TIME movies

Disney Announces Animated Feature Moana Coming in 2016

From the directors of 'Aladdin' and 'The Little Mermaid'

A new animation feature announced Monday by Walt Disney Animation Studios will tell the tale of a teenage girl navigating a journey through the South Pacific.

The film, set to be directed by Ron Clements and John Musker — who also directed Aladdin and The Little Mermaid will follow Moana, who sets out on an “impossible mission to fulfill her ancestors’ quest,” according to Disney’s blog. She’s apparently very good with boats.

Viewers can expect the feature to hit theaters in late 2016.

TIME viral

If Disney Characters Instagrammed, They’d Be Guilty of These Selfie Crimes

Artist Simona Bonafini created a series that will rock your childhood

The Little Mermaid always wanted to be a part of our world. And we live in a world of selfies — lots and lots of selfies.

Artist Simona Bonafini created a series titled “Selfie Fables” that imagines what your Instagram feed would look like if it were habituated by your favorite cartoon characters. And while it isn’t as disturbing as other Disney re-interpretations, Hercules and company are guilty of some selfie faux pas:

Shirtless gym selfies. We know this is going straight to Tinder:

Simona Bonafini

Bikini shots. There’s no need for #perfectbody thinspo…

Simona Bonafini

Instilling feelings of FOMO. Maybe your invite to the tea party went into your spam folder?

Simona Bonafini

Nothing is wrong with this selfie. Maleficent owns it:

Simona Bonafini
TIME movies

This Disney Censorship Story Is Udderly Ridiculous

Disney And Mickey
Walt Disney with Mickey Mouse, circa 1935 General Photographic Agency / Getty Images

The studio was founded on Oct. 16, 1923

When the Disney Brothers Studio got its start on this day, Oct. 16, in 1923, Walt Disney couldn’t have predicted that his animation studio would become the entertainment powerhouse that it’s been for nearly a century.

He also probably failed to predict that, within a decade, he’d get hit with what must be one of the sillier censorship cases in history.

Here’s how TIME described what happened in February of 1931:

Motion Picture Producers & Distributors of America last week announced that, because of complaints of many censor boards, the famed udder of the cow in the Mickey Mouse cartoons was now banned. Cows in Mickey Mouse or other cartoon pictures in the future will have small or invisible udders quite unlike the gargantuan organ whose antics of late have shocked some and convulsed other of Mickey Mouse’s patrons. In a recent picture the udder, besides flying violently to left and right or stretching far out behind when the cow was in motion, heaved with its panting when the cow stood still; it also stretched, when seized, in an exaggerated way.

That’s right: Clarabelle Cow’s udders were deemed inappropriate for tender American audiences, who one must presume did not know where milk comes from. Clarabelle was also censored at one point, in Ohio, after she was seen reading a racy book.

But, it turns out, Clarabelle wasn’t the only one of Disney’s creations to get adjusted by decency boards during the studio’s first decade. Canada banned another cartoon because of the way a fish got too close to a mermaid’s thigh, and German censors objected to a cartoon in which Mickey and friends were approached by cats wearing German military garb, which was seen as offensive to Germans. (It’s unclear from TIME’s coverage whether the German censors objected to being compared to undignified felines or to anti-Mickey predators.)

It was probably not because of her udders, but Clarabelle has largely faded away from the list of popular Disney characters, which means that–to paraphrase another cartoon icon, Bart Simpson–most of the studio’s movies these days do not, in fact, have a cow, man.

Read TIME’s 1937 cover story about Walt Disney here, in the archives: Mouse & Man

TIME Television

Guardians of the Galaxy is Headed to TV

Guardians of the Galaxy
Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy Marvel

The animated show will air on Disney XD in 2015

The Marvel sci-fi film Guardians of the Galaxy is headed to the small screen after a blockbuster summer at the box office. Disney Channel XD will launch an animated version of the show in 2015, according to The Hollywood Reporter. The announcement came Friday at New York Comic Con.

Like its live action predecessor, the new show will feature Peter Quill as Star-Lord and document his efforts to save the universe.

“We’re looking forward to working with the great team at Marvel Television to deliver an engaging animated series that fans can enjoy each week,” said Marc Buhaj, a Disney XD executive.

Guardians of the Galaxy ruled the box office this summer, grossing more than $300 million.

[THR]

TIME movies

See George Clooney as a Hermit in the First Trailer for Tomorrowland

Lost writer Damon Lindelof teams up with Disney for the sci-fi movie

Disney hasn’t gone into much detail yet about their upcoming sci-fi and fantasy film, Tomorrowland—named after the theme land featured in Disney’s five amusement parks. What we do know is this: Britt Robertson plays a teenager who finds a pin that brings her to some futuristic universe, and George Clooney plays a hermit and aspiring inventor who reveals some of Tomorrowland’s secrets.

