party in late 2013.

TIME

Hillary Clinton to Coordinate Fundraising with Democratic Party

CLEVELAND, OH - AUGUST 27:  Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to guests gathered for a campaign meeting on the campus of Case Western Reserve University on August 27, 2015 in Cleveland, Ohio. Clinton made her first official campaign stop in Ohio.     (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
Jeff Swensen—2015 Getty Images Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to guests gathered for a campaign meeting on the campus of Case Western Reserve University on August 27, 2015 in Cleveland, Ohio.

The DNC aims to make similar agreements with the other candidates

In the latest sign that Hillary Clinton is looking ahead to the general election, the Democratic frontrunner’s campaign has signed an agreement with the Democratic Nation Committee party allowing her to raise additional funds for the November 2016 contest.

The agreement lets Clinton raise funds in excess of $2,700 from individual donors, the limit candidates can raise in primary dollars. The additional amount goes to a fund managed by the DNC and can be used to help the Democratic nominee in a general election.

“In the face of unlimited soft money donations from billionaires funding the Republicans, Democrats will need a strong effort to counter and we are glad for the opportunity to work with the DNC on this,” Robby Mook, Clinton’s campaign manager, said in a statement.

Clinton and the DNC have agreed to coordinate fundraising far earlier in the cycle than in previous years. In the last Democratic primary, then-Sen. Barack Obama didn’t sign a similar agreement with the DNC until May 2008. By signing the agreement early, Clinton can lay the groundwork for a tough general election contest against the Republican nominee—a contest most Democrats expect her to fight.

The Clinton campaign raised more than $45 million in the first fundraising quarter of the campaign, three times the amount her next rival for the nomination, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. But the pro-Clinton super PAC, Priorities USA has been struggling to bring in big-dollar donations compared with Republicans: Jeb Bush’s campaign and super PAC raised well over $100 million in the last quarter, while Priorities raised just $15 million.

Clinton can now effectively double the amount she is raising during house party fundraisers, and hand over the excess to a war chest controlled by the DNC. The DNC will then manage and allocate the money, spending it on technology, voter outreach, advertising and media. “This funding will go toward the eventual nominee, whoever that is,” a source with the campaign said. “We are confident that will be Hillary Clinton, but thought getting the fundraising going now was important.”

Though Clinton aides say she is squarely focused on the primary, she has kept an eye on November 2016. The frontrunner has recently increased her attacks on Republicans for their views on women’s health and voting rights, and invested in a 50-state effort to secure support across the country at the start of her campaign. She has also held numerous events in general election swing states.

Supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley have accused the DNC of being biased in favor of a Clinton candidacy. They’ve pointed in particular to the schedule of six debates, which they argue is designed to limit Clinton’s exposure on a national stage.

The DNC said it hopes to sign similar agreements with the other Democratic candidates soon.

“The DNC has an impressive track record with presidential elections. Through this agreement and others we will sign with our party’s candidates, we are building the organization we will need now to make sure that whoever our nominee is, they are in the best possible position to win next November,” DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz said in a statement.

The agreement was announced to state party chairs and members at the DNC’s summer meeting in Minneapolis on Thursday afternoon.

TIME 2016 Election

Hillary Clinton Compares Republicans to ‘Terrorist Groups’ On Women’s Issues

Hillary Clinton
Daniel Acker—Bloomberg/Getty Images Hillary Clinton, former U.S. secretary of state and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, listens during her introduction at an event in Ankeny, Iowa, on Aug. 26, 2015.

"Extreme views about women - we expect that from some of the terrorist groups"

Hillary Clinton swung hard at Republican candidates’ views on women’s health Thursday, comparing the GOP field to “terrorist groups.”

Speaking in Cleveland, Ohio Thursday, Clinton talked about Republicans’ attempts to defund Planned Parenthood, saying, “Extreme views about women – we expect that from some of the terrorist groups. We expect that from people who don’t want to live in the modern world. But it’s a little hard to take coming from Republicans who want to be the president of the United States. Yet they expose of out of date and out of touch policies,” NBC reports.

Republican National Committee Press Secretary Allison Moore put out a statement saying, “For Hillary Clinton to equate her political opponents to terrorists is a new low for her flailing campaign. She should apologize immediately for her inflammatory rhetoric.”

Many members of the Republican field have called to cut off federal funding for Planned Parenthood in the wake of leaked videos showing employees discussing the sale of fetal tissue. Clinton’s comment represents another escalation in the emerging battle between Democrats and Republicans on this issue.

TIME Joe Biden

Biden Unsure He Has the ‘Emotional Fuel’ for a Presidential Campaign

Joe Biden
Brennan Linsley—AP Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a roundtable discussion at the Advanced Manufacturing Center at the Community College of Denver on July 21, 2015.

