MONEY the photo bank

I Raised $1,500 On Kickstarter—Then Gave It All Away

It took 31 days for Santa Fe–based photographer Matthew Chase-Daniel to raise $1,500 via Kickstarter. In addition to the money that came through the website, people handed him singles, a lump sum of $150, even a jar of pennies. They thrust cash at him when they saw him around town, at the post office or the market. Then, once Chase-Daniel had amassed all the funds, for 24 days starting in late August, he gave it all away, at a rate of 40 to 50 one-dollar bills a day.

Now, if you happened to read MONEY reporter Jacob Davidson‘s article earlier this week, “Kickstarter Backers Are Investors, and It’s Time They Got Used To It,” you may be tempted to write off the whole thing as another potential Kickstarter scam. How dare someone in the art world solicit donations when he didn’t even appear to need the money—not like, say, the L’ouvre, the Musée d’Orsay (as reported by the New York Times this week) or even the curatorial program for Portland’s Newspace Center for Photography. Heck, he didn’t even keep it! Take a breath. Chase-Daniel did exactly what he promised his backers: “If you give a dollar, I will smile when I hear about it. Then I’ll give the money away.”

The $1,500 that he raised was for an art installation entitled “Dollar Distribution” for the “Economologies” series exhibited in Axle Contemporary, a 1970 aluminum stepvan custom retrofitted as a mobile art gallery. After meeting and surpassing his goal (even after Kickstarter and Amazon Payments took their cuts), Chase-Daniel made a trip downtown:

I went to the bank and withdrew the money, all as 1-dollar bills. I wasn’t clear how much space that would take. I brought a zippered duffel bag into the bank. It turns out 1,500 bills can be quite compact. 1,000 of them were handed to me fresh from the vault, in a nice brick: 10 banded bundles of 100 ones, sealed in a plastic bag, straight from the Federal Reserve in El Paso. That brick has power. Holding it made me a little giddy and giggly.

Then, he took the brick of bills to Axle Contemporary, where he proceeded to use them to carpet the floor of the stepvan. Chase-Daniel put the final touch on the piece by installing a sheet of glass over the back door, after which he drove the gallery-cum-vault around town, parking in random locations to show the pile of money to interested passersby. (By sheer coincidence, the Axle Contemporary stepvan is not so dissimilar to a Brink’s truck—the distinction becoming even less so with its new cargo.)

Following the viewing, the artist dismantled the piece and distributed it around town. He tossed, slipped, hid, tucked, folded, crumpled, rolled, floated, and buried dollar bills in locations around Santa Fe for anyone to find. Sometimes they were “discarded” haphazardly, sometimes they were strategically placed.

Chase-Daniel recounted the impetus for the project—he was driving into town in 2013 when the breeze blew a dollar bill past his windshield. As he continued, a rolling tumbleweed of bills drifted across the road. The knee-jerk reaction of the drivers around him was to brake and swerve:

It doesn’t matter if you are rich or poor, the sight of cash blowing down the road gets attention and provokes reactions and thoughts and reflection of all sorts, positive, negative, joyous, angry, liberated, stressed-out. I decided I wanted to replicate my experience for others, to spark associations and reactions in others by simply leaving some cash around Santa Fe for others to happen upon by chance.

The Kickstarter approach came later. “Since my idea was to distribute the money randomly to a large ‘crowd,’ crowdsourced funding seemed like the logical way to raise the money,” said Chase-Daniel, who made no money from the project nor gave any credit to contributors.

In some ways, Chase-Daniels’ “Dollar Distribution” is similar to Jody Servon’s “I ____ a dollar” installation. Both used money they had been given (for Servon it came from a grant) to create their installations and then disseminate the money again, circulating it to a new group of people. Chase-Daniels makes a further distinction between his project and the illustrious @HiddenCash, this summer’s social media treasure hunt:

From what I understand of @HiddenCash, people are given clues and then search for the cash and are rewarded for their intelligence, problem-solving and determination. ‘Dollar Distribution’ gives money out to anyone, without discrimination. It is found by rich and poor, intelligent or not, with no warning or even knowledge of the project by the vast majority of ‘participants.’