The film brings together writer Damon Lindeloff (Lost, Prometheus) and director Brad Bird (The Incredibles, Mission: Impossible—Ghost Protocol). It is set to hit theaters on May 22, 2015.

MONEY Tourism

You’re Not Allowed to Wait in Line for This Disney Ride

Daytime TV talk show host Wendy Williams and her son Kevin take a ride on "Toy Story Midway Mania!" during a visit to Disney's Hollywood Studios theme park at Walt Disney World Resort January 19, 2014 in Lake Buena Vista, Florida.
Daytime TV talk show host Wendy Williams and her son Kevin take a ride on "Toy Story Midway Mania!" during a visit to Disney's Hollywood Studios theme park at Walt Disney World Resort January 19, 2014 in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. Gregg Newton—Disney Parks via Getty Images

If you want to ride Toy Story Midway Mania at Walt Disney World's Hollywood Studios, you better have a reservation.

In a test that started on Monday and runs through Thursday, Disney World is requiring Hollywood Studios visitors to make advance reservations via the FastPass+ system if they want to hop aboard the popular Toy Story ride, an interactive “4D” attraction in which guests twist through a series of virtual carnival games while wearing 3D glasses. Normally, the wait time to ride Toy Story Mania can easily stretch over an hour, but the new reservation-only system means that Disney World guests won’t have the option of waiting it out in the standby queue.

A Disney spokesperson explained to the Orlando Sentinel that extra FastPass+ reservations for Toy Story Mania would be available during the course of the experiment. On the one hand, the move means that no one will have to endure agonizingly long lines for the ride. The FastPass+ system gives riders a time window when they are to arrive and hop on in a jiffy. On the other hand, some worry that all of the available pass times could be snatched up as soon as they’re available, and those who don’t snag a reservation early in the day will be shut out from riding.

What makes this four-day test potentially big news is that it could be a vision of how theme parks will operate on a broader scale in the future. Over the years, Walt Disney World and other theme parks have tweaked numerous policies that essentially kill spontaneity because they all but force guests to plot out plans for meals, rides, and more in advance. Disney guests have been instructed that if they want to bring their kids to a Character Breakfast or have dinner at one of the nicer park establishments, they should reserve weeks if not months before arrival. Likewise, the MyMagic+ wristband system introduced in early 2013 was created to help guests reserve meals, ride times, and more.

When theme park guests aren’t waiting in lines for hours, they’re happier, which works out for Disney and park visitors alike. What works out especially brilliantly for Disney is that when guests aren’t waiting in lines, they’re free to roam about in the areas where they’re apt to spend more money, such as gift shops and restaurants. After all, you can’t buy overpriced souvenirs while you’re stuck waiting on line.

In a post at Theme Park Insider, most Disney fans seem opposed to reservation-only rides. “I want a vacation, for Christ’s sake, and if I have to plan everything in advance, then it’s simply not fun anymore,” one commenter stated, bashing the entire swath of policies pushing guests to plot minute-by-minute plans ahead of time. Still, another commenter noted that Toy Story Mania reservations are “definitely needed for the ride. The queues are longer than any other attraction in the Disney parks.”

Love it or hate it, the shift to more reservations and less waiting in line seems like the way things are heading. “Everybody’s striving to improve the flow of the guest. That’s the wave of the future in our industry,” Dennis Speigel, president of International Theme Park Services, explained to the Orlando Sentinel. “It would not surprise me within the next 10 years that we see rides that are totally reserved.”

TIME Pop Culture

This Map Shows That Disney World Has Grown Like Crazy

Disney Map
From the Oct. 18, 1971, issue of TIME TIME

The theme park opened on Oct. 1, 1971

A few decades ago, it was incredible to imagine a theme park surpassing the size and scope of California’s Disneyland — but Walt Disney World, which opened on this day, Oct. 1, in 1971, did. “‘World’ is right,” TIME marveled in the Oct. 18 issue of that year, alongside a map of the new attraction. “The latest Disney enterprise, four years in the building, includes a spotlessly clean amusement area, two enormous and elaborate hotels with marinas and beaches, two championship-caliber golf courses, lavishly landscaped lakes and a futuristic transportation network linking everything.”

The article went on to praise the “futuristic unisex jumpsuits” worn by workers, the $4.25 roast beef dinner at Cinderella Castle and the skill of the lawyers who worked to make Disney World “in effect a city-state” with near complete control of what goes on on its property.

So we can only imagine how much ooh-ing and aw-ing there would have been if those writers in 1971 had gotten a load of this modern map of Disney World:

Disney

Roll over to zoom; on mobile, click.

