TIME Video Games

There’s a Ridiculous Hidden Fee Inside Windows 10

It's tucked in an old stand-by that'll cost you now

Long before we had Angry Birds and Twitter to distract us at work, there was Solitaire on Windows. The card game has been a staple of Microsoft’s operating system for decades, but getting the full Solitaire experience on the newest OS may cost you.

The newly released Windows 10 features the Solitaire Collection, which includes several variants of the classic card game. However, unlike the version of the game you played at your grandma’s house in the ‘90s, Windows 10 Solitaire comes packed with advertisements. To get rid of the ads and earn some in-game currency (yes, this centuries-old game is borrowing from Candy Crush), users can pay $1.49 per month or $9.99 per year.

Read more: Windows 10 Reviews Are In—And People Love It

This actually isn’t the first time Microsoft has tried to get users to pay for Solitaire. A premium version of the game was also released for Windows 8, but the title wasn’t pre-installed in the operating system as it is in Windows 10.

It’s not that surprising that Microsoft is charging for Solitaire, considering that Windows 10 is free and the company is increasingly seeking revenue via ongoing subscription services instead of one-off software purchases.

TIME monopoly

Hasbro Is Selling the Factory Where it Made its Iconic Monopoly Game

Hasbro Announces New Monopoly Playing Figure
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images

The acquirer is a Belgian card business

Hasbro is selling the factory that for years manufactured its iconic Monopoly board game.

The plant will be sold to card maker based in Belgium called Cartamundi, which will continue to employ the factory’s workers. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The move comes as many of Hasbro’s toys are already made overseas and Hasbro is in the middle of transitioning itself from “a toy and game company to an organization delivering global brand experiences,” according to the company’s CEO Brian Goldner, as reported by the Boston Globe.

In other Monopoly news, Entertainment Weekly reported earlier this year that a Monopoly movie is in the works with Lionsgate. In February, Hasbro hid real money in French special editions of the game in honor of its 80th anniversary.

Hasbro first acquired the Monopoly maker Milton Bradley in 1984.

TIME Culture

‘Lolz’ And Thousands Of Other Words Added to Scrabble Dictionary

Scrabble
Getty Images

Quinzhee, an Inuit snow shelter, will get you 29 points

It’s obvs that lotsa people are going to use the new words added to the Scrabble dictionary.

“Obvs” and “lotsa” are both among the 6,500 new entries to the Collins Scrabble Word List, along with other slang terms like lolz, shizzle, and ridic, BBC reports.

The highest scoring new word is quinzhee, which will get you 29 points. It’s an Inuit snow shelter.

There’s also a bevy of new words related to technology on the list – facetime, hashtag, sexting and hacktivist are all fair game on the board.

Helen Newstead, head of language content at Collins, explained how Scrabble added so many new words. “Dictionaries have always included formal and informal English, but it used to be hard to find printed evidence of the use of slang words,” she said. “Now people use slang in social media posts, tweets, blogs, comments, text messages – you name it – so there’s a host of evidence for informal varieties of English that simply didn’t exist before.”

[BBC]

TIME Video Games

10 Most-Anticipated New iPhone Games

Have a look at our picks for the most promising iPhone games yet to come this year

We’re already playing some of 2015’s best iPhone games—take a bow, Sorcery! 3, Auro: A Monster-Bumping Adventure, Planet Quest and Ryan North’s To Be or Not To Be—so here’s a look at what’s left (that we know of, anyway) between now and year’s end.

  • Guitar Hero Live

    “No console? No problem,” reads the tagline for the handheld version of Activision’s upcoming rhythm rock-a-thon rethink. “The full game experience will be available on select mobile devices,” boasts the publisher, referring to a big-screen experience that’s designed to put you onstage with a live-ish reactive band and audience. How’s that work on a 5-inch screen? We’ll doubtless find out at E3 next month.

