MONEY Financial Education

The Surprising New Company Benefit That’s Helping Americans Retire Richer

chalkboard with graph showing increase in money over time
Oleg Prikhodko—Getty Images

Financial education at the office is booming—and none too soon.

Like it or not, the job of educating Americans about how to manage their money is falling to the corporations they work for—and new research suggests that many of those employers are responding.

Some 83% of companies feel a sense of responsibility for employees’ financial wellness, according to a Bank of America Merrill Lynch Workplace Benefits Report, which found the vast majority of large companies are investing in financial education programs. Among other things, companies are using the annual fall benefits re-enrollment period to talk about things like 401(k) deferral rates and asset allocation, and enjoying impressive results.

Workers are responding to other programs too. Another Merrill report found that retirement advice group sessions in the workplace rose 14% last year and that just about all of those sessions resulted in a positive outcome: employees enrolling in a 401(k) plan, increasing contributions, or signing up for more advice. Calls to employer-sponsored retirement education centers rose 17.6% and requests for one-on-one sessions more than doubled.

So a broad effort to educate Americans about money management is under way, including in government and schools—and none too soon. This year, Millennials became the largest share of the workforce. This is a huge generation coming of age with almost no social safety net. These 80 million strong must start saving early if they are going to retire. Given this generation’s love of mobile technology, it’s notable that Merrill found a 46% increase in visits to its mobile financial education platform. That means employers are reaching young workers, who as a group have shown enormous interest in saving.

“There is not a single good reason—none—that should prevent any American from gaining the knowledge and skills needed to build a healthy financial future,” writes Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, in a guest blog for the Council for Economic Education. His agency and dozens of nonprofits are pushing for financial education in grades K-12 but have had limited success. Just 17 states require a student to pass a personal finance course to graduate high school.

That’s why it’s critical that corporations take up the battle. Even college graduates entering the workplace generally lack basic personal money management skills. This often translates into lost time and productivity among workers trying to stay afloat in their personal financial affairs. So companies helping employees with financial advice is self serving, as well as beneficial to employees. Some argue it helps the economy as a whole, too, as it lessens the likelihood of another financial crisis linked to poor individual money decisions.

 

 

 

 

MONEY Kids and Money

Why Mothers Know Best About Money

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Jamie Grill—Getty Images

Eight in 10 Americans say they learned something about money from Mom. That's good, because Dad may have been a tad overconfident.

Moms deserve a lot of credit for the things they teach kids about money, and with Mother’s Day this weekend what better time to celebrate their financial tutelage? More than eight in 10 Americans say they learned something about money from their mother, a new survey shows.

The chief overall lesson: live within your means. That motherly wisdom was cited by 55% in the survey from BeFrugal.com. The same percentage said she taught them the difference between a want and a need. Some 44% said Mom emphasized the importance of being self-sufficient. Mom also taught them how to shop wisely: 67% said she taught them about sales, and 57% said she taught them about coupons.

These findings jibe with other research on the subject. A few years ago, TD Bank found that in many families Dad doles out allowance and oversees big purchases, and that Dad tends to be the most confident about money and most interested in results. Meanwhile, Mom is most interested in the kids’ money learning process and the day-to-day aspects of financial management.

Mom’s softer approach to money lessons probably stems from motherly wisdom in many areas. Life lessons like “don’t be late” and “practice, practice, practice” and “don’t be afraid to ask for help” and many others have direct application to the money world. After all, it’s sage advice indeed to never make a late payment and to seek advice on complicated money matters.

Given the financial mistakes that many parents have made—poorly managing credit cards, for example—some argue that young adults would do better to skip parental advice altogether and find a financial adviser or third-party online advice. But the best advice is probably to listen to both Mom and Dad. They often see financial matters differently. That’s natural—opposites attract. And through discussion and compromise, your parents probably run the household finances better together than either one would alone.

That’s good since kids—and even young adults—seem to depend on both Mom and Dad for financial advice. Two surveys last fall, one by Fidelity Investments and the other by TIAA-CREF, show that Millennials seek out their parents more than anyone else for financial guidance. Fidelity identified parents as their top choice for trusted money advice. TIAA-CREF found that 47% view their parents as especially influential in money matters.

