MONEY financial advice

Where to Go for the Best Financial Advice

Wall of paint chips
Carolyn Hebbard—Getty Images/Flickr Open

Seeking help with investments or retirement planning? Here's how to sort through the overwhelming number of options you face.

The financial advice business is changing dramatically in every aspect, from how advisers spend their time, to what they charge, to how they label and promote themselves.

The result? Further confusion for consumers who probably sought help to find clarity in the first place.

“Brokers” who used to pick stocks and sell mutual funds at firms like Morgan Stanley and Bank of America Merrill Lynch are now more likely now to call themselves “financial advisers” and manage portfolios for fees instead of (or in addition to) commissions.

Independents who used to offer comprehensive advice are now more likely to focus on investment management and call themselves “wealth managers.”

Charles Schwab, the online brokerage that made its name catering to do-it-yourself investors, now is pushing its own stable of are “financial consultants” and preaching the value of face-to-face (or at least Skype-to-Skype) connections.

New to the scene are “robo-advisers” — algorithmically driven online money management firms that will automate your investment decisions.

Further complicating consumer choice is the fact that most firms have a variety of ways in which they offer financial advice to clients.

At Vanguard, for example, a firm which promotes simplicity in investing, there are nine different advice platforms. They vary, based on whether a client is investing through a retirement account or directly, how much advice a client needs or wants, and how much money the client has to invest.

How can someone seeking financial advice navigate their way through this complex field and make sure they get the right advice? Here are a few things you should know now:

Needs Assessment

Assess your own needs. The first step is to figure out what you want a financial professional to do for you. Do you want comprehensive investment management? A whole-life plan that includes everything from how to pay for college to tax reduction to retirement planning? Just a reality check on your retirement readiness?

Pay for What You Eat

Once you know what you want, it’s easier to find the right adviser. For a spot check or limited amount of planning, consider hiring a by-the-hour adviser — you can find one through the Garrett Planning Network (www.garrettplanningnetwork.com).

Want a comprehensive soup-to-nuts life financial plan? Look for a fee-only certified financial planner through the CFP Board of Standards (www.cfp.net) or the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (www.napfa.org).

Learn the Lingo

“Fee only” means that the adviser is not paid to sell products and, if that person is a certified financial planner, it also means she doesn’t even own a small share in a financial company that does sell products.

“Fee-based” is a meaningless term of art, typically used by advisers who charge fees and reap commissions.

Watch Your Wallet

There’s a huge discrepancy in the amount of fees advisers charge.

At Vanguard, investors willing to stick with Vanguard funds can get basic fund choice advice for free and a comprehensive financial plan for 0.3% of the assets they invest with Vanguard.

Traditional brokerage firms will offer broader portfolios and go fee-only but at costs that can top 2% a year.

In the middle are most independent financial advisers, who tend to charge fees near 1% of assets, more for small accounts and less for bigger ones.

An extra percent or two, pulled from an account every year, can cost a long-term investor hundreds of thousands of dollars at the end of the day, so fees do matter.

Consider Generic Advice

A lot of lip service is given to selling the idea that everyone needs personalized and customized financial advice.

That’s true for people who have ultra-high net worth, with businesses, estates, tax issues and the like to manage. It’s also true of people who have very special situations, such as handicapped children who will need lifelong care.

But it may not be true of the average Joe and Jane, who simply need tips on how to invest their 401(k) or IRA fund.

Companies like T. Rowe Price, Vanguard and Fidelity will give you basic fund guidance for free, or close to it.

Remember the Robots

Companies like Wealthfront, Betterment and Hedgeable will invest your money for you in diversified portfolios regularly rebalanced and managed, if you need that, to minimize taxes.

They will charge pennies on the dollar of what a face-to-face individualized money manager will charge, and in some cases offer that for free.

They offer a reasonable solution for investors who know how much they have to invest, don’t need hand-holding, and are comfortable turning their finances over to an algorithm and sticking with passive index-linnked investing.

