MONEY financial advice

CEO of World’s Largest Mutual Fund Company Shares His Best Financial Advice

The CEO of the world's largest mutual fund company shares the best financial advice he ever got and reveals his biggest money mistake.

MONEY Financial Education

The Surprising New Company Benefit That’s Helping Americans Retire Richer

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Financial education at the office is booming—and none too soon.

Like it or not, the job of educating Americans about how to manage their money is falling to the corporations they work for—and new research suggests that many of those employers are responding.

Some 83% of companies feel a sense of responsibility for employees’ financial wellness, according to a Bank of America Merrill Lynch Workplace Benefits Report, which found the vast majority of large companies are investing in financial education programs. Among other things, companies are using the annual fall benefits re-enrollment period to talk about things like 401(k) deferral rates and asset allocation, and enjoying impressive results.

Workers are responding to other programs too. Another Merrill report found that retirement advice group sessions in the workplace rose 14% last year and that just about all of those sessions resulted in a positive outcome: employees enrolling in a 401(k) plan, increasing contributions, or signing up for more advice. Calls to employer-sponsored retirement education centers rose 17.6% and requests for one-on-one sessions more than doubled.

So a broad effort to educate Americans about money management is under way, including in government and schools—and none too soon. This year, Millennials became the largest share of the workforce. This is a huge generation coming of age with almost no social safety net. These 80 million strong must start saving early if they are going to retire. Given this generation’s love of mobile technology, it’s notable that Merrill found a 46% increase in visits to its mobile financial education platform. That means employers are reaching young workers, who as a group have shown enormous interest in saving.

“There is not a single good reason—none—that should prevent any American from gaining the knowledge and skills needed to build a healthy financial future,” writes Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, in a guest blog for the Council for Economic Education. His agency and dozens of nonprofits are pushing for financial education in grades K-12 but have had limited success. Just 17 states require a student to pass a personal finance course to graduate high school.

That’s why it’s critical that corporations take up the battle. Even college graduates entering the workplace generally lack basic personal money management skills. This often translates into lost time and productivity among workers trying to stay afloat in their personal financial affairs. So companies helping employees with financial advice is self serving, as well as beneficial to employees. Some argue it helps the economy as a whole, too, as it lessens the likelihood of another financial crisis linked to poor individual money decisions.

 

 

 

 

MONEY financial advisers

Breaking Up Is Hard to Do…With Your Financial Adviser

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Sarina Finkelstein (photo illustration)—Ashley Jouhar/Getty Images

Firing a financial adviser can be uncomfortable, but certain circumstances make it necessary.

Ending a relationship is never easy. You nurture it, get comfortable with it, and you learn what to expect. Sometimes you think about walking away because you’re just not sure it’s what you want. You wonder if breaking up is worth the hassle — and you decide to stick it out, telling yourself that next year will be better. But will it? Maybe not.

Should I stay or should I go? It’s a question people regularly ask, not just about their significant other but also about their hair stylist, their personal trainer, and, yes, their financial adviser.

The idea of leaving your financial adviser — and having to find a replacement — can be daunting. It involves a lot of research, paperwork, meetings, and time. Lots of time. All that and still no guarantee that this new adviser will be any better than the old one.

But things are changing. Consumers with money to save and invest now have more affordable, higher-quality investment options to choose from. As a result, more and more people are rethinking their long-term relationships with their financial advisers.

Four percent to six percent of U.S. investors change financial advisers in a given year, according to a 2014 survey by Spectrem Group, a firm that researches investors. The reasons for these break-ups vary, but ranking high on the list are a lack of communication, frustration with complex or hidden fees, and major life events such as death, divorce, or inheritance.

It was the death of a parent that started the ball rolling for one of my clients. A smart, savvy, and accomplished woman in her mid-30s, she juggles a demanding career, marriage and motherhood. When her father, a successful real estate developer, passed away unexpectedly, she and her sisters inherited money and securities. They also inherited his long-time financial adviser.

For years, her father had trusted this adviser to work in the family’s best financial interests, and she had no plans to end the relationship. The emotional loyalty factor made it hard to jump ship. Besides, she was only paying the typical 1% fee for decent portfolio growth.

Then she did a little digging and some comparison-shopping, just for her own education, and discovered she was wrong. In fact, her adviser had invested her in an actively managed fund with significant fees. He also had recommended a new fund for her — one with a front-end load that took 5% off the top. When all was said and done, she was paying 2.3% in annual fees, not the typical 1%.