So here’s to all the moms out there, imparting financial wisdom in ways only they seem able—and for being an important counter balance to all the fathers with misplaced confidence in their own money skills. Several studies have shown that women make better investors. But let’s give a nod to dads too. Embracing risk and a focus on results have their place, and the balance that both parents produce may be the best lesson of all.

Read next: What Dads Can Do to Really Help Mom This Mother’s Day

MONEY financial literacy

Most 20-Somethings Can’t Answer These 3 Financial Questions. Can You?

people taking quiz
Getty Images—Getty Images

A new study finds that young Americans could use some help when it comes to managing their money.

Just in time for financial literacy month, a new San Diego State University study of young Americans has found that they are lacking when it comes to financial knowledge and behavior.

Out of these three questions measuring basic financial knowledge, the average respondent could answer only 1.8 correctly—and only a quarter got all three right. (Answers are at the bottom of this story.)

(1) Do you think that the following statement is true or false? Buying a single company stock usually provides a safer return than a stock mutual fund.

(2) Suppose you had $100 in a savings account and the interest rate was 2% per year. After 5 years, how much do you think you would have in the account if you left the money to grow: More than $102, exactly $102, or less than $102?

(3) Imagine that the interest rate on your savings account was 1% per year and inflation was 2% per year. After 1 year, would you be able to buy more than, exactly the same as, or less than today with the money in this account?

Perhaps most troubling was what the research showed about how respondents have actually been managing their money. The average young person surveyed showed responsible behavior in only one of three categories: Paying off debts on time, budgeting and living within one’s means, and having any retirement savings at all. Only 2% of all respondents showed responsible behavior in all three categories.

Furthermore, the study—led by SDSU professors Ning Tang, Andrew Baker, and Paula Peter—found that there was little to no effect of financial knowledge on financial behavior. That is, young people manage money poorly, even when they know better.

But there is hope for America’s youth, says Tang.

“Our findings suggest that if you want to improve your own financial behavior, the best thing you can do is be open to the influences of others,” says Tang.

Though the study did not examine the influence of peers, its results suggest both family and financial professionals could play an important role in improving young people’s financial habits. The researchers found that being close with parents was correlated with better money management among women—and that higher self-reported levels of being “thorough” and “careful” was correlated with better financial behavior among men. Among both sexes, higher self-reported levels of being “self-disciplined” was correlated with better money habits.

That suggests educators and financial planners should focus on getting young people to be more self-aware in general and more motivated to improve their organizational habits across the board—not just when it comes to finances, says Tang.

“It can be helpful just to be more aware of your own psychological barriers,” she says.

One thing the study did not explore much is the cause of gender differences in the results. For example, the authors did not control for whether parents tend to treat daughters differently than sons.

And the answers to the questions above? They are: (1) false; (2) more than $102; and (3) less than today.

Read Next: This One Question Can Show If You’re Smarter Than Most U.S. Millennials

TIME

Why More Access to Credit Is Not a Good Thing

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It's basically like getting the keys to a race car we don't know how to drive

According to a recent survey from the New York Fed, Americans today feel pretty good about their ability to get credit. The percentage of people applying for credit cards ticked up over the last quarter, and it’s up about three percentage points since October 2013, while the percentages of rejected credit card applications and involuntary account closures have fallen. The percentage of people rejected when they ask for a credit limit increase has fallen even more sharply; as of last quarter, more than 75% of people who asked for increases got them.

And we think the good times are going to keep rolling. The same Fed survey found that more people expect to ask for credit limit increases — and get them — over the next 12 months. Abut 12% of survey respondents expect to apply for credit cards in the next year, a jump of about four percentage points over the previous quarter.

This would be all well and good, except for one tiny detail: We really have no idea what we’re doing when it comes to credit, and being clueless can cost us big bucks.

The 2015 Chase Slate Credit Survey finds that about 40% of us have never checked our credit scores, and people in this camp have a fuzzy grasp of what a “good” credit score entails. People who have never checked their credit think, on average, a score of 668 is good (it’s really not terrific).

