TIME celebrities

14 Celebrities You Didn’t Know Were Voice Actors

Freddie Prinze Jr. is back — and this time, he’s a Jedi.

In honor of Freddie Prinze Jr.’s voice acting role as Kanan in the new Disney Channel series Star Wars Rebels, here’s a look back at other celebrities who you may not have known had voice roles over the years.

Star Wars Rebels debuts on Oct. 3 with Star Wars Rebels: Spark of Rebellion, an hour-long television movie premiere on the Disney Channel, while the series itself will begin on October 13 on Disney XD.

TIME celebrities

Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher’s Baby Is Called Wyatt Isabelle Kutcher

But good luck guessing what she looks like

There are eight possibilities for what Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher’s newborn might look like, and one of them has hooves.

In a post on the website aplus.com, Kutcher said that his new daughter’s name is Wyatt Isabelle Kutcher, E! reports.

But, in a tease to celebrity-baby watchers, the new father declined to reveal what the child who goes by that name looks like, posting to the website six photos of tiny tots — plus one photo of a dog, and another of what might be a young goat (or maybe an alpaca).

“Mila and I would like to welcome Wyatt Isabelle Kutcher to the world. May your life be filled with wonder, love, laughter, health, happiness, curiosity, and privacy,” said Kutcher.

“Can you guess which one is ours, or does it really matter? All babies are cute,” he said.

Wyatt was born on Tuesday night at Los Angeles’ Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, E! says.

Commenters on the aplus.com link Kutcher posted to Facebook congratulated the couple on the birth, as well as on choosing a “nice, normal name.”

More than 1,000 commentators tussled on aplus.com over which baby belonged to the famous couple and appeared to come to a consensus that all the pictures are of the same baby — except for the dog and goat, of course.

TIME celebrities

Real Housewives of New Jersey Star Sentenced to 15 Months in Prison

White Party Hosted By Dina Manzo And Teresa Giudice
Tevevision Personality Teresa Giudice attends the White Party hosted by Dina Manzo and Teresa Giudice at Woodbury Country Club on July 21, 2014 in Woodbury, New York. Mike Pont—Getty Images

Teresa Giudice was found guilty of fraud

Teresa Giudice, star of Real Housewives of New Jersey was sentenced Thursday to 15 months in prison. She and her husband Joe Giudice, who was also sentenced, pled not guilty to 39 counts that included bank fraud, mail fraud and wire fraud.

Giudice asked the judge for no jail time. She stated in court that she is nothing like the intemperate character viewers see on the Bravo reality TV show, calling it “little more than a carefully crafted fiction, engineered by Bravo TV through scripted lines and clever editing,” TMZ reports.

Joe Giudice was also sentenced to 41 months in prison and order to pay $414,588 in restitution. He will also be placed under supervision for two years after prison.

Giudice had argued that her four children would be left alone were both she and her husband imprisoned, but the judge allowed their sentences to be carried out consecutively so that their children would be looked after.

[TheWrap.com]

 

 

TIME movies

Luke Wilson: How I Made My Award-Winning Short Film Satellite Beach

The actor opens up on writing, co-directing and starring in an evocative new short film

In the fall of 2012, the actor Luke Wilson and a small film crew trailed the Space Shuttle Endeavor as it moved through the Los Angeles streets to the California Science Center. Wilson, along with his brother Andrew, shot largely improvised footage of a character named Warren Flowers (played by Wilson) who believes he is in charge of the shuttle’s journey; the footage became a 20-minute evocative short film called Satellite Beach (now available to purchase online). For Wilson, the experience allowed him the chance to make a film in a different way and to explore space travel, a subject he says he finds compelling.

A hit at festivals, where it’s snapped up a string of awards, Satellite Beach is an unusual film, and one that deftly twists the viewer’s expectations while showcasing what it was like to drive a space shuttle through LA’s busy streets.

Wilson spoke with TIME about how this project materialized, how it challenged him as an actor, and why it’s set him and Andrew up to direct an upcoming feature film.

TIME: Where did you get the inspiration for this short film?

Luke Wilson: There was an article on Sunday in the LA Times about the man who was in charge of the moving of the Space Shuttle Endeavor. He said a couple of interesting things, like that he went to bed thinking about it and he woke up thinking about it. He drove the route almost daily. He was obsessed with it. I thought it would be interesting to do a guy that thought he was in charge of it, but turns out not to be.

So did the people moving the shuttle know you were making this movie around them?

