MONEY Autos

7 Cars That Save on Gas in a Way You Won’t Believe

2013 Ford Fusion
Ford began offering auto stop-start technology as an option with the 2013 Fusion. Ford—Wieck

New research shows that funky, futuristic auto stop-start technology is a proven money saver on gas. It's available right now only in a tiny fraction of cars, but that's going to change soon.

Over the years, one urban fuel-efficiency myth has been pervasive—that you’ll save gas by letting your car idle rather than shutting the engine off when, say, waiting at the curb for someone running into a store. Popular Mechanics, AAA, and others have busted this myth, pointing out that a vehicle gets negative miles per gallon while idle. The consensus advice now is that if you car is stopped for more than a minute, the smart move is to turn the engine off.

The arrival of auto stop-start, a technology most often seen in hybrids, does this work for you, and not only if you’re idle for minute or more. As the name suggests, the tech shuts off the vehicle’s engine automatically when the car comes to a stop—at a red light, say—and then starts it again in the jiffy when the driver takes a foot off the brake pedal.

The technology has slowly been spreading beyond hybrids to a few vehicles powered by traditional internal combustion engines, and new research from AAA indicates that this is a good thing. After testing several cars with the feature, researchers concluded that the tech is a no-brainer that saves drivers 5% to 7% on gas costs annually. A blurb from the press release explains a little more about what this means to us all:

“Up to seven percent improved fuel economy can mean a $215 annual fuel savings for Southern California consumers,” says Steve Mazor, the chief automotive engineer of the Auto Club’s Automotive Research Center. “It also reduces the main greenhouse gas emitted from cars (CO2) by 5 to 7 percent in city driving.”

Navigant Research predicts that by 2022, 55 million cars sold annually will have stop-start technology, up from 8.8 million last year. Adoption is ahead of the curve in Europe, where gas prices are astronomical compared to much of the world: Roughly 45% of cars built in Europe already come with start-stop systems.

In the U.S., meanwhile, the stop-start feature remains an anomaly; only about 500,000 new cars sold in the U.S. in 2013 had the technology. Estimates call for that figure to shoot up to 7 million by 2022. But there’s no need to wait. The vehicles below already offer stop-start as an option or a standard feature in the U.S.:

BMW: Several BMWs have auto start-stop technology, but not all drivers are fans. “The stop-start system is just awful,” one Automotive News columnist wrote of his 2012 328i, describing the herky-jerky feeling of stepping off the brake and automatically restarting the engine as “balky” and “uncomfortable.” Drivers do have the option to turn the start-stop feature off if it’s proving to be too annoying.

Chevrolet Impala: The automaker has made stop-start technology standard on the 2015 Impala.

Chevrolet Malibu: Starting with the 2014 model year, Chevy made stop-start standard on the Malibu, which the automaker says has helped it boost fuel efficiency by 14% with city driving.

Ford Fusion: A couple of years ago, Ford introduced a stop-start system as a $295 option for the first time in the U.S. on a non-hybrid model. At the time, the automaker estimated that drivers would save $1,100 in gasoline costs over five years of driving by upgrading to stop-start. The 2015 Fusion is estimated to get an extra 3 mpg over the base model.

Ford F-150: Buyers who go for the 2.7-liter EcoBoost engine on the 2015 version of Ford’s best-selling pickup get a special auto stop-start feature that’s a little different than others out there. Like other systems, this one automatically shuts off the engine as a fuel saver when the vehicle is stopped, but not when the vehicle is towing something or when it’s in four-wheel drive. Without that feature, the tech could prove frustrating for pickup drivers who are hauling something in the rear or are inching along stop-and-go on bumpy or muddy terrain. During all other driving situations, “The engine restarts in milliseconds when the brake is released,” Ford promises.

Porsche: Among the Porsche models that come with auto start-stop, the new Panamera’s system is special in that the engine not only shuts off when the vehicle is at a full stop—but it also shuts off when the car is slowing down approaching a traffic light. While the engine goes quiet, climate control, audio systems, and other interior features remain powered by the battery. And if the battery doesn’t have enough juice for all the auxiliary equipment, the engine will simply turn back on.

Ram 1500: The 2013 model year Ram truck offered start-stop technology as an option, the first in the pickup category to do so. “This new system is just one of the advances that allow the 2013 RAM 1500 to offer up to 20 percent greater fuel efficiency than previous models,” the automaker stated.

TIME energy

Obama Approves Sonic Cannons to Map Atlantic for Offshore Oil and Gas

Offshore drilling in the Atlantic is up for debate
The Atlantic offshore territory has been off limits to U.S. oil drilling, but that could change Brasil2 via Getty Images

Over environmental objections, the Obama Administration moves forward with exploration that could yield new domestic oil and gas sources

The Obama administration reopened part of the Eastern seaboard Friday to offshore oil and gas exploration, promising to boost job creation in the energy sector while at the same time fueling the fears of environmental groups.