Even among the people who have checked, they think a score of 719 is good — which is better, but still not where you need to be if you want to get the best rates. With a score like that, you’ll probably be able to get credit, but you might pay more, and these survey results indicate that many of us might not even realize we could be doing better and saving money in the process.

Chase also shows that we’re overconfident about our credit smarts in other ways. While almost 90% of people who say they’re in a “poor financial situation” have a good handle on what constitutes a good credit score, only about 80% of those who think they’re in good shape, credit-wise, know what that really means.

A survey by credit bureau TransUnion finds a similar knowledge gap: More than two in five of the people in its survey who checked their credit in the last month think your income is included in a credit report, and almost half of those who have checked their score in the last year think getting a raise automatically boosts your score. (Neither is true.)

And while we’ve got great intentions, we don’t always follow through: Although two-thirds of respondents to the Chase survey say they want to improve their credit over the next year, only about a third of respondents say they have a plan to do so, and more than one in five say they’ve never lifted a finger to improve their credit. More worrisome: A majority of people surveyed don’t even know paying bills on time is the top factor that contributes to your credit score.

Sometimes, this lack of knowledge can prevent us from educating ourselves further: 20% of respondents in TransUnion’s survey who checked their score in the last year think doing so lowered their score, which could keep them from checking it more frequently. In reality, checking your own score doesn’t hurt it; it’s only when a lender makes an inquiry that your score takes a small hit.

So, while lenders are happy to keep giving America credit and borrowers are eager to take it, many of us are doing so without even a basic grasp of how the system works. This isn’t blissful ignorance; this is potentially expensive ignorance, and the worst part is many people don’t know how or why to improve their credit.

 

MONEY Financial Education

Kids and Money: The Search for What Really Works

piggy banks with chalkboard saying "savings 101"
Getty Images

A new study aims to understand the effectiveness of the money lessons kids learn in school.

Those who oppose integrating financial education into our nation’s classrooms have long argued money lessons don’t actually change behavior. Slowly, evidence to the contrary is emerging. But much more proof is needed before personal finance will be taken as seriously as math, science, or history.

That line of thinking underlies a new $30 million commitment from professional services firm PwC, which in 2012 launched its Earn Your Future program, designed to help educators gain the tools and knowledge they need in order to teach kids about money. PwC pledged $100 million worth of service hours from its employees and $60 million in cash over five years.

This new commitment is all cash, and a good chunk of it takes aim at a research void: finding what teaching methods and strategies result in lasting behavior change among students who study personal finance. PwC has teamed with two major universities to analyze financial education programs in grade schools and colleges with the goal of understanding how students learn and apply money lessons.

“Financial capability techniques are still evolving,” says Shannon Schuyler, corporate responsibility leader at PwC. “We need to make sure that as we are implementing them into classrooms, we are measuring their effectiveness and adjusting our strategy and approach based on the findings from sound research.”

Critics say this may all be a waste of resources. They argue that marketing messages overwhelm the common sense you might learn as a young student, and that the financial landscape changes so fast that anything you learn about, say, bank fees and cell phone packages quickly becomes obsolete.

Such issues have been studied for years. We have a global library of some 1,400 papers on the subject. But only recently has this research begun to hone in on what really works. In a groundbreaking study in February, researchers at the University of Wisconsin Center for Financial Security tied personal finance lessons in school to higher credit scores among young adults. Other recent research sponsored by H&R Block found remarkable attitude changes in students following a nine-week personal finance course, including that 92% said learning about money management was very important and 80% wanted to learn more.

The new PwC commitment will also fund research into how iPads and other mobile technologies can speed learning of financial concepts—even as the firm sets aside more funds for good old-fashioned learning from print. A colorful six-page magazine through Time for Kids, Your $, spotlights financial literacy for kids. The print version is being distributed in New York schools and will roll out in Chicago this month. It is also available online.

Policymakers in the U.S. and around the world are embracing financial education as a way to help prevent or minimize the effects of another financial crisis. In the U.S., the Obama administration has made its priorities clear—it wants clean data that can be analyzed and used to find proof of financial education strategies that work. We seem to be moving that direction.

MONEY Savings

5 Signs You Will Become a Millionaire

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Martin Barraud—Getty Images

A million isn't what it used to be. But it's not bad, and here's how you get there.

A million bucks isn’t what it used to be. When your father, or maybe you, set that savings goal in 1980 it was like shooting for $3 million today. Still, millionaire status is nothing to sniff at—and new research suggests that a broad swath of millennials and Gen-Xers are on the right track.

The “emerging affluent” class, as defined in the latest Fidelity Millionaire Outlook study, has many of the same habits and traits as today’s millionaires and multimillionaires. You are in this class if you are 21 to 49 years of age with at least $100,000 of annual household income and $50,000 to $250,000 in investable assets. Fidelity found this group has five key points in common with today’s millionaires:

  • Lucrative career: The emerging affluent are largely pursuing careers in information technology, finance and accounting—much like many of today’s millionaires did years ago. They may be at a low level now, but they have time to climb the corporate ladder.
  • High income: The median household income of this emerging class is $125,000, more than double the median U.S. household income. That suggests they have more room to save now and are on track to earn and save even more.
  • Self-starters: Eight in 10 among the emerging affluent have built assets on their own, or added to those they inherited, which is also true of millionaires and multimillionaires.
  • Long-term focus: Three in four among the emerging affluent have a long-term approach to investments. Like the more established wealthy, this group stays with its investment regimen through all markets rather than try to time the market for short-term gains.
  • Appropriate aggressiveness: Similar to multimillionaires, the emerging affluent display a willingness to invest in riskier, high-growth assets for superior long-term returns.

Becoming a millionaire shouldn’t be difficult for millennials. All it takes is discipline and an early start. If you begin with $10,000 at age 25 and save $5,500 a year in an IRA that grows 6% a year, you will have $1 million at age 65. If you save in a 401(k) plan that matches half your contributions, you’ll amass nearly $1.5 million. That’s with no inheritance or other savings. Such sums may sound big to a young adult making little money. But if they save just $3,000 a year for seven years and then boost it to $7,500 a year, they will reach $1 million by age 65.

An emerging affluent who already has up to $250,000 and a big income can do this without breaking a sweat. They should be shooting far higher—to at least $3 million by 2050, just to keep pace with what $1 million buys today (assuming 3% annual inflation). But they will need $6 million in 2050 to have the purchasing power of $1 million back in 1980, when your father could rightly claim that a million dollars would make him rich.

Read next: What’s Your Best Path to $1 Million?

MONEY Kids and Money

The High School Class That Makes People Richer

Graduates with $$ on their caps
Mark Scott—Getty Images

Kids really do benefit from learning about money in school, new data show

Most experts believe students who study personal finance in school learn valuable money management concepts. Less clear is how much they retain into adulthood and whether studying things like budgets and saving changes behavior for the better.

But evidence that financial education works is beginning to surface. Researchers at the Center for Financial Security at the University of Wisconsin recently found a direct tie between personal finance classes in high school and higher credit scores as young adults. Now, national results from a high school “budget challenge” further build the case.

Researchers surveyed more than 25,000 high school students that participated in a nine-week Budget Challenge Simulation contest last fall and found the students made remarkable strides in financial awareness. After the contest:

  • 92% said learning about money management was very important and 80% wanted to learn more
  • 92% said they were more likely to check their account balance before writing a check
  • 89% said they were more confident and 91% said they were more aware of money pitfalls and mistakes
  • 87% said they were better able to avoid bank and credit card fees
  • 84% said they were better able to understand fine print and 79% said they were better able to compare financial products
  • 78% said they learned money management methods that worked best for them
  • 53% said they were rethinking their college major or career choice with an eye toward higher pay

These figures represent a vast improvement over attitudes about money before the contest, which H&R Block sponsored and individual teachers led in connection with a class. For example, among those surveyed before and after the contest, those who said learning about money was very important jumped to 92% from 81% and those who said having a budget was very important jumped to 84% from 71%. Those who said they should spend at least 45 minutes a month on their finances jumped to 44% from 31%.

The budget challenge simulates life decisions around insurance, retirement saving, household budgets, income, rent, cable packages, student loans, cell phones, and bank accounts. Teachers like it because it is experiential learning wrapped around a game with prizes. Every decision reshapes a student’s simulated financial picture and leads to more decision points, like when to a pay a bill in full or pay only the minimum to avoid fees while waiting for the next paycheck.

Block is giving away $3 million in scholarships and classroom grants to winners. The first round of awards totaling $1.4 million went out the door in January.

The new data fall short of proving that financial education leads to behavior improvement and smarter decisions as adults, and such proof is sorely needed if schools to are to hop on board with programs like this in a meaningful way. Yet the results clearly point to long-term benefits.

Once a student—no matter what age, including adults—learns that fine print is important and bank fees add up she is likely to be on the lookout the rest of her life. Once a student chooses to keep learning about money management he usually does. Added confidence only helps. Once students develop habits that work well for them and understand pitfalls and mistakes, they are likely to keep searching for what works and what protects them even as the world changes and their finances grow more complex. Slowly, skeptics about individuals’ ability to learn and sort out money issues for themselves are being discredited. But we have a long way to go.

 

MONEY retirement planning

What Women Can Do to Increase their Retirement Confidence

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Izabela Habur—Getty Images

Knowing how much to save and how to invest can help women feel more secure. Here's a cheat sheet.

Half of women report feeling worried about having enough money to last through retirement, according to a new survey from Fidelity Investments of 1,542 women with retirement plans.

Those anxieties aren’t necessarily misplaced either.

Women have longer projected lifespans than men and even if married, are likely to spend at least a portion of their older years alone due to widowhood.

“So they need larger pots of money to ensure they won’t outlive their savings,” says Kathy Murphy, president of personal investing at Fidelity.

Earlier research by the company found that while women save more on average for retirement (socking away an average 8.3% of their salary in 401(k)s vs. 7.9% for men) they typically earn two-thirds of what men do and thus have smaller retirement account balances ($63,700 versus $95,800 for men).

Also, while women are more disciplined long term investors who are less likely than men to time the market, women are also more reluctant to take risk with their portfolios, says Murphy.

“And if you invest too conservatively for your age and your time horizon, that money isn’t working hard enough for you,” she adds.

How Women Can Increase their Confidence

Financial education can help women reduce the confidence gap, and get to the finish line better prepared, says Murphy.

According to the Fidelity survey, some 92% of women say they want to learn more about financial planning. And there’s a lot you can do for free to educate yourself, notes Murphy. As an example, she notes that many employers now offer investing webinars and workshops for 401(k) participants.

You might also start by reading Money’s Ultimate Guide to Retirement for the least you need to know about retirement planning, in digestible chunks of plain English. In particular, you might check out the piece on figuring out the right mix of stocks and bonds, to help you determine if you’re being too risk averse.

Also, simply calculating how much you need to save for the retirement you want—using tools like T. Rowe Price’s Retirement Income Planner—can help you make plans and feel more secure.

The 10-minute exercise can have a powerful payoff: The Employee Benefit Research Institute regularly finds in its annual Retirement Confidence Index that people who even do a quick estimate have a much better handle on how much they need to save and are more confident about their money situation. Also, according to research by Georgetown University econ professor Annamaria Lusardi, who is also academic director of the university’s Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center, people who plan for retirement end up with three times the amount of wealth as non-planners.

Says Murphy, “We need to let women in on the secret that investing isn’t that hard.”

More from Money.com’s Ultimate Guide to Retirement:

MONEY Kids and Money

New Findings About Kids and Money That Your School Can’t Ignore

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Getty Images

For the first time, researchers have directly tied personal finance instruction in high school to better adult behavior. This could change everything.

A required personal finance course in high school leads to higher credit scores and fewer missed payments among young adults, new research shows. These are groundbreaking findings likely to alter educators’ thinking in 50 states.

Until now, researchers have been unable to show consistent evidence that mandatory financial education improved students’ money management skills. With no proof, states have moved slowly on this front—despite encouragement from the president and federal education officials who see financial education as a critical part of the strategy to avoid another financial crisis.

Only 22 states require students to take an economics course, and just 17 require instruction in personal finance, according to the Council for Economic Education’s most recent Survey of the States. While countries like Australia and England have adopted federal mandates for such coursework, the effort in the U.S. is at the state level and has been slow to gain traction.