Everything included in the original map fits into the upper right-hand corner. Though the basic layout of the Magic Kingdom is unchanged, the resort — that’s Epcot, Animal Kingdom and rest of the whole shebang — now covers an area about the same size as San Francisco, by Today.com‘s count. But the craziest thing of all on that up-to-date map isn’t a new addition to the park; it’s that there’s still so much empty space into which it could still expand.

Read the 1971 article about the theme park’s opening, here in TIME’s archives: Pixie Dust Over Florida

TIME Television

Neil deGrasse Tyson Voices a Pig In Disney’s Gravity Falls: First Look

NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON
Neil deGrasse Tyson records his role as "smart" Waddles for Gravity Falls. Lorenzo Bevilaqua—Disney XD

From scientist to... swine?

Neil deGrasse Tyson, the esteemed astrophysicist and host of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, can now add “voice actor” to his resume after a recent stint voicing Waddles, a pig, in Disney’s Gravity Falls.

The show follows brother-sister duo Dipper and Mabel Pines on their supernatural misadventures in the fictional town of Gravity Falls, Oregon; Waddles is Mabel’s pet pig.

Neil deGrasse Tyson becomes the voice of Waddles in the upcoming episode, “Little Gift Shop of Horrors,” when the pet pig accidentally eats a bowl of brain-enhancing jelly giving it the mental know-how to create a machine that allows it to talk.

SMART WADDLES, DIPPER, MABEL
Neil deGrasse Tyson stars as “smart” Waddles in Gravity Falls. Disney XD

On his experience of voicing a pig, Neil deGrasse Tyson had this to say: “I’m a fan of helping anything get smarter. Even if it’s a pig.”

This episode of Gravity Falls premieres on Saturday, October 4 at 9pm during Disney Channel’s “Monstober” programming event.

Read more: Disney’s Gravity Falls Creator on How to Create a Show for All Ages

MONEY Odd Spending

12 Things Made for Kids That Are Now Being Marketed to Adults

Who says kids should get to have all the fun? Not the forces behind a wide range of seemingly juvenile foods, products, and places that are increasingly being sold to adults—plenty of whom are happy to play along.

It’s hard to remember a time when video games and comic books were enjoyed almost exclusively by people under the age of 18. But that was the case a mere couple of decades ago, before both began featuring violence, profanity, sex, and other material not appropriate for young children. Along the same lines, in recent times many other things long associated with kids are now being marketed to adult consumers. Here are a dozen examples:

Gummy Vitamins. A string of studies indicating that vitamins appear to be largely a waste of money has resulted in flat sales for the once sizzling vitamin market. It looks like consumers are getting the messages spread by researchers in the field, who point out that while vitamin supplements are correlated with better health, there is little proof of causality because the people taking vitamins tend to healthier and take better care of themselves in the first place. But if consumers are dubious about the benefits of boring old-fashioned vitamins, they appear less skeptical about vitamins “disguised as candy,” a.k.a. gummy vitamins. Once popular only with children, colorful, chewable, sweet-tasting vitamins are now ubiquitous in stores’ adult vitamin sections, and makers of such adult vitamins say that the category has been enjoying “explosive growth” of late.

Walt Disney World. In some ways, Disney World has always been marketed to adults—who often say they enjoy “feeling like a kid” while touring the theme parks sans children. Some even wish Disney would host child-free days when adults could hit the rides without having to deal with the young whippersnappers clogging up the parks. While that’s highly unlikely to ever take place, Disney has taken several steps over the years to appeal to adult-only clientele, including the introduction of booze for sale at the Magic Kingdom, as well as special events like $35 “After Hours” party with alcohol and tasting menus, and, most recently, a $79 “Food & Wine Late Night” at EPCOT.

Pop Tarts. While interest in breakfast cereal has collapsed in recent years, sales of another kid favorite at the breakfast table, Pop Tarts, have risen each and every year for more than three decades straight. The Wall Street Journal noted that while Pop Tarts are most popular with teens and younger children, “adults reach for them as a retro snack.” It’s not just nostalgia that’s drawing adults to Pop Tarts, but that, “Shoppers increasingly want quick breakfasts they can eat with one hand on the go.” Over the years, Pop Tarts and its imitators have periodically tried out products more directly marketed to adults and foodies, such as “Toaster Pastries” in flavors like Cherry Pomegranate from Nature’s Path.