Here’s encouragement: Over long swaths of time, those passively-managed portfolios tend to beat the active investment managers.

MONEY financial advisers

A Young Financial Adviser Is Hard to Find

Only 5% of U.S. brokers are in their 20s, and training programs at large firms aren't getting any bigger.

Wall Street faces a mass exodus of retiring financial advisers over the next decade, so small brokerages are beefing up their training and presence on campuses to woo future employees.

Some 25,000 brokers and brokerage firm advisers will retire over the next three years, a trend that is expected to continue for more than 10 years, according to research firm Cerulli Associates. Within 10 years, roughly one-third of U.S. financial advisers will retire, it estimated.

Not enough young financial advisers are available to take their place. Only 5 percent of the 308,000 brokers and advisers at U.S. firms are younger than 30 years old, according to Cerulli.

“The issue isn’t that the seniors are leaving. It’s that the industry doesn’t have many freshmen or sophomores to replace them,” said Craig Pfeiffer, founder and chief executive of independent training program Advisors Ahead.

Training can be costly: about $250,000 to recruit and train a rookie adviser in a four-year program that only one out of four will complete, Andre Cappon, president of research firm CBM Group, said.

Though traditional brokerage firms like Morgan Stanley and Wells Fargo can recruit more rookie advisers because of their size, these so-called wirehouse firms are not expanding their training programs the way small firms are. Larger firms can be more successful at hiring established advisers and have been fine-tuning their training programs to focus on certain niches.

Morgan Stanley does not plan to increase the 1,000 trainees it annually accepts into its program in the near future, spokeswoman Christine Jockle said. Wells Fargo, which adds 600 to 900 participants per year, is trending toward the lower end of that range to “focus on quality,” Tom Allen, learning and development manager, said.

Smaller firms cannot easily poach experienced financial advisers from bigger firms, so they use training programs to build up their workforce.

“(Our increased training) stems from the need for building and investing in talent in the near future,” said Kimberly Thekan, director of talent acquisition and integration for Robert Baird’s private wealth management business. Baird is accelerating recruitment on college campuses and helping to develop a wealth management and financial planning track at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s business school.

Regional brokerage Edward D. Jones Investments has 400 recent college graduates in its current group of 3,000 trainees. The company, which spends $250,000 on each new adviser over two years, plans on increasing enrollment every year to accommodate growing customer demand for advisory services, said John Rahal, principal and financial adviser for talent acquisition at the firm.

Raymond James Financial will triple the 100 participants annually enrolled in its Advisor Mastery Program over the next three to five years, said Tash Elwyn, president of the firm’s private client group. He said he intends to use the program to replace the company’s retiring financial advisers on a one-to-one basis.

MONEY College

Why Your College-Bound Kid Needs to Meet Your Financial Planner

Parents showing jars of money
Jamie Grill—Getty Images

Sheltering children from tough money choices now can lead to unhappiness later on.

When I schedule a meeting with parents to talk about college costs, I always ask if the student will be attending the consultation.

About 80% of the time, the parents say no. Their usual response: “He’s too busy,” or “We would rather not include her.”

That’s a big mistake.

What I do is help estimate the final costs that the parents will be facing, taking into consideration projected financial aid, merit awards and the family’s current resources. Those costs can vary widely, from $5,500 a year to attend a community college while living at home to over $70,000 per year to go to a private college such as New York University.

Students should be involved from the start, so they can understand the financial issues that their parents will be facing. Students need to see the great disparity in cost outcomes among the different colleges on their wish list.

When I meet with the whole family, we can narrow down the types of schools that would be affordable to the parents as well as meet the academic and social needs of the student.

That way, we can avoid a situation in which a high school student, ignorant of any financial implications, pursues whatever college he is interested in. Then, in April of his senior year, when all of the acceptances and awards arrive, his parents review the options and say, “We can’t afford any of these.”