His son died of brain cancer in May

Vice President Joe Biden said Wednesday that he needs to figure out if he has the “emotional fuel” necessary to wage another campaign for the White House, in some of his most detailed comments yet on the prospect of a 2016 run.

“If I were to announce to run, I have to be able to commit to all of you that I would be able to give it my whole heart and my whole soul, and right now, both are pretty well banged up,” Biden told members of the Democratic National Committee on a conference call, according to audio published by CNN.

Biden’s eldest son Beau died of brain cancer in May. Ever since a report earlier this month that Beau pushed his father to mount another campaign before he died, Democrats have been watching to see what the Vice President will do.

MORE Joe Biden Weighs One More Shot at the Job He Always Wanted

A new poll shows that voters would be open to Biden if he challenged front-runner Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination, and he fares better than Clinton in some hypothetical general election match-ups against Republicans. Clinton said Wednesday in Iowa that Biden “should have the space and opportunity to decide what he wants to do.”

 

TIME 2016 Election

Voters Open to Joe Biden Presidential Bid in New Poll

joe biden presidential run
Jason Davis—Getty Images Vice President Joe Biden speaks at a memorial service to honor those killed in the shooting at the University of Tennessee on August 15, 2015 in Chattanooga, Tenn.

Hillary Clinton still leads the race for the Democratic nomination

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden may still be mulling his 2016 chances, but many voters appear open to his potential candidacy, a new survey finds.

A Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday finds Biden with the highest favorability rating in either the Democratic or Republican field among all voters, and leading head-to-head match-ups against hypothetical GOP rivals. But Biden, whose numbers are boosted by his near-universal name-recognition, trails former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in the race for the Democratic nomination.

Clinton commands the support of 45% of Democrats nationally, down from 55% a month ago, followed by Sanders at 22% and Biden at 18%.

On the Republican side, Donald Trump maintains a commanding lead of the GOP field with 28% of Republican support, followed by retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson at 12%. No other GOP candidate breaks double-digits, with a large cluster in a statistical tie filling out the top 10. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz are tied for third place with 7% each, representing a significant drop in support for Bush, who has raised more than $120 million for his presidential run.

The survey is one that will be used to determine eligibility for next month’s CNN debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, in which polls since July will be averaged and the top 10 placers fill the prime-time stage. Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina, whose performance was well regarded in the Fox News debate, merits 5% in the Quinnipiac poll, a significant jump. But her campaign complained Wednesday that a relative lack of polling before the second debate could still keep her out of the debate. Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul fell to 2%, as his campaign has faltered this summer.

Trump remains deeply disliked by the majority of voters who are not his supporters; 26% of Republicans say they would never vote for him and 54% of all voters view him negatively. Clinton, who is still dogged by questions about her use of a private email server, now has 61% of Americans viewing her as untrustworthy and 51% viewing her unfavorably.

Asked an open-ended question about the first word that pops into their minds when they hear a candidate’s name, “liar” topped the list when the 1,563 registered voters were surveyed about Clinton. “Arrogant” was the top word for Trump and “Bush” for Bush.

The nationwide survey was conducted from Aug. 20-25 and has a margin of error of ±2.5 percentage points, with 666 Republicans polled for a margin of error of ±3.8 percentage points and 647 Democrats for a margin of error of ± 3.9 percentage points.

TIME 2016 Election

Hillary Clinton Wants Joe Biden to Do ‘What’s Right for Him’

Biden has been meeting with key Democrats

Hillary Clinton said Wednesday that Joe Biden should have “space” to make his own decision about running for president, telling reporters she has “a great deal of admiration and respect” for her one-time colleague and potential adversary for the Democratic presidential nomination.

“Vice President Biden is a friend of mine. He and I were colleagues in the Senate, I worked with him as first lady, I worked with him in President Obama’s first term, and I have a great deal of admiration and respect for him,” Clinton said Wednesday in Ankeny, Iowa. “I think he has to make what is a very difficult decision for himself and his family, and he should have the space and opportunity to decide what he wants to do.”

Biden has been openly considering running for president for weeks, reaching out to donors and supporters and thinking ahead to a run. He’s spoken with Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a key leader of the progressive wing of the Democratic party, and President Barack Obama’s former counsel Bob Bauer.

His son, Beau, who died earlier this year of brain cancer urged him for years to run for president, but Biden would face a tough frontrunner in Hillary Clinton, as well as the disadvantage of jumping into a presidential contest late and without an experienced staff or organization.

TIME Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton Calls For Greater Investment in Rural America

Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during a campaign stop at Dr. William U. Pearson Community Center on August 18, 2015 in North Las Vegas, Nevada.
Isaac Brekken—2015 Getty Images Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during a campaign stop at Dr. William U. Pearson Community Center on August 18, 2015 in North Las Vegas, Nevada.