Not only was she surprised, she was furious. She felt like a trust had been broken, which is understandable. As she told me, if the financial adviser had disclosed all of the funds and fees up front, she might have reacted differently. But he didn’t, and that made it much easier for her to leave and take her retirement account with her.

So if you’re re-evaluating your adviser’s performance, consider what’s important to you and your financial goals. Do you want better communication, a lower risk factor, lower fees? Or is it just time to shake off the inertia? Whatever your reasons, if the relationship isn’t working for you, don’t be afraid to kiss it goodbye.

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Sally Brandon is vice president of client services for Rebalance IRA, a retirement-focused investment advisory firm with almost $250 million of assets under management. In this role, she manages a wide range of retirement investing needs for over 350 clients. Sally earned her BA from UCLA and an MBA from USC.

MONEY Small Business

New Ways to Invest in Small Businesses

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When nonprofessional investors are able to put money into small businesses, everyone can benefit.

I met with Paul on Tuesday. He is the CFO of a business start-up. He’s not sure if the next phase of his company’s financing is going to go through. Although he believes in the business model and the mission of the company, some days he thinks he won’t have a job in three weeks.

I met with David on Wednesday. While he’s a great saver and earns a decent buck, he isn’t wealthy. He wants to invest in small companies so much that we’ve set up a “fun money” account, which is 10% of his otherwise well-diversified, passively managed portfolio. “Fun money” is specifically set aside so that he can make individual investments he believes in.

Because of the way small business investing is structured in this country, the likelihood of Paul and David connecting has been infinitesimally small.

This drives me mad.

It’s not just these two who are missing out. Because small companies drive job and economic growth, the economy of the country loses when Paul and David don’t connect. And because the current system of funding is biased, some small businesses are a lot less likely to get funding despite their worthy ideas.

Recent developments could change all this.

To raise their initial start up money, small business owners typically first use their savings, and then appeal to their friends and family. Next, they go to banks. If they get big enough and have certain ambitions and contacts, they can get venture capital funding or private equity funding, which is what Paul was waiting on.

These sources of capital are all enhanced if you are affluent and well connected. Do your friends and family have extra money to invest in your business? Do you know anyone you can talk to at a bank? What about impressing people in the venture capital world? A lot of people with good ideas are shut out.

Enter the Internet. Raising money got a lot easier.

The Power of Reward Sites

With reward sites, startups with good ideas raise money in exchange for rewards.

Sesame, which opens doors remotely from smartphones, raised over $1.4 million on Kickstarter.com. The reward here was a chance to order the device.

Then there is Lammily, Barbie’s realistically proportioned cousin, whose designer raised almost $500,000 through Tilt.com. The reward for funding Lammily was the chance to pre-order the doll, and sticker packs with stretch marks, cellulite, freckles, and boo-boos.

The reward sites show that companies can raise large amounts of money through small contributions from a large number of people. Research suggests that Kickstarter.com reduces company funding gender bias by an order of magnitude and reduces geographic bias as well. Reward sites cater to consumers who love new products and want to support new ideas.

You may get first dibs on a cool new doll, but sending money to a reward site isn’t investing.

The Risks of Private Equity

Traditionally, to get private equity funding, you have to sell to accredited investors — the richest 1% of the population, roughly speaking.

Accredited investor regulations were set up in in the wake of the 1929 crash, when a lot of people got ripped off because they invested in dubious enterprises. The idea was that people with a high level of wealth are sophisticated enough to understand investment risk. Unfortunately, this leaves the Davids of the world — investors who are sophisticated but wealthy — shut out of these types of investments.

Private equity placements are not always a great deal. When I’ve looked into them for clients, I’ve concluded they are expensive, risky, and difficult to get out of, even if you die. The middlemen who offer these and the advisers who sell these seem to be the ones most likely to make money. The best deals I’ve looked at weren’t hawked by sales people or investment advisers, but came through clients’ friends and family.

The rise of Internet portals set up to connect small companies with accredited investors has the potential to cut down on intermediary costs. Still, the sector remains small.

In 2012, President Obama signed the JOBS act, which directed the Securities and Exchange Commission to devise rules opening up small business investing to non-accredited investors.

Some organizations didn’t wait for the SEC to issue the rules. Instead, they dusted off exemptions in the securities legislation that most of us have ignored for 80 years.