At that point, the only choices are for the student to attend a school he’s not happy with (such as a local college commuter school), or for the parents to go into deep debt in order to finance an education they cannot afford.

So I try my best to convince the parents to invite their student. Perhaps the parents are trying to shield their finances from their children. Eventually, however, the kids will be part of the parent’s estate planning. The earlier the children know about the parent’s financial situation the better. If a family limits the college search to the types of colleges that meet all needs (financial, academic, and social), then the only outcome in senior year will be a happy one for both the parents and the student!

——————————-

Paula Bishop is a certified public accountant and an adviser on financial aid for college. She holds a BS in economics with a major in finance from the Wharton School and an MBA from the University of California at Berkeley. She is a member of the National College Advocacy Group, whose mission is to provide education and resources for college planning professionals, students and families. Her website is www.paulabishop.com.

MONEY Aging

As You Age, You Need to Protect Your Money — From Yourself

Piggy Bank Locked Up
Andy Roberts—Getty Images

A financial planner explains why he couldn't help his client when she became delusional.

After three decades as a financial planner, I’m seeing more and more clients reach, not just retirement, but their final years. An issue that becomes especially important at this stage of life is how to help clients protect their financial resources from an unexpected threat — themselves.

One of my saddest professional experiences came several years ago when one of my long-time clients, a woman in her late 80s with no family and few close friends, abruptly fired me. Because Mary had no one else, I had helped her in many ways beyond the usual client/planner relationship and even reluctantly agreed to serve as her trustee and power of attorney in case she became incapacitated.

At what proved to be our final quarterly review meeting, Mary initially seemed confused. I was able to reassure her about the stability of her finances, and she seemed clearer by the time we finished. Three weeks later, I received a handwritten letter from her: “You have my finances in a mess. I can’t get to my money. You are fired.”

I was stunned. Yet ethically I was required to comply with her wishes by moving her holdings to another broker.

Several subsequent conversations demonstrated that Mary was suffering from periodic memory loss and delusion. Had she been disabled by a sudden accident or a stroke, I could have stepped in. Yet, because her decision to fire me was made at a time when she was arguably still competent, my hands were tied.

In theory, I could have gone to court with my power of attorney or in my position as trustee and petitioned to have Mary declared incompetent. But that posed a problem: Essentially, I would have been telling a judge, “Mary fired me as her adviser. I’d like to have her declared incompetent so I can re-hire myself as her adviser.” There was no way I was going to ask a judge to do that. I had a clear conflict of interest.

Since this experience, I have confirmed the wisdom, given the potential for conflict of interest, of never serving as a trustee or power of attorney for a client. With the help of suggestions from several other planners, I’ve also learned some strategies to help protect clients from themselves.

One tool is to ask clients to sign a statement authorizing a planner concerned about possible irrational behavior to contact someone, such as a family member or physician, designated by the client. While this would not prevent a client from firing an adviser, it would provide a method of discussing the issue and also involve another person in the decision.

Another possibility is to put clients’ assets into either an irrevocable living trust or a Domestic Asset Protection Trust (in states that allow them) and naming someone other than the client or the planner as trustee. While the client, as the beneficiary, would have the power to fire the trustee, concern about a trustee being fired irrationally could be mitigated to some degree by having a corporate trustee. In addition, with a DAPT, the beneficiary client would not have the power to amend the trust without the agreement of the trustee. This would give some protection against self-destructive choices by a client who was gradually losing competency. One disadvantage of this approach is cost, so it isn’t an option for everyone.

Perhaps the most important strategy is to work with clients to create a contingency plan in the event of mental decline. It could include arrangements to consult with family members or other professionals such as physicians, social workers, and counselors. For clients without close family members, the plan might authorize the financial adviser to call for an evaluation, by professionals chosen in advance by the client, if the client’s behavior appeared irrational. This team approach might alleviate clients’ fears about being judged incompetent by the person managing their assets.

The possibility of mental decline is something no one wants to consider. Yet it’s as essential a financial planning concern as making a will. Helping clients build financial resources for old age includes helping them create safety nets to protect those resources from themselves.

—————————————–

Rick Kahler is president of Kahler Financial Group, a fee-only financial planning firm. His work and research regarding the integration of financial planning and psychology has been featured or cited in scores of broadcast media, periodicals and books. He is a co-author of four books on financial planning and therapy. He is a faculty member at Golden Gate University and the president of the Financial Therapy Association.

MONEY Financial Planning

What My 3-Hour Lunch Says About Good Financial Advice

Women at a lunch meeting
Colorblind—Getty Images

Financial planning isn't about investing for retirement or saving for college; it's about turning your vision into reality.

It was Suzanne’s birthday. I really wanted her to have the next best thing to a day off. So I, the adviser, and Suzanne, my client, scheduled our meeting at Guglhupf, a lovely local restaurant.

In 2005, when I formed my company, I was sitting at one of Guglhupf’s upstairs tables when I came up with the tagline of my firm: “Driven by a Vision.” Now, years later, spending a sunny afternoon on Guglhuph’s patio with Suzanne, I had a powerful moment of living that ideal.

Suzanne is a visionary, an entrepreneur. She first came to me as a client because she wanted to be sure that the various ventures she had underway didn’t encumber too much of her wealth — that her assets wouldn’t all be at risk and that she would have enough set aside for her family’s future needs and her own retirement.

At its core, financial planning is helping people realize their vision. And for my entrepreneurial clients, I’m helping them navigate some very complicated waters at a time that’s emotionally charged due to hope, desire, exhaustion, and frankly, being stretched too thin.

These conversations can’t happen inside financial planning software, and they don’t happen on the pages of a financial plan. They aren’t about “Do I have enough money to fund my financial goals?” These conversations are about figuring out how to make those goals come to life.

And this is without my being a business consultant. I don’t know the trades of the businesses my clients start. What I do know is that there are risks associated with what they’re doing, and that likely their venture’s cash flow isn’t going to be as healthy as the projections project. I expect that there’ll be a need for another capital infusion. All of these things are going to impact their other financial planning goals: paying for their child’s education, for example, and being financially independent one day. They know all this too.

However, I believe that when a person has a strong vision for a world they want to impact — their community, their life’s energy making that impact — that inner urge trumps saving for retirement. It doesn’t trump it to the point of being reckless and blinded by today’s enthusiasm, but we recognize that they’re standing at the center point of the see saw, one foot on either arm, finding that balance between today and the long-term tomorrow.

I’ve never snuffed out their flame by saying, “You can’t do that.” I think that’s because I know what it’s like to be driven by a vision. It is my role to identify the risks I see, offer suggestions of how to look at it from another angle, ask them to name a Plan B, and beat the drum of the importance of managing cash flow. Then, I support them in their new venture, in whatever way reasonable.

At this meeting with Suzanne, there was an extra-special payoff. While I do try to stay out of the specifics of my clients’ businesses, over the course of our three-hour lunch we brainstormed about how she might finance one of her new ventures. I realized I knew some people who might be interested in funding it, and I promised to put Suzanne in contact with them. I later did, and they ended up providing money to Suzanne for this project.

So this meeting epitomized my work: My clients are driven by a vision, and I am driven to help them achieve that vision. And if we can enjoy a decadent dessert together, that’s even better.

MONEY financial advice

How Listening Better Will Make You Richer

140724_HO_Listening_1
Ruslan Dashinsky—iStock

A financial adviser explains that when you hear only what you want to hear, you can end up making some bad money choices.

Allison sat in my office, singing the praises of an annuity she had recently purchased. She was 64 years old, and she had come in for a free initial consultation after listening to my radio show.

“The investment guy at the bank,” she crowed, “told me this annuity would pay me a guaranteed income of 7% when I turn 70.”

I asked her to tell me more.

Allison had invested $300,000 as a rollover from her old 401(k) plan. She was told that at age 70, her annuity would be worth $450,000. Beginning at age 70, she could take $31,500 (7% of $450,000) and lock in that income stream forever.

“And when you die, what will be left to the kids?” I asked.

“The $300,000 plus all my earnings!” she said.

Suddenly my stomach began to sour.

Allison, I was sure, had heard only part of what the salesperson had told her.

I followed up with another question: “Besides the guaranteed $31,500 annual income, will you have access to any other money?”

“Oh yes,” she answered. “I can take up to 10% of the account value at any time without paying a surrender charge. In fact, next year I plan to take $30,000 so I can buy a new car!”

This story was getting worse, not better.

It was time to break the news to Allison.

I asked her to tell me the name of the product and the insurance company that issued it. Sure enough, I knew exactly the one she bought, since I had it available to my clients as well.

That’s when the conversation got a little tense.

I explained that if she withdrew any money from her annuity prior to beginning her guaranteed income payment, there was a strong likelihood she wouldn’t be able to collect $31,500 per year at age 70. Given the terms of the annuity, any such withdrawals now would reduce the guaranteed payment later.

She disagreed.

I explained that, with this and most other annuities, if she started the income stream as promised at $31,500, she would not likely have any money to pass on to the children.

She told me I was wrong — and defended the agent who sold her the annuity. She said that she bought a guaranteed death benefit rider so that she could protect her children upon her death.

I encouraged her to read the fine print. As expected, she reread the paragraph that stated that the “guaranteed death benefit” was equal to the initial investment plus earnings, less any withdrawals. When I told her that her death benefit in all likelihood would be worth nothing by age 80, she quickly said, “I need to call my agent back and check on this.”

I have conversations like this a lot, and not just with annuities. When it comes to investments, whether they’re annuities, commodity funds, or hot stocks, people often hear only what they want to hear. At various points in his sales pitch, the annuity salesman had probably said things like “guaranteed growth on the value of the contract,” “guaranteed income stream,” “can’t lose your money,” and “heirs get everything you put in.” What she had done was merge the different parts of the sales pitch together and ignore all the relevant conditions and exceptions.

When people hear about a product, there’s an emotional impact. “I want to buy that,” they think. They focus only on the benefits of the product; they assume the challenging parts of the product — the risks — won’t apply to them.

This story has a happy ending. Before Allison left my office, I asked when she received her annuity in the mail. “Three days ago,” she said.

I reminded her of the ten-day “free look” period that’s given to annuity buyers as a one-time “do-over” if they feel that the product they purchased isn’t right for them.

She called me back within two days. “The agent doesn’t like me very much,” she said. She had returned the annuity under the “free look” period and expected to get a full refund. The annuity salesman had just lost an $18,000 commission.

And I once again saw the wisdom of something I tell my clients every day: Prior to ever making a financial decision, it is absolutely critical you evaluate how this decision integrates into your overall financial life. That’s what’s important — not falling in love with a product.

———-

Marc S. Freedman, CFP, is president and CEO of Freedman Financial in Peabody, Mass. He has been delivering financial planning advice to mass affluent Baby Boomers for more than two decades. He is the author of Retiring with Confidence for the GENIUS, and he is host of “Dollars & Sense,” a weekly radio show on North Shore 104.9 in Beverly, Mass.

MONEY financial advice

Why Financial Advisers Have a Failure to Communicate

tin can toy telephone
James Porter / Alamy

Investment pros try to impress their clients with jargon, but the message isn't getting through.

Here’s a little quiz:

With each pair of phrases below, which do you think resonates more positively with everyday people? Which of the two sounds better to a client sitting across the desk from a financial adviser?

  1. Investment Strategies | Investment Solutions
  2. Straightforward Fees | Transparent Fees
  3. Financial Security | Financial Freedom.

I’ll get to the answers below.

I took this quiz myself recently at a presentation by Gary DeMoss from Invesco Consulting, a subsidiary of the money-management firm Invesco. The subject of the presentation: How financial advisers can better connect with clients by using the right words. The takeaway: We financial advisers are so familiar with investing jargon that we assume our clients understand it. But many don’t.

One study DeMoss’s group did with investors was to give them dials connected to a monitoring system and then have them listen to pre-recorded explanations of various financial and market topics. As the investors listened they moved their dials one way or another to rate if they liked what was being said or not. The consultants could then see which words made people react more positively or more negatively.

At one point in the presentation to this group of very experienced financial advisers, we were given a small deck of cards with words on the front and back. We were asked to guess which side we thought had resonated more positively with the investors tested.

Most of the advisers sitting around me — and me, too — got more wrong than right.

As for the three pairs of investment terms above, the first of each rated higher.

As DeMoss pointed out, it’s is not what we advisers say that matters, but what the client hears. I think many of us are guilty of trying to impress clients with our knowledge. We don’t realize that we need to speak in clearer, simpler terms. The specific words that we use make a difference.

We have to choose our words carefully and use less investing jargon. We should encourage clients to stop us whenever they don’t understand what we’re saying.

This will help us get our information across in a less intimidating manner — and serve our clients better.

———-

Raymond Mignone has been a certified financial planner and fee-only investment adviser since 1989, with offices in Boynton Beach, Fla., and Little Neck, N.Y. He is the author of the book RINKs – Retired, Independent, No Kids. His website is www.RayMignone.com.

 

MONEY Rollovers

Why Wall Street Is Wooing Women and Their Future Wealth

Businesswomen in a black car
Riccardo Savi—Getty Images

Women will receive 70% of inherited wealth over the next two generations, and Wall Street wants their business. Here's what you—and the advisers wooing you—need to know.

Is there a target on the back of my dress? Because it feels like there is a target on the back of my dress.

It was painted there by the financial services industry, which has grown hyper-aware of the fact that women have a lot of money and are about to have a lot more.

According to a 2009 study from the Boston College’s Center on Wealth and Philanthropy, women will inherit 70% of the money that gets passed down over the next two generations, and that excludes the increasing amounts they earn on their own. Women already own more than half of the investable assets in the United States.

Companies like Bank of America’s Merrill Lynch, Prudential Financial, and TD Ameritrade are studying the investing behavior of women, in the hopes of winning more of our dollars.

They know that when a husband dies, his widow often switches money managers.

Indeed, the Certified Financial Planning Board of Standards is trying to lure more women to the business of financial advice.

Sallie Krawcheck, who ran Merrill at Bank of America, recently bought a women’s network and started a mutual fund that seeks to invest in companies led or heavily influenced by women.

Last week, Barclay’s Bank moved in the same direction, creating a Women in Leadership index and related investments.

It’s great to be wooed, but it’s also scary to be the focus of a great marketing effort. It could all end badly if the industry simply pink-washes inferior financial products.

Here are a few bits of advice for women and Wall Street, as they circle each other warily:

Questions

There will be questions. Women are infamous in some financial advisory circles because we ask so many more questions than men. That is good. Do not invest in something you don’t understand. Advisers who want us to invest in complex products and services need to be willing to explain them clearly and simply.

Female Advisers Not Necessary

We don’t need our advisers to be women. It’s not like going to a gynecologist. A male financial adviser is fine with me, as long as he’s competent, straightforward and good with my money.

We also don’t need pink folders for our statements or ladies’ investment products. We like green, and want the products and services that will secure our money and make it grow.

Funds that invest in women-led companies may do well in the future; there’s some research that diverse boards govern winning companies. But women and men should be cautioned not to be over-dependent on niche funds and not to overpay for them.

Keep Costs Low

Women control most household income and tend to be price and budget conscious. So don’t try to win us with high-priced mutual funds when there are less expensive ones that do the job.

Don’t charge us a lot to recommend a generic plain-vanilla index fund portfolio we could find on our own.

Women, Worry Less

Survey after survey reveal that women are more afraid of managing money than men (which is not the same thing as being worse at it) and they are more afraid of market risks than are men.

Women keep a lower proportion of their money in stocks than men do, even though women live longer and the stock market has long proven itself to be the best place for long-term investors to keep money.

Advisers, Worry More

A good adviser won’t prey on those fears; she or he will help female clients overcome their worries and invest in low-cost products that balance risks and rewards.

And if they don’t? There’s another new company out there that is explicitly targeting women investors. It’s called FireMyAdvisor.com.

MONEY Debt

Have You Conquered Debt? Tell Us Your Story

Have you gotten rid of a big IOU on your balance sheet, or at least made significant progress toward that end? MONEY wants to hear your digging-out-of-debt stories, to share with and inspire our readers who might be in similar situations.

Use the confidential form below to tell us about it. What kind of debt did you have, and how much? How did you erase it—or what are you currently doing? What advice do you have for other people in your situation? We’re interested in stories about all kinds of debt, from student loans to credit cards to car loans to mortgages.

Please also let us know where you’re from, what you do for a living, and how old you are. We won’t use your story unless we speak with you first.

MONEY financial advisers

You Mean I Have to Pay for Financial Advice?!?

When financial advisers switch from working on commission to charging clients directly, they can run into resistance.

Financial advisers who transition from a commission-only business to a fee-based model are often stymied about how to explain their new fees without sending existing clients packing.

Some fear clients will feel sticker shock upon hearing they need to pay fees out of pocket instead of having costs deducted from investment accounts. Advisers also worry clients may question why they’re now paying a fee equal to one percent of their assets under management, instead of a fraction of that for their load funds.

The problem is that most investors don’t understand how adviser compensation works or how it affects the services they receive, says John Anderson, a practice management consultant with SEI Advisor Network, a unit of SEI Investments in Oaks, Pa. Many investors do not know what it means for an adviser to be a fiduciary, or somebody who acts in a client’s best interests, Anderson says.

A 2011 study by Cerulli Associates, a consulting firm in Boston, showed that 31 percent of investors thought financial planning services were free and one-third didn’t know how they paid for advice. What’s more, most investors prefer to pay hidden commissions instead of account fees, according to Cerulli studies.

Some clients might push back when advisers begin asking for fees, but their concerns usually dissolve once advisers show clients the benefits.

FOCUS ON SERVICES

Morgan Smith, an adviser in Austin, explained the ethical obligation of a fiduciary to his clients when he transitioned to a fee-only practice. “I asked, ‘Would you rather work with someone whose compensation structure has nothing to do with your best interest or someone whose structure is based on your best interest and goals?'” he says.

Every client except one, a day trader, stayed on. But some asked why they would pay him if their investments declined. He told them his advice would pay off more in a down market and that “when your investments go down, I get paid less,” he says.

Sheryl Garrett, whose Garrett Planning Network includes more than 300 fee-only advisers, says clients need to understand the difference between advisers who can afford to give advice because they sold a product and advisers who are objective because they have “no skin in the game.”

Clients who are paying for advice also need to know what other problems advisers are solving in exchange for the additional compensation, says Anderson. He tells advisers to create a one-page list of their services. That may include rebalancing clients’ portfolios and analyzing their future social security benefits.

He also starts client conversations by highlighting what they’ve recently accomplished, such as filling in paperwork to name beneficiaries for IRA accounts.

Anderson and Garrett both believe in showing clients that their daily decisions have more of an impact on their finances than the investments or insurance products they buy. It’s a holistic approach that often wins over clients, they say.

Related: Find the Right Financial Planner

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser