TIME Football

Tom Brady Appeal Hearing Ends After More Than 10 Hours

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady looks to pass during the first half of the NFL football AFC Championship game against the Indianapolis Colts in Foxborough, Mass on Jan. 18, 2015
Matt Slocum—AP Tom Brady looks to pass during the first half of the AFC Championship game against the Indianapolis Colts in Foxborough, Mass., on Jan. 18, 2015

This was the latest step in the protracted "Deflategate" scandal

(NEW YORK) — After a 10-hour hearing, Tom Brady now must wait to find out if his appeal of a four-game suspension carried any weight with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

Brady was suspended by the league for his role in the use of deflated footballs in the AFC championship game win over Indianapolis. He arrived at the NFL’s Park Avenue offices Tuesday morning, as did attorney Jeffrey Kessler, who is leading Brady’s defense.

It was growing dark when Goodell left the league headquarters after he heard Brady and representatives from the players’ union during the lengthy meeting. League security said Brady also had left.

No details of the hearing were immediately available.

“I think we put in a very compelling case,” Kessler said, adding that no timetable on a decision by Goodell had been given.

Kessler said he would have no further comments Tuesday night, and neither the union nor the league immediately commented.

This was the latest step in the protracted “Deflategate” scandal, and no decisions were expected Tuesday.

Indeed, it is uncertain how soon Goodell will announce anything; he could decide to keep the suspension as it is, reduce it or completely wipe it clean.

With training camps set to open in five weeks, the commissioner has some time to consider the evidence presented at the hearing. But the Patriots also can’t finalize training camp practice plans for the quarterback position until they know Brady’s availability for the 2015 season.

Should Goodell keep the four-game ban — or even if he reduces it but doesn’t dismiss it totally — Brady could go to court. That could delay any solution for months.

On Tuesday, as Goodell was hearing a myriad of testimonies, Brady supporters were outside, some wearing “Free Brady” T-shirts. At least until the rains came, that is.

Some reporters joked that the meeting lasted so long because a summer storm was hitting the city and no one wanted to leave the building in such weather.

But just past 8:30 p.m. EDT, the principles headed out.

The NFL Players Association had asked Goodell to recuse himself from hearing the appeal because he could not be impartial and might be called as a witness. But Goodell said it was his responsibility to oversee the hearing to protect the integrity of the league.

Based on the league-sanctioned Wells report, Brady was suspended and the Patriots were fined $1 million and docked a pair of draft picks.

Among the key elements of Brady’s appeal: who ordered his four-game suspension and whether science supports the league’s findings about deflated footballs.

The NFL says Goodell authorized the discipline that was imposed by league executive Troy Vincent, who signed the letters sent to Brady and the Patriots informing them of the penalties. The NFLPA challenged Vincent’s power to issue punishment, citing Article 46 of the league’s collective bargaining agreement.

Goodell dismissed the union’s claim.

“I did not delegate my disciplinary authority to Mr. Vincent; I concurred in his recommendation and authorized him to communicate to Mr. Brady the discipline imposed under my authority as Commissioner,” Goodell said in his letter to the union on June 2. “The identity of the person who signed the disciplinary letter is irrelevant.”

The penalties were announced after investigator Ted Wells found that the Super Bowl champions illegally used under-inflated footballs in the AFC title game.

Goodell issued punishments to Greg Hardy, Adrian Peterson and Ray Rice in recent, high-profile cases involving players violating the league’s personal conduct policy. The league doesn’t consider Brady’scase similar because it involved rules of the game.

Scientific arguments also were a major part of Brady’s defense. Brady’s lawyers tried to shoot down the findings of an independent firm hired to provide scientific analysis of the air pressure inside the footballs used by the Patriots and Colts during the AFC title game.

Brady’s side claimed:

— The evidence collected in the Wells report doesn’t prove Brady violated any NFL rules.

— The punishment is harsher than for similar violations.

While Brady is fighting his punishment, Patriots owner Robert Kraft declined to appeal the team’s penalty, though he defended his franchise player and denied any wrongdoing by team employees.