The U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) estimates that 4.72 billion barrels of recoverable oil and 37.51 trillion cubic feet of recoverable natural gas lies beneath the coast from Florida to Maine. The recent decision allows exploration from Florida to Delaware and could create thousands of new jobs supporting expanded energy infrastructure along the East Coast.

“Offshore energy exploration and production in the Atlantic could bring new jobs and higher revenues to states and local communities, while adding to our country’s capabilities as an energy superpower,” American Petroleum Institute upstream director Erik Milito said in a statement.

Environmentalists worry about damage to shorelines, and to the tourist industry. They also worry about the safety of ocean wildlife. The exploration will initially be conducted via seismic surveys that use sonic cannons to locate oil and gas deposits beneath the ocean floor. The cannons emit sound waves louder than a jet engine every ten seconds for weeks at a time.

“We’re definitely concerned,” Hamilton Davis, energy and climate change director for the South Carolina Coastal Conservation League, told TIME. “The exploration activities lead in the direction of actual development of oil and gas, and from our perspective as a coastal organization that worries about our environmental ecological landscape as well as our [tourism] economy, the oil and gas industry certainly doesn’t seem to fit into that equation. Just the impacts from exploration activities on marine wildlife I think would give most people pause… You’re talking about hundreds of thousands of animals that will be negatively impacted as a consequence of these activities.”

BOEM said it approved the seismic surveys with the environment in mind. “After thoroughly reviewing the analysis, coordinating with Federal agencies and considering extensive public input, the bureau has identified a path forward that addresses the need to update the nearly four-decade-old data in the region while protecting marine life and cultural sites,” said Acting BOEM Director Walter D. Cruickshank in a statement.

Sonic cannons are already used in the western Gulf of Mexico and off the coast of Alaska, but many constituents and elected officials in the newly opened East Coast territory have expressed their concerns about the testing and eventual drilling. Congressional officials from Florida, including Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Orlando, and Rep. Kathy Castor, D-Tampa, signed a letter to President Obama opposing the decision.

“Expanding unnecessary drilling offshore simply puts too much at risk. Florida has more coastline than any other state in the continental United States and its beaches and marine resources support the local economy across the state,” the letter states.

The area to be mapped is in federal waters, not under the jurisdiction of state law. Energy companies will apply for drilling leases in 2018, when current congressional limits expire.

 

TIME energy

New Poll Shows Americans Won’t Give Up Their Cars

Stuck in Traffic
Cars stuck in traffic. Maureen Sullivan—Getty Images

Our car-crazy culture lags behind global competitors in using public transportation

Gas prices are high, roads are clogged and driving alone is worse for the planet. But Americans still prefer to commute in their air-conditioned cocoons.

A new global survey conducted for TIME on attitudes toward energy reveals that Americans are more reluctant than international counterparts to ditch their cars for public transportation.

Only 16% of Americans prefer using public transportation to get to work, compared with 41% of respondents overall in the poll, which compared U.S. attitudes toward energy and conservation with those in Brazil, Germany, India, South Korea and Turkey. Just 8% of U.S. respondents said they always take public transit instead of a personal vehicle, sharply below the overall total of 27%.

Americans’ reluctance to ditch their cars may be a symptom of their overall disinclination to take steps to reduce their carbon footprint. One in three U.S. respondents said they were willing to change their behavior in their name of conservation, 10 percentage points below the overall average and ahead of only South Korea.

Or it may stem from our long-running love affair with the automobile. A full 79% of respondents from the U.S. said they rely on their car for transportation, about double the overall average of 39%. (Germans were the second biggest gearheads, with 47% relying on cars to get around.) Just 9% of Americans said they lean most heavily on trains, metro systems or public buses.

The survey was conducted among 3,505 online respondents equally divided between the U.S., Brazil, Germany, Turkey, India and South Korea. Polling was conducted from May 10 to May 22. The overall margin of error overall in the survey is 1.8%.

TIME Transportation

This Map Shows Where Gas is Taxed the Most

A map of gasoline tax in the US. American Petroleum Institute

Drivers in New York pay nearly 69 cents per gallon in taxes

New York drivers pay more in gas taxes than those in any other state, according to a new map from the American Petroleum Institute, a gas industry group. Empire State drivers pay nearly 69 cents in state and federal taxes for every gallon they buy, more than twice as much as Alaska, the state with the lowest rate.

Much like other taxes, gas tax rates vary dramatically from state to state. The federal tax is 18 cents (diesel is closer to 24 cents). In fifteen states the total tax is more than 50 cents per gallon, making it the approximate national average. The tax bottoms out in fuel-rich Alaska at less than 31 cents per gallon.

