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Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart Almost Joined Taylor Swift During ‘1989’ Tour

LONDON, ENGLAND - MAY 12: Sir Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart attend the UK Premiere of "X-Men: Days of Future Past" at Odeon Leicester Square on May 12, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Mike Marsland/WireImage)
Mike Marsland—WireImage/Getty Images Sir Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart attend the UK Premiere of "X-Men: Days of Future Past" at Odeon Leicester Square in London on May 12, 2014.

The pair nearly joined Taylor Swift onstage

Taylor Swift has already featured a number of A-list talent on stage during her “1989” tour, but her performances could’ve been made even brighter by Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart.

During an interview with Gay Star News, McKellen said, “[Taylor] did ask me to appear with Patrick Stewart at her show in L.A., but I had something else to do that night.”

Swift took over the Staples Center with a number of celebrity guests last week. Joining her on stage were Selena Gomez, Justin Timberlake, Ellen DeGeneres, Uzo Aduba, Lisa Kudrow, Kobe Bryant, and more.

Earlier this month, Stewart told PEOPLE he was hoping to connect with Swift when she hit up the City of Angels. “I mean, Ian [McKellen] and I are in the squad now, so right on!”

The dynamic duo were inducted into Swift’s squad after they were film reciting the lyrics to her hits “Bad Blood” and “Blank Space.” After tweeting to the singer and asking to join, she responded, “You’ve made my day. You two are ULTIMATE Squad Goals.”

Even before their new friendship, McKellen had a brief connection with Swift. The Lord of the Rings star told Gay Star News that the singer purchased director Peter Jackson’s apartment while he was staying there for free, forcing him to vacate. Fortunately, it seems the actor was able to “Shake It Off.”

This story originally appeared on EW.com

TIME celebrities

Jay Z Joined Instagram But Quit After 14 Hours

"This may be my first and last post"

Jay Z appeared to join — and quit — Instagram over the weekend, posting a tribute to the late Michael Jackson and briefly surprising fans accustomed to the rapper’s typically quiet online presence.

“Happy birthday to the King!” the record label owner captioned a split photo showing the legendary pop star and him that was posted on Saturday. “This may be my first and last post.” Music exec Michael Kyser, a friend of Jay Z, also encouraged his Instagram followers to follow the rapper in a photo showing him posting his first Instagram post:

Follow my brother @Hovsince96 ASAP!

A photo posted by G (@littleburger) on

But Jay Z’s Instagram experiment appeared to last for only a brief 14 hours. The the account, Hovsince96, was deactivated on Sunday morning. For now, it seems, the only option to catch a glimpse into his private life may be the Instagram account of his wife, Beyoncé.

Read next: Jay Z on the 2013 TIME 100

TIME celebrities

Scientists and Writers Pay Tribute to Oliver Sacks on Twitter

Neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks
Chris McGrath—Getty Images Neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks speaks at Columbia University on June 3, 2009 in New York City.

The neurologist and author has died at age 82

High-profile scientists and writers honored the life of Oliver Sacks on Sunday, tweeting quotes, memories and farewells to the neurologist and acclaimed author who has died at 82, months after announcing his diagnosis with terminal cancer.

Sacks was famous for writing popular, understandable books based on his work, including “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat.”

From surgeon-writer Atul Gawande to digital media scientist Michael Hawley, see eight high-profile figures paying tribute to the life of Sacks:

TIME celebrities

Neurologist and Writer Oliver Sacks Dies at 82

He had sold millions of books based on his cases

(NEW YORK) — Dr. Oliver Sacks, whose books like “The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat” probed distant ranges of human experience by compassionately portraying people with severe and sometimes bizarre neurological conditions, has died. He was 82.

Sacks died Sunday at his home in New York City, his assistant, Kate Edgar, said.

Sacks had announced in February 2015 that he was terminally ill with a rare eye cancer that had spread to his liver.

As a practicing neurologist, Sacks looked at some of his patients with a writer’s eye and found publishing gold.

In his best-selling 1985 book, he described a man who really did mistake his wife’s face for his hat while visiting Sacks’ office, because his brain had difficulty interpreting what he saw. Another story in the book featured autistic twins who had trouble with ordinary math but who could perform other amazing calculations.

Discover magazine ranked it among the 25 greatest science books of all time in 2006, declaring, “Legions of neuroscientists now probing the mysteries of the human brain cite this book as their greatest inspiration.”

