MONEY job search

6 Tips for Landing a Last-Minute Summer Internship

150504_CAR_SummerIntern
Eric Audras—Getty Images

Haven't started looking for an internship yet? These strategies will help you catch up in a hurry.

Summer is nearly here, and college students (along with some particularly ambitious high schoolers) who don’t already have plans are scrambling to snag a last-minute internship.

The reality is that by the time May comes around, many student-friendly jobs are already taken. “Organizations have been recruiting all year for internships,” says Philip D. Gardner, director of the College Employment Research Institute at Michigan State University.

Still, Gardner says, students who haven’t yet secured a spot shouldn’t give up hope. The internship market may not be as robust as it was in February, he tells MONEY, “but with some diligence, students should find them.”

Diligence, that is, combined with some smart searching skills. Keep these five tips in mind while on the hunt for the perfect summer job:

1. Ask the right questions

Summer positions aren’t beneficial for their own sake. The point of an internship is to give students real work experience that will eventually lead to a job in their chosen field, or help them decide whether that field is really where they want to work after graduation. So even last-minute job seekers shouldn’t leap at the first offer.

“Some offices offer internships to people trying to get cheap labor,” Gardner says. Students who coasted into positions with family friends or took the first offer “got an internship to put on their resume, but it didn’t get them where they wanted to go.”

According to Gardner, the key to finding a really useful internship is asking the right questions:

  • “What professional outcomes am I going to be able to obtain from this internship?”
  • “Will this allow me to develop teamwork skills or apply learning to problem-solving in this area?”
  • “Will I be able to obtain a good overview of potential careers in your organization, or have a chance to experience some of the basic fundamental responsibilities in this organization?”

Each industry has its own nuances that demand a unique set of queries, so Gardner advises students to talk to their college’s career services center to learn what they should be asking when meeting with potential employers. Plus, showing hiring managers that you’ve done some homework and are eager to learn about their field can only help your chances, especially at this late date.

2. Know where to look

It’s not enough to use the basic set of job search sites, like CareerSearch and O*Net, when hunting for an internship. Many industries also have their own niche job boards where positions that don’t appear elsewhere are posted. Check with your college’s career office, which often has knowledge of industry-specific job listings and connections with a variety of employers. He also recommends talking with professors, who might have tips on internships in their areas of expertise.

3. Give your resume a quick makeover

Hiring managers depend on your resume and cover letter when deciding who to interview for open positions, so it’s important to make sure yours is as perfect as it can be before you start sending out queries. Since time is of the essence, the fastest way to get your resume into shape is to solicit professional help.

Gardner recommends making an immediate appointment with one of your school’s career counselors. They’re a one-stop-shop for general advice—like what fonts to use, how much space each item deserves—and industry specific guidance, such as which achievements to highlight and which to leave out.

4. Become an interview expert

While a writing a good resume is essential, it’s difficult for any undergraduate to get a job based on solely on their past accomplishments. Students in their late teens or early 20s understandably tend to lack extensive work histories, meaning employers are usually going to value attitude and temperament over experience.

“Young people are going to be hired more often on personality traits than on knowledge or skills,” says Carol Christen, co-author of What Color Is Your Parachute? For Teens, a career guide for young people. “Are you willing to show up on time? Are you willing to ask questions?”

According to Christen, interviews are the primary way to show employers you have the right personality for the position. Moreover, she says, it can take as many as nine interviews for students to get comfortable, making practice essential.

How does one get interview practice before actually interviewing for a job? Mock interviews with college career counselors are one option, but a more time-efficient idea, championed by Christen, is to ask people already employed in your field for an informational interview.

Reach out to people and request a brief chat about their day-to-day responsibilities, how they got their job, and other inside knowledge. These discussions won’t give you experience talking about your own accomplishments, but Christen says they should help build confidence, develop connections, and teach students how to hold a conversation entirely around work.

5. Design your own internship

If your applications go unanswered, don’t give up. Look into volunteering at a nonprofit organization or political campaign in an area that will give you some exposure to career skills. Another option is to design an independent project that could be useful to a business or nonprofit—such as doing market research or looking into various fundraising options—and then ask if anyone on staff will “sponsor” the program by acting as a supervisor or mentor.

6. Next time, get started sooner

It’s possible to get a summer job if you start searching in May, but waiting this long is far from ideal. In the future, Gardner recommends, start looking for an internship as soon as you get back from summer break. He says underclassmen should start particularly early since recruiters tend to hit campuses in the fall and early winter. Getting a head start on the process not only means a higher chance of landing an internship, it also means you’ll have more options to pick from when deciding which position fits you best.