Critics of financial education have long argued that kids may learn financial concepts but do not retain them long enough to change behavior as adults, and that the power of advertising overwhelms any lessons of frugality learned in high school. Some believe financial education is a waste, and that we are better off using resources to set up third-party point-of-decision counseling.

Now the whole conversation may change. “I hope many people will read this paper and that many more states will adopt financial education in high school,” says Annamaria Lusardi, academic director at the Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center and an economics professor at the George Washington University School of Business.

Looking at students in three states—Georgia, Idaho, and Texas—that recently adopted relatively thorough financial education requirements, researchers tied to the Center for Financial Security at the University of Wisconsin found that young adults 18-22 in those states had higher credit scores and fewer credit delinquencies than students in neighboring states without a financial education requirement.

Interestingly, the first class of students in each state required to take such a course showed little or no improvement in credit score or delinquencies. But each subsequent class made noticeable strides toward smarter money management. This suggests there is a learning curve for teachers and schools, and that they become far more effective with practice.

Specifically, the research showed that three years after high school, students required to take a financial education class had significantly improved credit scores—up 11 points in Georgia, 16 points in Idaho, and 32 points in Texas, outstripping the gains in comparable states. In the third year, all three states also had cut the rate of credit payments at least 90 days late in this age group by 10% in Georgia, 16% in Idaho, and 33% in Texas.

Young adults have been shown to have particularly low levels of financial acumen; they are most prone to expensive credit behaviors like payday loans and paying interest and late fees on credit card balances. This behavior, combined with soaring student debt, often puts them in a financial bind before they earn their first paycheck. A little financial education, the evidence now shows, may go long way.

Read more about kids and money:
4 Costly Money Mistakes You’re Making With Your Kids
3 Money Skills to Teach Your Teen
8 Ways to Teach Your Kids to Be Financially Independent

MONEY 401(k)s

Why Your Employer May Be Your Best Financial Adviser

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Thomas Barwick—Getty Images

Employers are offering more than 401(k) advice. They are adding financial wellness programs that help workers budget, save for a home, and more.

Large employers are taking on the roles of retirement adviser and financial educator in increasing numbers, new research shows. This is welcome news, because the federal government and our schools have not done a great job on this front, and individuals generally have not been able to manage well on their own.

Employers have been tiptoeing into retirement planning for workers for years as part of their 401(k) plan benefits. Typically, the advice has been offered in the form of printed materials and online informational websites. More recently, personalized advice has become available through call-in services and, in some cases, face-to-face meetings with planners arranged through work.

But what started as help with, say, settling on a contribution rate and choosing appropriate investment options has evolved into a more rounded service that may offer lessons in how to budget and save for college or a home. A breathtaking 93% of employers intend to beef up their efforts at helping workers achieve overall financial wellness in a way that goes beyond retirement issues, according to an Aon Hewitt survey.

This effort promises to fill a deep void. Just five states require a stand-alone personal finance course in high school, and just 13 require money management instruction as part of some other class. Meanwhile, the Social Security and pension safety net continues to grow threadbare. Someone has to take charge of our crisis in financial know-how.

Employers don’t relish this role. It comes with lots of questions about fiduciary duty and liabilities related to the advice that is proffered. Yet legal obstacles are slowly being cleared away to encourage more employer involvement, which is coming in part out of self interest. Financially fit workers are more productive and more engaged, research shows.

A company that offers a financial wellness benefit could save $3 for every $1 they spend on their programs, according to a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau report. These programs also reduce absenteeism and worker disability costs. That’s because money problems may cause stress that leads to ill health. So helping employees improve not just their retirement plan but their entire financial picture makes sense.

Among the upgrades most popular with employers, Aon found:

  • 69% offer online investment guidance, up from 56% last year, and 18% of the rest are very likely to add this feature in 2015.
  • 53% offer phone access to financial advisers, up from 35% last year.
  • 49% offer third-party investment advice, up from 44% last year.

Aon also found that 34% of employers have cut their 401(k) plan’s administrative and other costs, compared with just 27% a year ago. This echoes a BrightScope study, which found that employers generally are beefing up investment options while reducing fees in their 401(k) plans. In all, it seems employers are embracing their role as financial big brother—for their own good as well as the good of their workers.

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