What Matthew Chase-Daniels hopes will result from the project is that people will experience a visceral reaction to the surprise of discovering a dollar bill at some unexpected point in their day, in the same way he did while driving last year. He likens it to “a feeling of joy or luckiness or good fortune” that comes with finding even such a small denomination as a penny on the sidewalk.

Chase-Daniels tried to remain unobserved while distributing the dollars, but he also felt compelled to document some of the placements photographically. Those photos (which he shared on social media) were—for the most part—cropped too tightly to clue anyone in to a specific location, but they did help to spread the word about the project. That led some people to respond by sharing photos of the bills they had found.

While Chase-Daniels didn’t plan out where he would “drop” the dollars, he did happen upon some locations—a Brink’s truck, a one-dollar table at a yard sale, a book on Dada art in the library—that were too perfect to resist. Over time, he began refining the compositions of the photographs as well as the placement of the money. Chase-Daniels is compiling the images and writing about the project in a book that will be out later this year.

Chase-Daniels emphasized that the most important part of the piece was the distribution of the money; the installation and the photos, he said, “are almost incidental.” If, as he noted, “the money IS the project,” then the 1,500 people that happened upon one of the lucky bills each acquired a limited edition intaglio print—valued at exactly one dollar.

This is part of The Photo Bank, a section of Money.com dedicated to conceptually-driven photography. From images that document the broader economy to ones that explore more personal concerns like paying for college, travel, retirement, advancing your career, or even buying groceries, The Photo Bank will showcase a spectrum of the best work being produced by emerging and established artists. Submissions are encouraged and should be sent to Sarina Finkelstein, Online Photo Editor for Money.com:sarina.finkelstein@timeinc.com.

More from The Photo Bank:
FREE MONEY! (If You _ _ _ _ It)
Looking at ‘Rich and Poor,’ 37 Years Later
When the DynaTAC Brick Phone Was Must-Have Technology
Inside the ‘Pay What You Want’ Marketplace

 

MONEY Odd Spending

WATCH: We Try Out NYC’s First Bitcoin ATM

The Bitcoin crypto-currency may be the wave of the future, but MONEY's Jacob Davidson finds that using it to buy lunch can be a hassle right now.

MONEY credit cards

The Spending Mistake that Millennials Are Making

millennial holding credit card
Dimitri Vervitsiotis—Getty Images

Millennials prefer to pay with plastic over cash, a new CreditCards.com study finds—but all that swiping may be unravelling their budgets.

Millennials don’t shop like their parents—and increasingly, they don’t pay like their parents either. Studies have already shown that many of them have chucked the checkbook (if they’ve ever had one); and they’re more likely to forego cash as well, a poll released today by CreditCards.com found.

Asked how they typically pay for purchases under $5, 77% of people over 50 surveyed preferred cash to debit or credit, while just 48% of people between 18 and 29 use paper money. The fact that millennials are using cards to pay for even such small expenses suggests they’re probably using plastic for most purchases.

And when they’re swiping, this group also uses debit (37%) vs. credit (14%) by a larger margin than any other cardholder group.

What millennials may not realize is that choosing plastic—even if it’s debit—over paper could be costing them.

Research has suggested that we’re inclined to spend more when we swipe. A 2008 study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology found that physically handing over bills triggers an emotional pain that actually helps to deter spending, while swiping doesn’t create the same aversion. As a result, the study found, cash discourages spending whereas plastic encourages it.

In addition, a 2012 study from The Journal of Consumer Research found that shoppers who pay with plastic focus more on the benefits of the purchase than the price, while those who pay with cash focus on price first. In other words, we’re more likely to make the decision to purchase an item when we know we’ll be charging it.

Further fueling our natural tendencies to spend more with plastic—a.k.a. “the credit card premium”—is the fact that many shops and bars mandate that you spend a minimum amount to use your card. So if you were planning to use the card anyway, you might pad your purchase to get to the minimum required.