States Get Into the Act

Some states have picked up on crowdfunding to boost their economies. Terms vary, but generally investors are subject to investment limits and companies are subject to a cap on raising money. Each individual, for example, might be limited to investing $10,000; each company might be limited to raising $1 million. Both investor and company are generally required to reside in the state.

This is music to ears of people who want to invest locally. The first successful offering using this type of exemption was in Georgia in 2013, where Bohemian Guitars raised approximately $130,000 through SparkMarket.com.

Other Exemptions

Village Power is another example of raising money using an exemption. This intermediary helps organizations set up and fund solar power projects. Village Power coaches their community partners to use an exemption in the SEC rules, which allows for up to 35 local, non-accredited investors.

New Rules Open Doors

New rules issued March 25 by the SEC removed a lot of the barriers for companies raising money and for non-accredited investors.

Companies will be able to raise up to $50 million. Non-accredited investors are welcome to invest, sometimes with limits — 10% of their net worth, say, or 10% of their net income.

Although Kickstarter has said that it won’t sell securities, other fundraising portals, such as Indiegogo, are looking into it.

And if all goes well, Paul, David, and I can start looking for the new opportunities in June of 2015.

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Bridget Sullivan Mermel helps clients throughout the country with her comprehensive fee-only financial planning firm based in Chicago. She’s the author of the upcoming book More Money, More Meaning. Both a certified public accountant and a certified financial planner, she specializes in helping clients lower their tax burden with tax-smart investing.

MONEY retirement planning

Answer These 10 Questions to See If You’re on Track to Retirement

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Getty Images

More Americans are confident about retirement—maybe too confident. Here's how to give your expectations a timely reality check.

The good news: The Employee Benefit Research Institute’s 2015 Retirement Confidence Survey says workers and retirees are more confident about affording retirement. The bad news: The survey also says there’s little sign they’re doing enough to achieve that goal. To see whether you’re taking the necessary steps for a secure retirement, answer the 10 questions below.

1. Have you set a savings target? No, I don’t mean a long-term goal like have a $1 million nest egg by age 65. I mean a short-term target like saving a specific dollar amount or percentage of your salary each year. You’ll be more likely to save if you have such a goal and you’ll have a better sense of whether you’re making progress toward a secure retirement. Saving 15% of salary—the figure cited in a recent Boston College Center for Retirement Research Study—is a good target. If you can’t manage that, start at 10% and increase your savings level by one percentage point a year, or go to the Will You Have Enough To Retire tool to see how you’ll fare with different rates.

2. Are you making the most of tax-advantaged savings plans? At the very least, you should be contributing enough to take full advantage of any matching funds your 401(k) or other workplace plan offers. If you’re maxing out your plan at work and have still more money you can save, you may also be able to save in other tax-advantaged plans, like a traditional IRA or Roth IRA. (Morningstar’s IRA calculator can tell you whether you’re eligible and, if so, how much you can contribute.) Able to sock away even more? Consider tax-efficient options like broad index funds, ETFs and tax-managed funds within taxable accounts.

3. Have you gauged your risk tolerance? You can’t set an effective retirement investing strategy unless you’ve done a gut check—that is, assessed your true risk tolerance. Otherwise, you run the risk of doing what what many investors do—investing too aggressively when the market’s doing well (and selling in a panic when it drops) and too conservatively after stock prices have plummeted (and missing the big gains when the market inevitably rebounds). You can get a good sense of your true appetite for risk within a few minutes by completing this Risk Tolerance Questionnaire-Asset Allocation tool.

4. Do you have the right stocks-bonds mix? Most investors focus their attention on picking specific investments—the top-performing fund or ETF, a high-flying stock, etc. Big mistake. The real driver of long-term investing success is your asset allocation, or how you divvy up your savings between stocks and bonds. Generally, the younger you are and the more risk you’re willing to handle, the more of your savings you want to devote to stocks. The older you are and the less willing you are to see your savings suffer setbacks during market downturns, the more of your savings you want to stash in bonds. The risk tolerance questionnaire mentioned above will suggest a stocks-bonds mix based on your appetite for risk and time horizon (how long you plan to keep your money invested). You can also get an idea of how you should be allocating your portfolio between stocks and bonds by checking out the Vanguard Target Retirement Fund for someone your age.