The federal portion of the gas tax goes into the Highway Trust Fund, where it’s used to build and maintain roads. But the fund has been dwindling as people drive less and cars become more fuel efficient. The Obama Administration has warned that the fund’s balance will be at zero by the end of August.

(Read More: The One Credit Card You Need to Ease Pain at the Pump)

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: July 10

1. Political corruption is a scourge and should be punished. Why not make these crooked politicians serve the public interest and help track down other lawbreakers?

By Walter Isaacson in TIME

2. With urban farming, Cleveland Crops energizes people with disabilities.

By Hannah Wallace in Civil Eats

3. Fertilizing the oceans: How feeding iron to plankton could help move the needle on global warming.

By David Biello in Aeon

4. The gas tax can’t solve America’s transportation funding problem. Oregon’s pay-per-mile program just might.

By Eric Jaffe in Citylab

5. Today’s 20-somethings have the lowest median income since 1970. To jumpstart that generation, we need to talk about wages.

By Derek Thompson in Quartz

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

MONEY credit cards

The One Credit Card You Need to Ease Pain at the Pump This Summer

paying for gas
The right credit card can provide an antidote to pain at the pump. Ana Abejon—Getty Images

You can get as much as 5% back if you swipe it right.

If you’ll be spending part of this July 4th weekend in the car—whether that’s for a day trip to the beach or a 500-mile drive to visit the in-laws—be prepared to pay more at the pump this year than last. A gallon of regular gasoline sits at $3.70, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, or about 9% higher than in 2013.

Those in the know, however, will be able to get a discount that mitigates the price escalation. How, you ask? With a cash back rewards card that gives them some extra juice at the gas station.

The picks that follow can get you up to 5% back on your purchase at the pump. You’ll notice something about these selections: None of them are gas-station-branded cards. The ones below offer more flexibility and more money back.

If you want to get the most money back possible…

We at Money are pretty big fans of the class of credit cards that offer 5% cash back in rotating categories. Within the category, both the Chase Freedom and Discover It offer 5% at the pump from July to September on the first $1,500 spent. That means if you spend $250 a month on gas, you’ll end up saving almost $40.

If you’re planning a cross-country road trip, it might pay to sign up for both. The Freedom and It cards are fee-free, so there’s no downside to doubling up.

But if you’re only planning on getting one, go for the Chase Freedom, which offers a $100 sign-up bonus after you spend $500 in the first three months, says CreditCardForum.com’s Ben Woolsey.

If you’d rather have an all-purpose card…

Managing a number of credit cards for specific categories can be daunting for some consumers. If that’s you, check out solid cash back cards that offer good rewards throughout the year. BankAmericard Cash Rewards holders, for instance, earn 3% on the first $1,500 spent at gas stations the entire year without having to pay an annual fee. There’s also a $100 sign-up bonus once you spent $500 in the first three months.

Also consider Money’s Best Credit Card winner American Express Blue Cash Preferred. While this card comes with a $75 fee, you receive 3% back at gas stations in addition to a $150 sign-up bonus if you spend $1,000 in the first three months. Where it comes out ahead of the BankAmericard is if you’ll also use it at the supermarket, since the best feature of Blue Cash Preferred is the 6% cash back you get on the first $6,000 spent on groceries.

TIME

This Is Where America Loves to Get Gas

Sharp Uptick In Gas Prices Forcing Some Gas Stations To Temporarily Close
Customers gas up their car at Costco Wholesale Corp. on October 5, 2012 in Burbank, California. Kevork Djansezian—Getty Images

Drivers are turning to grocery stores and retailers to fill their gas tanks

Your favorite gas station is also likely your grocery store, according to a new study.

Consumers prefer filling their gas tanks at grocery stores and wholesale clubs, not traditional gas stations, Market Force Information found in a study. Grocery and wholesale retailers have figured out that competitive pricing can lure customers away from traditional gas pumps.

“The rise of grocery and wholesale clubs is formidable in the petro-convenience sector, with the ability to use loyalty cards and point systems driving consumers to fuel where they perceive they get better value,” said Market Force CMO Janet Eden-Harris in a statement.

Researchers asked consumers how likely they were to return to the gas station they most recently used, and found that Kroger ranked first in satisfaction with a score of 79%. Costco and QuikTrip tied for second with 78% and Sam’s Club ranked third with 76%.

While location is the biggest factor in attracting customers to the pump, over a third of drivers (37%) said they were willing to drive past a gas station to go to their favorite brand. That said, Shell is the most frequented gas station in the country, likely because the company’s gas stations are so ubiquitous.

Market Force surveyed over 5,300 respondents across the United States and Canada for the study.