    Late 2015

  • Disney Infinity 3.0

    If playing Star Wars in story-less, multiplayer-focused, first-person shooter battle arenas turns you off—hello, Star Wars Battlefront!—then Disney Infinity 3.0 represents our best shot at solo-supportive, sandbox-based, story-driven Star Wars experiences. Look for characters like Anakin, Luke, Leia, Han and Vader to broaden Disney’s toy-game stable, and like last year’s version 2.0, the iPhone version of 3.0 should be all but identical to its console and tablet peers.

    Late 2015

  • Minecraft: Story Mode

    Telltale Games

    Did Minecraft need a narrative when part of the game’s triumph is the way it drives players to create their own? We’re going to find out when adventure-maker Telltale Games puts its imprimatur on the Lego-like sandbox builder later this year.

    TBD 2015

     

  • Age of Empires: World Domination

    The Age of Empires real-time strategy franchise fizzled a long time ago, and hasn’t seen a hit in years, so there’s understandable trepidation about this mobile-oriented version’s prospects. Can newcomer KLab Global resuscitate defunct creator Ensemble Studios’ once-beloved series? Pull it off without inundating players with freemium nagging? We’ll see.

    TBD 2015

  • Zodiac

    Boasting heady tunes by Final Fantasy XII‘s Hitoshi Sakimoto and expert scenario design by Final Fantasy VII‘s Kazushige Nojima, Zodiac is a 2D roleplaying game that marries side-scrolling levels with turn-based combat. Sounds a little like Valkyrie Profile, no? The difference: Zodiac transpires in an “ambitious” persistent online world, and supports cross-platform play (with Sony’s PS Vita handheld, and possibly others yet to be announced).

    TBD 2015

  • Ember

    If the demo teaser for N-Fusion’s Ember reminds you even a little of Ultima VII: The Black Gate, that’s no coincidence–the developer admits its upcoming fantasy quest-spinner was inspired by Origin’s classic 1992 title, remembered for its still rarely equalled depth of world and character design.

    TBD 2015

  • Firefly Online

    It’s one of TV’s most beloved science fiction tales reimagined as a roleplaying game in which players can pilot their own ships, assemble their own crews and trade with (or create missions for) other players. The original cast came back to handle voice work for their characters, which appear throughout the game.

    TBD 2015

  • Super Meat Boy Forever

    It’s the official sequel to 2010’s acclaimed platform game starring a tiny cube of flesh that darts and leaps through hundreds of trap-filled levels.

    TBD 2015

  • Forma.8

    You’re stuck orbiting an alien planet, your reserves nearly depleted, so you deploy a tiny probe to the planet, hoping to retrieve an underground energy source and continue your journey. Studio MixedBag dubs Forma.8 a “Metroidvania” (that is, Metroid plus Castlevania), wherein you’ll explore a mammoth and interlinked series of levels, solving puzzles and battling enemies to accomplish your goals.

    TBD 2015

  • Clockwork

    Explore a 400-year-old clockwork metropolis as Atto, a mechanical boy who sets out to mend both his malfunctioning machine city and its many robotic inhabitants—human survivors, who abandoned their organic bodies centuries ago to escape the ravages of a deadly plague.

    TBD 2015

TIME Video Games

This Is the Best Game on the Apple Watch

I'm convinced Apple's newest device might actually be fun to play games on

A few weeks in, the things the Apple Watch does well are pretty obvious. It’s a great fitness and exercise tracker. It’s built-in apps work as advertised. It’s a nice-looking physical object. It tells the time.

But as a new product, running a 1.0 operating system, there’s also a lot to improve on. One of the biggest outstanding questions is whether or not people will use the Watch to do things they’re already used to doing on their phones, like reading the news and playing games.

The later in particular, seems in greater doubt. Most of the titles released so far are either relatively light-weight (and benign) extensions of their phone counter parts or uber-simple incarnations of popular games. Most of these don’t last past an initial blush of gee-whiz.

Lifeline, a newly released game by 3 Minute Games, could change that. It’s the first game I’ve loaded on my Watch that is not only fun to play, but fun to play specifically on a wearable.

