TIME Food & Drink

7 Wines to Pair With Your Favorite Halloween Candy

Assortment of candy
Getty Images

Here's what to eat and drink on October 31

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

One of the worst parts about being an adult is that, unless you want a weird neighborhood reputation, you can’t go trick-or-treating anymore. But one of the best parts about being an adult is that you can buy as much candy as you want and don’t have to wait for your parents to meter it out to you. Not only that, but now you can also drink while you eat it. To help us choose appropriate wines, we enlisted Alpana Singh, owner of the Boarding House in Chicago, judge on Food Network’s Food Truck Faceoff and the youngest woman to ever become a master sommelier (she was 23). Here are her recommendations for what to pair with whatever your favorite candy might be (NO CANDY CORN).

1. Sour Patch Kids and 2012 Hogue Late Harvest Riesling, Washington State ($9):

A mouth-puckering Riesling with sweet and sour notes of green apples, apricots and honey make for a seamless match with Sour Patch Kids.

2. Laffy Taffy and 2013 Quady Electra Moscato, California ($11):

Be it banana, green apple, watermelon or strawberry taffy, this versatile, slightly sparkling dessert wine with flavors of apricots, honey and green apples is sure to out a smile on your face.

3. Butterfinger and Pellegrino Sweet Marsala, Italy ($13):

Marsala isn’t just for making chicken. Enjoy the sweet raisin flavors with notes of toffee and buttered nuts with the slight salty and nutty flavors of Butterfinger candy.

4. Nerds and Dr. L Sparkling Riesling, Germany ($13):

Nerds are inherently sour and then sweet which perfectly describes this sparkling wine. The bubbles also act as a palate cleanser to get you ready for your next bite.

5. Mr. Goodbar and Sandeman Tawny Port, Portugal ($15):

Milk chocolate and roasted peanut flavors meld beautifully with the caramel, raisin, toffee and nutty notes of this delightful Port.

6. Nestle Crunch and 2012 Dashe Late Harvest Zinfandel, Dry Creek Valley ($24):

Sweet raspberry and strawberry flavors really bring out the crunchy milk chocolate goodness.

7. Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and Emilio Lustau Solera Sherry, Spain ($37):

The raisin, caramel and almond flavors enhance the creamy peanut butter filling.

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TIME celebrity

Watch Paul McCartney Rap About Vegetarians

A promo for Meat-Free Mondays

Sir Paul McCartney is not only one of the most famous musicians in the world, but he is also one of the most famous vegetarians in the world. In a new video, McCartney melds those two passions together into a jingle to promote Meat-Free Mondays.

The Meat-Free Monday movement stems from the idea that cutting out animal products from the human diet — even just getting meat consumption down to one day a week — can reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In this clip released ahead of the UN climate summit on Tuesday, McCartney calls on politicians and the public to commit to a weekly meat-free day to raise awareness of the environmental impacts of eating meat.

At the end of the call to action, McCartney starts rapping the web address for the organization. It’s hard to tell whether the former Beatle intended to burst into song, or whether he’s just so musically inclined that he couldn’t help it. One thing is for sure, though, you won’t forget that web address anytime soon.

TIME food and drink

6 Cocktails to Cure Your Ailments

Curative Cocktails
The Aztec Medicine Thomas Schauer

Life would be better if going to the doctor were like going to the bar

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

Life would be better if going to the doctor were like going to the bar. Way back in the days of yore, it used to be. Apothecaries, which were like pharmacists and doctors and herbalists rolled into one, often prescribed bitters and tinctures (alcohol-based infusions) to their customers. Now, sadly, your doctor won’t write you a script for Angostura—but mixologist Albert Trummer will. The man who brought the apothecary-influenced Apothéke to New York City is opening The Drawing Room at the Shelborne Wyndham in Miami this October. There, he’ll use his “little formula book” to make elixirs and cocktails designed to cure customers’ ailments.

Don’t expect to find aspirin-laced martinis or even medical marijuana-infused Manhattans on the menu. “I don’t want to compete with Pfizer,” Trummer says. His cocktails, elixirs and bitters are all made with natural (and legal) herbs, spices and fruits.

Here, a few of Trummer’s most useful prescriptions.

Ailment: Stress
Cure: Gin & Tonic from the Market
For his green market take on a classic gin and tonic, Trummer pours an herbaceous gin like Bombay Sapphire over fresh thyme, basil and cucumber. He tops it with Fever-Tree tonic water and house-made herbal bitters. Both thyme and rosemary are known to be natural stress relievers—and, of course, the alcohol content doesn’t hurt.

