TIME hawaii

Remains of Missing WWII Marines Brought Back to Pearl Harbor

Pacific Battle Remains
Marco Garcia—AP U.S. Marines carry the remains of 36 unidentified Marines found at a World War II battlefield during a ceremony at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, July 26, 2015, in Honolulu.

The 36 Marines were listed as missing in action during World War II

Correction appended, July 28, 2015

The remains of three-dozen U.S. Marines missing in action during World War II were brought back to U.S. territory on Sunday in the largest single recovery of U.S. MIAs.

The 36 Marines were listed as missing in action at the World War II Battle of Tarawa and repatriated during Sunday’s ceremony, held at Pearl Harbor. Among them was 1st Lt. Alexander Bonnyman Jr., a recipient of the Medal of Honor, reports Hawaii news channel KHON2.

“We stand here humbled before you today to receive, honor and commemorate our fallen courageous Marine Corps warriors who on the field of battle fought and died to preserve our freedom,” said Capt. Mark Hendricks, U.S. Marine Corps Pacific Chaplain.

The remains were recovered by a non-profit called History Flight, which has been sending teams of scientists and historians to Tarawa for the last decade.

[KHON2]

Correction: The original version of this story misstated the number of Marines whose remains were returned to the U.S. on Sunday. It was 36.

TIME space

Scientists Emerge After Eight-Month ‘Trip to Mars’

Mars Mission Simulation
Neil Scheibelhut—AP The dome where six scientists lived an isolated existence to simulate life on a mission to Mars, on the bleak slopes of dormant volcano Mauna Loa near Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaii.

Housed under a dome located 8,000 feet above ground in a dormant Hawaii volcano

Six scientists tasked with simulating life on Mars emerged on Saturday after eight months living under a dome located 8,000 feet above sea level in a dormant Hawaii volcano.

The six were part of a human performance study funded by NASA and had not left the dome without a spacesuit on since entering the study almost a year ago. Operating in complete isolation, the scientists were monitored by surveillance cameras, body-movement trackers and electronic surveys to track how they worked as a team.

MORE: See The Trailer For TIME’s Unprecedented New Series, A Year In Space

“Astronauts are very stoic people, very level-headed, and there’s a certain hesitancy to report problems,” University of Hawaii professor Kim Binsted, principal investigator for the study, told the AP. “So this is a way for people on the ground to detect cohesion-related problems before they become a real issue.”

To release stress, the crew members could use a treadmill or stationary bike–only on sunny afternoons, however, because both were solar powered. Their diet consisted mainly of freeze-dried chili.

Mauna Loa was a prime site for the study because of its terrain and silence. When looking out the dome’s porthole windows, the scientists could only see lava fields and mountains.

[AP]

TIME Aviation

5 Days, 5,000 Miles, Fueled Only by the Sun: Solar Impulse Readies for Pacific Crossing

Relying entirely on solar power, the aircraft will attempt to travel from China to Hawaii

On Tuesday morning local time, a Swiss man named André Borschberg will take off from an airport in Nanjing, China, and fly for roughly 120 hours straight. He will travel east and south across the vast Pacific, spending days and nights over deep, dark sea as he hurtles toward Hawaii in an airplane powered by the sun.

An airplane powered by the sun? It’s the type of thing we dreamed about as children — running with our arms outstretched, circling like birds on the breeze. Kids love airplanes and astronauts — even airports, the bane of adults. Grown-ups tend to prefer our feet firmly planted. We’ve lost sight of the magic: a plane is a plane.

Borschberg and fellow pilot Bertrand Piccard want to restore our sense of wonder, which is why they’ve spent more than a decade preparing to fly their fuelless aircraft, Solar Impulse 2, around the globe. There will be 12 flights total, with the pilots taking turns at the helm of the single-seater. The goal of the trip, which started March 9 in the United Arab Emirates, is to inspire interest in clean tech.

“Adventure is where when you learn to be more open to the unknown,” says Piccard. “There is normal life, where we live automatically, we reproduce what we have learned, and [there are] moments of rupture and crisis. It is in these moments that you have to get rid of your certainties and habits.”