Happy Meals. McDonald’s briefly tried to market a “Go Active Happy Meal” for adults a decade ago, with a salad and an exercise booklet instead of chicken nuggets and a plastic toy. It obviously didn’t catch on—very few healthy fast food items are successful—but this fall, the Happy Meal for Adults concept is back, bizarrely, in the world of high fashion. Nordstrom is selling a series of pop culture-themed items from Moschino, including an iPhone case that looks like a McDonald’s French fry container ($85) and a Happy Meal lookalike shoulder bag that retails for over $1,000.

Backpacks. In what could be considered a sign that adults really don’t want to grow up, backpack sales are up dramatically among consumers ages 18 and up—including a 48% rise in backpack purchases by female adults over a recent time span. Valentino, Alexander McQueen, and Fendi are among the many fashion designers to feature posh leather and camouflage versions of the bag normally associated with high school and college kids, only theirs sometimes cost $2,000.

Lunchables. OK, so neither Kraft nor its Oscar Mayer brand actually markets Lunchables to adults. But the Adult Lunch Combos look eerily like Lunchables only without Oreos or Capri Sun, and everyone is referring to the new protein-packed prepared lunches as “Lunchables for Adults” even though the real name is the Portable Protein Pack.

Obstacle Courses. Kids have playgrounds in town parks and schools. What do adults have to help keep them in shape while also having fun? The gym doesn’t qualify because, for most people, working out is work, not fun. The exception is when the workout allows adults to swing, jump, get dirty, and challenge themselves on courses made specifically for them, like those on the popular TV show “American Ninja Warrior” and on Tough Mudder and other extreme obstacle course races. This fall, Las Vegas is even hosting an “Adult-Themed” course where the obstacles have names like the Dominatrix Dungeon and the Blue Balls Dash.

Sugary Cereals. A big reason that cereal sales have dropped is that fewer kids are eating them for breakfast. Yet as parents try to sub in healthier fare as a replacement for kid-favorite sugary cereals, the cereal giants appear to be having some success reaching a different audience—the parents themselves. Baby Boomers and Gen X, who grew up craving the sugar rush provided by a bowl of neon-colored goodies on Saturday mornings, are now being fed heaping doses of nostalgia, in the form of cartoon-character cereals brought back from the dead and other adult-focused marketing efforts. The fastest-growing consumers of Trix and Lucky Charms are, in fact, older adults.

Legos. “The Lego Movie” was certainly clever and entertaining enough to warrant an adult audience, especially among those who grew up building with the bricks. Lately, Lego has been making another appeal to adults. Several Legoland Discovery Centers—which normally attract families with children under the age of 10 or 12—have been offering special Adult Nights, where all visitors must be 18 or over.

Fruit Roll-Ups. Many adults would probably be embarrassed if they were caught eating Fruit Roll-Ups, delicious though they may be. How can you avoid being kidded about your preference for what is a quintessential kid snack? Easy. Call them something more adult-sounding, such as Fruit Strips or Fruit Leather.

Hot Pockets. Last year, Nestle attempted to broaden the Hot Pocket demographic—typically, teen boys and slacker college kids who don’t want to cook or even order pizza—by introducing gourmet versions featuring angus beef, hickory ham to appeal to adult foodies.

Halloween. October 31 used to be about children trick-or-treating door to door in their neighborhoods. Now it’s the centerpiece of a whole Halloween season where the kids are invited to enjoy only some—but by no means all—of the fun. A year ago, adults spent roughly $1.2 billion on costumes, compared to $1 billion spent on costumes for kids. Roughly 7 out of 10 college-aged adults plan on dressing up for Halloween, which explains the sales success of oddly “sexy” costumes of pizza slices or corn fields. Or sexy nuns. Adults also tend to spend more on their costumes than they do on Halloween outfits for kids. So that explains why companies are marketing the holiday to adults more and more. Still, it’s hard to come up with a good explanation for the existence of the Sexy Pizza Costume.

TIME Theater

The Lion King Musical Is Now the Highest-Grossing Box Office Draw Ever

Buyi Zama, Buyisile Zama
A scene during a performance of Disney's "The Lion King," in Las Vegas. Darrin Bush—AP

And not just for musicals

Disney’s stage musical version of The Lion King has grossed more than $6.2 billion worldwide, according to a new report, making it the biggest box office hit of any work in any medium of all time.

The Lion King musical, directed by Julie Taymor and based off the animated Disney movie, has raked in more than any Harry Potter film, any Hunger Games movie, or Frozen. Avatar, which is the highest-grossing movie in history, has made less than half of what The Lion King musical has made, at $2.8 billion worldwide gross. The Associated Press reports that the Lion King musical eclipsed The Phantom of the Opera, the previous highest-grossing work, late this summer.

The Phantom of the Opera, with a box office gross of about $6 billion, is still the longest-running show of all time since debuting in London in 1986.

[AP]

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