All this spending on plastic also can cause you to rack up debt or overdraft fees, if you’re not swiping mindfully. And many members of Gen Y are not, it would seem.

For example, millennials are more likely than any other age group to overdraw their checking accounts, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found. About 11% of millennials overdraft more than 10 times a year, and these overdrafts were typically for small purchases under $24 and were paid back within three days. With the median overdraft fee equaling $34, borrowing $24 for three days is like taking out a loan with a 17,000% annual percentage rate, the study found.

Of course, we can avoid paying the credit card premium by just using cash. But if you won’t remember to go to the ATM, at least take a second to close your eyes the next time you’re about to buy something using plastic: Think about the price of the item and how it will impact your bank account. You might even give yourself a 24-hour cooling off period to think over any nonessential purchases.

Avoid overdrawing or getting in over your head in debt by reviewing your bank and/or credit card account online once per day, or by using an app like Mint.com, which lets you track all your accounts in one place. Also, consider setting alerts at your bank or credit card website to let you know when you’re approaching a certain balance—this can keep your spending in check.

Related:

Money 101: How Do I Figure Out My Financial Priorities?

Money 101: How Do I Create a Budget I Can Stick To?

MONEY Savings

Millennials Are Hoarding Cash Because They’re Smarter Than Their Parents

Cash under mattress
Zachary Scott—Getty Images

Sure, young adults could get higher returns by investing in stocks, but many have good reasons to stay safe in cash right now.

Another day another study about the short-comings of Millennials as investors. This time around, Bankrate.com weighs in—data from their latest Financial Security Index show that 39% of 18-29 year-olds choose cash as their preferred way to invest money they won’t touch for least 10 years. That’s three times the percentage that would choose stocks.

“These findings are troubling because Millennials need the returns of stocks to meet their retirement goals,” says Bankrate.com chief financial analyst Greg McBride. “They need to rethink the level of risk they need to take.”

Bankrate.com is not the only group trying to push Millennials out of cash and into stocks. Previous surveys have scolded young adults for “stashing cash under the mattress,” being as “financially conservative as the generation born during the Great Depression,” and more being “less trustful of others”—in particular financial institutions and Wall Street. (You can find these surveys here, here and here.)

These criticisms are way overblown. It’s simply not true that Millennials are uniquely averse to equities—many are investing in stocks, despite their responses to polls. As for cash holdings, keeping a portion of your portfolio liquid is simply common sense, though you can overdo it.

Here’s what’s really going on:

  1. Millennials are not much more risk averse than older generations. In the wake of the financial crisis, investors of all ages have been keeping more of their portfolios in cash—some 40% of assets on average, according to State Street’s research. Baby Boomers held the highest cash levels (43%), followed by Millennials (40%) and Gen X-ers (38%). That’s not a wide spread.
  2. Many Millennials do keep significant stakes in equities. This is especially true of those who hold jobs and have access to 401(k) plans. That’s because they save some 10% of pay on average in their 401(k)s, which is typically funneled into a target-date retirement fund. For someone in their 20s, the average target-date fund invests the bulk of its assets in stocks. Thanks to their early head start in investing, these young adults are an “emerging generation of super savers,” according to Catherine Collinson, president of the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies.
  3. Young adults who lack jobs or 401(k)s need to keep more in cash. Most young people don’t have much in the way of financial cushion. The latest Survey of Consumer Finances found that the average household headed by someone age 35 or younger held only $5,500 in financial assets. That’s less than two months pay for someone earning $40,000 annually, barely enough for a rainy day fund, let alone a long-term investing portfolio. Besides, that cash may be earmarked for other short-term needs, such as student loan repayments (a top priority for many), rent, or more education to qualify for a better-paying job.

There’s no question that young adults will eventually have to funnel more money into stocks to meet their long-term right goals, so in that sense the surveys are right. But many are doing better than their parents did at their age—the typical Millennial starts saving at age 22 vs 35 for boomers. And if many young adults hold more in cash right now because they’re unsure about their job security or ability to pay the bills, there are worse moves to make. After all, it was overconfidence in the markets that led older generations into the financial crisis in the first place.

MONEY retirement income

Need Low-Risk Yield? CDs are Back in Fashion

Dollars and cents
Finnbarr Webster / Alamy

Retirees and other people desperate to earn interest can find respectable deals on certificates of deposit.

Getting low-risk yield has been one of the toughest challenges for retirees ever since the financial meltdown of 2008-2009. Interest rates are near zero, and many retirees are nervous about bonds out of fear that rates might jump.

All of which leaves a simple question: How about a good old-fashioned certificate of deposit?

Retirees desperate for yield can find some respectable deals on CDs. The yields may not sound sexy, but there’s no risk to principal and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation protects accounts up to $250,000.

There’s nothing new about the higher rates on CDs compared with bonds. Banks, especially those without extensive retail branch networks, have long offered generous rates on CDs, mostly online, as an inexpensive way to attract deposits. It’s also a way for banks to bring in retail clients who can be cross-sold other higher-margin products.

But there’s an especially compelling case to be made for CDs in the current rate environment.

“For retirees, it’s the one corner of the investment world where you can get additional return without additional risk,” says Greg McBride, chief financial analyst for Bankrate.com.

The most aggressive banks will sell you a two-year CD with an annual percentage yield (APY) of 1.25%; compare that with current two-year Treasury rates, now at about 0.48%. Three-year CDs top out at 1.45%, compared with 0.92% on a Treasury of the same duration. If you want to go longer, five-year CDs top out over 2%.

Five or 10 years ago, the high rates came mainly from smaller no-name banks, but that’s not the case now. Some of the more aggressive offers currently come from big names like Synchrony Bank (formerly GE Capital Retail Bank), Barclays and CIT Bank. Bankrate.com lets you search and compare offers.

You could get higher yields on corporate or junk bonds. But they’re risky because the available yield isn’t adequate for the credit risk you need to take, argues Sam Lee, editor of Morningstar’s ETFInvestor newsletter.

“I’d rather be in a five-year CD than a bond fund taking on more duration or credit risk,” Lee says. “If rates do rise, you can lose a whole bunch of money on long-duration bonds — maybe 10 or 20% of your principal.”

The only risk you face locking in a longer CD — five years, for example — is the lost opportunity cost of obtaining a higher rate should rates jump. Lee likes that strategy.

“The interest rate sensitivity is very low, because you can always just get out and reinvest at a higher rate,” he says. “You’ll pay a bit of a penalty, but that is more than offset by the higher rate and value of the FDIC guarantee.”

McBride isn’t convinced rates will jump substantially anytime soon. “The long-awaited rising rate environment has yet to show itself — it might happen next year, or maybe not.”

Still, you should understand CD penalties in case you do need to make a move, because the terms can vary. The most common penalties for early withdrawal on a five-year CD are 6 or 12 months’ worth of interest, says McBride. “The terms can vary widely — some are assessed just on the amount you withdraw, others on the entire investment.”

If you’re worried about opportunity cost, some of the banks offering aggressive CD rates also have attractive savings accounts that let you make a move at any time – although some require a minimum level of deposit to qualify for the best rates. For example, Synchrony will pay you 0.95%. That’s not much less than the 1.1% it pays on a one-year CD – or the 1.2% for a two-year CD, for that matter.

The other option is a step-up CD that boosts your rate if interest rates rise in return for a lower initial rate. But those aren’t easy to find right now, McBride says. “We’ll see those become more prevalent if we get into a rising rate environment.”

No matter how long you go, Lee says, the implication for retirees is clear: Use CDs for the risk-free part of your portfolio and equities for whatever portion where some risk is acceptable.

Equities should help keep your overall portfolio returns substantially above the rate of inflation. The Consumer Price Index is up 2.1% for the 12 months ended in May.

“The U.S. stock market’s expected real [after-inflation] return right now is about 4%,” he says. “The expected inflation-adjusted yield on bonds right now is close to zero.”

MONEY retirement planning

Leave a Financial Legacy? Boomers and Millennials Slug It Out

Unlike older Americans, young adults want to leave an inheritance to future generations. Too bad they're investing in cash.

Baby Boomers like to point out that our famously self-absorbed generation advocated for many good causes as youngsters and turned the corner to greater giving in retirement. Much of it is true. But younger generations are way ahead of us, new research suggests.

Maybe it’s a case of our kids doing as we say, not as we do. Boomers are the least likely generation to say it is important to leave a financial legacy—even though they have benefited from an enormous wealth transfer from their own parents, according to a new U.S. Trust survey of high net worth individuals. How’s that for self-absorbed?

More boomers have received an inheritance (57%) than say it is important to leave one (53%). The opposite holds true for younger generations. Some 36% of Gen X and 48% of Millennials have received some type of inheritance while 59% of Gen X and a whopping 65% of Millennials say it is important to leave one.

Circumstances may account for the difference in mindset. The Great Recession struck just as boomers were preparing to call it quits. With more to lose, and little time to make it back, boomers suffered the worst of the crisis from a savings point of view. A financial legacy seems less important when you are downsizing your retirement dreams.

For younger generations, the crisis created an employment nightmare. But it drove home the need to begin saving early, and those that did have seen stock prices double from the bottom and house prices begin to rebound as well. Millennials’ problem may be that they still don’t trust the stock market enough.

Well more than half in the survey remain on the sidelines with 10% or more of their portfolio in cash. Millennials are the most likely to be tilting that direction. Two-thirds of Millennials, the most of any cohort, say they are fine carrying a lot of cash and just 13%, the least of any cohort, have plans to invest some of their sideline cash in the next 12 months. This conservative nature threatens to work against their desire to leave a financial legacy—or even retire comfortably.

Millennials are the youngest adult generation and have the most time to absorb bumps in the stock market and benefit from its long-term superior gains. Intuitively, they know that. In the survey, those holding the most cash, regardless of age, were the most likely to say they missed the market rally the past few years and are not on track to meet their goals.

In our younger days, boomers rallied around things like civil rights and workplace equality for women, among other grand moral battles. But we didn’t necessarily put our money where our mouth was. Today’s young adults are quieter about how to fix the world. But they are willing to invest for change. One-third of all high net worth individuals invest in a socially conscious way while two-thirds of Millennials do so, U.S. Trust found.

By a wide margin, more Millennials say that investment decisions are a way to express social, political or environmental values (67%). Most (73%) believe it is possible to achieve market-rate returns investing in companies based on their social or environmental impact, and that private capital from socially motivated investors can help hold public companies and governments accountable (79%). I’d say the kids are alright.

MONEY Saving

WATCH: Tips From the Pros: The Secret to Financial Success

Financial experts reveal the one thing you must do to build wealth.

TIME U.S.

The Rich Guy Who’s Been Giving Away Free Money May Be Heading to Your City

145868151
Getty Images

If you live in New York, Las Vegas, Houston, Chicago or Mexico City, get ready for a scavenger hunt

Last month we reported that an anonymous real estate magnate (who has since been outed as Bay Area resident Jason Buzi) was giving away free money in San Francisco. Using the Twitter handle @HiddenCash, Buzi shared clues that ultimately directed people toward crisp white envelopes stuffed with bills.

Well, this weekend Buzi’s expanding his operation across North America. He shared his itinerary on Twitter:

If you hope to score some dough, be sure to pay close attention to Twitter, because the second Buzi provides any information, you’ll need to act fast. Buzi isn’t just doling out free money, though. He’s also doling out free life lessons:

(h/t Business Insider)

MONEY freebies

Free Money! @HiddenCash Scavenger Hunt Spreads

140610_EM_FreeMoney_1
Hundreds of people search for 36 buried plastic Angry Bird orbs filled with hidden cash in Hermosa Beach, California May 31, 2014. They were following clues posted via the Twitter handle @HiddenCash. Jonathan Alcorn—Reuters

The Twitter-based scavenger hunt @HiddenCash, in which clues lead to envelopes stuffed with money, is spreading to several big cities this weekend.

Talk about “found money.” It’s not every day that some anonymous philanthropist decides to give away thousands of dollars to total strangers via a social media-coordinated scavenger hunt. So when the @HiddenCash hunt came out of the blue a couple weeks ago in San Francisco, it understandably drew worldwide attention.

Coming this weekend, people outside the San Francisco Bay area can also join in the fun. The man behind HiddenCash—he’s a Palo Alto-based real estate investor named Jason Buzi, and he was outed over the weekend—appeared Anderson Cooper’s show on CNN on Monday night and revealed that the game-hunt will take place this weekend in Chicago, Houston, Las Vegas, New York City (Brooklyn and Manhattan), and Mexico City. The cash hunts are also due to hit Paris, London and Madrid by the first week of July. A @HiddenCash Tweet went out this morning spreading the word:

While the HiddenCash phenomenon is intended to be fun, Buzi was also motivated to create the hunt for the purposes of spreading the wealth in a world rife with income inequality. As the then-anonymous Buzi told TIME via e-mail a couple weeks ago:

“My message for the ‘haves’ is to be a little more generous, and to give back more,” HiddenCash adds. “I know so many wealthy people who are selfish and greedy, and just want more, more, more. When is it enough? When will you be satisfied? Take a step back, relax, and give back a bit. Putting smiles on other people’s faces will put a smile on your face. Believe me.”

Buzi told CNN that he’s already given away $15,000 in cash, and he’s planning to give away a lot more in scavenger hunts this summer.

MONEY stocks

How Owning Apple Stock is Now Like Owning Bonds

140609_INV_Apple_Bonds_1
Inside Apple's balance sheet is a whole lot of cash and bonds. Jesus Jauregui—Getty Images

Apple's stock split makes it easier to buy. But you'll get a big bond fund as part of the bargain.

By splitting its shares 7-for-1 today, Apple has made its stock more easily accessible to retail investors. But of course if you have any money at all in an equity mutual fund, you almost certainly own a chunk of Apple APPLE INC. AAPL 0.5075% . The stock is 3.11% of the S&P 500 S&P 500 INDEX SPX -0.7299% , making it the biggest name in the index.

What you get if you own Apple is, of course, a world-beating consumer technology company. But you also get a huge chunk of cash and bonds—about $150 billion worth, or 27% of Apple’s total market value. One way to wrap your head around how much extra money Apple is managing is to compare it to the biggest bond mutual funds in the country. If Apple’s fixed-income portfolio were a fund, its only real peers would be the giant Pimco and Vanguard portfolios, the mainstay core holdings in many 401(k) plans.

Source: Morningstar, Apple
Source: Morningstar, Apple

If you’ve ever scratched your head and wondered why investors complain about Apple’s cash, as if being wildly successful at pulling in profits is a bad thing, this is why. If you have money to put in the market and wanted some of it to go into bonds, you could hand that money over to Pimco and Vanguard and get a reliable return. No one needs Apple CEO Tim Cook to be a bond manager.

Cook knows that, which is why Apple has announced it plans to return $130 billion in cash to shareholder via dividends and stock buybacks by the end of 2015. Of course, even if it does that, it would still have loads of cash on hand—the company generated about $36 billion in cash flow from operations in the six months ended March 31. That alone is enough to do twelve more Beats-sized deals. (One odd wrinkle: To get cash back to shareholders, Apple is actually borrowing. It’s a tax thing.)

Bottom line: If you buy Apple today, between now and the end of next year, you’ll get a lot of that money back and will have to figure out somewhere else to invest. Another portion will earn modest returns. And then you hope the rest is invested back in the business or in smart acquisitions in a way that continues to power growth forward. Shawn Tully over at Fortune.com thinks Apple is just too big to deliver the kind of growth Apple fans hope for. Then again, if you subtract Apple’s “bond fund” from its market value, you get the part of the business that’s still a tech company for about 11 times the past year’s earnings, compared to just under 20 for the S&P 500. Assuming you think Cook won’t waste the cash, that doesn’t sound like such a terrible deal.

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