MONEY Sports

Patriots’ Rob Gronkowski Hasn’t Spent a Dime of His NFL Salary

gronkowski-patriots-gronk-nfl-earnings-endorsements
Kevin C. Cox—Getty Images Rob Gronkowski of the New England Patriots celebrates after Super Bowl XLIX on February 1, 2015.

Gronk claims he has not spent "one dime" of his $10 million in contract money.

New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski has been saving like a pro during his five seasons in the National Football League—at least according to his new book, It’s Good to Be Gronk.

The football star claims he has been spending only his endorsement money, not his NFL salary, and avoids making big-ticket purchases.

“To this day, I still haven’t touched one dime of my signing bonus or NFL contract money. I live off my marketing money and haven’t blown it on any big-money expensive cars, expensive jewelry or tattoos and still wear my favorite pair of jeans from high school,” Gronkowski writes in an excerpt of the book published Monday on Sports Illustrated‘s MMQB blog.

If that’s true, he’s likely amassed at least $10 million (or more, if he’s been investing his savings). Given that a disproportionately high number of NFL players blow through their money and end up filing for bankruptcy, it seems that Gronk is a rare role model among his peers.

Well, at least when it comes to money.

TIME Soccer

U.S. Advances to World Cup Quarterfinals With 2-0 Win Over Colombia

Alex Morgan, Angela Clavijo
Jason Franson—The Canadian Press/AP Alex Morgan kicks the ball in front of Colombia's Angela Clavijo during a World Cup round of 16 match in Edmonton, Canada, on June 22, 2015

The U.S. is seeking its third World Cup title, but first since 1999

(EDMONTON, Alberta) —Alex Morgan scored her first goal of the Women’s World Cup and the United States advanced to the quarterfinals with a 2-0 victory over Colombia on Monday night.

Abby Wambach’s penalty kick early in the second half went wide after Colombia goalkeeper Catalina Perez — a backup herself — was ejected for a foul on Morgan. Stefany Castano, who replaced Perez in goal, got a hand on Morgan’s shot five minutes later, but couldn’t stop the goal to put the United States up 1-0.

Carli Lloyd also scored for the second-ranked Americans, who will face No. 16 China on Friday in Ottawa. The United States is seeking its third World Cup title, but first since 1999.

The Americans have not allowed a goal in 333 minutes.

Colombia has never won soccer’s premier tournament, but the No. 28 Las Cafeteras pulled off one of the biggest upsets in any World Cup in the group stage when they defeated third-ranked France 2-0.

Morgan and Wambach started up top for the United States, which used the same starting lineup as it did in the group-stage finale against Nigeria — a first since Jill Ellis became coach.

It was Morgan’s second straight start after working her way back from a bone bruise in her left knee. Morgan came in as a sub in the first two matches of the tournament.

Perez, a 20-year-old junior at Miami, started because regular goalkeeper Sandra Sepulveda was serving a suspension for yellow-card accumulation. Sepulveda had six saves in Colombia’s win over France. Castano had started in Colombia’s World Cup opener, a 1-1 draw with Mexico.

The teams played to a goalless first half, with the United States unable to finish several good chances.

Wambach was ruled offside for her attempt at a rebound goal in the fourth minute. Morgan later had a chance, but her shot bounced in front of Perez, who tipped it up and over the crossbar. Perez made three saves in the first half.

The United States was hurt in the 17th minute when Lauren Holiday got a yellow card, her second of the World Cup. She’ll have to sit out the quarterfinal, and it happened again in the 41st minute when Megan Rapinoe got her second yellow.

Perez was sent off at the start of the second half after sliding into Morgan, who was charging toward goal. After Castano took over, Wambach fooled her on the right side but the penalty kick sailed well left of the post.

After Morgan’s goal in the 53rd minute, Lloyd scored on a penalty kick in the 66th, Lloyd’s first goal of the tournament.

The U.S. had won each of the previous two meetings. When they met nearly three years ago in the London Olympics, Colombia striker Lady Andrade sucker-punched U.S. star Abby Wambach in the eye, drawing a two-match suspension.

In the days before the match in Edmonton, some of Colombia’s players said they felt they’d been disrespected by the Americans ever since.