We just filmed here and there. There would be people that didn’t notice me; there would people who thought I was an official. And then there would be people that recognized me. If I was going to ask guys to move on a roof or something, I’d say, “We’re doing a little movie. Do you guys mind if I ask you to get down from there?” Everybody was into it. It reminded me of going to the Rose Bowl Parade as a kid, where we were in these parts of the city, and everyone was in a good mood, and there was a going-with-the-flow attitude.

Did you write the story beforehand, or just improvise as you went?

I worked it out all as I did it. I had the idea for a few scenes, and had the idea of how it would start and what would going on — knowing that gradually this guy would unravel, and people would see him unravel. Initially, the ending was supposed to be a gala at the California Science Center, and you think this guy is in charge until the end, when he can’t get into the gala. And then the transporter that moved the space shuttle broke down the first night, and they had to fix it. I always knew there were would be voiceover, and the voiceover would be dictated by the shots that we got.

That’s an interesting way to make a movie.

Yeah, it is. Not that it hasn’t been done, but I certainly hadn’t done it. And I’d always been interested in certain filmmakers or actors like Dennis Hopper, making experimental films. Or even Andy Warhol. I liked the idea of doing something off-the-cuff. When you’ve worked on a bunch of projects that have been stuck in development or waiting you think, “Gosh, someday I’d really like to make a movie my way” — which I still haven’t gotten to do, but we did get to make this short in this way. But it definitely came about from trying to emulate people I’d read about over the years.

You had directed previously, right?

Yeah, I had directed The Wendell Baker Story. It was this movie I’d written about ten years ago. My brother Andrew and I directed it together like we did with Satellite Beach. I’m not one of those actors who’s hell-bent on directing. It just seemed like a way to cut out the middle man. It’s hard enough to make a movie and we had a limited amount of time, so I didn’t want to have to be explaining to a director what I was trying to do.

As an actor, what’s exciting about being in a short film that’s largely improvised?

I found it really nerve-wracking! And I’m surprised we didn’t get arrested, frankly, as close as we were to the shuttle. We were asking people to move and going up to police and jumping over barricades. When they moved it across the Manchester Bridge they were filming a Super Bowl commercial, and I walked right into the middle of that. I went up to the mayor dressed as the character. I was definitely on edge the whole time, which I think helped. I was waiting to be put in the back of a squad car.

Did it feel like you were playing out some childhood fantasy about space travel at all?

It did. Just growing up, The Right Stuff was a big book and then a big movie. For me and the few friends who made [the movie], it was a huge deal to be around the space shuttle. Everybody was incredibly excited to see it and to be that close to it. It was the kind of thing where we were all elbowing each other and high-fiving each other. Also, getting to get to go Kennedy Space Center in Florida. That, too, was incredible. Just getting to be on that land that is so historic and iconic. We saw the Apollo launch pad. It kept changing the project — to think it just started with an idea from the newspaper and then it became this movie.

You’re also in The Skeleton Twins right now. What compelled you about that role?

I was a big fan of both Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader. It was one of those particularly strong SNL classes. I really liked their characters and I knew, having worked with Will Ferrell, that I love working with SNL actors. I watched SNL every Saturday night growing up. My dad would get us revved up when it was coming on in the ‘70s. So I still feel that way about the show and the people on it.

How does that role play into where you want to be in your career overall?

I always admire people that have a set plan. I really don’t. I like to work because I always feel like I’m learning something and I always feel like I’m meeting somebody, whether it’s an actor or a crew member, who I want to work with again. I don’t really have a set plan and I don’t know that you can have a set plan unless you’re Brad Pitt, where you can pick and do exactly what you want.

Do you have more movies upcoming?

I have this movie called Ride, which Helen Hunt directed. And then I have this movie called Prison Love that I wrote. We’re going to be doing it in the next few months, that Owen [Wilson] is going to be in. I will be directing it with Andrew, my brother. That will be fun to try and do that again, obviously on a larger scale than Satellite Beach — although I feel like Satellite Beach was helpful in terms of directing.

Is there a director you’ve worked with who has inspired how you want to do it?

Wes Anderson, for sure. I’ve also always liked what I’ve read about Clint Eastwood as a director. He’s not walking around shouting into a megaphone and wearing an ascot. I like the idea of it being a workmanlike job, and that you are a part of a team. Even though you’re in charge, you want people to feel free to contribute.

Wait — have you worked with a director who wore an ascot on set?

I don’t think so, but I’ve definitely worked with a few directors where I’ve found myself not listening to their direction. I was just imagining them wearing the ascot.

TIME privacy

Celebrity Lawyer Threatens Google With $100 Million Suit Over Nude Selfies

The Daily Front Row Second Annual Fashion Media Awards - Arrivals
Model Kate Upton attends The Daily Front Row Second Annual Fashion Media Awards at Park Hyatt New York on September 5, 2014 in New York City. Rommel Demano—Getty Images

“Google’s ‘Don’t be evil’ motto’ is a sham.”

Updated 2:54 p.m. ET Thursday

A lawyer representing more than a dozen celebrities whose personal and sometimes nude photos were stolen and shared on the Internet issued a scathing letter to Google that accuses the tech giant of helping the images spread and threatens a $100 million lawsuit.

The letter, written by lawyer Marty Singer and obtained by The Hollywood Reporter, calls Google’s conduct “despicable” for what it says is Google’s failure to remove the images and its “facilitating and perpetuating the unlawful conduct.”

A Google spokesperson said via email Thursday afternoon that “We’ve removed tens of thousands of pictures — within hours of the requests being made — and we have closed hundreds of accounts. The Internet is used for many good things. Stealing people’s private photos is not one of them.”

Indeed, the firm has removed some images from its sites and links to the images from its search engine. Still, the letter says lawyers have asked Google more than a dozen times to remove the images from Google sites like BlogSpot and YouTube, but some of the images are still available several weeks after the initial breach.

Google “has acted dishonorably by allowing and perpetuating unlawful activity that exemplifies an utter lack of respect for women and privacy,” the letter says. “Google’s ‘Don’t be evil’ motto’ is a sham.”

[THR]

TIME celebrities

Ashton Kutcher, Mila Kunis Welcome Baby Girl

PEOPLE has confirmed the birth of the former That '70s Show co-stars' first child

Congratulations are in order for actors Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis. PEOPLE confirmed Wednesday the two have welcomed a baby girl, the couple’s first child together.

The birth of their daughter is the latest big news for the former That ’70s Show co-stars, who in February announced their engagement, just one month before Kunis’ pregnancy was confirmed.

The baby is said to be “here and healthy” according to PEOPLE.

Read more at PEOPLE.com

TIME People

What Price Fame: James Dean Was “Barely a Celebrity” Before He Died

James Dean advice
From the Sept. 3, 1956, issue of TIME TIME

Sept. 30, 1955: James Dean is killed in a California car crash

James Dean’s career picked up considerably after he died.

The budding film star was killed on this day, Sept. 30, in 1955 after crashing his Porsche Spyder en route to a road race in Salinas, Calif., in which he was scheduled to compete. Just 24, he was “barely a celebrity” at the time, according to a 1956 story in TIME, which went on to report that within a year of his death he had gained more popularity than most living actors. Magazine and book publishers looking to memorialize the enigmatic icon were preparing “to jump aboard the bandwagon that looks disconcertingly like a hearse,” the piece proclaimed.

When he died, Dean had acted in only three movies: East of Eden, Rebel Without a Cause, and Giant, only one of which had yet been released. He had worked his way up from smaller to larger roles: from appearing in a Pepsi commercial to working as a “test pilot” for stunts on a TV game show called Beat the Clock — a sort of precursor to Minute to Win It in which contestants competed in absurd timed challenges — to a well-reviewed role as a young gigolo in a Broadway adaptation of Andre Gide’s The Immoralist.

After he died, though, his fame reached new heights. By September of 1956, TIME noted Deans’ bewildering ascent to Hollywood superstardom:

Today he ranks No. 1 in Photoplay’s actor popularity poll, draws 1,000 fan letters a week (“Dear Jimmy: I know you are not dead”) at Warner’s — more than any live actor on the lot. Marveled one West Coast cynic: “This is really something new in Hollywood — boy meets ghoul.” Hollywood’s explanation: Dean not only appeals to a “mother complex” among teenage girls, but his roles as a troubled insecure youth prompted many young movie fans to identify with him.

Business types were eager to cash in on his posthumous popularity. In 1956, the story continued, Dean was still “haunting” newsstands with “four fast-selling magazines devoted wholly to him.”

He hasn’t stopped earning since. Forbes reported that in 2000, Dean’s estate raked in $3 million, very little of which took the form of royalties from his three films. Most came instead from licensing and merchandizing: “The rebellious heartthrob currently hawks everything from Hamilton watches, Lee Jeans, and Franklin Mint collectibles to cards by American Greetings, funneling funds to James Dean Inc., which is run by cousin Marcus Winslow.”