Read next: How to convert a summer internship into a full-time job

TIME Retirement

Retirement ‘More Myth Than Reality,’ Survey Finds

Pensioners in Retirement
Christopher Furlong—Getty Images A pensioner holds his walking stick on September 8, 2014 in Walsall, England.

61% of Americans expect to continue working past the age of 65

Only 21% of Americans say they plan to stop working at the age of retirement, according to a new survey.

The Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies (TCRS) surveyed 4,550 full-time and part-time workers about their retirement and savings plans. One in five said they would continue working as long as possible and 41% planned to reduce their hours. The study also found that 61% of Americans expect to continue working past the age of 65 or do not plan to retire at all.

“Today’s workers recognize they need to save and self-fund a greater portion of their retirement income,” said Catherine Collinson, president of TCRS. “The long-held view that retirement is a moment in time when people reach a certain age, immediately stop working, fully retire, and begin pursuing their dreams is more myth than reality.”

MONEY everyday money

The New College Grad’s Guide to Money

So long, college! Hello, adult life! Here's a quick and painless lesson in real-world finances for the class of 2015.

Person putting coin in mortarboard
John Kuczala—Getty Images

Graduates of the class of 2015, it’s time to further your education. Yes, you just spent four years amassing a crazy amount of knowledge. But despite all you’ve learned, you possibly still have an incomplete in one subject: money. Suddenly you’re at a financial turning point, facing challenges like finding a place to live and starting a new job. At the same time, your college friends have scattered across the country, the clock is ticking on your student loan grace period, and you are feeling broke, really broke.

Don’t worry. The basic money skills you need to get on your feet are easy to master. And by doing so right out of the college gates, you’ll have more opportunities off in the future—and greater peace of mind right away. So, drawing from the advice of recent graduates and experts familiar with your challenge, MONEY offers you this cheat sheet for launching your post-college financial life.

  • BUDGETING

    Money

    Make Technology Your Friend

    Remember life before college? Seasonal wardrobe updates, lots of dinners out, new cellphones on a regular basis? Well, Mom and Dad worked a good 20 years or so before they could afford that lifestyle, so don’t expect to carry on as you did when you lived at home.

    If you play it right, though, you can enjoy a taste of what’s important to you, with enough left over to start building a cushier future.

    The plan: Automate. Direct deposit and auto-deduction make it easy to set aside money before you can spend it. To make sure you have enough for large, regular monthly outlays like rent, savings, and student loans—more about those expenses later—set up your pay-check for split deposits. Put money for big necessities in one account, cash for everything else in another.

    Then it’s just a question of making those remaining funds last until your next paycheck. To do that, you don’t need a life of self-denial; just think about spending in terms of tradeoffs: Would I rather buy x now or y later?

    Handy tool: The Mint app tracks your cash and can build a budget from your past spending.

    One grad’s story: When Sean Starling, a 2013 Morehouse College graduate, started his first job out of school, he thought he was set. “I was like, ‘I’m making money now, and I can spend whatever I want,'” says Starling, 25. Repeatedly running out of cash—and failing to save enough—changed his mind. He used Mint to track his spending, then moved to Excel for more detail. With his budget now under control, Starling, a cost analyst, is repaying student debt and saving up for his September wedding. “Whether you use a piggy bank or Mint or an Excel spreadsheet,” he says, “find a way to make the savings process your own.”

  • HOUSING

    Money

    Share and Save

    Most likely, you’ll share your first home post-college with a roommate or two. And there’s a good chance their names will be Mom and Dad. Whomever you’re living with, make it a time for saving money.

    The plan: Moving out of your childhood home? Aim to spend no more than one-quarter of your income on rent, advises Ben Barzideh, a financial planner with Piershale Financial Group in Crystal Lake, Ill.

    Moving back in with the folks? Be sure to wash your dishes. But you’ll really warm their hearts if you take advantage of your rent-free digs and set aside at least 25% of your salary—the money you might have paid for rent—to start a getaway fund.

    Handy tools: Splitwise makes it easy for roommates to figure out who owes whom for different housing expenses. “It’s super-fast and streamlined,” says Zach Feldman, a 24-year-old New York University graduate living in Brooklyn. “It takes maybe 10 minutes out of the month to get my bills done.” The Venmo payment app makes it simple to settle up and verify that everyone has paid up.

    One grad’s story: Kristine Nicolaysen-Dowhan, 24, moved in with her mom and stepdad in Grosse Ile, Mich., after graduating from the University of Michigan in 2012. Her first paycheck went toward clothes for work; her second paid off debt. Within four months Dowhan was saving a whopping 75% of her salary. “The rest I just had as fun money,” she says.

  • CREDIT CARDS

    Money

    Handle With Care

    Credit cards are great—in moderation. They’re useful as backup in emergencies, and paying on time helps build your credit score—good for lower rates on future home and car loans. (Employers and landlords also use your score to gauge your reliability.) The downside: Plastic makes it easy to spend money you don’t have, at a high cost.

    The plan: Get a card—just one—and use it sparingly. (Starling reserves his card for emergencies and online purchases.) Activate text alerts in your account for upcoming bills. To help your score, pay on time and keep charges to one-fourth of your credit limit. And pay each month’s bill in full; if your card charges interest of, say, 20%, keeping a balance for a year means that every $100 you spend will cost you an extra $20.

    Handy tool: MONEY’s credit card guide points you to the best available cash-back credit cards—good if you pay your full bill each month—and the best card for first-time card users.

  • STUDENT LOANS

    Money

    Pick a Plan

    You can’t wriggle out of repaying student debt, but you can choose how you pay. Instead of a standard 10-year plan, you have other options: lower initial payments or more time to repay, in return for higher interest costs. You have six months after graduation to choose a plan (which you can change later).

    The plan: Run numbers to see what you can manage. On the average federal loan balance of $27,000 for a four-year public college, you’d pay $272 monthly under the standard plan; under another one that bases payments on your income, a person making $35,000 would begin paying just $146 but owe $3,100 more in total interest. Automatically deduct payments from your bank account; paying on time helps your credit score. At tax time, deduct your interest payments, up to $2,500, on your return (the deduction is phased out for singles making more than $80,000). Tax savings: up to $625.

    Handy tools: Get a list of your federal loans at nslds.ed.gov. Use the government’s Repayment Estimator to ballpark payments under different plans.

  • YOUR JOB

    Money

    Don’t Say Yes So Soon

    Relax. Based on horror stories of recent years, maybe you’ve decided you’re lucky to get a job, any job, at any salary. But you may have more bargaining power than you think. In the best market for new grads since the financial crisis, nearly two-thirds of employers—an all-time high—plan to raise starting salaries over last year, reports the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

    That positions you well for a salary negotiation, which can pay big dividends over time. A bump in pay of $5,000 by the time you’re 25 years old translates into a $634,000 boost in lifetime earnings, according to a study out of Temple and George Mason universities.

    The plan: Don’t accept an offer right away. Salary.com says 84% of employers expect applicants to negotiate their salary. And compensation data provider PayScale found that 75% of workers asking for more money got at least some of their request.

    When you do ask, tie your case (politely) to other offers you may have or to experience you bring—say, a previous internship—that will help you hit the ground running.

    Handy tools: PayScale, Salary.com, and Glassdoor will give you a realistic sense of salary ranges, taking into account factors such as company size and location.

    One grad’s story: When Kirk Leonard, 24, a 2013 graduate of Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas, was offered a job as an office manager at a local dialysis facility, he laid out the case for his future boss as to why he deserved higher pay: Having worked for the company before, he knew its operations. And he could start right away—saving the company the time and hassle of a job search. The payoff: a salary 10% higher than the original offer.

  • HEALTH INSURANCE

    Money

    Get Covered

    Another reason to worry less this year: Thanks to Obamacare, it’s easier and cheaper than ever to get health insurance to cover major medical expenses. Any plan you sign up for should include a free annual checkup and access to prescriptions for birth control.

    The plan: The cheapest route is probably to stay on (or return to) a parent’s plan—open to you until you turn 26. You may not want to, though, if you live far from your parents; finding in-network doctors and hospitals might be difficult, says Carrie McLean of eHealth.com.

    Insured through work? Since being young means you’re (probably) healthy, you might pick the company plan you’re offered with the lowest upfront cost and highest deductible (the amount you pay before insurance starts kicking in). But, warns Karen Pollitz of the Kaiser Family Foundation, be sure you can quickly scare up the deductible, which can be as much as $6,600 this year; a broken leg, for example, can easily cost thousands.