MONEY Gas

Gas Prices Hit a High for 2014—but the News Isn’t All Bad

Steven Puetzer—Getty Images

Right now, prices at the pump are as expensive as they've been all year. With any luck, though, it'll be all downhill from here.

According to the federal Energy Information Administration, as of Monday, the national average for a gallon of regular gasoline reached $3.70. That’s 13¢ higher than a year ago at this time, and it matches the previous high thus far in 2014, set in late April.

The bad news, beyond the obvious—you know, having to pay more to fill up and all—is that prices have been creeping upward just at a time the opposite was supposed to happen. The expectation was that gas prices would actually decrease in June, as they have in each of the past three years. The summer forecast from AAA called for a 10¢ to 15¢ per-gallon drop in prices at the pump this month, and predicted that the national average would remain in the vicinity of $3.55 to $3.70 through the summer. We’ve already hit the high end of the predicted price range long before anticipated—and gas prices have tended to rise toward summer’s end in recent years.

That said, prices at the pump aren’t exactly spiking. Nationally, the per-gallon price is only up a few pennies compared to a week ago, or even a month ago for that matter. Still, because everybody was expecting a significant decline this month, drivers are justified in feeling like they’re paying a lot more than they should to gas up right now. Turmoil in Iraq is being blamed for the persistently high gas prices.

So what’s the good news here? While drivers in 41 states and Washington, D.C., are currently paying more for gas than they did at this time last year, a handful of states are starting to see price breaks. According to the gas-pricing monitoring site GasBuddy, Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan drivers have all seen a per-gallon price decrease of 9¢ to 12¢ over the past week. And areas that have experienced a gas price hike lately can expect prices to flatten out going forward. “Many areas that saw gains over a nickel should see a calmer, cooler week at the pump,” a GasBuddy post on Monday explained. “So far this morning, oil prices are down 55 cents a barrel while gasoline spot prices are generally negative, a good sign for motorists.”

What’s more, the analysts generally say that it’s extremely unlikely the national average will reach $4 per gallon, or even close to $3.90 as happened in September 2012.

Then again, the analysts have been wrong before. Like when they were making predictions just a few weeks ago, for instance.

TIME

When Is it Best to Refill a Tank of Gas?

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DreamPictures—Getty Images/Blend Images RM

Answer by Ryan Carlyle, an engineer, on Quora.

I have a few important reasons outside your vehicle’s mechanical behavior to keep your tank half full or better.

Whenever there is a natural disaster, disease outbreak, major holiday, or other reason for a large number of people to leave the cities at once, everyone will want to fill up at the same time in the same place. Keeping your tank on the low side most of the time increases your risk of getting stuck in gas station lines, or running out of fuel when the highways jam up, or other screw-ups that can range in severity from inconvenient to calamitous. Do not be the sucker waiting in a 6 hour gasoline line when an evacuation is ordered. Do not be the poor schmuck who runs out of gas and is stranded when a natural disaster is about to hit. Always, always, always keep enough fuel in your tank to get out of town in a hurry. This is basic emergency-preparedness.

The other reason to keep your tank at least half-full is national energy security. One of the dark secrets of the world’s energy infrastructure is that it has very little centralized storage capacity — creation of government stockpiles like the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve has actually caused the private sector to decrease their storage capacity to just barely cover minor supply shocks and seasonal demand fluctuations. World fuel and oil supply is entirely based on constant pipeline flows and tanker traffic — if the flow is disrupted by war or disaster for even a few days, localized shortages appear almost immediately. It’s actually a very robust system, and the shortfall is always made up via redistribution of existing supply, but there is a considerable delay (1-2 weeks) before supply lines can be rerouted.

So how does this affect you, the individual driver? Gasoline production is very well-balanced with average demand, and enough fuel is always made to supply everyone. The real problem isn’t lack of fuel, it’s too many people trying to fill up at once. If the media whispers the word “shortage,” everyone rushes out to fill their tank at once. You can’t top off all the cars in the country in a day. All the gas stations and distribution depots in the country have considerably less total storage volume than everyone’s individual vehicle tanks added together. So there doesn’t have to be a real supply shortage! Just the threat of a shortage causes people to overwhelm the system, creating an artificial shortage for a week or so until the oil and fuel flows can catch up.

By keeping your tank over half full, you can ride out both real supply shortages (which clear out in a week or two) and panic-induced fake supply shortages (which also clear out in a week or two). Do not be part of the panic. Do not contribute to the world’s susceptibility to energy supply disruption. Do your part to improve your country’s national energy security by using your vehicle as rolling fuel storage. If everyone always kept their tanks over half full, it would double the world’s normal fuel storage levels.

This question originally appeared on Quora: When is it best to refill a tank of gas? More questions:

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