One of the many teenage girls pining for the departed heartthrob wrote to the advice columnist Dorothy Dix in the year after Dean’s death, lamenting, “I am 15 and in love. The problem is that I love the late James Dean. I don’t know what to do.” Dix advised her that time would lessen the sting of love and loss. In this case, however, the platitude’s been proved not entirely true: more than half a century on, society’s love for the late James Dean is still going strong.

Read about James Dean’s legacy here, in TIME’s archives: Dean of the One-Shotters

TIME celebrities

Walmart Faults Tracy Morgan for Not Wearing Seatbelt in Limo Crash

Spike TV's "Don Rickles: One Night Only" - Show
Tracy Morgan speaks onstage at Spike TV's "Don Rickles: One Night Only" on May 6, 2014 in New York City. Theo Wargo—Getty Images for Spike TV

Injuries suffered by Morgan and fellow passengers "were caused, in whole or in part, by plaintiffs’ failure to properly wear an appropriate available seatbelt restraint device," company says in legal filing

Updated: 6:01 p.m.

Walmart said Monday that comedian Tracy Morgan and several others injured in an accident on the New Jersey Turnpike in June were partially responsible for their injuries, for failing to wear seatbelts.

A speeding Walmart driver allegedly hit Morgan’s limo on June 7, badly injuring the comedian and killing friend and colleague James McNair. Morgan and three others brought a suit against the company in July, alleging that driver Kevin Roper was fatigued and that Walmart acted negligently.

In a response Monday, the company largely refrained from responding to the allegations brought in the suit, citing National Transportation Safety Board regulations regarding ongoing investigations.

But in a list of affirmative defenses, the company said that the injuries “were caused, in whole or in part, by plaintiffs’ failure to properly wear an appropriate available seatbelt restraint device.”

“By failing to exercise ordinary care in making use of available seatbelts, upon information and belief, plaintiffs acted unreasonably and in disregard of plaintiffs’ own best interests,” the response says. “Accordingly, all or a portion of the injuries could have been diminished or minimized by the exercise of reasonable conduct in using the available seatbelts.”

Brooke Buchanan, a company spokesperson, provided an emailed statement on Monday.

“Walmart filed its official response to the plaintiffs’ lawsuit earlier today, and the company continues to stand willing to work with Mr. Morgan and the other plaintiffs to resolve this matter,” said Brooke Buchanan, a Walmart spokesperson, in an emailed statement.

TIME celebrities

George Clooney and Amal Alamuddin Get Married in Venice

Clooney has tied the knot at last

Hollywood’s most-eligible bachelor is officially bachelor no more.

George Clooney married the human rights lawyer Amal Alamuddin in Venice, Italy, in a private ceremony Saturday, the actor’s representative said. A brief statement from Clooney’s rep, Stan Rosenfeld, was the only communication on the marriage, which has seen a lot of hype but few remarks from Clooney.

Clooney, 53, was joined by friends to celebrate his marriage to the 36-year-old Alamuddin, 36 at Aman, a luxury hotel overlooking Venice’s Grand Canal. Families and close friends, including Matt Damon, John Krasinski and the Oscar winner’s producing partner, Grant Heslov were in attendance, People reports.

Clooney had mostly managed to keep their courtship out of the spotlight until he shared the news of their wedding date on Sept. 7.

The couple was married by close friend Walter Veltroni, who is the former mayor of Rome.

[People]

TIME celebrities

Chelsea Clinton Gives Birth to Baby Girl Named Charlotte

Charlotte Clinton Mezvinsky was born Friday, making Hillary and Bill Clinton grandparents

If Hillary Clinton runs in 2016, she will be the first serious presidential contender who is also a grandmother.

Chelsea Clinton, daughter of Hillary and Bill, gave birth to a baby girl named Charlotte, announcing on Twitter and Facebook early Saturday that she and husband Marc Mezvinsky are “full of love, awe and gratitude as we celebrate the birth of our daughter, Charlotte Clinton Mezvinsky.”

Hillary Clinton, who is considering a second run for President in 2016, called being a grandmother her “most exciting title yet,” and has picked out “Goodnight Moon” as the first book she intends to read to her future grandchild, the Associated Press reports.

The 34-year-old Chelsea Clinton said last year in an interview that she was hoping to have a child in 2014. “I just hope I will be as good a mom to my child and, hopefully, children as my mom was to me,” she said.

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