    On your own? Hit the government exchange. Plan labels range from Bronze to Platinum, based on premiums and out-of-pocket contributions. You’re likely eligible for subsidies if you make less than $46,680 in 2015. The silver plan is a good pick, since a break on out-of-pocket costs (if you earn less than $29,175 this year) is available only with that choice.

    Handy tools: To buy through the government exchange, start at healthcare.gov/lower-costs and see if you qualify for discounts. Making less than $16,105 this year? Check the map at kff.org/medicaid to see if your state offers a free plan.

     

  • EMERGENCIES

    Money

    Stash a Little Cash

    Stuff happens—stuff that costs money. Your car might break down… or a friend might invite you to his spur-of-the-moment Vegas wedding. Be ready without having to fall back on a credit card you can’t pay off.

    The plan: An emergency fund of about $1,000 is enough for you, says Barzideh. Set a little money aside from any graduation checks you might receive, and add $50 or so a month into a bank account—one that’s separate from your day-to-day account, so you won’t be tempted to raid it for everyday needs.

    Handy tool: Keep your money in an online bank like Ally.com. There’s no minimum balance or monthly fee; the interest rate is now 0.99%.

  • SAVINGS

    Money

    Get Richer Now

    You too can be a millionaire later in life. The earlier you start saving, the easier it is, and the more freedom you’ll have later on. “You don’t know what choices you’ll be considering in 20 or 30 years, but you do want to have choices,” says Brenda Cude, a professor of financial planning at the University of Georgia.

    The plan: The best place to save long term is in a 401(k) retirement savings plan, offered by employers of nearly 80% of workers. You aren’t taxed on the money you put in that 401(k), and it grows tax-free over the years (you’ll pay taxes on withdrawals). Most employers will match a portion of your contributions, typically 50¢ for every dollar on the first 6% of pay. Start small, putting aside $50 or $100 a month.

    If you don’t have a 401(k), you can put up to $5,500 this year in an individual retirement account called a Roth IRA, where your investments will grow tax-free. (You can open one up through any major fund company, such as Vanguard, Fidelity, or T. Rowe Price.) You get no upfront tax break, but you won’t be taxed when you take money out. And that’s good, since your tax rate will probably be higher later on than it is now.

    Wherever you save, the best starter investment is a mutual fund called a target-date fund. It will give you, in a single investment, a package of stocks and bonds that’s right for your age.

MONEY Workplace

9 Ways to Make More Money at Work

150428_CAR_BuildWealthAtWork
Jamie Kripke—Corbis

Career strategies for every stage.

Even if you’re not among the super-savers who are on their way to becoming 401(k) millionaires, there are plenty of ways to build wealth on the job. Whether you’re just starting out, in your peak earning years, or planning a career second act, here are 9 ways to fatten your paycheck.

1. Begin your career in a wealth-building city. To maximize your earning potential, minimize the amount you spend on housing—for most people the largest chunk of their monthly budget. According to Zillow.com, three metro areas where job growth exceeds the median 1.3% and housing costs are below the typical 2.9 times income are Dallas (job growth 3.3%, housing costs 2.5x income); Atlanta (job growth 2.4%, housing cost: 2.7x income), and Indianapolis (job growth 2%, housing costs 2.4x income). Plus, these are great places to live: Dallas suburb McKinney and metro Indianapolis both made it onto MONEY’s annual list of the best places to live, while Atlanta is home to the headquarters of Fortune 500 companies including Coca-Cola and UPS.

2. Don’t wait for a performance review to ask for a raise. Most companies do performance reviews in February or March—but set budgets before the end of the prior year. If you can make the case for a raise, start the conversation no later than December.

3. Lead with the dollars. You are more likely to get a raise, and a higher one at that, when you say what you want first and explain why you deserve it second. “It sounds like a trivial difference, but it produces a significantly different outcome,” says negotiations expert Robin Pinkley of Southern Methodist University. You’ll also do better if you couch your request in a range. Asking for an extra $5,000 to $7,000 a year beats plain old $5,000. You’ll seem cooperative and flexible—and make it harder for the boss to return with a lowball counteroffer, according to a new study by Daniel Ames and Malia Mason of Columbia University.

4. Become a free agent. Workers may get 3% raises in 2015, but execs who jump ship can expect 15%, says the executive search firm Salveson-Stetson Group. A raise like that at the age of 40 can boost lifetime income by 9%.

5. Repackage yourself. When you were starting out, you may have played up your full work history. As you advance in your career, tailor your résumé to experiences that speak to a specific job—for instance, how you boosted sales at your last position, says Marcelle Yeager, president of Career Valet. Also, put education credentials at the bottom, says professional résumé writer Dawn Bugni. That you got a bachelor’s degree 20 years ago doesn’t mean that much now.

6. Automate your job search. There are simple ways you can help prospective employers find you with little effort. For starters, make it easy for hiring managers to spot you by filling your LinkedIn profile with keywords associated with the type of job you want. The service will make suggestions for you, but look at job listings posted on the site by companies you want to work for to see what keywords they use as well. Also, sign up for the anonymous job site Poachable, and download the app Poacht.

7. Climb one more rung. After 45, only the top 2% of earners see real continued wage growth, on average. So it’s time to gun for one more big promotion. For example, while the median salary for a software engineer is $76,000, senior engineers can expect $101,000, according to payScale.com.

8. Switch ladders. Didn’t snag the pay you deserve? With the economy adding 266,000 jobs a month, you have options. After giving notice, arrange a friendly exit interview with the boss—her endorsement will be valuable in the next switch.

9. Have a Plan B. Your middle years are crucial savings years, but perilous careerwise. On average, unemployed Americans 55 to 64 have been jobless for 11 months. so lay the groundwork for a backup plan—whether it’s a short-term project, freelancing, or a business idea.

Adapted from “101 Ways to Build Wealth,” by Daniel Bortz, Kara Brandeisky, Paul J. Lim, and Taylor Tepper, which originally appeared in the May 2015 issue of MONEY magazine.

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TIME Careers

Women Earn 24% Less Than Men on Average, U.N. Report Finds

New report shows gender pay gap remains sizeable

Women are still earning significantly less money than men, despite working longer hours when paid and unpaid work is taken into account, a new U.N. report reveals.

The U.N. Women report shows that even though more women are in the workplace and taking on leadership positions worldwide, pay levels are nowhere near reaching equality worldwide. On average women around the world earn 24% less than men, the report says, and earn just half of the income men earn over a lifetime. Women in South Asia experience the greatest gender pay gap, earning 33% less than men. The Middle East and North Africa have a 14% pay gap.

Women do nearly 2½ times more unpaid and domestic work compared with men and are less likely to receive a pension. Only half of working-age women are in the workforce compared to three-fourths of working-age men.

As a solution, the report suggests creating an economy that prioritizes women’s needs. It provides 10 recommendations for governments and other key players to adopt, such as creating more and better jobs for women, reducing occupational segregation, and establishing benchmarks to assess progress in women’s economic and social rights.

TIME Business

A Brief History of Secretaries

Toni Kari
Phil Slattery—Post Archive/Getty Images Toni Kari, who won the title of "Secretary of the Year" of the Denver Chapter of the National Secretaries Association, in 1964, on Jan. 24, 1964, in Denver

On Administrative Professionals Day, a look back at the 'secretary shortage' of 1957 and 'rebel secretaries' of the 1970s

When offices around the United States celebrate Administrative Professionals Day on Wednesday, they’ll be following the lead of more than six decades of businesses. According to the International Association of Administrative Professionals — formerly the National Secretaries Association — the day started as a 1952 celebration of National Secretaries Week; as of 2000, that celebration has been dubbed Administrative Professionals Week.

And in the ’50s, when the first such celebration took place, there was good reason for the American businessman (he was nearly always a man) to want to thank his secretary (nearly always a woman).

As TIME reported in a 1957 article about “The Secretary Shortage: They’re Either Too Pretty or Too Old,” the record number of women entering the workplace during that decade was not translating to a surplus of stenographers. The young, unmarried cohort that had traditionally served as secretaries was particularly small, due to the Depression-era birth-rate decline, and booming post-war business meant that demand was up. In addition, the opening up of a wide range of jobs to female workers meant that the women who were available for jobs were less likely to choose repetitive secretarial work. (Not that being a secretary was always boring: in a 1954 paean to the magazine’s administrative workers, TIME’s publisher praised bureau secretaries for being able to speak multiple languages, take dictation on two separate stories at once by using both hands — really! — and organize complicated international shipments for war photographers.)