“Because of something that happened three years ago, they’ve said things that have not been taken by us in the best way,” midfielder Yoreli Rincon said. Andrade told reporters she thought the Americans had “belittled” the Colombians.

Colombia, the third-place finisher in Group F behind France and England, was making its second World Cup appearance; it finished in 14th in 2011 in Germany. Colombia had never won a match in the sport’s premier tournament until the upset of France.

The second-ranked Americans finished on top of the so-called Group of Death, with victories over Australia and Nigeria and a 0-0 tie with Sweden.

China, the Americans’ next opponent, has played in six World Cups, but missed out four years ago. The Steel Roses have never won a title, but they made the final in 1999, losing memorably to the United States on penalty kicks at the Rose Bowl.

 

TIME Bizarre

This Soccer Team’s New Mascot Will Haunt Your Every Waking Moment

Kingsley
Jeff Holmes — Partick Thistle Football Club

Meet "Kingsley"

The Scottish soccer team Partick Thistle has a new mascot, and it’s caused quite a stir on social media.

The new mascot was designed by artist David Shrigley and was unveiled Monday after the Scottish team signed a new six-figure sponsorship deal with the California-based company Kingsford Capital Management.

The mascot is named Kingsley, and it’s pretty unclear what exactly Kingsley is. It’s been described by some as “absolutely terrifying.”

The new deal includes front shirt sponsorship, branding around the stadium, and the selling of your soul to Kingsley the Yellow King of Carcosa.

TIME Football

A Deflategate Football Is Going Up for Auction

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady throws a pass during the first half of the AFC championship NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts in Foxborough, Mass on Jan. 18, 2015.
Charles Krupa—AP New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady throws a pass during the first half of the AFC championship NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts in Foxborough, Mass on Jan. 18, 2015.

Bidding starts at $25,000

One of the infamous “Deflategate” footballs is set to hit the auction block.

Lelands will host an auction for one of the game balls used during the AFC Championship Game on Jan. 18. The New England Patriots were later investigated for deflating a number of game balls, resulting in a big fine against the team and a several-game suspension for quarterback Tom Brady over what investigators claimed was his knowledge about the scheme.

The current owners of the ball, as detailed in the lot prompt, received the ball from a Patriots player after a touchdown. The couple says they left the game early to make sure their ball stayed safe. Lelands called the game ball “the most ‘topical’ piece of sports memorabilia that we can recall ever being sold so close to the event itself.”

Bidding, which begins at 9 p.m. ET on July 18, starts at $25,000.

TIME energy

This Is How Much Energy Goes Into the Super Bowl Every Year

NFL logo at Ford Field in Detroit.
Mark Cunningham—Detroit Lions/Getty Images NFL logo at Ford Field in Detroit.

The annual sporting event is huge and more expensive for America than most people realize

In the pantheon of American culture, no event is more iconic and distinctly American than the Super Bowl. Like all things American, the Super Bowl is huge, expensive, and a source of incredible passion for fans. Just running a 30-second commercial to the more than 100 million people that watch the game costs nearly $5 million.

So how much electricity and energy go into putting on the Super Bowl?

There are lots of components here, but the biggest indisputable three are TVs used to watch the game, lighting and possibly climate control in a stadium, and fuel used in traveling to the game (by car or plane).

Worldwide, roughly 30 million televisions watched the five-hour extravaganza, assuming a little over five people per Super Bowl party. The average TV uses around 100 watts per hour. Plasma TVs use more electricity, and presumably people watch the Super Bowl on the biggest brightest TV they have available, so maybe the average TV watching the Super Bowl actually uses more like 125 watts per hour. Add another 125 watts per hour for extra lighting and other electricity use and over five hours then the average TV would use 1.25 kwh, and the 30 million households around the world watching the game would use 37.5 million kilowatt hours of electricity or 37.5 GWh. At an average price across the country of about $0.11 per kwh, that works out to a total cost of roughly $4,125,000.

