TIME society

College Students Found a New, Better Way To Use Tinder

111659979
Hungry Man Eating Fruit Pastilles Getty Images

FREE FOOD

College students have begun using Tinder to pursue the greatest thing in the world. No, not love. Free food.

American University junior Julia Reinstein realized that the dating/hookup app could be used for more practical means than finding makeout partners. People could identify if they had or were in need of a spare meal swipe at the school’s cafeteria. By limiting your search distance to a mile, meal matches would proliferate. Think of all the food babies yet to be born.

“That’s symbiosis, folks,” Reinstein wrote on Swipe for Swipes’ Tumblr.

I had friends who, while in grad school, used to joke about using OKCupid as their meal plan, but this endeavor is much more direct. As long as the salad bar doesn’t come with a side of expectations, everybody wins.

[Washington Post]

TIME Dating

LoveRoom and Other Apps That Should Be Reality Shows

166310501
You never know... nullplus—Getty Images

The folks who created the 'Tinder of AirBnB,' are now casting a reality TV show about hooking up with renters. But why stop there? Here are 6 more app mash-ups that would make great TV

Reality shows have been putting humans together in twisted ways for more than a decade now, but like everything else, apps are now involved. LoveRoom is like the demon love child of Airbnb and Tinder; the premise is that hosts can use this social platform to rent out their spare rooms to hotties who just might have sex with them. And if its creators have their way, some of these antics will be fodder for broadcast TV.

To be clear, LoveRoom doesn’t have any official relationship with either AirBnB or Tinder, but they might as well be family. This mash-up of 21st century convenience apps is casting its own reality show founder Joshua Bocanegra told BetaBeat. An announcement on LoveRoom’s website says the show is seeking “sexy singles” with “dynamic personalities” who are “looking for love — or maybe just a hookup — in their cities.” (Which is of course way different from all the reality shows who want to cast people with boring personalities who hate sex.)

Bocanegra didn’t reveal which production company he’s working with, or any other details of the show, but he did say that the show would be “on national television” by October even though the concept hasn’t been picked up by a network yet. Sounds a little sketchy on the details, but that didn’t stop us from thinking of other app pairings that could make the leap to reality TV.

1. Words With Friends + Coffee Meets Bagel = LoveLetters

The app would sync your Words With Friends challengers with daily romantic matches from Coffee Meets Bagel. The reality show could be a couples Words With Friends round-robin tournament where contestants with dynamic personalities and large vocabularies have to choose between love and victory.

2. CandyCrush + Venmo = CandyCost

CandyCrush is already supremely addictive, but what if you could win cash? CandyCost the app would match users against specific players so you could put real money on the table (if that were legal.) The reality show can place 20 drama-loving contestants on a deserted island and them face-off on high-stakes CandyCrush games. Think Survivor meets the Player Channel.

3. Hinge + Kindle = Book of Love

The app would set you up with friends of friends who are reading the same chapter of the same book. The reality TV show would be the Oprah’s Book Club of love. Everyone would have to take a reading quiz at the end of each episode, and the person with the lowest score gets eliminated. Oh, and everyone has to wear bathing suits the whole time.

4. Seamless + FourSquare = FoodSquare

The app would tell you which friends are close by and want to split a food order with you. The reality TV show would feature 20 contestants who battle to agree on what to order for dinner. The hitch is that each contestant has a food allergy, but nobody knows about anybody else’s allergies.

5. Instagram + Epicurious = InstaCulinary

The app would tell you how to make the food you see on Instagram. The TV show would make amateur chefs compete to prepare food found on celebrity Instagrams. Then the celebrities would taste the food to select the winner each episode.

6. SnapChat + Grindr = SnapR

Obviously this app would feature raunchy pictures that disappear. The reality TV show would be like one of those memory card games where contestants have to match the body part to the owner. Then they compete to find true love with a sensitive partner who appreciates them for who they are.

 

 

 

 

 

TIME social

The Words Most Likely to Find You Online Dating Success

Is your online dating profile failing to attract “the one?” It may be because of the words you’re using, a new analysis from dating site PlentyOfFish reveals.

In the study, a team of PhD scientists analyzed the words used by the 1.2 million profiles on PlentyOfFish. According to the company, very clear trends arose amongst those who were successful in finding love and those who were still looking.

