MONEY Debit Card

What Happens If I Swipe My Debit Card as “Credit”?

person swiping credit card
David Woolley—Getty Images

The answer may surprise you.

It’s a question we’ve all heard when shopping: “Credit or debit?” It seems straightforward, just the cashier asking you what type of payment card you’re using, but there’s actually a lot more history to that question than you might think.

Debit and credit transactions are processed differently: Here’s how MasterCard explained it in an emailed statement to Credit.com: When you use a debit card and your PIN (personal identification number), the transaction is completed in real time, also known as an online transaction — you authorize the purchase with your PIN and the money is immediately transferred from your bank account to the merchant. With a credit card, or using a debit card as credit, it’s an offline transaction.

“The funds for offline transactions are deducted after the merchant settles the purchase with the credit card processor and typically take 2-3 days to be reflected in your account balance,” MasterCard says.

Issuers used to charge merchants different fees for accepting credit cards than for accepting debit card transactions with a PIN. Before the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act was passed, Sen. Dick Durbin added a provision, now called the Durbin Amendment, that restricted interchange fees to 12¢ per transaction. By the time the bill was signed into law, the cap was set at 21¢, much lower than the previous average of 45¢ per transaction. (On Jan. 20, the Supreme Court declined to hear retailers’ challenge to that 21¢ cap.)

With the cap on interchange fees, banks saw their revenue source for things like debit card rewards and free banking dry up, which is why you’re unlikely to find those things these days.

“There’s several thousand community banks and credit unions, what the act refers to as unregulated, who can actually charge greater interchange on transactions,” said Nick Barnes senior vice president of retail banking at ACI Worldwide, a payments system company. The Durbin Amendment only impacted financial service providers with $10 billion or more in assets. “That’s why you go to these tiny banks you’ll still see free banking and debit rewards.”

Should You Choose Debit or Credit?

Credit cards and debit cards are very different products, each with their own advantages and drawbacks that should influence when and how you use them. As for hitting the “credit” button when you’re using a debit card: It doesn’t really matter.

Other than the changes banks may have made as a result changing interchange fees, choosing to use a debit card as credit doesn’t really impact you. You often have the choice to use your debit card with or without the PIN, and how you use it is a matter of personal preference. Running a debit card as an offline transaction still ends up doing the same thing — taking money from your checking account — and it doesn’t help you build credit, like using a credit card does.

More from Credit.com

This article originally appeared on Credit.com.

Read next: Why You Need to Get a Credit Card

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MONEY Debt

You’re Going to Spend $280,000 on Interest in Your Lifetime

Sorry.

The typical American consumer will fork over an average of $279,002 in interest payments during the course of his or her lifetime. So says a new report from Credit.com, which analyzed the lifetime cost of debt in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, based on average mortgage balances, credit card debt, and credit scores.

The size of the nut varies dramatically from state to state. Residents of Washington, D.C.—where average new mortgages are $462,000 and the average credit score of 656 falls squarely in the “fair” range—can expect to pay $451,890 in interest, the highest in the nation.

Concerned D.C. residents might want to consider hitching a ride to Iowa, where the average new mortgage is the nation’s lowest, at $120,467. Add in an average credit card debt of $2,935—also the lowest in the country—and a credit score of 689, and residents of the Hawkeye State have a lifetime cost of debt of “only” $129,394.

Along with 30-year fixed-rate mortgages, Credit.com also considered an average auto loan balance of $22,750 (assuming nine cars over a lifetime) and 40 years of revolving credit card debt when calculating its findings.

Here’s a breakdown of the top 10 states with the highest cost of debt:

  1. Washington, D.C. ($451,890)
  2. California ($368,745)
  3. Hawaii ($312,747)
  4. New Jersey ($309,500)
  5. New York ($300,031)
  6. Maryland ($294,720)
  7. Virginia ($280,516)
  8. Washington ($267,964)
  9. Massachusetts ($261,220)
  10. Colorado ($255,232)

And the lowest:

  1. Iowa ($129,394)
  2. Nebraska ($137,174)
  3. Wisconsin ($144,127)
  4. Maine ($154,340)
  5. North Dakota ($157,011)
  6. South Dakota ($157,136)
  7. Montana ($160,849)
  8. Pennsylvania ($163,513)
  9. West Virginia ($166,232)
  10. Vermont ($167,042)

See the full state-by-state list.

MONEY interest rates

4 Smart Moves for Borrowers and Savers in 2015

What rising interest rates could mean to you.