TVs: 37.5 GWh or $4.125 million

On the football stadium itself, there is a lot of debate and no clear answers. Stadiums use pretty efficient lighting, and certainly air conditioning is not likely to be an issue in the dead of winter. So using the low end of estimates, an average stadium might use 10MW of energy for five hours, or roughly 50 MWh for the game. Compared to the TV use, that’s not a lot, but of course, there are roughly 80,000 people in a stadium watching a game versus hundreds of millions around the world watching. Stadiums are industrial users of power, so they won’t pay standard power rates, but for the sake of simplicity, assuming an average of $0.11 per Kwh again leads to a total cost of $5,500.

Stadium: 50 MWh or $5,500

Finally, transporting 80,000 people to a stadium is going to use some energy. The amount of energy varies based on where the stadium is and where the people are coming from of course. Stadiums are roughly equally spread out across the U.S., while people are not. Given the size of the country (about 3,000 miles across), the average person going to the game probably flies around 1,500 miles or about 2 hours of peak aircraft time. A Boeing 747 carries 500 people and uses 280 MWh for a 2 hour flight. That means about 45 GWh of power for the 160 planes needed to ferry 80,000 people to the stadium. Aircraft, of course, run on jet fuel and at current prices, that fuel will cost around $100,000 for each of those 160 flights or $16 million.

Travel: 280 MWh or $16 million

Overall, the Super Bowl costs more than $20 million in energy every year – quite a bill one football game. It also requires nearly 38 GWh of energy, or more than the equivalent amount of electricity that the entire country of Morocco can generate over the same five-hour period (given their 6.8 GW of capacity that existed in 2012).

The takeaway here is that the Super Bowl is huge and more expensive for America, and perhaps the environment, than most people realize. Still, the Super Bowl has quite a ways to go before it catches up in size and cost to the World Cup.

This article originally appeared on Oilprice.com.

More from Oilprice.com:

TIME Soccer

English Soccer Club Sacks 3 Players Over Racist Sex Tape

James Pearson of Leicester in action during the Capital One Cup second round match between Leicester City and Shrewsbury Town at The King Power Stadium on Aug. 26, 2014 in Leicester, England.
Michael Regan—Getty Images James Pearson of Leicester in action during the Capital One Cup second round match between Leicester City and Shrewsbury Town at The King Power Stadium on Aug. 26, 2014 in Leicester, England.

The players from Leicester City Football Club had previously apologized

A soccer club in the U.K. canned three players, including the manager’s son, after investigating reports of sexual and racist misconduct in Thailand.

Leicester City Football Club, part of the Premier League, said in a statement released Wednesday that Tom Hopper, Adam Smith and James Pearson’s contracts were terminated after “the conclusion of an internal investigation and disciplinary proceedings, as a consequence of events that took place during the Club’s end-of-season goodwill tour of Thailand.”

The trio, which has apologized, was accused of making racist remarks to women they were apparently engaged with sexually in a hotel room in Thailand, with one alleged to have called one woman a “slit eye.” News of the remarks spread after a video was supposedly shown to friends when the players had returned to the U.K., and then obtained by the Mirror in May.

“Leicester City Football Club is acutely aware of its position, and that of its players, as a representative of the city of Leicester [and] the Premier League…It is committed to promoting a positive message of community and family values and equality, and to upholding the standards expected of a Club with its history, tradition and aspirations,” the statement read.

TIME Soccer

Wambach’s Goal Gives U.S. a 1-0 Win Over Nigeria

Julie Johnston, Courtney Dike
Darryl Dyck—AP Julie Johnston, left, and Nigeria's Courtney Dike vie for the ball during the first half of a FIFA Women's World Cup game on June 16, 2015

The U.S. hasn't won a World Cup since 1999

(VANCOUVER) — Abby Wambach scored late in the first half and the U.S. women’s national team went on to beat Nigeria 1-0 on Tuesday night for a first-place finish in its group at the Women’s World Cup.

It was Wambach’s 14th World Cup goal, pulling her even with Birgit Prinz for second on the all-time list behind Brazil’s Marta, who has 15.

Wambach came off the bench for the United States in the team’s last match against Sweden. Tuesday, she started up top with Alex Morgan, who was making her first World Cup start in Canada after working her way back from a bone bruise in her left knee.