Those who have found love, unsurprisingly, use the word “love” the most in their profiles. Successful daters of both sexes frequently used the words “time,” “life,” “friend” and “music,” as well.

Men are more likely to find love using words in their online dating profile that suggest an interest in a long-term relationship. The words “heart,” “children,” “romantic” and “relationship” are all markers of a man most likely to see success in love. The advice holds true for women, as well: Women who found relationships used the word “relationship” 16% more often than those who are still single.

Those still looking for love tend to use words that describe shorter term activities, like “travel,” “dinner” and “shop” for women and “hang” and “humor” for men.

Want to learn more about saucing up your online dating profile? Check out this more detailed word analysis of successful OKCupid and Match.com profiles. Then be sure to read up on these online dating red flags so you know what – and who – to avoid online.

This article was written by Fox Van Allen and originally appeared on Techlicious.

More from Techlicious:

TIME relationships

There’s Now A Wide Selection Of Tinder Alternatives For Jewish Singles

Getty Images

Matchmaker, matchmaker, swipe me a match

Considering that there are dating apps for farmers looking for other famers, it should hardly be a surprise that there’s a new Tinder specifically geared towards Jewish singles.

JSwipe is a Tinder derivative that launched on the first day of Passover, perhaps aiming to distract a bread-starved consumer base with pictures of nearby Jewish matches. After clarifying your Jewish affiliation (Orthodox? Willing to convert?) and eating tendencies (What’s your stance on cheeseburgers?), users are free to swipe right (which prompts a happy face Star of David) and left (sad face Star of David) to their Semitic-seeking hearts’ content.

And why stop at just one Jewish Tinder alternative?

There’s also JCrush, an app that launched in early April for the less decisive lover. Not only do users have a “Maybe” option, but even if they swipe left for no (in this case shown by a red “x” mark with “Oy Vey” written across the symbol) they can go back to change their minds.

Note: Religious affiliation doesn’t assure quality control. Some mensch matches apparently believe “Mazel Tov, sweet cheeks!” is an appropriate conversation starter.

TIME Internet

Women Named Jennifer Are Gold Diggers According to Dubious Survey

Jennifer Lawrence
Rosalyn Rosenfeld (Jennifer Lawrence) in American Hustle. Francois Duhamel—2013 Annapurna Productions LLC/Columbia Pictures

Stupid survey predicts whether you're a money grubber based on your name

If you’re bachelor with cash to spare, you should stay away from women names Jennifer, according to a sexist and highly suspect new survey. DirtSearch.org, a background check service, skimmed through their data to find the most-searched female names on their site that had petty crime records. Then the good people at Dirt Search decided that women who’d had trouble with the law must surely be gold diggers and took it upon themselves to warn wealthy men to be on the look out for Jennifers, Jessicas and other suspiciously named women.

The Daily Mail published the list of most common “gold digger” names as follows:

1. Jennifer

2. Jessica

3. Michelle

4. Lisa

5. Ashley

6. Amanda

7. Melissa

8. Stephanie

9. Nicole

10. Angela

Sorry, J-Law, J Woww and Jennifer Aniston. Looks like you’re not going to be able to fulfill your dreams of marrying rich. Husbands of Jennifer Lopez, Jennifer Garner and Jennifer Connelly: I hope you got a prenup. All other Jennifers: don’t even try to get on Millionaire Matchmaker this season.

One more note: the DirtSearch list is pretty close to the most popular women’s names from 1985. (I chose that year randomly—women born that year would be 29 now. I’m fairly certain if you cross reference this list with other years around the age, you would find a similar overlap.) I’ve bolded the names that are on both lists. Turns out the most-searched names on a background check website also were the most popular girl baby names in the mid-1980s.

1. Jessica

2. Ashley

3. Jennifer

4. Amanda

5. Sarah

6. Stephanie

7. Nicole

8. Heather

9. Elizabeth

10. Megan

So maybe don’t breakup with your girlfriend named Jennifer quite yet, men.

TIME movies

Watch the Trailer for Reproductive Rights Rom-Com Obvious Child

Saturday Night Live alum Jenny Slate stars

+ READ ARTICLE

The new trailer for Obvious Child — starring Jenny Slate and Jake Lacy of The Office fame — doesn’t shy away from the signs that it’s a comedy. Farting? Check. Stand-up sets? Check. Bad break-ups and silly dates? Check and check.

