MONEY temps

Why Your Colleague Has the Same Boss, but a Different Employer

Temp nameplate
Jeffrey Coolidge—Corbis

As the economy recovers, companies are hiring more "temporary" workers who aren't all that temporary.

When Americans get back into the office after Labor Day weekend, they’ll probably see fewer empty cubicles than they have in recent years. New jobless claims have been falling, and as of May there are more people working than there were in early 2008, before the downturn.

But some of those people sitting next to you, or chatting with you by the coffee machine, might be working for a different company.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 2.9 million Americans work in the “temporary help services industry.” That means that while they show up at the office of one employer, they really work for the staffing agency that signed their contract.

Of course, “temps” are nothing new. Companies—especially in white-collar industries—have been hiring temporary workers since the 1950s, often for specialized tasks for a short period of time. But today, some “temporary” employees do the exact same tasks as permanent employees, and they stick around for a lot longer.

“‘Temp’ is kind of a misnomer,” says Catherine Ruckelshaus, general counsel and program director at the National Employment Law Project, a liberal advocacy group. “Staffing companies are acting like human resource departments. They’re placing permanent slots, if not permanent workers.”

The number of temp jobs really began to balloon in the early 1990s. And since temps are easy to hire and easy to fire, they’ve borne the brunt of the booms and busts of the last 25 years. Temps were hit particularly hard during the recession of the early 2000s. “More than 25 percent of all jobs lost during that period were in temporary help services, despite their accounting for less than 2 percent of total employment,” according to the BLS.

“Whenever there’s a recession, temp and staffing trails off early and picks up in the beginning as the jobs start to come back,” Ruckelshaus says. “Oftentimes employers start to fill up their payroll with temp and staffing jobs as opposed to permanent positions.”

temporary help

That’s exactly what has happened since late 2009. “It’s a little bit early to tell if that’s a long-term trend or if that’s a normal bubble,” Ruckelshaus adds.

Increasingly, blue collar industries like janitorial services, warehouse and logistics, and home care have started to make use of contract workers. So have white collar industries like legal services, accounting, records processing, and media. (Some journalists at Time Inc., which publishes this site, are employed by an outside staffing company.)

What’s in it for companies? They like the flexibility—which is another way of saying easy-to-hire, easy-to-fire. Research suggests that temps are generally paid less, get fewer benefits and face more health and safety violations than direct hires.

In a new case before the National Labor Relations Board, a union argues that a subcontractor relationship has weakened its collective bargaining power. Browning-Ferris Industries gets some of its workers at a recycling facility though Leadpoint, a temporary staffing company. The union wants both companies to be considered those workers’ employers. The case could change the way NLRB evaluates “joint-employer” relationships, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Even so, it’s unlikely to mean that employers will stop using outside staffing—at least not until the job market is strong enough for potential employees to demand a less “flexible” arrangement.

Related:
If Jobs Are Back, Where’s My Raise?
If You’re Looking for Work, the Outlook Is Brightening
5 Ways to Speed Up Your Job Search This Fall

TIME History

How the Job Corps Is Still Helping Thousands of Americans Find Work, 50 Years Later

Job Corps Memphis Perez
U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez talks with carpentry students during a trip to the Benjamin L. Hooks Job Corps Center in Memphis, Tenn., Aug. 20, 2014. Jim Weber—AP

The little-known program has helped more than 2 million find jobs since its founding

Fifty years ago, Charles “Huckleback” Logan was down on his luck. The 17-year-old had failed out of school and was living with his grandmother in an apartment filled with cockroaches. He had been stabbed at a party shortly after seeing a friend shot dead.

But Huckleback’s life took a turn for the better when he became the first person to enroll a newly created Job Corps that would house him, feed him, and teach him a skill that would allow him to earn a living and stay off the streets.

“I just don’t want no more trouble,” Huckleback told TIME after joining the program.

Today, 50 years later, the program is virtually unknown to most Americans, but it continues to serve communities across the country. Approximately 60,000 modern-day Hucklebacks take part in the program each year, being taught valuable skills in more than 100 areas. In total, some 2.7 million young people have participated in the Jobs Corps since President Lyndon Johnson launched the program as part of his Great Society initiative in 1964. And just like in the 1960’s, participants come from the harshest of circumstances. Still, 80 percent of program graduates leave with a full-time occupation.

“Very often a lack of jobs and money is not the cause of poverty, but the symptom,” Johnson told Congress in 1964 as he declared his War on Poverty, a set of programs the efficacy of which historians continue to debate today. “The cause may lie deeper in our failure to give our fellow citizens a fair chance to develop their own capacities, in a lack of education and training, in a lack of medical care and housing, in a lack of decent communities in which to live and bring up their children,” Johnson said.

TIME Careers

America’s Fastest Growing Jobs

145083638
Nurse talking to older man in home Cultura/Tim MacPherson—Getty Images

247-LogoVersions-114x57
This post is in partnership with 24/7 Wall Street. The article below was originally published on 247wallst.com.

By Robert Serenbetz

After the recession wiped out millions of jobs, the American labor market has at least partially recovered. So far this year, the United States has added roughly 1.6 million jobs. And in the 10 years through 2022, the BLS estimates that employment will grow by over 15 million jobs, or by 11%.

Some jobs are expected to better capitalize on economic, demographic, and workplace trends than others. For example, industrial-organizational psychologists are expected to grow 53.4%, the fastest in the nation, and occupations in the health sector are also anticipated to disproportionately grow. Based on estimated employment figures and projections for 2012 and 2022 published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) for more than 1,000 occupations, 24/7 Wall St. identified the fastest growing jobs in America.

Click here to see the 10 fastest growing jobs.

The jobs with the largest expected growth are often those that benefit from America’s changing demographics. In an interview with 24/7 Wall St., Martin Kohli, chief regional economist for the BLS, noted that the effects of an aging population, which has access to Medicare, “combined with innovations that provide new treatments” has led to increases in health care spending. In turn, more spending creates “a high demand for jobs to provide these services,” he added.

In fact, the average of all health support occupations is expected to grow 28% by 2022. Six jobs within the top 10 are in the health care sector.

Some of the fastest growing jobs are expected to receive a boost from economic trends. For example, the BLS expects that a continued economic rebound will lead to greater demand for construction and renovations. While construction laborers and helpers are expected to grow 25%, jobs such as masons’ helpers are expected to grow at a considerably higher rate of 45%.

Government and private sector initiatives are also expected to contribute to growth in specific occupations. New federal health care legislation is expected to increase access to health care and, in turn, to the scale of the health care industry. Meanwhile, mechanical insulators are expected to benefit from an increased focus on environmental sustainability.

Most of the occupations with the highest estimated growth rates are not especially large. Only two occupations, home health aides and personal care aides, are estimated to be among the larger jobs by number of people employed in 2022.

There does not appear to be wage or educational trends among the jobs with the largest growth rates. These occupations all have various levels of median wage as well as differing educational requirements.

To determine the jobs with the highest forecast rate of employment growth, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed BLS Employment Projections program data for 2012 and 2022. In order to qualify, occupations needed to reference a specific job rather than a broader classification. Figures from the BLS for 2012 represent estimates, while figures for 2022 represent forecasts and may be revised. Further information on each occupation came from the BLS’ Occupational Outlook Handbook.

These are the fastest growing jobs in America.

1. Industrial-Organizational Psychologists
> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: 53.4%
> Number employed, 2012: 1,600
> Number employed, 2022: 2,500
> Median annual income: $83,580
> Educational qualification: Master’s degree

Industrial organizational psychologists are anticipated to be the fastest growing job in the U.S. in the 10 years through 2022. The BLS estimates that in the 10-year period through 2022, employment of industrial-organizational psychologists will rise more than 53%, dramatically higher than the growth rates for all jobs and for other psychologist professions. The use of psychology is expected to increase across the nation as individuals and institutions look for help in solving or managing problems. Industrial-organizational psychologists address issues relating to workplace productivity, organizational developments, and employee screening. Becoming an industrial-organizational psychologist typically requires a master’s degree, as well as an internship or residency. Despite the forecast growth rate, the actual number of jobs expected to be added is very small — just 900 by 2022.

2. Personal Care Aides
> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: 48.8%
> Number employed, 2012: 1,190,600
> Number employed, 2022: 1,771,400
> Median annual income: $19,190
> Educational qualification: Less than high school

Similar to home health aides, personal care aides provide individualized home health services to elderly clients living at home. However, personal care aids are restricted to providing only basic medical services and will often work in conjunction with nurses or social workers. The BLS expects that over 580,000 jobs for personal care aides will be created in the decade through 2022, the most out of any of America’s fastest growing jobs. Yet, the median annual wage for personal care aids was just $19,910 as of 2012, well below the nationwide median of $34,750 for all occupations.

3. Home Health Aides
> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: 48.5%
> Number employed, 2012: 875,100
> Number employed, 2022: 1,299,300
> Median annual income: $20,820
> Educational qualification: Less than high school

An aging population will likely result in a greater need for home health aides, who provide individualized daily client care. The number of such aides is expected to grow by over 48% in the 10 years from 2012 and become one of the most commonly-held jobs by 2022. Home health aides typically work for a medical institution and keep a record of services performed and the client’s conditions, in addition to providing home care and companionship. For elderly clients, home health care is increasingly popular because it offers a “less expensive alternative to nursing homes or hospitals,” the BLS notes.

MORE: The Best (and Worst) Countries to Find a Full-Time Job

4. Mechanical Insulation Workers
> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: 46.7%
> Number employed, 2012: 28,900
> Number employed, 2022: 42,400
> Median annual income: $39,170
> Educational qualification: High school diploma

While the BLS forecasts above average growth in construction employment, the estimated growth rate of mechanical insulation workers is projected to be more-than twice that, at 47%. Unlike other types of insulators, mechanical insulation workers require greater specialty given the challenges of applying insulation to pipes and ducts in all types of buildings. Increased emphasis on energy efficiency will result in growing demand for mechanical insulation workers instead of non-mechanical insulation workers.

5. Interpreters and Translators
> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: 46.1%
> Number employed, 2012: 63,600
> Number employed, 2022: 92,900
> Median annual income: $45,430
> Educational qualification: Bachelor’s degree

The BLS pointed to increased globalization and greater diversity within the United States as the primary driver of growth for the profession. Although computers have greatly increased the efficiency and productivity of interpreters and translators, technology cannot provide the specific nuances of human translation. Demand will likely remain strong for frequently translated languages, but most growth will likely be due to greater need for translators in American Sign Language and emerging market languages. According to the BLS, “growing international trade and broadening global ties” will create new jobs for interpreters and translators.

For the rest of the list, please go to 24/7WallStreet.com.

MORE

Customer Service Hall of Shame

States Where It’s Hardest to Find Full-Time Work

10 Brands That Will Disappear in 2015

 

 

MONEY Jobs

The Economy is Improving, but May Face a New Speed Limit

empty cubicles
Get ready for Boomers to leave the work force. Getty Images

The recession is gradually ending, but we're about to enter a world where fewer and fewer people work.

While it might not feel like it yet, the economy is getting better. On Thursday, the Bureau of Economic Analysis announced the U.S. economy grew faster than expected in the second quarter of this year.

Here’s the thing, though. Even as employers add jobs, we’re about to enter an era with the lowest percentage of working Americans since 1973. Below is a Congressional Budget Office projection, from a new set of charts they’ve released here, showing the labor force participation rate—the number of people working or looking for a job—through the year 2024. As you can see, despite the economic recovery, it has a distinctly downward trend.

Screen Shot 2014-08-29 at 12.06.20 PM
Source: Congressional Budget Office.

Why doesn’t a better economic climate mean more workers? The boomers, largest generation in American history, is on the cusp of retirement, and will soon begin to drop out of the workforce in even greater numbers. Over time, this will have an dampening effect on the economy—though by how much is disputed. The CBO predicts that GDP growth will average around 2.2% per year, noticeably less than the growth we got used to in the 1980s and 1990s.

Another way to visualize the change is something called the dependency ratio, which measures the proportion of the population that aren’t of working age (below 18 or over over 65). As FiveThirtyEight’s Ben Casselman points out, that number is about to increase from 59% in 2010 to 75% in 2030.

Screen Shot 2014-08-29 at 12.05.20 PM
Source: U.S. Census.

As you’ll notice from the above chart, we’ve been a demographically fortunate nation of late, but we’re about to lose that tailwind. On the other hand, this country has faced big demographic changes before: Look the at the jump in the dependency ratio from the 1950s to the 1960s. Back then, an increasingly prosperous nation spent part of its wealth on kids. Those kids grew up and made the economy even larger, and soon we’ll have to spend part of that prosperity on their retirement.

TIME Education

Here Are the Crucial Job Skills Employers Are Really Looking For

483636127
Tom Merton—Gety Images

'Soft skills' like professionalism and oral communication rank among the most valued, regardless of education level

Labor Day offers an opportunity for politicians and economists to offer their two cents on the state of labor. It’s a good bet that some of that commentary will focus on the so-called “skills gap” — the notion that millions of jobs in highly technical fields remain unfilled while millions of Americans without those skills remain unemployed.

The solution according to the pundits? Education and training that focus on technical skills like computer engineering, or on crucial but scarce skills like welding. Match these newly trained employees with open jobs that require those skills and, voila, the skills gap is gone — and the labor market is steadied.

If only it were so simple.

Yes, more American workers need to learn skills that are underrepresented in the labor market. And yes, those technology titans who advocate for more challenging school curricula, for greater funding for science and engineering education and for immigration reforms to bring more skilled workers are responding to a real problem. But that’s not all there is to it. The problem with the skills gap argument is that it accounts for only one set of skills that employers consider important.

I work at Books@Work, a non-profit organization that brings university professors to the workplace to lead literature seminars with employees. The employers with whom we work want to provide professional development opportunities for all members of their organizations, and — we like to think — are more creative in their approach to doing so than most. Yet even this group of employers has few ways of helping their employees to develop skills that aren’t about content or subject matter — skills like communication, critical thinking, creativity, empathy and understanding of diversity.

Such skills cut across sector, hierarchy and function – and are, according to employers, crucial to the success of their companies. According to research conducted by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU), 93 percent of business and non-profit leaders who were surveyed consider critical thinking and communication skills to be more important than a person’s undergraduate major when it comes to hiring.

That’s bad news because, while many public programs try to bridge gaps in the knowledge of future workers, there are few programs to address the gap in skills that are more difficult to measure, like creativity and critical thinking. My colleagues and I often hear from hiring managers who are hungry for programs that will encourage their employees (at all levels of the organization) to think more creatively, communicate more effectively and become more adept at reacting to changing circumstances.

The gap in these “soft” skills is very real. Professionalism/work ethic, teamwork/collaboration, and oral communication rank among the top five skills valued by employers hiring candidates at any educational level, according to one study. Yet employers rank significant portions of those entering the workforce deficient on all these dimensions. The problem is particularly acute among those without a college degree. Employers rate those entering the workforce with a high school degree deficient on professionalism/work ethic, critical thinking/problem solving, and oral communication. Meanwhile, employers do not regard a majority of college graduates deficient in any of these areas.

The introduction at the K-12 level of the Common Core, which is supposed to emphasize critical thinking and problem solving, may produce changes in these figures in the years to come. But for now, those without access to a university education — and even some workers with college degrees — enter the workforce lacking the interpersonal, reasoning and thinking skills necessary for success. Unlike direct knowledge areas — like computer basics — that can be taught through employer training sessions, there is no set curriculum for critical thinking or applied reasoning.

There is no silver bullet for addressing this gap, though our approach at Books@Work, having employees read literature and reflect on it, is one example of an attempt to disseminate some of the benefits of a liberal arts education beyond the confines of the traditional university setting. We need many more such efforts. In discussing Macbeth or Frankenstein, workers explore complex (and timeless) interpersonal dynamics — an opportunity that a training on the latest operating system or review of safety regulations is unlikely to provide.

We’ve found that reading literature with colleagues can offer a new perspective on the practice of work itself, leading to greater professionalism and new ways of doing things. Themes of empathy in a powerful novella by May Sarton, As We Are Now, which is about a woman in a terrible nursing home, led workers in one hospitality company to reconsider their approach toward customers, resulting in a renewed awareness of customer needs and expectations. A conversation about the racial tension in the post-war Northwest in David Guterson’s Snow Falling on Cedars became a platform to discuss personal integration issues in a company growing rapidly through acquisition and organizational acculturation.

Programs like Books@Work are not an adequate substitute for public policy solutions to the gap in thinking and interpersonal skills. We do not address disparities in such skills among job applicants — only among those who are hired. And they place the burden for addressing the problem squarely with employers. But programs that address the significant divide in soft skills are a first step toward realizing that solving the so-called skills gap requires more than teaching kids to code, retraining the unemployed as welders or encouraging college dropouts to complete technical degrees. We all need to continue to improve the most important skill of them all – our thinking.

Rachel Burstein, Ph.D. is Academic Director at Books@Work. This piece originally appeared at Zocalo Public Square.

MONEY Jobs

If Jobs Are Back, Where’s My Raise?

Empty pockets of businessman
Dude, where's my raise? Jeffrey Coolidge—Getty Images

Despite good jobs numbers, wages aren't growing much. The reason why is the biggest debate in economics right now

Today’s strong jobless claims data, which show that applications for unemployment benefits dropped again, is one reason to be cheerful heading into the Labor Day weekend.

Yet despite this, and the fact that the unemployment rate is now down to 6.2%, the economy still has this glaring weak spot: Workers aren’t getting serious raises.

Here’s how two important measures of wage growth have done since the recession. (The Brookings Institution keeps a running tab of these and other key economic indicators in the excellent interactive graphic here.)

fredgraph

Basically, what you are seeing is that pay to workers, whether measured as hourly wages or salaries plus benefits, has been running neck-and-neck with inflation of a bit under 2%. As Fed chair Janet Yellen pointed out in her recent speech at a Fed symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyo., wages are also growing less than workers’ productivity.

Why is this happening? Yellen, for one, likely thinks there’s some remaining “slack” in the economy. Employers are still wary about whether there’s growing demand for their stuff, and so they remain slow to hire. The low unemployment figures leave out a large number of workers who have become discouraged after a long time out of work. But if the slack explanation is right, as companies continue to hire, more of those labor-force dropouts will be drawn back into the employment pool. You won’t see companies under serious pressure to raise wages until that process has played out and companies start competing for a scarcer pool of job-seekers.

Yellen points to (though doesn’t endorse) another possible explanation. Many economists believe wages are downwardly “sticky”—even when companies want to cut costs, they’d rather lay people off than reduce the pay of the people they hang onto. That means that for people who kept working after the recession, wages were higher than they’d otherwise be. And now that the economy is (fitfully) coming back, maybe that means there’s also less room for wages to rise.

Another factor, of course, is that both corporate managers and workers are human, and people can take some time to adjust to new economic signals. Back in July, I sat down with a stock fund manager, who talked about what he was seeing going on at the companies he kept in touch with. More than five years after the financial crisis, he said, the corporate culture among top managers had changed. The people in the C-suite got their positions not by expanding their companies and finding great new hires, but by cutting costs. And they got used to a slack labor market. The manager used the specific example of truckers: You always know you can get a guy to drive a truck from your warehouse to your customer on a moment’s notice. So why worry about hiring more truckers?

As it happens, at the New York Times Upshot blog earlier this month, Neil Irwin wrote that this may be changing. A trucking company called Swift told investors it was having hard time finding enough drivers. The company says the problem is that there aren’t enough skilled people, but Irwin wonders if the problem is really that companies just aren’t paying enough. Trucker pay has fallen, in real terms, over the past decade. Irwin writes:

The most basic of economic theories would suggest that when supply isn’t enough to meet demand, it’s because the price—in this case, truckers’ wages—is too low. Raise wages, and an ample supply of workers should follow…. But corporate America has become so parsimonious about paying workers outside the executive suite that meaningful wage increases may seem an unacceptable affront.

The question now is, how strong does the economy have to get before employers are forced to change their thinking?

Related:
If You’re Looking for Work, the Outlook is Brightening
Why the Fed Won’t Care About Higher Prices Until You Get a Real Raise
What’s the Deal With America’s Declining Workforce?

TIME Jobs

10 American Jobs That Are Disappearing Now

U.S. Postal Service Truck
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images

Very hard times ahead for these professions

247-LogoVersions-114x57
This post is in partnership with 24/7 Wall Street. The article below was originally published on 247wallst.com.

By Alexander E.M. Hess

After the Great Recession, which cost millions of Americans their jobs, the U.S. labor market has begun to heal. So far this year the United States has added an average of nearly 230,000 jobs per month. In the 10 years through 2022, the BLS estimates that total employment will grow by more than 15 million jobs, or nearly 11%.

However, the outlook for some occupations is bleak. For example, the number of fallers — logging workers who cut down trees — is expected to decline by 43% between 2012 and 2022, the most of any occupation. Based on Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimates and projections for more than 1,000 occupations for 2012 and 2022, 24/7 Wall St. identified America’s disappearing jobs.

Click here to see the nation’s disappearing jobs

In many cases, these rapidly declining occupations are already quite rare. For instance, there were just 1,600 locomotive firers — who are responsible for monitoring train tracks and engine instruments — in the U.S. as of 2012. In all, five of the fastest declining occupations had fewer than 10,000 workers in 2012.

Yet, in other instances, occupations that are expected to contract still employ a large number of Americans. There were more than 320,000 people employed as data entry and information processing workers in 2012. There also were nearly half a million postal service workers.

The projected decline in postal service workers is especially significant. In all, the BLS forecasts that the number postal service jobs will fall by 139,000 between 2012 and 2022 — or more than all of the other disappearing occupations put together. A number of factors are expected to contribute to this decline, including continued drops in mail volumes as well as the ongoing financial struggles of the U.S. Postal Service. The USPS has already cut tens of thousands of jobs since 2012, and it is currently slated to cut another 15,000 jobs next year.

Increased automation, digitization, and technological innovation play a role in the decline of several of the fastest shrinking occupations. “We definitely think that technology and automation are a factor with some of these [jobs],” Martin Kohli, chief regional economist at the BLS, told 24/7 Wall St.

MORE: 10 Cities That Are Running Out of Water

The development of email has reduced mail volumes and, as a result, the need for postal service workers. Automated sorting systems have further reduced the need for human sorting. Similarly, motion picture projectionists have become less common as digital projection replaces traditional film rolls, Kohli said.

International trade can also play a part in the decline of an occupation. Specifically, Kohli identified free trade and imports as factors impacting textile occupations. Trade, Kohli said, “reduces the demand for people to make shoes and textiles in this country, because imported shoes and cloth, often from Asia, cost relatively little.” At the same time, he noted that this allows Americans to focus on other industries, such as high-level manufacturing and providing financial services. Semiconductor processors, too, have become less-common in the U.S., as many businesses have elected to outsource manufacturing work abroad and focus on design, marketing, and distribution.

To determine the jobs with the greatest forecast percentage decline in employment, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed BLS Employment Projections program data for 2012 and 2022. Most of these occupations refer to a specific job. In a few cases — postal service workers, data entry and information processing workers, and textile machine setters, operators, and tenders — we used a broader classification to reflect that multiple jobs in the larger job category would be among the fastest shrinking. Where several occupations were similar in their description, such as textile machine workers and fabric and apparel patternmakers, we selected only one occupation. Employment figures from the BLS for 2012 represent estimates, while figures for 2022 represent forecasts. Median annual wage figures are for 2012. Further information on each occupation came from the BLS’ Occupational Outlook Handbook.

These are America’s Disappearing Jobs:

5. Semiconductor Processors
> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: -27.1%
> Number employed, 2012: 21,300
> Number employed, 2022: 15,500
> Median annual income: $33,020
> Educational qualification: Associate’s degree

Semiconductor processors oversee the manufacturing process by cleaning silicon, monitoring machinery, and testing circuits to ensure they function correctly. Processors work in perfectly clean rooms while wearing lightweight attire called “bunny suits” in order to prevent dust particles from damaging semiconductors. The combination of automation and foreign manufacturing is expected to reduce the number of processors by more than one-fourth between 2012 and 2022. Today, a number of major U.S. companies such as Broadcom and Qualcomm are “fabless” chip makers, meaning they outsource manufacturing operations, often to other countries.

4. Postal Service Workers
> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: -28.3%
> Number employed, 2012: 491,600
> Number employed, 2022: 352,600
> Median annual income: $53,100
> Educational qualification: N/A

The number of postal service workers in general is projected to drop by more than 28% from 2012 to 2022, with postal service clerks expected to experience the biggest percentage drop. According to the BLS, “automated sorting systems, cluster mailboxes, and tight budgets” are all expected to lead to lower postal worker employment. The U.S. Postal Service has struggled for years to repair its finances, and posted a net loss of nearly $5 billion last year amid a decline in mail volume that will likely continue. In response to these declines, the USPS cut hours worked by 2.3% in 2012, and by an additional 1.1% last year. The USPS forecasts that it will run a multi-billion dollar loss in fiscal 2014. It has also announced plans to cut up to 15,000 jobs in 2015, an action that is being opposed by 50 U.S. senators.

MORE: America’s Best Companies to Work For

3. Shoe Machine Operators and Tenders
> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: -35.3%
> Number employed, 2012: 3,500
> Number employed, 2022: 2,300
> Median annual income: $24,310
> Educational qualification: High school diploma

Jobs for shoe machine operators and tenders, who work to build shoes and shoe parts, are projected to drop by more than a third between 2012 and 2022. Yet, such jobs are already quite rare in the U.S., with only 3,500 people working in the field as of 2012. Today, many footwear makers outsource their manufacturing to foreign countries and companies. One such company headquartered in Hong Kong, Yue Yuen, employed roughly 413,000 people at the end of 2013. Major companies that outsource manufacturing to Yue Yuen include Nike, Adidas, and Puma.

2. Locomotive Firers
> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: -42.0%
> Number employed, 2012: 1,600
> Number employed, 2022: 900
> Median annual income: $44,920
> Educational qualification: High school diploma

Locomotive firers are responsible for monitoring train tracks for debris, and they check various instruments in order to ensure that no problems are present with the trains’ engines. The job is currently very rare, with less than 2,000 workers as of 2012 — a number that is expected to drop far more in the coming decade. Already, many such jobs have become obsolete as automation has taken the place of people, with locomotive engineers and conductors filling most of these roles. A handful of companies — BNSF, CSX, Norfolk Southern, and Union Pacific, as well as the national rail operator, Amtrak — employ most railroad workers.

MORE: 10 Companies That Will Disappear in 2015

1. Fallers
> Pct. change in employment 2012 – 2022: -43.3%
> Number employed, 2012: 6,600
> Number employed, 2022: 3,800
> Median annual income: $35,250
> Educational qualification: High school diploma

Fallers are logging workers that cut down trees. According to the BLS, fallers face numerous job pressures that are projected to cut jobs by roughly 43%. Despite a focus on safety, jobs in logging are often dangerous due to the machinery used and the dangers of falling branches. According to the BLS, fallers face numerous job pressures, including increased mechanization, conservation efforts, and foreign competition, that are projected to cut jobs by roughly 43%. Logging workers are already something of a rare occupation. As of 2012, there were just under 44,000 logging workers in the U.S., of which roughly 6,600 were fallers. The number of logging workers, overall, is expected to decline by 8.7% from 2012 to 2022.

For the rest of the list, please go to 24/7 Wall Street.

TIME Careers & Workplace

6 Sure-Fire Signs They’re Planning to Replace You

200437037-001
A J James—Getty Images

What to look out for and how to deal with it

LinkedIn Influencer Liz Ryan published this post originally on LinkedIn. Follow Liz on LinkedIn.

There’s lot of wildlife in Boulder. I was gobsmacked the first time bear came into our yard, after living in Chicago and New York for years. It got to be more normal, and then we had a mountain lion on our street. Now there’s a mother lion and two cubs wandering the neighborhood. We didn’t have this kind of thing in New Jersey.

They say that a prey animal’s nervous system shuts down when the prey animal is snatched by a predator. Humans have a bit of that going on, too. We tune out signals that should alert us to be on guard and on our feet, at home and at work.

Most of us are so tuned into the next thing on our to-do list and the general crush of daily obligations that we shut down our antennae for new information, especially scary information. We don’t take it in, for example the signals that tell you “You are not going to have this job much longer.”

Every day in our office we hear people say “I was completely blindsided. I got called into someone’s office, they gave me papers to sign and I wasn’t tracking with the conversation, I was so overwhelmed.”

When you lose your job suddenly, you’re in shock. It’s normal. When you get bushwhacked, how else would you react?

When you turn on your antennae to be mindful of signals in the energy field around you, you’ll be in a better position whether you’re working for someone else or for yourself.

The more information you can take in and attend to, the better. The closer you can keep an ear to the ground and all your other senses working at a high level, the stronger your position will be.

When people get in a rut at work it’s called falling asleep on your career. Your spidey sense weakens. Your old street muscles from the playground or the basketball court atrophy. You forget how to pay attention to what’s going on around you, and the press of your work makes that inattention even more likely.

Just then you get the lightning bolt and you’re out of a job without warning. Two weeks later when your body has had time to process everything, you’ll say “Actually, there were signs. I missed them.”

I don’t want to make you paranoid, but every time I write about this topic we get letters from people who say “I was guided to read your column today. I see it now. I’m putting the breadcrumbs together. My boss wants me out.”

That early warning helps you get centered. When you see the storm swells forming as you look out across the water, you can prepare. You can be proactive then. First we’ll walk through the six signs they’re planning to replace you, and then I’ll tell you what to do about them.

You’re Pulled Off a Big Project for No Reason

Be suspicious when you’re on a big project doing fine, and all of a sudden you’re off the project for no reason. That’s not a sensible business move, unless they can tell you what you’re doing next and why that’s good for your employer (and you). If you ask why you were pulled off the project and the answer is mushy and non-committal, get your job-search engine going and start building your mojo for a job search.

All of a Sudden, Your Knowledge is Valuable

God bless our colleagues who lack emotional intelligence, because they broadcast their intentions. One way they do it is to suddenly have an interest in everything you know about your job.

They’ll say one random day “Why don’t you train Elissa, our temp, on how you create newsletters and marketing brochures, and teach her how to do trade shows?” Cross-training is great, but there should be a particular need for it, because cross-training takes a lot of time. If you feel sketchy about somebody’s sudden desire to pick your entire brain, trust your feelings.

Former Strategic Conflicts Disappear

Knowledge work can get us emotionally and philosophically attached to our jobs. We care about decisions made at work when we’re connected to our power source there. Strategic disagreements can get fierce and personal at times.

If you’ve been in a wrangle with someone and suddenly it’s all forgotten, there’s no discussion and everything is fine, the word may have come down that you aren’t staying.

You Can’t Get Forward Visibility

Most folks outside the executive suite don’t get formal employment agreements unless they’re contractors, but we like to have some visibility a year or so into the future. We like to know what the organization is trying to do, and to hear as often as possible how well it’s doing with its goals.

If you can’t get a hint from your manager about your future, that’s a bad sign. Most people would rather waffle than tell you something and have to backtrack later. They may keep you treading water until they’re ready to toss you out of the pool completely.

Your Red-Hot Project Goes Suddenly Cold

A screaming neon sign of an upcoming personnel switch-out is for a person’s pet project which was high-priority suddenly to slip to the back burner almost without mention. It typically means that the leaders still still love the project but don’t want you running it, for whatever energetic-disturbance reason they have. They’ll low-key the project until you’re gone and then rev it back up.

Don’t take it personally. It isn’t about you. Your flame can grow from an experience like that, even if you leave. Look what influence you had! Your great ideas travel with you wherever you go.

You Just Feel It

Humans are an old species. Once I traveled to visit a friend, and on the last day of my visit she scheduled a half-day off work to show me her city. In the morning she had a meeting to attend at work, and she said “Come to my office and meet everyone. There’s a spare office where you can work.”

She went into her meeting and I sat in her office working. I felt a chill. I was in a private office but the door was open to a suite of three other offices in a corner of the building. I stopped typing and felt it. Something in the looks of my friend’s co-workers when they walked by — I couldn’t put my finger on it. I scribbled on a Post-It Note “Went down the street for coffee. Call me.”

My friend called me an hour later and said “Which coffee shop are you at? I’ll join you. I just got fired.”

The bad energy was in the air – the tension. It drove me out. You will feel things and your job is not to judge or pooh-pooh them but to let them sit in your right brain and percolate for a few days. Is there a change in the air temperature? If so, you’ve got to mention it.

What To Do If It Happens?

What if you see some of these signs, or all of them? Take the bull by the horns and find your center. Set up a time to talk with your boss and warmly ask him or her what’s up.

Jump here for a script to guide you.

Liz Ryan is the CEO and Founder of Human Workplace.

TIME Careers & Workplace

This Is Exactly How to Make Sure Your Resume Gets Seen

172965881
nazdravie—Getty Images

The gatekeepers between you and the job you want are often digital first, human second. Here’s how to approach both

fortunelogo-blue
This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

By Anne Fisher

Dear Annie: What exactly is an applicant tracking system? I’ve applied for several job openings where my qualifications match the job descriptions for each position precisely, yet I’ve gotten called in for an interview only once (so far). A colleague at my current job told me he read somewhere that computerized applicant tracking systems reject most resumes before a human being even gets involved in the process. Is that true? If it is, how do you get past that and reach an actual person? — Left Hanging in Houston

Dear L.H.H.: An applicant tracking system (ATS), as the name implies, is how many big companies keep track of the hundreds or thousands of resumes that are constantly coming in. Designed to follow each candidate through each stage of the hiring process, from application to start date, the systems usually begin with computer software that “reads” each resume and weeds out the ones that don’t match up with specific job openings.

Unfortunately, that’s usually a lot less efficient than it sounds. That 75% rejection rate your friend cited probably came from a study by a job search services firm called Preptel (which was founded by its CEO Jon Ciampi, an alumnus of ATS maker SumTotal Systems).

The huge number of rejections is due to some, shall we say, quirks in the software that screens resumes before they arrive on a hiring manager’s desk. You could be the perfect prospect for a given job, using all the right keywords, and still be kicked aside by the system because it couldn’t quite make out parts of your resume — like work experience, for instance.

For the rest of the story, please visit Fortune.com.

TIME Careers & Workplace

10 Companies That Need to Hire You This Month

154502639
Geri Lavrov—Getty Images/Flickr RF

Looking for a good new job? August could be your month

themuselogo
This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

If a career change is on your mind, we know it’s not the easiest thing in the world to find a company you can feel at home at—which is why The Muse is here to help!

We’ve rounded up some great companies that are looking to hire like crazy this month. Check out the listings below to get a sense of why they’re awesome, and see how you might have the chance to work for them.

1. Counsyl

Where: San Francisco, Chicago, Cleveland, and Richmond, VA

Counsyl wants to give people more information about their bodies. With a simple saliva sample, Counsyl can give you easy online access to information about things such as genetic diseases and inherited cancer. And more information means more power to make smart decisions about your future and family! Want to help with this important mission? Counsyl is currently looking for new team members in almost every department.

See the Jobs

2. Worldwide101

Where: Flexible

Worldwide101 helps connect talented professionals who want flexible work options with small businesses, entrepreneurs, and startups around the world to provide virtual support in all sorts of things: administration, customer service, social media, project management, design, web development, and more. Besides the virtual assistant and multilingual virtual assistant teams that the company is always looking to grow, Worldwide101 is in serious need of some help on the operations and account management front.

See the Jobs

3. Deloitte

Where: All Around the U.S.

For businesses around the world, Deloitte is known as one of the largest professional services organizations in the U.S., delivering innovative solutions to the complex business problems. For employees, Deloitte is known as the place to get a seriously rewarding career in auditing, tax, consulting, financial advisory, and even engineering. Check out the hoards of job openings to find the role for you.

See the Jobs

4. Nitro

Where: San Francisco, Melbourne, and Dublin

Nitro is changing the way the world—including more than 50% of the Fortune 500—works with documents. From the desktop to the cloud, Nitro makes it easy to create, edit, share, sign, and collaborate—anytime and anywhere. Even if you’re not a techie, there are plenty of roles for you here, so check them out and get pumped to become a Nitronaut!

See the Jobs

5. Nextdoor

Where: San Francisco

Nextdoor is the new social network for neighbors, letting you share important information with—and just generally get to know—the people who live around you. The company wants to use technology to help strengthen community, one neighborhood at a time, and needs your help to do it.

See the Jobs

6. LivePerson

Where: New York, San Francisco, Atlanta, and Around the World

LivePerson wants to help companies give customers superior support in spite of (or with the help of) the digital technology. This leader in digital engagement needs new team members across the board to help it become the number one place businesses go when they want to connect more with their customers.

See the Jobs

7. The Nerdery

Where: Chicago, Minneapolis, and Kansas City

The developers at The Nerdery collaborate with advertisers, marketers, and other creatives to build award-winning interactive projects. It’s the perfect place for talented developers with a creative streak to work on super rewarding things. Ready to join this team of nerds? The Nerdery is looking for tons of new engineers, along with project management and sales pros.

See the Jobs

8. BrightRoll

Where: San Francisco, New York, and Chicago

BrightRoll is the largest independent video advertising platform, helping advertisers move away from broadcast and reach consumers across the screens of today: computers, smartphones, tablets, and connected TVs. If you’re a marketing, PR, or engineering professional, BrightRoll especially needs your help to change the future of ads.

See the Jobs

9. Squarespace

Where: New York

On a mission to make the web a more beautiful place, Squarespace has tools to help users create incredible websites—without even having to know how to code! Now that everyone is looking to make their mark on the internet, Squarespace is sure to contintue growing, and you could be there as it becomes big.

See the Jobs

10. Facebook

Where: Silicon Valley, New York, and Seattle

You know what Facebook is. But did you know it’s at the center of people sharing interests, forming new relationships, and unifying large populations to make the world a smaller, friendlier place? And did you know it’s an awesome place to work, offering plenty of perks to help creativity and productivity thrive? Check out open jobs today and find out for yourself.

See the Jobs

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 46,510 other followers