The United States, ranked second in the world behind Germany, has two World Cup titles, but hasn’t won since 1999.

Four years ago in Germany, the U.S. advanced to the final but fell to Japan on penalty kicks.

The win sent the United States through as the leader of its group for the sixth time in seven Women’s World Cups. The team heads to Edmonton, Alberta, for the first match of the knockout stage. The opponent has not been determined.

Nigeria, which has won seven of nine African championships, has been to every World Cup since it started for the women in 1991. The Super Falcons were eliminated after the loss to the United States after playing to a 3-all draw with Sweden in the opener and falling 2-0 to Australia.

The U.S. opened Group D with a 3-1 victory over No. 10 Australia, before playing to a 0-0 draw with No. 5 Sweden.

Morgan hadn’t started a match since April. The speedy 25-year-old played 12 minutes as a sub in the draw with Sweden.

Wambach also came in as a sub in the match against Sweden last Friday. It was the first time she had played off the bench at a World Cup since her first in 2003.

Wambach, who didn’t score in the first two U.S. group stage matches, had never gone without a goal in the opening round in four World Cup appearances.

Julie Johnston had the best chance for the United States early, but her strike in the eighth minute was ruled offside. Minutes later, U.S. goalkeeper Hope Solo dove to stop Nigeria forward Asisat Oshoala’s attempt.

Nigerian goalkeeper Precious Dede had to punch Megan Rapinoe’s long 25-foot blast in the 17th minute. Johnston battled to catch Oshoala on a fast break, sliding to deflect the ball as Solo charged.

Wambach finally put the United States ahead just before the end of the half when she rushed in on a corner kick from Megan Rapinoe and volleyed the ball into the goal at the far post.

Dede stopped a shot from an onrushing Morgan to open the second half.

A scary moment came when Wambach and Josephine Chukwunoye appeared to bump heads. Wambach got up quickly, but Chukwunoye — who got a yellow card on the play — was helped off but returned a few moments later.

Sydney Leroux, who grew up in the Vancouver area, replaced Morgan in the 65th minute. Leroux, who has an American father, left Canada as a teenager to pursue her goal of playing for the United States.

Nigeria, which was physical all game, was hurt when Sarah Nnodim was sent off with her second yellow of the night for a tackle on Leroux in the 69th minute. That put Nigeria at 10 players for the rest of the match.

Morgan, who has 51 goals in 84 international appearances, had not started in a match since April 11, the season opener for the Portland Thorns of the National Women’s Soccer League. Her last start for the United States came in a 4-0 victory over New Zealand in St. Louis, Missouri.

She wore pink tape on her knee during the match.

TIME Football

Joe Paterno Will Be Inducted Into Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame

Penn State football coach Joe Paterno acknowledges the crowd before an NCAA college football game against Wisconsin in State College, Pa. on Nov. 5, 2005.
Carolyn Kaster—AP Penn State football coach Joe Paterno acknowledges the crowd before an NCAA college football game against Wisconsin in State College, Pa. on Nov. 5, 2005.

The late Penn State football coach's legacy was marred by the Jerry Sandusky scandal

Joe Paterno, the late Penn State football coach whose legacy was tarnished by a child sex abuse scandal involving a team colleague, will be inducted into the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame.

The ceremony will take place in October, the university announced on Tuesday. Paterno led the Nittany Lion football program for 46 years—after 16 years as an assistant coach—and holds a NCAA Division I-record of 409 victories. He also helped produce dozens of nationally recognized scholar-athletes, eventually achieving an 87% NCAA graduation success rate in the year before his passing due to cancer on Jan. 22, 2012.

The coaching legend’s career ended in November 2011 after former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was arrested and charged with 52 counts of child sex abuse. Paterno was dismissed by university officials on grounds that he had allegedly failed to act after being alerted to Sandusky’s actions in 2002. Following Paterno’s death in early 2012, an independent report by former FBI director Louis Freeh showed that Paterno had concealed facts relating to Sandusky’s crimes. (Paterno’s family and lawyers have challenged the findings.)

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com