Unplanned pregnancy and abortion? Those too. (And yes, it’s still a romantic comedy — not an advocacy film.)

Slate plays Donna, a New York comedian struggling with her career, her relationships, her family and pretty much everything else. When she meets Max, played by Lacy, it seems like he might take her mind off things — until their fun night has some major consequences. The movie also stars Gaby Hoffman, Polly Draper, Richard Kind and David Cross, to add to the comedy checklist, and arrives in select theaters June 6.

TIME Dating

Washer Seeks Dryer: ‘Laundry Bistros’ Are the New Dating Frontier

Getty Images

At least you'll have clean underwear in this new wrinkle on the dating scene.

Correction appended, April 15

The new place for over scheduled New Yorkers to land a date could be a…laundromat.

The Wash House, a small “laundry bistro” with three washers and three dryers that opened March 6 in the East Village (think “La Vie Boheme” from Rent), offers drop off service in a casual, coffee house setting, and hopes to cater to young workaholics who may be trying to turn the tide on their neglected social lives, so to speak.

“We want to cater to up-and-coming young professionals who are working so hard trying to build whatever business they’re building that they don’t have time to go meet people,” says Veronica Kerzner, one of the owners.

With the café handling the wash and fold in the back, customers are freed up to mingle in the front. There’s a “Laundry Today or Naked Tomorrow” sign right by the bar where customers can order a beer, coffee, or an artisanal Challah bread sandwich with Nutella, mascarpone, strawberry, and honey. Then they can hunker down on one of the stools under the giant roman numerals clock that says “Drop Your Pants Here” across the face and strike up conversation with someone. That way, it looks like “you’re not there to pick up girls, you’re there to do your laundry,” says Christopher Conlon, another owner of the Wash House.

“I have thought about doing a speed-dating thing here just because doing laundry is so intimate,” he says. “You’re bringing in your undergarments, you’re cleaning, you’re cleansing, but maybe you’re trying to find someone too, so you kind of take away that thin veil that everyone has on.”

“It’s like the new way to pick up people — at the laundromat!” Kerzner chimes in, citing the music video for “Every Heartbeat”, in which Grammy-winning singer Amy Grant (known for “Baby, Baby”) meets the glance of a hot guy, and the two toss aside the book they are reading called “Shyness” and start unbuttoning their clothes.

The Wash House is just the latest in the cycle of laundromat cafés. They popped up around the country from the mid-1980s through the early 2000s. In the late 80s, singles would go to Oasis Laundry in San Jose, Calif., on Friday nights and watch movies. A Des Moines, Iowa-based chain Duds ‘N Suds boasted “good clean fun” like pool tables and warm pretzels with cheese sauce. Saga Launder Bar & Cafe in Chicago, a combination laundromat and sports bar, promoted “Buds and suds”, while partygoers danced the night away to DJ mixes at The Laundry Bar in Miami Beach, Florida.

While most laundromat cafés have washed up, the one that is still as hot as ever is BrainWash in San Francisco’s SOMA (South of Market) neighborhood, where, since 1989, residents have done their own laundry in a café and live music setting — an atmosphere that not only fostered a sense of community in the area, but also brought people together in a romantic sense.

“You’re sitting at the same folding table, that’s a natural place for conversation,” says Susan Schindler, founder of BrainWash, who ran it between 1989 and 1997. “I used to always joke it was great because a guy could look and see exactly what kind of underwear a girl is wearing as she’s folding. So of course there were very romantic hookups.” During her tenure, a couple that met there got married there. “I think [the bride] walked down the aisle between the washers.”

Washing and folding clothes with someone you don’t know is a fast way to get to know someone–you’re seeing their delicates after all. But there are pitfalls. After observing a public laundromat, sociologist Regina Kenen found people engaged in “impression management”, concealing “padded bras, torn underwear, stained garments, or even designer bedsheets” to avoid revealing too much personal information.