Sacks’ 1973 book, “Awakenings,” about hospital patients who’d spent decades in a kind of frozen state until Sacks tried a new treatment, led to a 1990 movie in which Sacks was portrayed by Robin Williams. It was nominated for three Academy Awards.

Still another book, “An Anthropologist on Mars: Seven Paradoxical Tales,” published in 1995, described cases like a painter who lost color vision in a car accident but found new creative power in black-and-white.

It also told of a 50-year-old man who suddenly regained sight after nearly a lifetime of blindness. The experience was a disaster; the man’s brain could not make sense of the visual world. It perceived the human face as a shifting mass of meaningless colors and textures.

After a full and rich life as a blind person, he became “a very disabled and miserable partially sighted man,” Sacks recalled later. “When he went blind again, he was rather glad of it.”

Despite the drama and unusual stories, his books were not literary freak shows.

“Oliver Sacks humanizes illness … he writes of body and mind, and from every one of his case studies there radiates a feeling of respect for the patient and for the illness,” Roald Hoffmann, a Nobel Prize-winning chemist, said in 2001. “What others consider unmitigated tragedy or dysfunction, Sacks sees, and makes us see, as a human being coping with dignity with a biological problem.”

When Sacks received the prestigious Lewis Thomas Prize for science writing in 2002, the citation declared, “Sacks presses us to follow him into uncharted regions of human experience — and compels us to realize, once there, that we are confronting only ourselves.”

In a 1998 interview with The Associated Press, Sacks said he tries to make “visits to other people, to other interiors, seeing the world through their eyes.”

His 2007 book, “Musicophilia,” looked at the relationship between music and the brain, including its healing effect on people suffering from such diseases as Tourette’s syndrome, Parkinson’s, autism and Alzheimer’s.

“Even with advanced dementia, when powers of memory and language are lost, people will respond to music,” he told the AP in 2008.

Oliver Wolf Sacks was born in 1933 in London, son of husband-and-wife physicians. Both were skilled at recounting medical stories, and Sack’s own writing impulse “seems to have come directly from them,” he said in his 2015 memoir, “On the Move.”

In childhood he was drawn to chemistry (his 2001 memoir is called, “Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood”) and biology. Around age 11, fascinated by how ferns slowly unfurl, he set up a camera to take pictures every hour or so of a fern and then assembled a flip book to compress the process into a few seconds.

“I became a doctor a little belatedly and a little reluctantly,” he told one interviewer. “In a sense, I was a naturalist first and I only came to individuals relatively late.”

After earning a medical degree at Oxford, Sacks moved to the United States in 1960 and completed a medical internship in San Francisco and a neurology residency at the University of California, Los Angeles. He moved to New York in 1965 and began decades of neurology practice. At a Bronx hospital he met the profoundly disabled patients he described in “Awakenings.”

Among his other books were “The Island of the Colorblind” (1997) about a society where congenital colorblindness was common, “Seeing Voices” (1989) about the world of deaf culture, and “Hallucinations” (2012), in which Sacks discussed his own hallucinations as well as those of some patients.

In the AP interview, Sacks was asked what he’d learned from peering into lives much different from the norm.

“People will make a life in their own terms, whether they are deaf or colorblind or autistic or whatever,” he replied. “And their world will be quite as rich and interesting and full as our world.”

Sacks reflected on his own life in 2015 when he wrote in the New York Times that he was terminally ill. “I am a man of vehement disposition, with violent enthusiasms, and extreme immoderation in all my passions,” he wrote.

In the time he had remaining, he said, he would no longer pay attention to matters like politics and global warming because they “are no longer my business; they belong to the future. I rejoice when I meet gifted young people. … I feel the future is in good hands.”

“I cannot pretend I am without fear. But my predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved; I have been given much and I have given something in return; I have read and traveled and thought and written. … Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure.”

___

Associated Press writer Hillel Italie contributed to this report.

Read more: Q&A: An Interview with Oliver Sacks

 

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‘Django Unchained’ Actress Sentenced to Community Service

Daniele Watts Brian Lucas
AP Daniele Watts and Brian Lucas speaking during an interview with KABC-TV in Los Angeles on Sept. 14, 2015.