Once Solar Impulse leaves Nanjing, there will be few certainties. A flight like this has never been done.

The 5,000-mile leg will be a technical and physical test. Priority No. 1 is marshaling the sun, Borschberg says. During the day, Solar Impulse will fly high while capturing energy. When darkness falls, the engines will be cut and the plane will soar for several hours, losing altitude. At some point, the engine will start drawing on battery power. Then, at daybreak, the cycle begins again.

The flight will not be easy on the pilot. Seated in tiny cockpit, the 62-year-old will be awake for most of the flight, resting only for 20 minutes at a time. The conditions in the plane will be far from first-class comfort: the space is small, and the temperature and air pressure will vary dramatically through the trip. At some points, he will be able to communicate with mission control in Monaco. If things go wrong, he could be on his own.

For Borschberg, this is the flight of a lifetime. He started flying at 15, studied engineering, and spent decades as a pilot in the Swiss Air Force reserves. He is detail-driven and aviation-obsessed, brought to life by talk of aerodynamics. “I feel at home up there, at ease,” he says. “You get access to something that human beings on earth can’t access.”

Flying a plane like Solar Impulse, which is incredibly light, means working with the elements, not racing through them — a change of mind-set for a fighter pilot. “The more extreme the airplane, the more you have to have nature on your side and not the other way around,” Borschberg says. “You can look at the wind as a problem — turbulence, downdraft — or you can ask, how can I make it my ally? How can I integrate with nature instead of fearing it or trying to change it?”

His partner, Piccard, is the dreamer. Also born in Switzerland, the 57-year-old spent part of his childhood living in Florida during the U.S.-Soviet race to the moon. “The entire country was living for the conquest of the moon, and I had the chance to witness the most extraordinary human adventure,” he says. “When this was finished I had the impression that there was nothing else.”

Perhaps to prove himself wrong, he took up hang gliding and ballooning. He also studied psychiatry and hypnosis, fascinated, he said, by how being pushed to the limit could affect the mind. He went on to become, with Brian Jones, the first to complete a nonstop balloon flight around the world. He met Borschberg about 12 years ago and they have been planning, and fundraising, ever since.

Now they face the most difficult and dangerous part of the journey. Both pilots have trained hard for this — even dropping into water, blindfolded and strapped into parachutes, to simulate one possible worst case. They admit to nerves but prefer to talk about planning, preparation and the professionalism of the team that will guide them from Monaco.

Besides, they say, flight is about facing fear — taking a leap. When Borschberg sets out over the ocean, he will be sitting in a cockpit adorned with photographs of his family — a midair reminder of all that awaits him when he, and Solar Impulse, return to ground.

TIME Addiction

Hawaii Set to Become First State to Raise Smoking Age to 21

TIME.com stock photos E-Cig Electronic Cigarette Smoke
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

The bill covers both cigarette and e-cigarette use

Hawaii is set to become the first state to pass a law banning the sale, use and possession of cigarettes and e-cigarettes to people under the age of 21.

If a bill approved by Hawaii lawmakers on Friday is signed into law by Governor David Ige, adolescents will be prohibited from smoking, buying and possessing both conventional cigarettes and e-cigarettes. First-time offenders will be fined $10, and after that they can be charged a $50 fine or be required to complete community service, the Associated Press reports.

Some local governments have raised the smoking age to 21 in certain counties and cities — New York City among them — but if the bill becomes law, Hawaii will be the first state to do so.

Though the rates of high-school-age smokers have dropped in recent years, some 2.3 million children and young adults started smoking in 2012. In addition, a recent report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that e-cigarette use among middle-school and high school students tripled in one year.

If the Hawaii bill passes, it will go into effect Jan. 1, 2016.

[AP]

TIME portfolio

Beyond The Waves: An Intimate Look at the Life of Surfer John John Florence

Photographer Cole Barash's recent book, Talk Story, takes us into the insular surfing community of Hawaii's North Shore.