So will the Wash House catch on in a world of hyper-efficient Tinder-style apps that connect people virtually? There is some indication that combining a chore and dating is appealing to millennials. According to data provided to TIME by HowAboutWe Dating, a dating website in which individuals nationwide and in more than 30 countries connect by posting and responding to unusual date ideas, nearly 1 in 10 U.S. users like to multitask their first dates with errands. New Yorkers are the most likely to suggest errand dates compared to singles living in other U.S. cities, and errand dates make up 7% of dates suggested in New York over the past six months. In fact, shopping — at supermarkets, flea markets, antique shops, or the Apple Store — is the most popular errand date idea, with “dog walking / going to the dog park” coming in second, apartment hunting at third, the gym at fourth, and laundry at fifth.

At the very least it’s a refreshing change from the standard drink and dinner date suggestion. “Doing something that’s like, ‘Let’s have champagne in a laundromat,’ definitely catches your eye,” says Jessica Tom, HowAboutWe’s Community Director. “Sure you’re getting something done, but you’re also getting noticed for being a little offbeat.”

In fact, supermarkets are gearing up to be the next unlikely date site nationwide. Throughout the Midwest, Hy-Vee supermarkets are adding restaurants with bars that start serving alcohol at 11 a.m. Bar Lamar at Whole Foods in Austin offers wine on tap until 10 p.m., while a 99-cent “walk-around beer” could give customers the kind of liquid courage they need to approach someone they find attractive in the store.

“The more multitasking that exists in a space, the more likely people will talk to each other,” says BrainWash’s Susan Schindler. Put another way, to use a laundry metaphor, balance your load, balance your life.

Correction: The original post misstated the worldwide presence of the HowAboutWe Dating site. It reaches more than 30 countries.

TIME relationships

These Cities Have the Most Open-Minded Daters

481541221
Fremont Experience at night Mitch Diamond—Getty Images

Unsurprisingly, Vegas takes the "open minded" cake

There has been a lot of recent data stating that most daters are complete narcissists when it comes to romance and only want to pursue people who remind them of themselves. But according to a new study from dating site Zoosk, many online daters are open minded to pursuing people with different characteristics. And it turns out that Las Vegas, home to contortionists and “no judgement” policies, is the most flexible city when it comes to being “open minded” in romance.

Here are Zoosk’s results for the cities you should consider traveling to for singles who aren’t interested in dopplegangers:

Top 10 Most Open-Minded Cities for Dating:

1. Las Vegas, Nevada
2.Detroit, Michigan
3.Columbus, Ohio
4.Sacramento, California
5.San Antonio, Texas
6.Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
7.Indianapolis, Indiana
8.Jacksonville, Florida
9.Nashville, Tennessee
10.Memphis, Tennessee

Top 10 Least Open-Minded Cities for Dating:

1. Raleigh, North Carolina
2. San Jose, California
3. Birmingham, Alabama
4. Richmond, Virginia
5. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
6. Washington DC
7. San Diego, California
8. Atlanta, Georgia
9. Riverside, California
10. Orlando, Florida

Zoosk also specifically broke down what cities are the most open minded in different categories, showing where people of one religion are open to dating someone from a different denomination, or where someone of one height would be more open to dating someone of a different height (although this assumes a 5’4″ is just as open to dating a guy who’s 5’10” as she is one who is 4’10”):

Zoosk

But don’t move just yet. Zoosk gathered data from matches who engaged in “deep conversation,” meaning that they exhibited interest by sending at least two messages to one another each. That means a conversation consisting of: “Hey sexy, I want to take you to the moon,” “Please stop,” “I’m revving up my engine to take you out of this world,” “Oh dear God,” shows sustained romantic interest.

TIME Dating

Update: IAC Denies $5 Billion Tinder Valuation

App is only 20 months old, but daily users have doubled to 10 million since December

Updated April 11, 4:45 p.m.

Bloomberg reported Friday afternoon that dating app Tinder may be worth about $5 billion, but shareholder and venture capitalist Chamath Palihapitiya later tweeted that estimate was incorrect.

Barry Diller’s IAC/InterActiveCorp already has a majority stake in Tinder, and did buy more shares, but not the 10% originally reported to be bought for $500 million, according to Forbes.

Tinder hasn’t contributed any revenue to IAC, which earned about $3.2 billion last year. IAC shares rose 5.7% to $72.28 Friday.

Palihapitiya acquired his stake of Tinder in 2012 when he purchased a majority share of Toronto-based X-Treme Labs, which built Tinder’s first iteration. Tinder, which is 20 months old, has seen its daily active user number skyrocket from 5 million at the end of December to 10 million at present.

