MONEY Estate Planning

Why My Grandparents’ Home Got Torn Down

Empty residential lot
Shutterstock

Estate planning can prevent a lot of heartache.

My family loves get-togethers—we find any reason to gather and eat. We credit this wonderful trait to my grandparents. They were gracious hosts with amazing culinary skills. Their home, built with my grandfather’s hands, was a sanctuary for family, friends, and welcome strangers.

My grandparents didn’t just leave legacy of memorable gatherings; they also left their home to their children, expecting regular family reunions after they were gone. My grandparents would not have it any other way!

My grandmother died in 1994, eight years after my grandfather’s death.

Their children tried their best to embrace my grandparents’ vision of maintaining the family home. But time, distance, and money wreaked havoc on implementing the plan. Our hearts sank as the house slowly fell into disrepair. It took almost 14 years before the children agreed that one sibling would buy out the other childrens’ shares of the home.

By then, however, the damage to the home was done. Now, only the land and memories remain.

I believe that if my grandparents had addressed certain questions about the house, they might have been able to protect it after their death with some thoughtful estate planning. Here are those questions:

  • Who wants to keep the home?
  • Who would prefer their inheritance to be cash instead?
  • Who can afford to buy the home?
  • How will the children handle multiple owners now? How would they handle ownership upon their own divorce or death?
  • Who will pay the property taxes?
  • Who will ensure upkeep?

One option might have been an estate-planning provision requiring the home be sold, with the first rights to buy given to the children. Or maybe the home could have been left to one or more children, and other assets left to other children to equalize inheritances. Maybe they could have established a trust in order to fund perpetual care of the home, and to manage generational ownership.

These considerations and others in the estate planning process might have allowed the children to preserve both their wealth and their legacy.

A significant amount of wealth is transferred through real estate. According to a 2014 study by Credit Suisse and Brandeis University’s Institute on Asset and Social Policy, the primary residence represents 31% of total assets for the top 5% of wealthy black families in the U.S. and 22% for the wealthiest white Americans. The percentage of wealth embodied in a primary residence is even greater for less well-off households.

Now it’s up to my aunts and uncles to get it right for the next generation. Will wealth be lost again or will it transfer for the benefit of their descendants? It’s a great question for the next family gathering…at a place to be determined.

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Lazetta Rainey Braxton is a certified financial planner and CEO of Financial Fountains. She assists individuals, families, and institutions with achieving financial well-being and contributing to the common good through financial planning and investment management services. She serves as president of the Association of African American Financial Advisors. Braxton holds an MBA in finance and entrepreneurship from the Wake Forest University Babcock Graduate School of Management and a BS in finance and international business from the University of Virginia.

MONEY financial advice

Vanguard’s Founder Explains What Your Investment Adviser Should Do

Jack Bogle, founder of the mutual fund giant, shares what makes an investment adviser worth paying for.

The life of a financial adviser can be very tricky. Many of them believe that leaving a client’s investments alone is the best option, but when, year after year, clients come in asking what the best course of action is for their money, what do you tell them? Jack Bogle, who 40 years ago founded the mutual fund giant Vanguard (it now has about $3 trillion of assets under management), explains exactly what a financial adviser should do and what a financial adviser should say.

Read next: Jack Bogle Explains How the Index Fund Won With Investors

MONEY financial advice

Financial Website Brothers Share Their Best Financial Advice

BrightScope co-founders Mike and Ryan Alfred talk about retirement savings and their biggest money mistakes.

Save until it hurts was the first thing Mike Alfred, a co-founder of BrightScope, said about retirement savings, and that’s part of his best financial advice to give others as well. “Live below your means,” he said, “which sounds very simple in theory but it much more difficult in practice.” His brother Ryan, the other BrightScope co-founder, suggests keeping your investments at arms-length so you’re not tempted to overanalyze them.

Mike said his biggest mistake was buying in to the dot-com bubble, while Ryan talks about how they funded a large part of their business on their own credit cards.

Read next: The Co-founders of BrightScope Share The Painful Secret to Retirement Success

MONEY financial advice

How to Become a 401(k) Millionaire

Fidelity Investments' Jeanne Thompson lays out three simple steps.

For millennials, retirement is something that feels like it’s forever away, which is a good thing when it comes to preparing for it. Jeanne Thompson, Fidelity Investments’ vice president of thought leadership, lays out three simple steps for hitting the ultimate 401(k) milestone: a million dollars.

1) Save a lot. Seriously, save as much as you can. One of the BrightScope co-founders phrases it simply as “Save until it hurts.

2) Start now. When you start saving while you’re young—Thompson says 25 at the latest—you give your money as much time as possible to mature alongside you.

3) Invest for growth. Keep your eye on stocks, and don’t shy away from aggressive investments.

Read next: The Painful Secret to Retirement Success

MONEY financial advice

The Painful Secret to Retirement Success

The co-founders of retirement and investment analytics firm BrightScope share the secret of a well-funded retirement.

BrightScope co-founders (and brothers) Mike and Ryan Alfred say saving is the most important thing you can do for your retirement. Start saving early and start saving a lot—way more than the 5% or 6% that workers put in their 401(k) to get an employer match. Ryan, president and chief operating officer, said he knows it can be hard to start saving when you’re young and just started a career, but he thinks you should start saving a little bit and try to increase how much you save each year.

MONEY financial advice

How Vanguard Founder Jack Bogle Invests His Grandchildren’s Money

Ahead of Father's Day, Bogle also talks about the investment advice he gives—or doesn't give—his children.

Just a few days before Father’s Day 2015, MONEY assistant managing editor Pat Regnier interviewed John C. “Jack” Bogle, the founder and former CEO of Vanguard, the world’s largest mutual fund company. The elder statesman of the mutual fund industry—and a pioneer in index investing—talked about the investing advice he gives his children, one of whom runs a hedge fund, along with how he invests, and doesn’t invest, on behalf of his grandchildren. Look for an in-depth interview with Bogle in an upcoming issue of MONEY.

Read next: Where are Most of the World’s Millionaires?

MONEY stock market

A Financial Planner’s Investment Advice for His Son — and Everyone Else

family on roller coaster
Joe McBride—Getty Images

Father's Day has a financial adviser thinking about important lessons to be passing along.

A friend recently asked me to recommend a book for his son on buying and selling stocks.

As I pondered his request, I started thinking about the various books I’ve read or skimmed over my 24-plus years of working in financial services. Initially, I was overwhelmed with titles. Then I started thinking about my own teenaged son and the difficulty I was having getting him to think differently about his money—that he won’t always be able to depend on his parents to help him out. Anyway, I thought if I couldn’t compel a 14-year-old to change his ways, what could I say to my friend’s son, who’s in his 20s?

Finally, I asked myself what would I say—not bark, I promise—to my own son if he were in his 20s and came to me for investing advice? This is what I came up with:

You can go to just about any investment site (e.g. Vanguard, Schwab, or Fidelity) to learn the fundamentals of investing. You need to know, however, that the process of buying and selling is not hard. The real challenge is knowing what to buy, when to buy, and when to sell. If you plan to make investing a career, there is a lot more you need to know than you can learn from a website or book. That would require another conversation.

For now, I would advise you to think long and hard about why you want to invest. In other words, take time to map out your life goals for the next three to five years and the financial resources you will need to achieve them.

Simply saying you want to invest “to make money” will not work when you are invested in a fluctuating market. Short-term volatility can be a bear (pun intended). You have to be willing to ask how much money you can withstand losing when the market goes down, as well as how much profit is enough. As the old Wall Street saying goes, bulls make money in up markets, bears in down markets, and pigs get slaughtered. You also have to be willing to ask yourself how long you plan to stay invested, no matter how much the market fluctuates or falls.

Why am I focusing on declining markets and roller-coaster, up-and-down markets? It’s because people tend to fixate on rising stocks and profits, but pay very little attention to the markets’ inevitable declines. Everyone loves bull markets, which are great for the average investor. But when the market heads south quickly or takes a long, slow journey to the cellar, someone who was looking to make a quick profit can suffer a lot of stress.

Finally, I hope this short note does not come across as too preachy. I congratulate you on your interest in investing, and I will end by saying you are way ahead of the game because you’re thinking about investing now instead of later. Good luck.

Read next: The 3 Most Important Money Lessons My Dad Taught Me

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Frank Paré is a certified financial planner in private practice in Oakland, California. He and his firm, PF Wealth Management Group, specialize in serving professional women in transition. Frank is currently on the board of the Financial Planning Association and was a recipient of the FPA’s 2011 Heart of Financial Planning award.

MONEY Kids and Money

The 3 Most Important Money Lessons My Dad Taught Me

father letting son swipe credit card at cash register
Monashee Frantz—Getty Images

Many of our financial dos and don'ts are instilled by parents at an early age. Here's what my father passed along to me.

One of the responses I often hear from clients toward the end of a financial planning meeting is, “This sounds good. I’m going to talk to my dad about it.”

For many of us, our mothers and fathers have played a profound role in shaping our financial habits—so much so that we still discuss our plans with our parents well into our adult lives. Whether it’s deciding where to invest retirement savings, how much to pay for a first home, or how much of each paycheck to invest in a 401(k), we sometimes go to our parents to help make decisions and to doublecheck we’re on the right path.

These conversations with many of my clients have me thinking about the values and habits my father instilled in me at a young age. Three very powerful lessons come to mind:

Live Within Your Means

On my eighth birthday, my father began to teach me how to live within my means. As I write those words, it sounds funny, even to me. He sat me down and taught me about an allowance. He was going to provide me with a weekly stipend that I would later come to realize was my means. I was going to have a set amount of money that I could spend on anything I’d like. The only catch was that once I spent it all, I couldn’t buy anything else until the following Friday when I received my next allowance. At the age of 8, I began to learn how to budget, how to save, and how to spend wisely.

Plan For the Future

At 14, my father took me to his bank’s local branch to open my first savings account. We sat down at the desk with the bank manager and I shared that I had saved $370 and I needed a place to keep it so it would grow. Entering high school, I knew I wanted two things on the day I turned 16: a driver’s license and a car. If I was going to make them both happen, I was going to need a plan. Dad and I worked out a savings plan to help me save the money I earned from a part-time tutoring job. It took me a bit longer to save up for my first car than I anticipated, but planning and saving to reach a future goal is a valuable life lesson—one I share with my clients every day..

Start Today

When I was 16, I sat down again with Dad to learn about a Roth IRA, retirement planning and perhaps, most importantly, compound interest. I learned that by starting early and investing, my money could grow. By opening an investment account and saving into my Roth IRA with the possibility to earn compound returns, I could potentially become a millionaire when I was older—a crazy thought for a 16-year-old. We charted out a simple savings plan to invest a portion of each paycheck I earned—a savings and investing program I follow to this day.

On the occasion of Father’s Day, I thank you, Dad, for instilling many of my financial values and habits at a young age—habits that will continue to shape the decisions I make for years to come.

Read next: 3 Financial Lessons For Dads on Father’s Day

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Joe O’Boyle is a financial adviser with Voya Financial Advisors. Based in Beverly Hills, Calif., O’Boyle provides personalized, full service financial and retirement planning to individual and corporate clients. O’Boyle focuses on the entertainment, legal and medical industries, with a particular interest in educating Gen Xers and Millennials about the benefits of early retirement planning.

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