At 16, Cole Barash was prepared to chase his passion. With the approval of his parents, he left his family home in Vermont with two snowboard friends of his age, and set out for California. There, he juggled the demands of being a homeschooled student and an obsession with snow and photography. Soon after high school, Barash’s move paid off, as he landed a job at one of the industry’s leading snow sports companies.

Now, the 27-year-old, self-taught photographer has earned several of the photo world’s most prestigious distinctions for young talent, including being recognized as part of the Photo District News 30 , which he won at 22. And he is frequently commissioned by big-name brands like Nike.

Although primarily known as an action and commercial photographer, Barash managed to distinguish himself from the rest of the genre with his keen eye for capturing emotion and context. Yet the long hours of commercial work were slowly draining his creativity. “I just hit the ceiling creatively and got really frustrated,” he says. In 2013, when the opportunity came to photograph the famed 22-year-old surfing phenom John John Florence, Barash didn’t hesitate.

Born in Honolulu and residing in Haleʻiwa, Florence was introduced to surfing by his mother Alex, shortly after he learned to walk. At 13, he became the youngest surfer ever to compete in the prestigious professional surfing competition, the Triple Crown. Barash realized he needed to unlearn the routine and expected practices of photographing wave riders – which, in Florence’s case, would be his signature tube riding – and make it a more personal project, both for himself and Florence.

“I want to dig deep into what his family looks like, the surrounding area, and what really makes up that amazing story he has,” Barash says.

The photographer began by shadowing Florence’s family: his mother Alex, a surfer herself, and his two younger brothers, Ivan and Nathan. He then broadened to include members of the island’s insular surfing community, as well as the landscapes of the legendary North Shore of Oahu, where the massive waves made it popular among world-class surfers and film crews.

“Every year, so much amazing action is documented there. I wanted to go 180 degrees away from that,” he says.

Barash exposed about 100 rolls of film over the course of six weeks. Blending color images with black and white ones, the result, compiled in his self-published book, Talk Story, offers a more subtle and intimate look into the young surfer’s life as well as the Hawaiian subculture that created him.

Cole Barash is a Brooklyn-based photographer. His images have been featured in various exhibitions and publications, including the Rolling Stone and ESPN Magazine.

Michelle Molloy, who edited this photo essay, is a senior international photo editor at TIME.

Ye Ming is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram.

TIME Aviation

Watch a Pilot Ditch His Plane Into the Sea and Get Rescued by a Cruise Ship

The Coast Guard captured dramatic footage of the rescue

A pilot flying from Tracy, Calif., to Maui, Hawaii, had to ditch his single-engine plane in the Pacific Ocean after the aircraft experienced engine trouble.

Lue Morton radioed the Hawaii National Coast Guard at 12:30 p.m. Sunday saying he was having problems with the fuel tank and would have to ditch his plane, NBC reports.

The Coast Guard directed him to bail near a cruise ship, which was en route to Lahaina at the time.

Video shows the plane releasing a parachute and nose-diving before crashing into the water. Morton can be seen climbing out of the top of the plane and into a life raft where he was rescued by the cruise ship.

Morton says he’s an experienced pilot and has flown to Hawaii before.

[NBC]

TIME White House

President Obama Gets Some ‘Shave Ice’ in First Outing of 2015

US President Obama stops for shave ice in Kailua during Hawaiian holiday vacation
Gary Cameron—Reuters U.S. President Barack Obama waves to people while enjoying a shave ice at Island Snow in Kailua, Hawaii January 1, 2015.

The frozen treat he ordered was flavored with melon, cherry and Hawaiian fruit lilikoi

U.S. President Barack Obama began 2015 by treating himself to some shave ice.

Obama, accompanied by his two daughters and a few friends, sampled a three-flavor version of the Hawaiian frozen treat while vacationing near Honolulu, Reuters reports.

The president’s visit to local vendor Island Snow, where he ordered shave ice with flavors melon, cherry and Hawaiian fruit lilikoi, was also attended by more than 40 people eager to catch a glimpse of the First Family.

“Happy New Year. Hope you’re enjoying the weather,” Obama reportedly said while shaking hands with those gathered.