Ailment: Back pain
Cure: Aztec Medicine
For this painkilling cocktail, Trummer mixes muddled pineapple with Santa Teresa Rum, fresh lime juice and, the key ingredient, his own elixir #5. He makes the elixir with a tequila and mezcal base. “The Aztecs used to muddle blue agave and brew it to help relieve pain,” Trummer explains. Also in the elixir: herbs, habanero peppers (spicy peppers are known to help relieve pain) and aloe (whose curative powers anyone prone to burns will know well).

Ailment: Jet lag
Cure: Vanilla Negroni
“I practice this drink on myself because I have to fly all over the place,” says Trummer. He mixes a super-herbal sweet vermouth like one from Torino with Campari, gin and a few drops of his vanilla elixir. The vanilla doesn’t add sweetness, just the essence of vanilla. “I have two of those and I am over the jet lag,” he says.

Ailment: Insomnia
Cure: Red Wine Sangria
“No Champagne, no tequila, no mezcal,” says Trummer. “You need a red wine–based cocktail like sangria with cloves. If you do yoga on the beach and drink a couple of glasses of clove-heavy sangria, you’ll have a really good sleep.”

Ailment: Congestion
Cure: Saffron-Infused Bourbon
For people with blocked-up sinuses, Trummer serves a saffron-infused bourbon with rhubarb, celery and lavender essences. “It’s very cleansing,” he says.

Ailment: The Blues
Cure: The Healthy Brain
“I think there’s a happy hormone in Champagne,” Trummer says. To lift spirits, he recommends the occasional morning glass of Champagne with his own chocolate bitters made with cocoa beans, Cognac, a few drops of Angostura and some melted Valrhona chocolate.

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TIME Food & Drink

Pizza Hut Tests ‘Skinny Slice’

More fast food chains are adding lower calorie options, and it's not always working

Pizza Hut is testing out “skinny slices” in two U.S. cities for those who are trying to cut calories without cutting their favorite foods, the Associated Press reports.

In Toledo, Ohio, customers will be able to create an entire pie of skinny slices with up to five toppings, with each slice under 300 calories. In West Palm Beach, Fla., customers will have a selection of six pre-set skinny slice pies, with each slice under 250 calories.

The caloric reduction is due to using less dough and fewer toppings, a Pizza Hut spokesman told the AP.

A non-skinny slice of Pizza Hut pizza ranges from 180 calories (12″ medium Thin ‘N Crispy Veggie Lover’s) to 470 calories (14″ large pan Meat Lover’s), according to Pizza Hut’s nutrition information.

Pizza Hut’s lighter pizza is the fast food industry’s latest attempt at improving its image, though to date the success has been limited. Burger King last year unveiled its lower-calorie fries, called “Satisfries,” but discontinued them in August after the snack failed to resonate with customers. Domino’s previously tested a whole wheat crust to appeal to diners on the Atkins diet, but soon abandoned that idea, too.

In fact, the real demand at fast food restaurants may in fact be for their unhealthy options. At Wendy’s, for example, owners decided to bring back the Pretzel Bacon Burger permanently after strong customer demand, and the burger soon garnered heavy praise from critics and customers alike.

TIME food and drink

KFC Has Made a Fried Chicken Keyboard

KFC Japan
KFC Japan

Sadly, it's not edible

It’s time to move to Japan.

Not only do they get the goth-meets-gross black chicken sandwich at Burger King, snake-flavored ice cream and a tear sommelier, but now they are getting a KFC-branded fried chicken keyboard, too. It’s the perfect thing to write your resignation letter on as you pack your bags and head east.

A contest run by the Japanese branch of KFC is offering a chance to win KFC swag like a fried chicken keyboard, a fried chicken drumstick mouse that will make you drool all over the keyboard, and a fried chicken thumb drive that will have you backing up data in style.

KFC Japan
KFC Japan

Unfortunately, the contest is only open to KFC fans who are residents of Japan. Guess we’ll have to type on our boring old keyboards and console ourselves with waffle tacos and taco socks and terrifying Happy Meals. Or move.

TIME Food & Drink

Olive Garden Introduces the ‘Never Ending Pasta Pass’

Darden

For $100

Get ready for all-you-can-eat pasta.

Starting Monday afternoon, pasta fanatics can purchase online what Olive Garden is billing as limited edition Never Ending Pasta Passes. It buys seven weeks of unlimited pasta, salad, bread and Coca-Cola soft drinks, for the cool price of $100.

Only 1,000 passes will be released, the restaurant said, in conjunction with Olive Garden’s most popular promotional offer, the Never Ending Pasta Bowl. Jay Spenchian, the company’s executive vice president of marketing, said that it “served more than 13 million bowls of pasta during last year’s promotion.”

Both promotional offers will run from Sept. 22 through Nov. 9, and Spenchian hopes the new promotion will “make our fans feel like VIPS.”

TIME food and drink

Starbucks Plans New ‘Tasting Room’ and Express Stores

Megachain hopes to expand its pricier, small-batch coffee line

Starbucks is about to get fancier — and even more widespread.