5. Do you have the right investments? You can easily get the impression you’re some sort of slacker if you’re not loading up your retirement portfolio with all manner of funds, ETFs and other investments that cover every obscure corner of the financial markets. Nonsense. Diversification is important, but you can go too far. You can “di-worse-ify” and end up with an expensive, unwieldy and unworkable smorgasbord of investments. A better strategy: focus on plain-vanilla index funds and ETFs that give you broad exposure to stocks and bonds at a low cost. That approach always makes sense, but it’s especially important to diversify broadly and hold costs down given the projections for lower-than-normal investment returns in the years ahead.

6. Have you assessed where you stand? Once you’ve answered the previous questions, it’s important that you establish a baseline—that is, see whether you’ll be on track toward a secure retirement if you continue along the saving and investing path you’ve set. Fortunately, it’s relatively easy to do this sort of evaluation. Just go to a retirement income calculator that uses Monte Carlo analysis to do its projections, enter such information as your age, salary, savings rate, how much you already have tucked away in retirement accounts, your stocks-bonds mix and the percentage of pre-retirement income you’ll need after you retire retirement (70% to 80% is a good starting estimate) and the calculator will estimate the probability that you’ll be able to retire given how much you’re saving and how you’re investing. If you’re already retired, the calculator will give you the probability that Social Security, your savings and any other resources will be able to generate the retirement income you’ll need. Ideally, you want a probability of 80% or higher. But if it comes in lower, you can make adjustments such as saving more, spending less, retiring later, etc. to improve your chances. And, in fact, you should go through this assessment every year or so just to see if you do need to tweak your planning.

7. Have you done any “lifestyle planning”? Finances are important, but planning for retirement isn’t just about the bucks. You also want to take time to think seriously about how you’ll actually live in retirement. Among the questions: Will you stay in your current home, downsize or perhaps even relocate to an area with lower living costs? Do you have enough activities—hobbies, volunteering, perhaps a part-time job—to keep you busy and engaged once you no longer have the nine-to-five routine to provide a framework for most days? Do you have plenty of friends, relatives and former co-workers you can turn to for companionship and support. Research shows that people who have a solid social network tend to be happier in retirement (the same, by the way, is true for retirees who have more frequent sex). Obviously, this is an area where your personal preferences are paramount. But seminars for pre-retirees like the Paths To Creative Retirement workshops at the University of North Carolina at Asheville and tools like Ready-2-Retire can help you better focus on lifestyle issues so can ultimately integrate them into your financial planning.

8. Have you checked out your Social Security options? Although many retirees may not think of it that way, the inflation-adjusted lifetime payments Social Security provides are one of their biggest financial assets, if not the biggest. Which is why it’s crucial that a good five to 10 years before you retire, you seriously consider when to claim Social Security and, if you’re married, how best to coordinate benefits with your spouse. Advance planning can make a big difference. For each year you delay taking benefits between age 62 and 70, you can boost your monthly payment by roughly 7% to 8%. And by taking advantage of different claiming strategies, married couples may be able to increase their lifetime benefit by several hundred thousand dollars. You’ll find more tips on how to get the most out of Social Security in Boston University economist and Social Security expert Larry Kotlikoff’s new Social Security Q&A column on RealDealRetirement.com.

9. Do you have a Plan B? Sometimes even the best planning can go awry. Indeed, two-thirds of Americans said their retirement planning has been disrupted by such things as major health bills, spates of unemployment, business setbacks or divorce, according to a a recent TD Ameritrade survey. Which is why it’s crucial that you consider what might go wrong ahead of time, and come up with ways to respond so you can mitigate the damage and recover from setbacks more quickly. Along the same lines, it’s also a good idea to periodically crash-test your retirement plan. Knowing how your nest egg might fare during a severe market downturn and what that mean for your retirement prospects can help prevent you from freaking out during periods of financial stress and better formulate a way to get back on track.

10. Do You Need Help? If you’re comfortable flying solo with your retirement planning, that’s great. But if you think you could do with some assistance—whether on an ongoing basis or with a specific issue—then it makes sense to seek guidance. The key, though, is finding an adviser who’s competent, honest and willing to provide that advice at a reasonable price. The Department of Labor recently released a proposal designed to better protect investors from advisers’ conflicts of interest. We’ll have to see how that works out. In the meantime, though, you can increase your chances of getting good affordable advice by following these four tips and asking these five questions.

Walter Updegrave is the editor of RealDealRetirement.com. If you have a question on retirement or investing that you would like Walter to answer online, send it to him at walter@realdealretirement.com.

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