[Reuters]

TIME Addiction

Hawaii Teens Love Electronic Cigarettes

Popularity of a new tobacco product raises health concerns

It looks like vaping has a bright future in Hawaii.

Experimentation with electronic cigarettes among Hawaii’s high school and middle school students more than tripled from 2011-2013, according to a new state survey. Almost 8% of middle school students and 18% of high school students had tried electronic cigarettes in 2013 (up from 2% and 5%, respectively, in 2011), according to the survey of public school students by the Hawaii State Department of Health. It’s illegal in Hawaii to sell electronic cigarettes to children under the age of 18.

The latest federal data in 2012 showed that 10% teens have tried electronic cigarettes nationwide. New federal numbers on national teen use of electronic cigarettes will come out next week.

MORE: The future of smoking

Smoking of traditional cigarettes among high school students in Hawaii dropped from 2011-2013 and remained steady for Hawaii’s middle schoolers, according to the survey.

The health effects of electronic cigarettes are not well understood. Many in the health community fear that the rise in youth exposure to electronic cigarettes could re-glamorize smoking and become a gateway to traditional cigarettes. Electronic cigarette manufacturers have come under fire from Congress for marketing practices and flavors that seem geared at teens. The federal government has yet to regulate electronic cigarettes.

MORE: Electronic cigarette executives get schooled in Senate hearing

 

 

 

TIME hawaii

Watch Lava Burn Through Asphalt Outside Hawaii Town

The stream of lava continues to advance after devouring its first house on Monday

The lava flow threatening the Hawaii town of Pahoa continues to advance, devouring its first house on Monday and setting an asphalt road on fire Wednesday.

Hawaii Civil Defense officials are currently monitoring three breakouts from the main lava stream, but say that there are no immediate threats to residents, reports Hawaii News Now.

The lava flow emanates from a June 27 eruption at the Kilauea volcano, which has been active for 31 years.

TIME Disaster

Obama Signs Disaster Declaration to Aid Lava-Threatened Hawaiian Community

U.S. Geological Survey—AP This Nov. 2, 2014 photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a breakout from an inflated lobe of the June 27 lava flow near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii.

Lava from the Kilauea volcano has been creeping toward the small town of Pahoa for four months

President Barack Obama signed a Disaster Declaration for Public Assistance on Monday to help a small Hawaiian town cope with the ongoing lava flow threatening its residents.

The declaration comes in response to Governor Neil Abercrombie’s Oct. 24 request for federal aid to boost local emergency protective measures, including repairs, re-establishment of alternate routes in and out of affected communities and the accommodation of around 900 schoolchildren that are expected to be displaced, reports local channel KITV4.

The smoldering lava has been creeping toward the small town of Pahoa since a new vent opened on the Kilauea volcano on June 27. Currently, the flow has stalled a few hundred feet from Pahoa Village Road.

“We can definitely see a bit of a glow, smell the smoke and the burning vegetation,” says Eric Johnson, a teacher at the Hawaii Academy of Arts and Science (HAAS), located one road down. “On occasions, I’ve heard loud booms, like shotgun blasts, when methane pockets in the ground explode.”

However, the village of about 900 has become known for its independent mindedness and some people in the community are critical of the government’s response.

“I’m not worried about the volcano, I’m worried about the government,” local resident Robert Petricci tells TIME. “The lava has been inching forward for 30 years, now the National Guard is here with humvees and flak vests like it’s a war zone. Everything’s a mess, with all the checkpoints, asking people who they’re riding with and where they’re going.”

Johnson’s students have meanwhile launched a social media campaign called Hope for HAAS, coming up with projects on how to facilitate living with a volcano, such as ideas for bridges over lava streams.

“I’m very impressed and proud of the kids, they’ve decided to make a bad situation into something positive,” Johnson says.

He points out that diverting lava flows is viewed in traditional Hawaiian culture as disrespecting the volcano goddess Pele. “The lava flow is very unpredictable, but Hawaiians have always lived with volcanoes. This project is creating hope, and plays a part in keeping the community who we are.”

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