The coffee giant announced plans Friday to open a Starbucks Roastery and Tasting Room on its home turf in Seattle by December, a move it hopes will anchor a significant expansion of its business and “transform the future of coffee.”

“Everything we have created and learned about coffee has led us to this moment,” CEO Howard Schultz said in a statement.

The 15,000-square-foot facility — which will highlight what the company calls “coffee theater” — will be an “integrated coffee roasting, education and retail space” that will allow it to ramp up production capacity for its small-batch “Starbucks Reserve” coffee line. That, in turn, will boost its availability to 1,500 locations worldwide.

Starbucks plans to open at least 100 new stores to highlight those coffee options and also test out express stores that will offer fewer products in a bid to lower customer wait times.

So, fear not: Beverage innovation is here.

TIME health

5 Things That Make You Overeat

bussiness-man-eating-alone
Businessman working on a laptop at breakfast table Getty Images

We eat solo about half of the time, according to a recent report. We dine alone 60% of the time at breakfast, 55% of the time at lunch, and up to 70% of the time when eating snacks. The solitary dining trend is due in part to on-the-go lifestyles, as well as the fact that nearly one third of households consist of just one person.

Whether you live alone or with your significant other or family, you may find yourself eating in a different way when you dine by yourself. Specifically, if you’re like many of my clients, you’re probably falling into some unhealthy eating traps. Here are five common dine-alone conundrums, along with practical ways to thwart them.

Health.com: 10 Weight Loss Mistakes Everyone Makes

Relying on processed convenience food

I’ve had numerous clients tell me that they don’t make meals from scratch when they dine alone, because they think, ‘why bother going to the trouble just for one person?’ As a result, they find themselves relying on frozen dinners or packaged products, and that quality difference can negatively affect your waistline. One recent study found that we burn about 50% more calories metabolizing whole foods versus processed foods. In other words, it’s not just about the total calories you consume; some prep and cooking time is a worthy investment, even for a solo meal. To keep it fresh, simple, and relatively fast, consider whipping up breakfast for dinner. You can sauté fresh veggies like tomatoes, onion, spinach, and mushrooms in low sodium organic veggie broth with garlic and herbs, and then pair it with either scrambled organic eggs or mashed white beans. Serve this over a small portion of healthy starch, such as quinoa or brown rice, and top with sliced avocado for healthy fat.

Health.com: 14 Ways to Cut Portions Without Feeling Hungry

Making too much

One of the biggest challenges many of my clients face when dining solo is making more than they need, which results in eating extra portions. I know it’s really a pain, or sometimes impossible, to make just a half cup of quinoa, for example. So if you cook more than you need for a single meal, keep a BPA-free storage container at the ready to stash your surplus in the fridge. And to check yourself, consider pulling out your measuring cups and spoons. Eating just 20% more than you need meal after meal can keep you about 20 pounds heavier–so while quality food rules, managing quantity is still key for weight control.

Eating while distracted

Eating alone often involves eating while doing something else–watching TV, checking email, reading, or surfing the web. And distracted eating is a major setup for overeating. When you aren’t paying attention, it’s easy to become disconnected from how much you’re eating, or how full you feel. And when you’re out of touch with the eating experience–not noticing the aromas, flavors, and textures because you’re multitasking–you’re more likely to feel unsatisfied, which can lead to post-meal snacking. I know it may feel awkward, but when dining alone, try to sit at a table and just eat. You may be surprised at how much more you enjoy your meal, and how much more satisfied you feel. In fact, many people have told me that establishing this habit resulted in getting excited about cooking again, so they could experiment with new recipes or seasonings.

Health.com: 10 Types of Hunger and How to Control Them

Gobbling too fast

Since dining alone isn’t social, you may be tempted to rush through a meal, in order to get onto your next task. But in addition to potentially triggering bloating and acid reflux, speed eating is a recipe for weight gain. One study of 3,000 people found that fast eaters were 84% more likely to be overweight. Set a goal to simply slow down; put your utensil or food down between bites, take a few breaths between forkfuls, and chew more thoroughly.

Mindless nibbling

Another common pitfall associated with eating solo is mindlessly nibbling, especially on snacks. One of my clients who often worked from home found herself grabbing whatever was within reach throughout the day, an apple from the fruit bowl, one of her son’s granola bars or hubby’s energy bars, a handful of jarred nuts…. If you’re in the same boat, the best remedy is to keep food out of your sightline, and schedule your meals and snacks. When this client began working from a desk rather than a kitchen stool, and set her cell phone alarm for a designated lunch and afternoon snack time, the extra noshing went away, and so did the excess pounds.

Health.com: A Slacker’s Guide to Losing Weight Without Trying

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

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