TIME Transportation

Video Captures Bus Exploding on Massachusetts Turnpike

No injuries have been reported

A bus on a Massachusetts highway exploded on Monday with the incident caught on camera.

Though the blast was violent enough to knock out the vehicle’s windows, there have been no reports of injuries, according to ABC News. The bus became engulfed in flames but firefighters eventually managed to get the blaze under control. One lane of eastbound traffic was closed due to the incident but reopened 20 minutes later.

The operating company, BoltBus, tweeted in the aftermath that the passengers were safe.

[ABC]

TIME Crime

See Baltimore Dig Out From the Ashes as National Guard Arrives

After a night of riots, looting and arson, Baltimore community members came out to restore "Charm City"

TIME Music

Lady Antebellum’s Tour Bus Caught on Fire

Firemen look at the damage after a fire on Lady Antebellum's bus on eastbound I-30 in Garland, Texas
Ron Baselice—The Dallas Morning News/Reuters Firemen look at the damage after a fire on county music group Lady Antebellum's bus on eastbound I-30 in Garland, Texas, April 16, 2015.

Everyone is OK

The Lady Antebellum tour bus was on the way to Dallas for the American Country Music Awards when a wheel blew out and the vehicle caught fire.

Singer Hillary Scott shared the news on Instagram, explaining that they “had to evacuate very quickly,” but that fortunately everyone is safe and sound. She was on the bus with her husband, manager and driver when they had to pull over in Garland, Tex. on Thursday morning, E! reports.

The group is up for Best Vocal Group of the Year at the ACM Awards, airing Sunday at 8 p.m. EDT on CBS.

[E!]

TIME fire

Huge Fire Rages at General Electric Building in Kentucky

Joshua Garcia (@garciagolf18) via Instagram Joshua Garcia posted this photo from Louisville, KY., on Apr. 3, 2015.

No reported deaths or injuries

A six-alarm fire broke out at General Electric Appliance Park in Louisville, Ky. early Friday, consuming the entire building. As of 3:30 pm, the fire was still blazing.

Jefferson County Fire spokesman Kevin Tyler confirmed that there were no deaths or reported injuries in the massive fire, but said the building is likely to be completely destroyed.

Fire officials are not yet sure what caused the blaze in the storage building, but said at this point they are just focused on putting out the flames. All production at the complex has been cancelled through next week, and affected employees will be relocated, according to WKLY.

Residents who live within a half-mile radius of the blaze have been ordered to shelter in place, according to Louisville emergency services spokeswoman Jody Duncan. The shelter-in-place order was not because of hazardous materials, but because of the smoke from the fire. “There is ash falling as well,” says Duncan, adding that the precaution is more for residents that have respiratory issues.

 

TIME Accident

California Firefighter in Critical Condition After Falling Through Burning Roof

Doctors say he is stable but remains in a critical condition

There has been an outpouring of support for Fire Captain Pete Dern, a firefighter who fell through a roof in Fresno, Calif., on Sunday while battling a house blaze, and remains critically injured in hospital.

The 49-year-old was venting the roof of a garage that was ablaze when it gave way and he fell into the flames. The dramatic moment was caught on video by a neighbor.

Dern was rescued within minutes by his fellow firefighters but suffered third degree burns to 65% of his body. Over $17,000 has been raised on You Caring in just over 12 hours for him and his family, reports ABC 30.

In a press conference on Monday, Dr. William Dominic, the medical director for burn services at the Community Regional Medical Center in Fresno, said Dern was stable and breathing with the help of a ventilator but remained in a critical condition.

“He is receiving very powerful intravenous pain and sedation medication but he is following commands and appears to be understanding what we are telling him and will do things when we ask him to do that,” said Dominic.

Dern’s injuries may still be life threatening and there is a risk he has severely damaged his lungs from smoke inhalation. He will likely remain in intensive care for months.

“It is a very high likelihood that at some point during his hospitalization he will have a significant infection,” Dominic added.

Fresno Fire Department called Dern “one of the most respected fire Captains on the Fresno Fire Department.”

And many others have taken to Twitter to show their support for the veteran who has served his community for 25 years.

[ABC 30]

TIME animals

See Firefighters Resuscitate Unconscious Cats

Clackamas Fire District 1

After a blaze, they saved two cats with feline-fitted oxygen masks

These firefighters are rescuing cats—not from trees, but from smoke inhalation.

After extinguishing a blaze in Oregon City, Ore. on Monday, rescue workers discovered two unconscious cats on the second floor of the house, Clackamas Fire District 1 says in a press release.

The firefighters brought the cats outside and treated them with special pet resuscitation equipment—plastic, cone-shaped oxygen masks fitted to the animals’ size that funnel air to their lungs.

Both cats revived and were taken to the vet by the homeowner’s son.

The fire department carries its pet equipment on all calls, and stocks masks for cats and dogs, officials say. And this isn’t the first time the department’s machines have added to a feline’s nine lives: it’s the second time in two months that the equipment has helped revive cats.

TIME conflict

Who Started the Reichstag Fire?

World War Two
FPG / Getty Images Firemen surveying the ruins following the Reichstag fire in Germany, 1933.

On Feb. 27, 1933, the building was destroyed — and no matter who did it, the Nazis got what they wanted

It’s a semi-mystery that’s over eight decades long: who set fire to the Reichstag, the German parliament, on Feb. 27, 1933?

As described in the Mar. 6, 1933, issue of TIME, the arson came amid “a campaign of unparalleled violence and bitterness” by then-Chancellor Adolf Hitler, in advance of an approaching German election, and it turned a building that was “as famous through Germany as is the dome of the Capitol in Washington among U. S. citizens” into “a glowing hodge-podge of incandescent girders.”

Marinus van der Lubbe, an unemployed Dutch bricklayer linked to the Communist party, was tried and executed for the crime the following year, but even then TIME questioned whether the Nazis who held him responsible were also the ones who had paid him to set the fire, “promising to save his neck by a Presidential reprieve and to reward him handsomely for hiding their identity and taking the whole blame in court.”

In 1981, a West Berlin court declared that the trial had been “a miscarriage of justice,” though they stopped short of saying that he had been innocent. In 2001, evidence emerged that the conspiracy theory had been right along, with historians announcing that the Nazis had been the ones responsible for the fire, though even then others disagreed — and, as recently as 2014, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum noted that “the origins of the fire are still unclear.”

But, while van der Lubbe’s life still hung in the balance, reporting on the aftermath of the fire made clear that, whoever set the spark, the aftermath had already been determined by Nazi powers, in their own favor. Here’s how TIME summed it up just a week after the original report on the fire:

Before German Democracy could thus be downed this week, the Hitler Cabinet had to launch last week a juggernaut of super-suppressive measures & decrees for which they needed an excuse. What excuse could be better than the colossal act of arson which had just sent a $1,500,000 fire roaring through the Reichstag Building […] gutting completely the brown oak Reichstag Chamber and ruining its great dome of gilded copper and glass.

The Reichstag fire was set by Communists, police promptly charged. Over a nationwide radio hookup the Minister of Interior for Prussia, blustering Nazi Captain Hermann Wilhelm Göring, cried: “The Reichstag fire was to have been the signal for the outbreak of civil war! … The Communists had in readiness ‘terror squads’ of 200 each … These were to commit their dastardly acts disguised as units of our own Nazi Storm Troops and the Stahlhelm … The women and children of high Government officials were to have been kidnapped as hostages and used in the civil war as ‘living shields’!…

“The Communists had organized to poison food … and burn down granaries throughout the Reich … They planned to use every kind of weapon—even hot water, knives and forks and boiling oil!…

“From all these horrors we have saved the Fatherland! We want to state clearly that the measures taken are not a mere defense against Communism. Ours is a fight to the finish until Communism has been absolutely uprooted in Germany!”

The “juggernaut” of new decrees included increasing the weaponry provided to Nazi troops (despite violation of the Treaty of Versailles) and the transfer of the majority of state powers from President Paul von Hindenburg to Hitler and his cabinet. Rights ensured by the German constitution were suspended, and a gag rule was placed on foreign journalists within the country, with severe punishments for violation. The German government was moved from Berlin to Potsdam. Within the month, TIME reported that nearly all of the country’s leading Communists and Socialists were in jail. By April, Nazis were using the threat of another fire to ensure the passage of the Enabling Act, which solidified Hitler’s place as dictatorial leader for years to come.

Whether Nazi involvement in the Reichstag fire was direct or indirect or, improbably, nonexistent, the result was the same.

TIME Accident

Witness the Aftermath of the New York Train Crash

Seven people were killed and several others injured after a commuter train collided with an SUV and caught fire Tuesday evening outside New York City

TIME Disaster

Firefighters Battle Massive Blaze Amid Freezing Temperatures in NYC

Largest blaze FDNY has battled since 2006

Around 270 firefighters and emergency medical services personnel were working to contain a seven-alarm fire on the New York City waterfront Saturday.

The blaze, which engulfed a storage building in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, cast thick, black smoke across the New York City skyline.

Firefighters are expected to be on the scene for days and possibly weeks, a FDNY spokesperson told TIME. Attempts to contain the fire were hampered by sub-freezing temperatures and high gusts of wind.

The fire is the largest the FDNY has battled since a 2006 fire at the Greenpoint Terminal Warehouse, also in Brooklyn.

 

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