She makes her pitch on Wednesday in Iowa

Hillary Clinton announced a multi-step plan on Wednesday to grow the economy and local services in rural areas, marking the latest effort for the Democratic frontrunner to firm up support for her candidacy in Iowa and broaden her appeal outside major metropolitan areas.

The proposal, which Clinton will officially announce Wednesday in Iowa, calls for increased investment in rural areas through a series of public-private partnerships that increase federal capital in rural areas.

“America’s rural communities lie at the heart of what makes this country great,” says Clinton’s white paper, provided to reporters. “The affordability of our food, the independence and sophistication of our energy supply, and the strength of our small communities all depend on a vibrant rural America. Despite their critical role in our economy, too many rural communities are not sharing in our nation’s economic gains.”

Several parts of Clinton’s rural agenda have already been announced in other plans, including the creation of an infrastructure bank, her goal of increasing the number of solar panels to more than 500 million in five years, as well as comprehensive immigration reform.

But the plan also includes a pitch directly to Iowa farmers: She would doubling federal loan guarantees for bio processing plants and technologies, long a boon to rural Iowa’s farming industry. Clinton also reiterated her support for strengthening the Renewable Fuel Standard, which her policy paper said “drives the development of advanced cellulosic and other advanced biofuels.”

She would also double federal funding for a program that educates beginning farmers, and build on Clinton’s “Farm-to-Fork” initiative as New York Senator by doubling funding for farmers markets and direct food sales.

Clinton’s proposal would increase the number of Rural Business Investment Companies—government-funded capital networks—that make investments in small rural businesses. She would expand the New Markets Tax Credit, which gives investors a federal tax credit for investments in businesses located in low-income areas. The program expired in 2014 but has bipartisan support in Congress.

The plan also calls for improving healthcare in rural areas by expanding telehealth and remote patient monitoring It also called for better prevention and treatment of substance abuse, noting that drug-associated deaths have grown fastest in rural areas.

Clinton has a strong lead in Iowa over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, according to recent polls showing her with 54% compared with Sanders’ 20%. She’s also earned major endorsements from key Iowa leaders in recent weeks, including former Senator from Iowa Tom Harkin, and Tuesday, from Secretary of Agriculture and former Iowa governor Tom Vilsack.

“Her strong support for the Renewable Fuel Standard and bio-based manufacturing as important parts of a revitalized rural economy makes clear she will work hard to promote meaningful economic opportunity throughout the country,” Vilsack wrote in an op-ed announcing his support.

In New Hampshire, the primary contest after Iowa, Clinton is trailing Sanders, according to recent polls.

TIME Hillary Clinton

Conservative Sting Video Goes Inside Clinton Campaign Training

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Charlie Neibergall—AP Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to supporters during a rally before the Iowa Democratic Party's Hall of Fame Dinner, Friday, July 17, 2015, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

A first shot in a coming undercover series

The conservative group Project Veritas released a video Wednesday morning showing a glimpse of its long-anticipated undercover video sting inside the Clinton campaign.

“This is just the tip of the iceberg,” says James O’Keefe, the group’s founder in the clip.

Filmed by hidden camera by Project Veritas supporters posing as Clinton volunteers, the video shows a Clinton campaign staffer discussing strategies for targeting voter registration efforts. The campaign’s policy is to register all those who ask to register, a fact the staffer repeats.

But the staffer is also seen encouraging the “volunteer” to first ask whether the Iowans they encounter are Clinton supporters before asking if they are registered to vote. “We don’t want to make our focus be voter registration, because then we have to, like, register everyone regardless of whether they’re supporters or not,” the Clinton organizer is shown saying.

Nothing in the video shows the Clinton campaign violating the law, or the campaign’s own policy. But Veritas claims, nonetheless, that the campaign is “skirting the law” by first asking whether potential voters are supporters before making the registration offer. This approach to training volunteers is standard operating procedure across field campaigns, according to a Republican field staffer, who requested anonymity.

The Clinton campaign put its offices on alert nationwide last week after catching wind of the Project Veritas effort, warning about the potential for more attempts to infiltrate its campaign. Other schemes identified by the Clinton campaign included efforts to convince staffers and volunteers to accept potentially illegal contributions.

In the video, a Veritas supporter is seen greeting Clinton and posing for a photo with her, though it is not clear whether their interaction yielded anything of note. “Stay tuned Hillary, because we’re shortly going to release a stunning story of electoral malfeasance at the highest levels of your campaign,” O’Keefe says. “Check your email.”

The Clinton campaign declined to comment on the video.

Read next: Why Bernie Sanders Won’t Add Debates Without Hillary Clinton

Download TIME’s mobile app for iOS to have your world explained wherever you go

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com