Watts had accused police of racial profiling

(LOS ANGELES) — “Django Unchained” actress Daniele Watts has been ordered to perform community service after a judge refused to buy her apologies to Los Angeles police she’d accused of racial profiling.

Watts and her boyfriend, Brian Lucas, were sentenced Wednesday to 15 hours of community labor.

Last September, police questioned the couple while investigating reports of people having sex in a car. Watts, who’s black, and Lucas, who’s white, claimed they were profiled.

The couple later pleaded no contest to disturbing the peace and was told to write apology letters.

The Los Angeles Times says in her initial letter, Watts called a police sergeant sarcastic and dismissive. The judge said: try again. This week, Watts apologized for what she called lack of emotional control.

But the judge called the apologies insincere.

TIME celebrities

Robert Downey Jr. Celebrates 10 Years of Marriage With Adorable Instagram Post

It's not the first time he's taken to Instagram to praise his wife

A quick scroll through Robert Downey Jr.‘s Instagram and it’s clear to see why his wife fell in love with him: his great sense of humor.

But in his latest post, the Iron Man actor, 50, put all jokes aside, taking on a more earnest tone to share just how much he loves his wife in return.

To celebrate his 10th anniversary with wife Susan Downey, the actor posted a cute photo of the two wearing matching black shirts and sunglasses on the beach.

Referring to both his wife’s undeniable beauty and the number of years they have been married, he captioned the photo, “A perfect 10. Happy Anniversary, Mrs. Downey.”

A perfect 10. Happy Anniversary, Mrs. Downey.

A photo posted by Robert Downey, Jr. (@robertdowneyjr) on

It’s clearly been a great year for the couple, who welcomed a daughter together in November.

“Yep … Avri Roel Downey joined the party @ 3:22 a.m. on November 4th … she’s 7 lbs even, spans 20 inches, and is accompanied by a variety of Susan’s traits that have seemingly overwritten my ‘junk DNA,’ ” Downey wrote onFacebook the day after his daughter’s birth.

Read next: Robert Downey Jr. Walks Out of Interview After Questions Turn Personal

TIME celebrities

10 Notable Hamlets on Stage and Screen

From Laurence Olivier to David Tennant

From Olivier’s Oscar glory to Day-Lewis’ Method meltdown (when he hallucinated and saw his dead dad onstage), THR critic Stephen Dalton picks 10 of the most riveting performances of literature’s most demanding role, before Benedict Cumberbatch stepped in.

This article originally appeared on The Hollywood Reporter

More from The Hollywood Reporter:

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Hugh Jackman Knew Exactly How to Surprise a Sick Young Fan

Heart-warming!

In a special visit organized by the Make-a-Wish Foundation, a nine-year-old Australian boy with cystic fibrosis named Dominic got to visit the KISS 1065 radio studio, call up his idol, Wolverine star Hugh Jackman, and ask him what his favorite Wolverine pose is. He never expected the actor to show up and do it for him in person, which is exactly what Jackman did. The Australian actor gave the youngster a big hug and then asked the little one to do his best Wolverine impression. And in a span of about two minutes, the fictional superhero did not seem so fictional anymore.

TIME celebrities

Ricky Martin Says Donald Trump ‘Makes My Blood Boil’

The Jorge Ramos incident sparked the singer's op-ed

Ricky Martin has written an op-ed disparaging Donald Trump’s remarks about Latinos, saying that the presidential candidate’s attitude toward the community “makes my blood boil.”

The Latin singer apparently saw Trump’s kerfuffle with Univision journalist Jorge Ramos as the last straw. “Jorge Ramos was doing HIS JOB as a journalist at a press conference in which he appeared freely and democratically, representing one of the most important Latin television networks in the world,” Martin wrote. “But this new character in American politics verbally attacks him and ejects him from the press conference.”

Trump has said that Ramos was “totally out of line” at the press conference in question, and that Ramos should have waited his turn to be called on to ask a question, while Ramos told TIME that he was just trying to make Trump answer some tough questions on his immigration proposals.

In the op-ed for Univision (translated from the original Spanish to English on Billboard), Martin called on the Latino community to hold Trump accountable for his “racist, absurd, and above all incoherent and ignorant” comments. “Xenophobia as a political strategy is the lowest you can go in search of political power,” he wrote.

[Univision, Billboard]

Read Next: Univision’s Jorge Ramos: Reporters Need to Get Tougher on Donald Trump

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