This post has been updated to reflect Chamath Palihapitiya’s denial of the originally reported value.

[Bloomberg]

 

TIME Dating

Dating Narcissism: Why We Look for Ourselves in a Partner

475083777
Marga Buschbell Steeger—Getty Images

When it comes to dating, maybe you're the yin to your own yang

When How I Met Your Mother wrapped up last week, fans were delighted to find out that the mother of Ted’s children was his soul mate. Why? Because she was just like Ted: they shared the same dorky interests, a similar sense of humor and a taste in yellow umbrellas. They even shared the same initials! And many complained when (spoiler alert) in the final minutes of the episode, Ted decides to court Robin, a character who in many ways is Ted’s opposite.

In the search for a partner, we struggle to determine who’s our best match. Is it someone who complements us?—the guy who’s calm when you’re emotional; the girl who’s organized when you’re messy? Or is it someone who looks, thinks and acts like us? Do opposites attract or do they “attract and then attack” as eHarmony advertises?

The attributes of the person who “completes” us has befuddled singles for centuries: In Plato’s Symposium, a philosopher asserts that humans began as androgynous creatures with both male and female parts. The gods split each creature in half, separating one being into man and woman. The result? We now spend our lives looking for our soulmate, the one who makes us whole—though it’s unclear whether that other half is just like us or the yin to our yang.

But Plato didn’t have the luxury of examining data from dating sites. An analysis of eHarmony users by FiveThirtyEight.com this week found that while 86 percent of people say they want someone who “complements” them (as opposed to someone who “resembles them”), women and men are much more likely to message those who are similar to them not only in terms of age, attractiveness, education, race and income, but also in terms of less obvious traits like intelligence, creativity and humor. And then there’s the Boyfriend Twin Tumblr that recently surfaced, featuring gay couples that look almost identical running under the headline, “What’s sexier than dating yourself?” A similar Siblings Or Dating? website features straight, gay and lesbian couples who look like they could be related.

Both of these blogs tap that impulse to be with someone who echoes your own personality and looks. That urge is called homogamy, a marriage between two individuals who are extremely similar. For decades, we’ve been becoming more homogamous in terms of education, income, religion and even looks. A Slate article on the Boyfriend Twin Tumblr cites a study that shows people are attracted to versions of themselves: researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign altered their subjects’ faces into those of strangers and asked them to evaluate the strangers’ attractiveness. Subjects favored faces that looked like their own. Another study found that people are even more attracted to those who share superficial traits like letters in their names and birthdays with them.

Social scientists are already anxious about the amount of time we spend thinking about and looking at ourselves, what with the hours we spend advertising our thoughts and activities on social networks and the rise of the selfie. Now it looks like we’re dating ourselves too. It smacks of narcissism — and remember what happened to Narcissus, who was so entranced with his own reflection in a pool of water that he couldn’t move and eventually was transformed into a flower.

But there may be hope for us narcissists yet. Biologically speaking, we’re built to be attracted to people who are dissimilar to us. A famous 1995 study that asked women to smell the sweaty t-shirts of men found that women preferred the smells of those who were genetically dissimilar to them. (Though notably this wasn’t true for women on the pill.) Scientifically speaking, opposites really do attract. Experts have a clear explanation for our tendency towards genetic diversity: our bodies are trying to prevent us from inbreeding. Plus, parents with more diverse MHC genes birth offspring with better immune system.

This genetic diversity impulse cannot apply to gay couples where reproduction is taken out of the equation. And yet data suggests that gay and lesbian couples, too, prefer diversity in their partners. Though Boyfriend Twin may be a fun Tumblr, research shows that gay couples are actually a lot less likely to be homogamous than straight couples.

So in the end which dating impulse wins out? Our narcissistic tendencies, or the quest to diversify our gene pool?

It turns out there may be no universal truth. An October study from Rutgers University found that a specific balance of chemicals affects what type of person each individual is attracted to. People with active dopamine levels (impulsive, curious types) or high serotonin levels (social, conscientious types) tended to like people similar to themselves. But men with high testosterone tended to be drawn to women with high estrogen and oxytocin levels (and vice versa). So who you fall for all boils down to how the chemicals are distributed in your brain.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser