TIME Nepal

Watch This Touching Movie About the Aftermath of Everest Avalanche

"This is our tribute to the fallen."

Climbers on Everest who were caught in an avalanche triggered by Saturday’s earthquake in Nepal have made a short film about the hours and days following the disaster.

The touching video, created by Canadian filmmaker Elia Sailkaly, shows the moment the avalanche hit Everest’s base camp and the rescue efforts immediately following it.

“Our hearts go out to those affected by the earthquake in Nepal, and we pray for the more than 4,000 people who lost their lives on April 25, 2015,” the caption to the video reads. “This is our experience at Mount Everest Base Camp after the avalanche. This is our tribute to the fallen.”

TIME europe

Watch Fighters Literally Go Medieval on Each Other in This New Documentary

Fighters down swords and shields in medieval copmetition

If Game of Thrones has you hankering to see a real-life sword-fight or jousting match, consider a trip to the Battle of the Nations. The annual European event involves fighters in actual armor, using real weapons (that have been blunted for safety) competing across a variety of events. A new documentary from distributor Journeyman Pictures chronicles the 2014 event, which took place in Trogir, Croatia. The video features both fighters and fans donning actual medieval garb, competing in both one-on-one bouts and large-scale pitched “battles.”

The Battle of Nations begins in May this year in Prague, Czech Republic.

TIME India

A Documentary on Cricket Demigod Sachin Tendulkar Is in the Works

Red Carpet Studio - 2015 Laureus World Sports Awards - Shanghai
Ian Walton—Getty Images/Laureus Former Indian cricketer Sachin Tendulkar attends the 2015 Laureus World Sports Awards at Shanghai Grand Theatre on April 15, 2015, in Shanghai

The sporting legend turned 42 on Friday

Fans and well-wishers of Sachin Tendulkar (there are literally billions of them) were devastated when the legendary Indian cricketer announced his retirement from the sport two years ago. But as India’s “god of cricket” turns 42 on Friday, his supporters around the world have something to look forward to.

Tendulkar is busy shooting a documentary feature on his life, and a photograph released by Indian news channel CNN-IBN shows him deep in conversation with the film’s British director James Erskine next to a trunk of his most treasured possessions.

Producers of the film, which was announced earlier this year, are reportedly targeting a 2016 release on big screens. The film does not have a title yet, but some of Tendulkar’s 9.08 million Twitter followers might get to decide that.

TIME movies

How a Photo Reveals an Early Encounter Between Abraham Lincoln and John Wilkes Booth

See a clip from the HBO documentary 'Living With Lincoln'

It was 150 years ago this week, on April 14, 1865, mere days after the Confederate surrender at Appomattox, that President Abraham Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth. The act put an end to the life of one of history’s most revered men.

As shown in the exclusive clip above, a photograph from the time provides evidence for a claim that circulated in the days following the crime: that Booth was actually within firing range of the president during Lincoln’s second inauguration, about a month before the assassination actually took place.

That proof of a near-miss is just one of the ways that photographs have illuminated Lincoln’s story. In the HBO documentary Living With Lincoln, from which this exclusive clip is taken, Peter Kunhardt explores his family’s history collecting Lincoln artifacts and photographs like this one—a hobby, obsession and calling that has come down through the generations for a century and a half. The Kunhardt family’s collection has contributed to the ways the world remembers Lincoln—their pictures include the portraits used to design the penny and the five-dollar bill—and also links the 16th President to, oddly enough, LIFE Magazine and the children’s book Pat the Bunny.

Living With Lincoln premieres on HBO on April 13.

TIME movies

These Men Are Reenacting a War Many Others Want to Forget

The new documentary 'In Country' introduces a group of Vietnam War reenactors

As the sesquicentennial of the Civil War winds to an end, the hundreds of Americans who regularly reenact that conflict are likely to get plenty of attention. The reenactment at Appomattox is going on right now, in fact.

But the Civil War isn’t the only American conflict that draws citizens, decades later, to replay its battles. In their new documentary In Country (in theaters April 10 and VOD April 28), filmmakers Mike Attie and Meghan O’Hara follow a group of men who, for one weekend a year, recreate the Vietnam War.

They wear the uniforms. They carry the weapons. They even, as shown in the clip above, use the lingo that would have been heard on those battlefields (even when some of that language is offensive). The experience is so immersive that Attie and O’Hara had to dress as war correspondents in order to get approval to film the weekend.

But the time-travel aspect of war reenactment is, the filmmakers say, a little stranger when the war is still relatively fresh. As the 40th anniversary of the Fall of Saigon approaches — the war concluded at the end of April, 1975 — Vietnam remains raw.

“When I heard it I couldn’t believe it,” Attie recalls. “Why would someone want to recreate this war that was so divisive? Both Meghan and I were born after the war ended, but it still seemed like something that was fresh and controversial.”

Whereas Civil War and Revolutionary War reenactments are often family-friendly events, a Vietnam reenactment lacks the distance that neuters the violence. Attie says there was a joke in his high school that the school year would conveniently end before history class got to the Vietnam War, because nobody wanted to talk about it. It felt, he says, like a conflict that people didn’t want to remember — even though the men in his new film are proof otherwise.

And their remembering is not just a matter of learning about the history, obsessing over details like how long the soldiers’ hair would have been in one year versus another. It’s also an exercise in empathy, the movie posits, as veterans in the group are able to revisit their real experiences or, in one particular case, impart their wisdom on a soon-to-be Marine along for the ride.

“It made me think, when does history become History with a capital H, and have the teeth taken out of it a little bit?” O’Hara says. “These men are trying to wrestle with it and it seems so soon.”

TIME review

The Enduring Importance of the Last Man on the Moon

Good times: Gene Cernan (left) and fellow moon walker Jack Schmitt, during the Apollo 17 mission, photographed by crew mate Ron Evans
NASA Good times: Gene Cernan (left) and crew mate Ron Evans, during the Apollo 17 mission, photographed by crew mate J

Jeffrey Kluger is Editor at Large for TIME.

A new documentary about astronaut Gene Cernan is far more than the story of one person's life

Correction appended, April 7

Real astronauts never say goodbye. At least, not the way you’d think they would before they take off on a mission that could very well kill them. They’re good at the quick wave, the hat tip, the catch-you-on-the-flip-side wink. But the real goodbye—the if I don’t come home here are all the things I always wanted to say to you sort of thing? Not a chance.

But Gene Cernan, commander of Apollo 17, tried to split the difference—as a scene in the new documentary The Last Man on the Moon sweetly captures. Before Cernan headed off for his first trip to the moon, the Apollo 10 orbital mission, which was the final dress rehearsal for the Apollo 11 landing a few months later, he mailed his young daughter Tracy a letter. It was written on the fragile onion skin that was air mail stationery, back in the era when the very idea of air mail carried a whiff of exotic distance.

Cernan was a young man when he wrote the letter in 1969, and is a much older man, at 81, when he returns to it in the film. “You’re almost too young to know what it means to have your Daddy go to the moon,” he reads aloud, “But one day, you’ll have the feeling of excitement and pride Mommy and Daddy do. Punk, we have lots of camping and horseback riding to do when I get back. I want you to look at the moon, because when you are reading this, Daddy is almost there.” If the Navy pilot who once landed jets on carrier decks and twice went to the moon mists up as he reads, if his voice quavers a bit, well what of it?

As the title of the movie makes clear, Cernan was the last of the dozen men who set foot on the moon, and the 24 overall who journeyed there. No human being has traveled further into space than low-Earth orbit since Cernan climbed up the ladder of his lunar module in December of 1972, closed the hatch and headed for home. That makes it a very good time for a movie that can serve as equal parts biography, reminiscence and, yes, cultural reprimand for a nation that did a great thing once and has spent a whole lot of time since trying to summon the resolve, the discipline and the political maturity to do something similar again.

The Last Man on the Moon, which premiered at Austin’s South by Southwest festival in March and was later shown at the Toronto Film Festival, had a long provenance, beginning eight years ago when director Mark Craig, who had read Cernan’s book, requested an interview. Cernan agreed and six months later Craig got back in touch and said he wanted to make a movie based on his memoir.

“My first answer was, ‘Who would be interested in a movie about me?'” Cernan tells TIME. The answer he got impressed him: “This movie is not going to be about you.” It was, instead, going to be about the larger story.

That story, as Cernan and Craig came to agree, would be about the lunar program as a whole and the up-from-the-farm narrative of so many of the men who flew in it, as well as the random currents of fortune that saw some those men make it from terrestrial soil to lunar soil, while others perished in the violent machines that were necessary for them to make those journeys.

So we see the wreckage of the jet that killed astronauts Charlie Bassett and Elliott See, the prime crew for the 1966 Gemini 9 flight, an accident that required backup pilots Tom Stafford and Cernan to go in their place. We see Gemini 9 unfold, a mission that could have claimed Cernan too. The absence of handholds on the spacecraft and the poor state of knowledge about maneuvering in space left him whipping about at the end of his umbilical cord during his spacewalk, his visor blinding him with fog and his suit swelling so much in the surrounding vacuum that he could barely get back inside through the hatch.

We see, wrenchingly, Martha Chaffee, Cernan’s one-time neighbor and the wife of his close friend Roger—one of the three astronauts who died in the Apollo 1 fire in 1967—describing the moment she learned the terrible thing that had happened to her husband. “That evening, January 27th, a Friday, I was giving my kids hot dogs,” she says, fighting back tears these 48 years later, “and somebody said there’d been an accident. So when Mike Collins came to the door, I knew, I knew, I knew right away. I said, ‘I know, Mike, but you’ve got to tell me.’ And he did.”

Cernan is philosophical about the deaths—losses as inevitable as the very physics of space travel—and sees neither plan nor order in them. “I went to the cemetery at Arlington and I see Charlie’s and Roger’s headstone and say, ‘Why them, not me?'” he says. “Fate. Fate picked Neil [Armstrong] to be first on the moon, not [head astronaut] Deke Slayton. The point is, here we are, so what do we do with it?”

What Cernan has decided to do with it, in the ninth decade of his life, is tell the story of where America went before, make the case for going again and, importantly, remind children that while not every life mission involves going to the moon, each requires the same ferocious focus and commitment. He knows—perhaps immodestly, but surely accurately—that that message carries a special resonance when it comes from the likes of him.

“I realize that I’m the last man on the moon and that the more of us who leave this Earth permanently the more we’re appreciated,” he says. “I want to inspire a young kid to dream about being a doctor, a teacher an engineer, a scientist. I want that young kid to believe he could do things other people said he couldn’t, wouldn’t do.”

Yes, that’s a message American kids are bottle-fed almost from birth. But when it’s spoken by a man who lived on the moon for three remarkable days, who would come inside from work in the evening, shake the lunar dust off his suit, smell its strange gunpowder scent, then go out the next morning and leave prints that endure on the windless lunar surface to this day, it’s something else entirely. Cernan, last among the moonwalkers, may be first in the enduring good he does with the journeys he made.

Correction: The original version of the photo caption accompanying this story, using information from NASA, misidentified the astronaut on the right. He is Ron Evans.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME movies

You May Need a Box of Tissues to Watch the Amy Winehouse Documentary

The teaser for Amy promises a sad look at the singer's tragic life

Amy Winehouse’s death by alcohol poisoning rocked Britain—and the world—in 2011, and when the documentary Amy comes out this summer right around the four-year anniversary of her death, it’s likely to make fans sad all over again.

The movie features interviews with the soul singer/songwriter from her early days, before she adopted the distinctive look so many likened to Ronnie Spector, and well before her rocky personal life became prime fodder for tabloids. In a telling moment in the teaser, an interviewer asks Winehouse how big a celebrity she thinks she’ll be. “I don’t,” she replies. “I don’t think I’m going to be at all famous. I don’t think I could handle it—I would probably go mad.”

The documentary, directed by Asif Kapadia, is due to hit theaters on July 3 in the U.K.

TIME movies

Watch the Trailer For Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck

The film provides an intimate look into the troubled singer's life

HBO has revealed the first full trailer for upcoming Kurt Cobain documentary Montage of Heck.

The film, which details the life of Nirvana front man, premiered at Sundance Film Festival earlier this year and has received rave reviews, writes Rolling Stone.

Directed by Brett Morgen, Montage of Heck follows the life of Cobain growing up in the Pacific Northwest and ultimately becoming a rock legend. Cobain’s wife Courtney Love and daughter Frances Bean (who is executive producer of the film) also feature heavily.

In the trailer, interviews with family members and friends are mixed with animation and never-before-seen family photos, home movies and artwork of the Smells Like Teen Spirit singer who took his own life when he was 27.

A companion book will be released prior to the film containing animation stills and photography from Cobain’s archives.

The film’s soundtrack will also feature an unreleased 12-minute acoustic song by Cobain.

Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck will premier on television May 4.

[Rolling Stone]

TIME India

Filmmaker Leslee Udwin Denies Paying Delhi Rapist for Documentary Interview

INDIA-BRITAIN-FILM-WOMEN
CHANDAN KHANNA—AFP/Getty Images Leslee Udwin, director of the documentary India's Daughter, attends a press conference in New Delhi on March 3, 2015

India's Daughter was banned in India in part because of the rapist's comments in which he blamed his victim

British filmmaker Leslee Udwin, embroiled in controversy over her documentary about the fatal 2012 New Delhi gang rape that was banned by the Indian government last week, has vehemently denied reports that she paid one of the convicted rapists for his interview.

“I can tell you hand on heart that we have not paid 1 rupee to anyone we interviewed,” she told Indian newspaper the Hindu, shrugging off the allegations as a “smear campaign.”

Indian media outlets had earlier reported that Udwin paid Mukesh Singh — one of six men convicted of the rape and murder of a 23-year-old student a little over two years ago — the equivalent of $600 for his controversial interview. An investigation by Hindi-language Navbharat Times newspaper alleged that Singh had initially asked for more than $3,000.

Udwin also denied that the filming of the interview with Singh, in which he blames his victim for the rape and says her life may have been spared if she had not fought back, was done without his knowledge.

“As a world-renowned producer who has won a [BAFTA Award], I would never do a thing like that,” Udwin said.

The Indian government banned the film, titled India’s Daughter, over concerns that Singh’s comments would cause “apprehension of public disorder.”

NDTV, the channel scheduled to air the documentary before the government’s television ban resulted in the film going viral on YouTube, protested by broadcasting a blank screen between 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. on Sunday.

The intended message of the film, Udwin said, was to tell the world to follow India’s example of protesting against rape and forcing the government to amend the status quo. According to the award-winning director, global statistics on rape that were a part of the Indian and international TV broadcasts did not make it to the BBC version that spread over the Internet.

“The government is inviting the world to point fingers at India, and call it undemocratic and unconstitutional,” she said. “Why are they intent on committing international suicide?”

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