MORE: These May Be the Most Absurd Apple Watch Accessories Yet

The premise is fairly is simple: A far-off radio signal connects you to Taylor, a young student who was selected to study rats in space. He sends a distress signal when he crash lands on a moon somewhere—all of this is communicated through simple text messages. From there, it’s essentially a choose-you-own adventure style narrative with the player directing Taylor to try this or that, go here or there, and so on.

Communication goes silent as Taylor follows your instructions, taking time to travel somewhere for example. This real-time aspect is what makes Lifeline a convincing simulation of actually working with someone. That, and its extreme simplicity, make Lifeline a compelling game to play on your watch.

This also works because of a strong story. Lifeline was written by Dave Justus, a co-writer on the also narratively excellent The Wolf Among Us. It can be played solely on a phone, but if you have an Apple Watch, it’s worth downloading.

TIME apps

The 5 Best iPhone Games of the Month

Bouncy Bits
Bouncy Bits Bouncy Bits

From 'Ducktails' to 'Hellrider'

Every week, TIME rounds up our favorite iPhone games of the past few days. Here are the best of the best for March, from a 1990s throwback to a spooky dungeon adventure.

 

DuckTales: Remastered

DuckTales, originally released in the late 1980s and 1990s, was one of the best adventure games ever. Now, it’s been remastered for iOS — which means no more crummy, hard to see graphics. Take Scrooge McDuck on a string of journeys through dangerous terrains, traps and maps until you find your treasure. It’s an expensive game, but it’s a small price to pay for reliving one of the best games ever developed – or discovering it for the first time.

DuckTales: Remastered is available for $9.99 in the App Store

Bouncy Bits

If you were to take Frogger and give it to the creators of Adventure Time, you’d get Bouncy Bits. It’s a simple runner game with a slight twist. The goal is to navigate your character and bounce through each level while dodging obstacles. You can upgrade to new maps and players and rack up points. There are some in-app purchases you can make, like new player modes and characters, to enhance gameplay.

Bouncy Bits is free in the App Store

MORTAL KOMBAT X

This hugely anticipated game was well worth the wait. It’s essentially just like the much-loved button mashing games of yesteryear, except with greatly improved graphics. You can unlock a variety of characters, including some of your favorites from the old series, and spend your time ripping opponents throats out or stabbing them in the face or turning them into ice sculptures.

MORTAL KOMBAT X is free in the App Store

Hellrider

Imagine Mad Max, but instead of fighting other humans, you’re battling an army of skeletons. Clobber your way through various maps and destroy your enemies. Despite the fact that Hellrider follows the basic arcade game principle of running through levels and smashing enemies to bits, the game is remarkably designed and never gets boring.

Hellrider is free in the App Store

Tiny Dangerous Dungeons

Until the day Nintendo decides to get launch a full suite of titles for iOS, games like Tiny Dangerous Dungeons will have to do. Take your character (who is wearing a suspiciously Mario-like outfit) through spooky arenas and over obstacles until you reach the end of each level. There’s not much enemy-fighting in this one, which is why it’s so endearingly like games of yesteryear, down to the blocky graphics and monochrome display. It’ll look really cool on your iPhone screen.

Tiny Dangerous Dungeons is free in the App Store

TIME apps

The 5 Best iPhone Games of the Week

Bouncy Bits
Bouncy Bits Bouncy Bits

Try 'Bouncy Bits,' which is like a modern Frogger

Had enough Candy Crush and looking for some fun new games to play on your iPhone? Here are five favorites TIME rounded up this week.

Wrassling

Although Wrassling is truly inane in its gameplay, it’s reminiscent of the classic Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robots. Command a blockheaded wrestler and try your best to clobber your opponent even as your limbs fall off. There’s something truly mesmerizing about how long you can spend playing a game this simple.

Wrassling is free in the App Store

Burn It Down

For a blocky, retro-looking game, Burn it Down is surprisingly plot-heavy. You wake up and find that all of the sudden, your lover is missing. The kidnapper and the motive remain unclear, but you must work your way through various, grim levels and find clues in order to get to the bottom of it. Part detective story, part haunted mansion explorer.e

Burn It Down is free in the App Store

Bouncy Bits

If you were to take Frogger and give it to the creators of Adventure Time, you’d get Bouncy Bits. It’s a simple runner game with a slight twist. The goal is to navigate your character and bounce through each level while dodging obstacles. You can upgrade to new maps and players and rack up points. There are some in-app purchases you can make, like new player modes and characters, to enhance gameplay.

Bouncy Bits is free in the App Store

Tower Slash

Tower Slash takes the classic neo-pixel game format and does something that is at once both incredibly retro and very well suited to the iPhone. Climb up a tower on the game’s vertical landscape and try to beat your friend’s scores — but you’re limited to the few basic commands of jumping to dodge obstacles and attacking enemies with a few weapons upgrades.

Tower Slash is free in the App Store

Tadpole Tap

This should have been a Game Boy Color game. Navigate a tadpole with an elastic tongue through a river and snatch various bugs and animals. As you improve, and as the game becomes more impossible, you also unlock other tadpoles to play with. Every fly you eat earns you points. There’s something incredibly calming about the game’s design and how easy it is to play for a few short minutes here and there.

Tadpole Tap is free in the App Store

TIME apps

The 5 Best iPhone Games of the Week

TIME.com stock photos Social Apps iPhone
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

Try 'Ducktails' and 'Hellrider'

Had enough Candy Crush and looking for some fun new games to play on your iPhone? Here are five favorites TIME rounded up this week.

DuckTales: Remastered

DuckTales, originally released in the late 1980s and 1990s, was one of the best adventure games ever. Now, it’s been remastered for iOS — which means no more crummy, hard to see graphics. Take Scrooge McDuck on a string of journeys through dangerous terrains, traps and maps until you find your treasure. It’s an expensive game, but it’s a small price to pay for reliving one of the best games ever developed – or discovering it for the first time.

DuckTales: Remastered is available for $9.99 in the App Store

Hellrider

Imagine Mad Max, but instead of fighting other humans, you’re battling an army of skeletons. Clobber your way through various maps and destroy your enemies. Despite the fact that Hellrider follows the basic arcade game principle of running through levels and smashing enemies to bits, the game is remarkably designed and never gets boring.

Hellrider is free in the App Store

Tiny Dangerous Dungeons

Until the day Nintendo decides to get launch a full suite of titles for iOS, games like Tiny Dangerous Dungeons will have to do. Take your character (who is wearing a suspiciously Mario-like outfit) through spooky arenas and over obstacles until you reach the end of each level. There’s not much enemy-fighting in this one, which is why it’s so endearingly like games of yesteryear, down to the blocky graphics and monochrome display. It’ll look really cool on your iPhone screen.

Tiny Dangerous Dungeons is free in the App Store

Last Voyage

Unlike almost every puzzle game, Last Voyage is a strange quest through time and space. One moment you’re solving something that looks more like a Rubik’s Cube, and the next, you’re racing from chapter to chapter and beaming around stars at warp speed. The puzzles are almost impossible to solve, but it’s incredibly rewarding once you unlock the next stage. Though the graphics are basic, games like Last Voyage are bringing a new level of complexity to the realm of iOS puzzle games.

Last Voyage is available for $0.99 in the App Store

Phil The Pill

A game that looks like it could be turned into a Cartoon Network show, Phil The Pill is the story of a character who must restore order to his once peaceful universe of strange animated characters. Enemies have invaded Phil’s village, and it’s up to him to fight his way through alleyways and mazes in order to liberate his town’s princess and free his fellow citizens from invaders.

Phil The Pill is free in the App Store

 

TIME Sports

The Centuries-Old Good Friday Tradition You’ve Probably Never Heard About

Busmen from the Crawley, Sussex depot at the Tinsley Green, Surrey marbles match v Tinsley Green, 19th April 1935
Popperfoto/Getty Images Busmen from the Crawley, Sussex depot at the Tinsley Green, Surrey marbles match, April 19, 1935

This annual Good Friday event isn't exactly a religious rite

This year, on Good Friday, observers may mark the day with prayer and preparation for Easter.

But in Tinsley Green, a small town near London, a very different sort of Good Friday tradition will take place, just as it has for decades. The British and World Marbles Championship is held on that day every year and, as TIME described it in 1969, the annual event has been going for far longer than one might expect:

As legend has it, the British marbling tourney traces its heritage to the days of Elizabethan chivalry. For the hand of a maiden, two 16th century swains clashed in an “all known sports” tournament in which marbles, for reasons now obscure, became the dominant contest. By the 1700s the marble tournament had become an annual Good Friday ritual in Tinsley Green. The tourney began in the morning; at high noon (the hour Sussex taverns open), the referee cried “Smug!” and the tournament ended. The rules are wondrously simple: 49 marbles are placed in the “pitch” (ring) and each member of the competing teams takes his turn at trying to knock one out. Shooting is a thumbs-only proposition—a flick of the wrist constitutes a “fudge” (foul) and disqualifies the contestant for that round. As in pool, each successful shot merits another, and the team that picks up the most marbles wins.

According to the tournament’s website, the ritual fell away sometime around the year 1900 and was brought back in 1932. Though the first years of that era saw the matches as mostly local competitions, the tournament began to attract foreign teams as well. That 1969 story focused on a team from Chicago that threatened to take the title — except that they never showed up.

And even if they had, TIME ventured, they were unlikely to win. After all, the defending champions had a secret weapon: “marbles hand-carved from the finest porcelain commodes” because “only porcelain gives the ‘tolley’ (shooter) the proper heft and feel.”

TIME remembrance

Monopoly Turns 80: Everything You Didn’t Know About the Iconic Game

Monopoly Game 1935
Hasbro Monopoly Game 1935

The longest official game of Monopoly lasted 70 days

On Thursday, Monopoly celebrates its birthday. Can you guess what number birthday it is? No?

Well, it’s a big one: The game that brought families together – and then slowly tore them apart – with the healing power of capitalism is turning 80 this year. To celebrate, the good folks at Hasbro have provided us with not only scads of trivia about the game, but some photos that show how the now-iconic board game has evolved over the years. Enjoy, and do not collect $200.

Monopoly Game 1936

The game’s inventor, Charles Darrow, first developed Monopoly in 1933, from materials in his own home: the cards were handwritten, and the houses and hotels were made from scraps of wooden molding.

Monopoly Popular Edition Game 1936

Parker Brothers initially rejected the game for “52 fundamental errors” that included the game’s length, theme and complexity. After Darrow successfully sold the game at local Philadelphia department stores, the company reconsidered and negotiated the rights to the game.

Monopoly in 1957

Within a year of its release in the U.S. (it was initially sold for $2), 35,000 copies of the game were being made per week. To date, it’s been published in 47 languages, sold in 114 countries and played by over 1 billion people worldwide. There have been more than 300 licensed versions of the game, including a Braille version and one made from chocolate.

Monopoly in 1962

The longest official game of Monopoly lasted a nightmarish 70 days. The largest took place in 2008, when nearly 3,000 fans united to play the game at the same time. The most expensive version of the game was created by San Francisco jeweler Sidney Mobell in 1998 for $2 million.

Monopoly in 1976

The first Monopoly World Championships took place in 1973 in Liberty, New York. The winner was Lee Bayrd, of the U.S. The last time someone from the U.S. won the World Championships was in 1974. Since then, the games have been held in locations like Tokyo, Monte Carlo and Toronto. The 2015 Monopoly World Championships will be held in Macau, China.

It would be nice if someone could bring the championship back to the U.S. for the game’s 80th birthday. Maybe it’s you.

This article originally appeared on People.com.

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com