Most experts expect U.S. interest rates to rise in 2015, but no one knows when and by how much.

Rate increases rarely happen with great velocity, though. The last time the Federal Reserve raised the federal funds rate, which banks use to lend money overnight, was in June 2006. It brought the rate to 5.25% — after 17 increases.

By 2008, in the midst of the financial crisis, the federal funds rate was down to zero, where it has stayed.

A jump in interest rates in 2015 could have a big financial impact, however, especially if you are looking to buy a home, have credit card debt or own bonds.

Here is what to expect:

Consumer Loans

Rates for consumer loans, which include mortgages and automobiles, are bouncing around 3.75%, a quarter percentage point above historic lows reached in May 2013. Greg McBride, chief financial analyst for Bankrate.com, expects a series of rate hikes in the year ahead.

“This is going to be a very volatile year,” says McBride.

Overall, however, the net change will probably be within one percentage point.

For a car buyer, a change from 4% to 5% would be almost imperceptible. The average auto loan is $27,000, and borrowing that much over five years would mean a difference of just $12 a month.

Home loans are another story, so plan accordingly. Over 30 years, that one percentage point difference in interest rates on a $100,000 mortgage would mean you would pay about $22,000 more, according to an example provided by Quicken.

Credit Cards

Consumers looking to roll over credit card debt to a zero percent balance transfer should act fast, because offers have never been more generous.

“We don’t expect offers to get better,” says Odysseas Papadimitriou, chief executive officer of CardHub.com, which rates credit card offers. Duration of deals is at an all-time high, at an average of 11 months, and the average balance transfer fee is only 3%.

These deals could disappear if the Fed raises rates significantly or a tanking economy causes default rates to surge, Papadimitriou adds.

Consumers tend to focus on the length of the balance transfer deal, which can be up to 24 months, but Papadimitriou says you must also consider the monthly payments, annual and transfer fees and the interest rate after the introductory period ends.

To learn how much you will save each month, use an online calculator like Cardhub’s. It will tell you, for instance, that if you have average credit card debt of $7,000 and are paying the average rate of 14%, you would save enough to pay off your debt two months faster if you transferred it to a zero-percent card with no fee.

Most bank’s websites also provide some suggestions. For example, the Citizens Bank Platinum MasterCard offers a zero-percent balance transfer for 15 months with no balance transfer or annual fees.

Savings Rates

If you are a saver looking for higher yields, life is not about to get rosier in 2015.

“Rates are brutal,” says Morgan Quinn, feature writer for GoBankingRates.com. The yield on the typical savings account is less than 1%.

Good news in this category amounts to rates tipping over 1% on some CDs and savings accounts with high balances.

Interest rates on savings accounts probably will not head toward 3% until 2020, according to GoBankingRates latest report.

In the meantime, the highest rate Quinn was able to find was 1.4% at EverBank for “yield-pledge” checking with a $1,500 minimum opening deposit and an ongoing balance of between $50,000 and $100,000.

Bonds

The benchmark 10-year U.S. Treasury yield fell to 1.89% on Monday, its lowest since May 2013.

If interest rates go up, “it will be a tough year for bond investors,” Bankrate’s McBride says.

You can mitigate this risk with individual bonds by simply holding them to maturity, he says. But if you invest in bond funds, either directly or through target-date or managed funds in your retirement accounts, the value will probably decline.

That is not all bad news if you just stay the course. McBride’s advice: “Buckle your seat belt and hold on.”

MONEY Love and Money

3 Ways Couples Can Dig Out of Debt After the Holidays

illustration of a couple digging a dollar sign out in the snow
Taylor Callery

Overdid it on spending? Stop pointing fingers at each other and start taking action jointly.

For Michelle Argento and Brendan Diamond, bickering over holiday spending usually kicks off as soon as the Christmas tree goes up and lasts until they pay off their credit card bill in February.

While she’s a self-described “giver,” he doesn’t get her need to buy presents for everyone and his brother. “It’s a culture clash that drives us nuts,” Argento says. And tensions increase when the final tally arrives: Last winter the Chicago couple charged $1,630 over the holidays, more than twice what the average American spends.

Sound familiar? “People put good financial sense on the back burner around the holidays,” says Gail Cunningham of the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. And when couples need to face the music in January and pay down debt, she says, “that ugly finger of blame can come out very easily.” Nurse your holiday hangover as a team with these steps.

Take the blame together. Regardless of who spent what, accept that you’re both responsible. “You might not have swiped the card, but you were likely complicit, either by putting all the gift-giving responsibility on your partner or for not starting a discussion around a holiday budget,” says Brad Klontz, a clinical psychologist in Lihue, Hawaii, and the author of Mind Over Money. What’s passed is past, so move forward and focus on getting out from under.

Design a support system. Keep from getting on each other’s cases by making a payoff plan. Start by moving the debt to a card like Chase Slate, which offers 0% for 15 months with no transfer fee in the first 60 days. Then set up auto-payments to zero out the debt before the no-interest window is up, and use the ReadyForZero app (free) for an occasional nudge to good behavior. If you make a larger-than-normal bank deposit, for example, the app sends a notification suggesting an extra payment.

Cut expenses independently. Rather than try to pare, say, $300 from the family budget, assign each other a goal of $150 from personal expenses. That way you can both reduce spending as you wish—as opposed to how your mate insists.

Along the way, schedule (free) celebrations, like a marathon of your favorite TV show on Netflix when you’ve paid off half. “Having something to look forward to helps you stay on track,” says Kate Northrup, author of Money: A Love Story.

Work it off. Budgeting gives you the blues? The alternative is to raise extra cash. On evenings and weekends last winter, Argento and Diamond picked up jobs running errands via Craigslist and TaskRabbit. Their hustle got them back in the black before spring arrived. Now they plan to make it a tradition—ahead of shopping season. “It’s no longer about me buying gifts for my friends,” says Argento. “It’s about us using our business to pay for gifts together.”

Farnoosh Torabi is a contributing editor at MONEY and the author of the book When She Makes More: 10 Rules for Breadwinning Women. More of her columns and videos for MONEY.com:

MONEY Debt

7 Ways to Free Yourself From Debt—for Good!—in 2015

How to pay off debt
PM Images—Getty Images

These smart and easy strategies can get you back in the black before you know it.

If you’re in debt, getting out may seem impossible.

One in eight Americans don’t think they’ll ever pay off what they owe, according to a survey by CreditCards.com.

But it’s a new year and a new balance sheet. And the seven steps here can help you put hundreds more towards your bills every month—while still living the kind of life you want.

Can you taste the freedom?

1) Know What You Owe

It may sound easy, but this can be the hardest part, says Gail Cunningham, spokesperson for the National Foundation of Credit Counseling. “A disturbing number of people come to our offices with grocery bags filled with bills,” she adds.

After you’ve tallied up your total debt, make a “cash-flow calendar” to track how much money is going in and out of your accounts, and when, Cunningham says. When do you get your paycheck, and how much do you get net taxes and benefits? When is each bill due every month, and what is the typical cost? How much do you spend on each of your other expenses, and when?

The more you want to procrastinate on this step, the more you need to do it.

“People resist doing this,” Cunningham says. “I think that’s because they’re afraid of what they’ll find. There’s nothing like seeing your spending staring back at you. That could force a behavioral change.”

2) Follow the 10×10 Rule

If you want to create a debt-repayment plan you can follow, you need to set reasonable and sustainable goals. Curb rather than cut your spending, advises Kevin R. Weeks, president of the Association of Independent Consumer Credit Counseling Agencies.

“Just like a New Year’s resolution to get in shape, it’s very difficult to go cold turkey and say, ‘I’m going to do all this, this week, or today,'” Weeks says. “People bite off more than they can chew, with good intentions.”

Start slowly by following Cunningham’s 10×10 rule: “If you could shave $10 off 10 disposable spending accounts, you’d never miss it, never feel it, never feel deprived—and you’d have another $100 in your pocket,” she says. “Little money adds up to big money.”

3) Spend Cash

Researchers have found that when people shop with credit cards and gift certificates, they are more likely to make impulse purchases on luxury items because they feel like they’re using “play” money. If that sounds like you, cut up the plastic.

And force yourself to feel the pain associated with spending real money by going on a cash-only diet.

“People who live on a cash basis typically save 20% over their previous spending, without feeling deprived,” Cunningham says. “It’s because using cash creates a heightened sense of awareness. You are more contemplative, and you realize you’re going to have to pay for things with hard-earned cash. Something clicks in that allows you to feel better about not buying the item.”

4) Tackle Christmas First

There are two possible ways you can go when it comes to prioritizing your debts: You can pay off your highest interest-rate balance first to cut your financing charges the most or you can pay off a small debt first to build confidence and momentum.

To decide which path is best, you need to know what drives you, Weeks says.

Whichever way you choose to go, Cunningham recommends beginning with a goal of paying off all your holiday spending debt by the end of the first quarter of 2015.

“That will keep you from dragging that debt along with you all the way through 2015,” Cunningham says. “You’ll be back to where you were debt-wise before the holidays.”

No matter what, expect a series of small steps. “It’s going to take time,” Weeks says. “If you’re looking to lose 50 pounds, you should focus on losing the first five and then you move yourself forward. It’s the same thing on the financial side.”

5) Reduce Your Rates

Don’t do all the work yourself. Get your lender to cut your interest rates.

One way to do that is a balance transfer. Many credit cards offer promotions of 0% interest for a year or more if you transfer your debt from an old card and pay a small fee.

You can save $265.48 on a $5,000 debt with a typical balance transfer, according to a new report from Creditcards.com. That’s assuming a 3% balance transfer fee, a 12-month 0% intro APR, and the debt being paid off within the year.

You could do even better than that if you used Money’s pick for a balance transfer card, the Chase Slate, which currently offers a 0% APR for 15 months, no balance transfer fee in the first 60 days, and standard APR of 12.99% to 22.99% after the promotional period.

If you won’t be able to pay off your debt in the promotional period, however, this might not be the best option. You don’t want to move your debt only to possibly get stuck with a higher APR than the one you already have. A better choice: Move your debt to the Lake Michigan Credit Union Prime Platinum Visa, which has no balance transfer fee and an ongoing APR starting at an ultra-low 6%.

Or, simply call your issuer and request that your APR be reduced. In another report, CreditCards.com found that two-thirds of people who asked for a lower rate got it.

6) Stop lending so much money to the IRS

The average household got a $3,034 tax refund last year. In other words, every month, an extra $253 was taken out of your paycheck and loaned to the IRS interest free!

Sure, you’ll get it back after you file your taxes, but don’t you need it now?

“I don’t want anybody to receive an income tax refund—that $250 a month can make a major, life-changing difference,” Cunningham says.

Rather than paying interest on your debt every month while the government gets your money, you should be funneling that cash toward your balance. On a $5,000 debt at 16%, adding $250 a month to a payment of $200 a month, you’d save $675 in interest and get your debt paid off in just over a year vs. two and a half.

You can put your money back in your pocket by adjusting your withholding on a W-4 tax form.

Of course, you don’t want to owe money at tax time, so use the government’s withholding calculator to figure out exactly how many allowances you should take. File your new W-4 with your human resources department and give yourself a raise.

7) Ask for help

If you can’t stop taking on debt or are really unable to make payments on what you owe, you may need professional help. Credit counseling can be especially useful if you’re struggling with student loan debt or medical debt, not just credit card debt.

Find a nonprofit credit counselor through the National Foundation of Credit Counseling or the Association of Independent Consumer Credit Counseling Agencies. Financial counseling should be free, though agencies can charge an enrollment fee for a debt management plan, which will consolidate your debt into one payment with a more reasonable interest rate, Weeks says.

If you don’t need professional help, but you need someone to keep you honest, ask a friend to be your accountability partner, Cunningham suggests. Share your debt repayment plan and check in periodically about how you’re doing. Leverage the positive power of peer pressure.

“People don’t want to let somebody down,” Cunningham says. “They don’t want to have to admit that they weren’t as committed to their plan long-term.”

More on paying off debt:

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MONEY Ask the Expert

Why You Might Want to Take Student Loans Before Using Up College Savings

Ask the Expert - Family Finance illustration
Robert A. Di Ieso, Jr.

Q: “My daughter will be starting college this fall. I’m estimating the tuition will be about $25,000 each year. I’ve got about $45,000 put aside in a 529 for her. When should I tap that money?” —Henry Winkler, Colorado

A: The first thing you and your daughter should do is fill out a FAFSA, the federal financial aid application. Even if you think your household income will be too great to qualify for aid, it’s worth applying just to be certain, says Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of Edvisors.com, a website that helps people plan and pay for college. “I have seen many cases where families assume they won’t receive any aid, but actually do qualify based on the number of children they have currently attending college or because the high costs of the tuition resulted in a lower than expected family contribution amount.”

Don’t worry that the savings you currently have in your 529 will hurt her chances for aid either. Federal aid will be reduced by no more than 5.64% of the value of the account and account distributions are not considered income, Kantrowitz says.

Next, she should apply for the most available in federal direct student loans. In her first year, she can borrow $5,500. In her second year, $6,500, and any of the years following up to $7,500. Because you only get to borrow a certain amount in these direct federal student loans—which have much lower interest rates than Parent PLUS loans or private loans—it’s worth borrowing the max each year and accruing that interest rather than waiting and trying to borrow the full cost of college her third or fourth year, says Kantrowitz.

If you have other savings accounts you can draw from, Kantrowitz recommends setting aside $4,000 a year from such an account for your daughter’s college education so that you can take advantage of the American Opportunity Tax Credit.

With this credit, you get 100% of the first $2,000 you spend on tuition, fees and course materials paid during the year, plus 25% of the next $2,000. The credit is worth $2,500 off your tax bill. Also, 40% of the credit (up to $1,000) is refundable, which means you can get it even if you owe no tax.

The caveat: You will need to have a modified adjusted gross income of $80,000 or less, or $160,000 or less for married couples, a year to get the full benefit. If you earn more than $90,000 or $180,000 for joint filers, you cannot claim the credit.

You cannot use any of the funds from your 529 to qualify for the tax credit since that plan is already a form of tax-free educational assistance. If you do not have an additional $4,000 a year to put toward her education, you can also qualify for the credit by using the student loan amount she received—but just know that you may not be also able to claim the student loan deduction on that amount since you’ve already received a tax break on it, says Kantrowitz. (Right now you can claim both, but Kantrowitz says that could change in the future.)

After deducting any grant aid, her student loan sum, and the $4,000 from another savings account, pay the remaining education expenses with funds from the 529 plan.

“Under this plan it is likely your 529 will be exhausted after her third year of college, or sooner if you don’t put aside that additional $4,000 for the tax credit each year,” says Kantrowitz.

To make up the difference you’ll need to secure another loan. If you own a home, consider home equity financing before PLUS loans, since the latter currently carry a 7.21% interest rate and come with an “origination” fee of about 4.3% of the principal amount you borrow.

If you must take the PLUS, you might be tempted to try to lock in current interest rates by borrowing to cover the first two years’ worth of expenses. But you’d end up having to borrow more since she’ll be getting less federal loan money those first two years, and you’d have to pay two more year’s worth of interest. Even with possible rate increases, you’re still better off taking the PLUS loans in her last two years.

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MONEY consumer psychology

7 Reasons to Pretend You Make Less Money

Trick your brain and your wallet will follow.

We all know you can get in financial trouble by pretending to have more money than you actually do — and most of us know that you can’t make an educated guess at someone’s salary by checking out the car they drive. So you can appear to be wealthy even if you’re not. But can you get ahead by telling yourself (and intimating to others) that your paycheck is smaller than it actually is? There are some pretty compelling reasons to do it, and you could find yourself in a far better position than if your paycheck just barely covers expenses.

Here are some reasons to consider pretending your paycheck is just a bit smaller than it really is.

1. Sock Away Money in an Emergency Fund

If you don’t have an emergency fund (or even if you do), you can pretty much count on having an emergency. Car transmissions break, you need to travel unexpectedly or someone in your family ends up needing help. Experts recommend six to 12 months’ worth of expenses in your emergency fund. If you don’t yet have that, you may want to make sure you have access to credit. (You can check your free credit report summary on Credit.com to get an idea of how you would be judged by potential lenders.) But having the money saved is a better alternative.

2. Pay Down Debt Faster

If you pretend you make, say, 10% less than you actually do, you can probably cut expenses to accommodate the reduced pay. But the money you will save isn’t pretend — and you can send it to your creditors, reducing or eliminating debt much more quickly. This little fib helps keep your spending in check, which will free you to direct the money someplace else, making some other dream a reality more quickly. You can even figure out a timeline for getting out of credit card debt with this nifty calculator.

3. Save for a Down Payment or Your Kid’s College

Whether you’re looking to buy a house, educate a child or take a trip around the world, your dream is likely to require a significant chunk of change. And one way to get that is to pretend that earmarked money does not even exist. You can have it transferred into a designated account the same day you get paid so that you are not tempted to use it for the heavily discounted camping equipment that you know about because the advertisement for it popped up in your inbox. (Another money-saving hint: Most of us will spend less if we unsubscribe.)

4. Put More Money in Retirement Savings

Retirement seems a long way off when you are in your 20s, and it is. But most people’s expenses grow with time (particularly if you choose to raise children). It is not going to suddenly become easier to save more, at least not until you have far less time to do it, and the money has less time to grow. How many people have you heard complaining that they wished they hadn’t saved so much for retirement?

5. Friends Won’t Pressure You to Splurge

We’re not suggesting you do away with little luxuries altogether. You and a friend want to go get manicures? Go for it (sometimes). But think about whether all of your get-togethers need to involve a meal out, shopping or manicures. Maybe they made a resolution to move more. Walks can do double duty to help get your body and finances in better shape. And if your friends know you are on a beer budget, chances are they won’t assume you have a champagne salary.

6. Friends & Family Won’t Consider You a Human ATM

Do you often or always pick up the tab for groups because you can afford it? If you say, “my treat” too often, it’s possible you’re sending a signal that because you have more, you have an obligation to share it with your friends and family. You may feel that way as well, and if you do, you would be especially wise to pretend you have a little less money than you actually do. If you do choose to give or lend money to friends and relatives, make sure everyone is clear on what is a gift and what is a loan. Money misunderstandings have the potential to damage relationships.

7. Your Income Could Drop

It’s easy — and tempting — to think your salary will be on an upward trajectory from your first day of work until your last. (Don’t the retirement calculators assume that?) And who plans for a furlough or the loss of a big client? During hard times, it’s not unheard-of for companies to levy across-the-board salary cuts. And if you’re acting as if you make every dime that you actually do, it will be harder to adjust than if you’ve been acting as if you made less.

More from Credit.com

This article originally appeared on Credit.com.

MONEY Millennials

How to Set Financial Priorities When You’re Young and Squeezed

man counting coins
MichaelDeLeon—Getty Images

You have a lot of demands on your money—and not a lot of it. Here's what to do first.

The most financially challenging state of life is not retirement, it is early career.

That’s the time when your salary is still probably low, but you have the longest list of expenses: career clothes, cell phone bills, your first home furnishings, cars, weddings, rent—need I go on? You probably don’t have enough money to pay for all of that at once, unless your parents have set you up very well or you are a junior investment banker.

The rest of us have to make choices with our limited “discretionary” income. Here is a rough priorities list for newbies who have shopping lists that are bigger than their bank accounts.

First, feed the 401(k) to the match, not the max. If your employer matches your contributions, make sure that your paycheck withdrawals are high enough to capture the entire company match. That is free money. If you have enough money to contribute more to your 401(k), that is a good thing to do, but only if you’re able to cover other key expenses.

Invest in items that will improve your lifetime earning power. A good interview suit. An advanced degree. The right electronic devices and services for the serious job hunt.

Pay off credit card balances. Chasing those “balance due” notices every month will kill just about any other financial goal you have. If you’re carrying significant credit card balances, abandon all other extra savings and spending until you’ve paid them off, in chunks as large as possible.

Put money into a Roth individual retirement account. The younger you are and the lower your tax bracket, the better this works out for you. Money goes in on an after-tax basis and comes out tax-free in retirement. You can withdraw your own contributions tax-free whenever you want. Once the account has been in existence for five years, you can pull an additional $10,000 out, tax-free, to buy a home. It’s nice to have a Roth, and the younger you start it the better.

Save for a home down payment. Homeownership is still a smart way to build equity over a lifetime. New guidelines will once again make mortgages available to people who make downpayments as low as 3%. Even though interest rates are still at unrewarding lows, it’s good to amass these earmarked funds in a savings or money market account.

Pay down high-interest student loans. If you had private loans with interest rates over 8%, find out whether you can refinance them at a lower rate. If not, consider paying extra principal to burn that costly debt more quickly. Don’t race to pay off lower-interest student loans; the interest on them may be tax deductible, and there are better places to put extra cash.

Buy experiences, not things. Still have some money left? Fly across the country to attend your college roommate’s wedding. Take road trips with friends. Spend money to join a sports team, theater group, or fantasy football league. Focus your finances on making memories, not acquiring things—academic research holds that you get more happiness for the dollar by doing that, and you’ll probably be moving soon anyway.

Buy a couch. For now, make this the bottom of your list. Sure, everyone needs a place to sit, but there’s nothing wrong with living like a student just a little bit longer. If you defer expensive things for a few years while you put money towards all the higher priorities on this list, you’ll be sitting pretty in the future.

UPDATE: This story has been updated to clarify that Roth IRA holders can withdraw their own contributions at any time and do not have to wait until the account is five years old.

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