Businesses tried a variety of tactics to change their minds, according to TIME:

Across the country businessmen beg for secretaries with bristling columns of help-wanted ads, promising prestige (“Your Own Office!”), or glamour (“Handle TV Stars!”), or romance (“Young Execs!”). Many big companies, whose long-set salary and seniority schedules make them less attractive than higher-paying small companies, try to make up the difference with a long string of fringe benefits. After a survey of several score firms in the New York area, the Commerce and Industry Association of New York reported that 78.1% offer profit-sharing plans, 52.7% pay full costs for employees’ health and accident insurance. But only the most exquisite melding of money, kindness and men leaves a girl impressed. “Fringe benefits are such old hat,” says one employment agent, “that the girls just want to know how many they’re getting—not if there are any.”

At the time, the magazine guessed at the maturation of the Baby Boom generation would mean that, given another decade, supply and demand would sort themselves out.

And yes, by the late ’60s there were more 20-something working women than there had been a decade earlier — but that wasn’t all that had changed. In fact, TIME articles about secretaries of the 1970s are also about the work shortage, despite what was at the time a high unemployment rate. Attitudes toward secretarial work hadn’t caught up with the rise of Women’s Liberation: Secretaries were thought to get little credit for their work and few opportunities to advance. Those young, educated women who had once been lured in with the promise of “Young Execs!” were giving it a pass.

As TIME reported in 1972, under the headline “Rebel Secretaries,” things were changing:

Last week, responding to complaints from employees, the U.S. State Department ordered its executives to stop treating secretaries as “char help,” to show a little more diplomacy toward them and to encourage independent secretarial decision making. Officials warned especially against the “reliable-old-shoe syndrome,” in which secretaries are assumed to be content with the same duties throughout their career while almost everyone else moves up.

…This week a group of New York City secretaries, backed by members of the National Organization of Women, plans to picket the headquarters of Olivetti Corp., which is running ads that infuriate feminists. The ads promote “brainy” typewriters that are supposed to eliminate some typing errors made by dippy-looking secretaries, who presumably lack the brains to avoid them in the first place. In the TV commercial, the secretary is shown as a vacuous sex kitten who finds that she can attract men by becoming “an Olivetti girl.”

More and more secretaries, like airline stewardesses, are rebelling against being viewed as objects of vicarious sexual pleasure (or being called “dear” and “honey” by men in the office). Linda Lervold, a secretary at a Manhattan ad agency, complains about an office “hotpants party” at which women employees were invited to “show their wares.” A N.O.W. member, Miss Lervold attended wearing distinctly unsexy culottes and gave the host, a vice president, a pair of men’s hot pants. “I don’t think anybody at the party got the point,” she laments.

But, one way or another, the message got through. At the time, the National Secretaries Association counted that half of its members had aspirations of using their jobs to work toward management positions; accordingly, training courses were moving beyond shorthand to include topics like accounting.

And, as computers became a regular presence at the average office, the typing and filing that had once filled a secretary’s days diminished, leaving room for much more and varied work — a change that eventually created the administrative professional role we’re familiar with today.

Read the 1972 report, from a special issue about the American woman, here in the TIME Vault: Rebel Secretaries

MONEY job search

4 Job Interview Takeaways From College Senior’s Facebook Rant

Elizabeth Bentivegna
Elizabeth Bentivegna in the outfit she wore to an interview at a Cleveland tech company. She says a recruiter told her it looked like she was ready to go "clubbing."

An Oberlin College student's Facebook post about the reason she believes a tech company cut her from its job applicant pool has ignited a firestorm of comment about proper interview attire and etiquette. Here's what you can learn from the incident.

An Oberlin College senior named Elizabeth Bentivegna recently vented in a Facebook post about being rejected for a programming job at a Cleveland software company. Specifically, she was outraged by what she feels is sexism in the tech industry, and her post has sparked fierce debate online about whether there are different standards for men and women and just what is appropriate conduct during and after a job interview.

As reported in the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Bentivegna said that a recruiter contacted her for the position, and after she interviewed with the tech company, passed along the feedback that she didn’t appear “put-together.”

“She said they’d love to hire me based on my technical ability and my personality, but were not going to because A: I looked like I was about to go clubbing and not be on an interview, B: I had a huge run in my tights and C: I was late. And I told them I was going to be late,” Bentivegna told the Plain Dealer.

The company said in prepared statement that Bentivegna was passed over for the job because they had more qualified applicants, not because of her appearance.

Regardless of gender—or your opinion on Bentivegna’s choice of interview outfit—there are a couple things every young person entering the job market can learn from this incident, says New York career coach Roy Cohen. Here are some takeaways.

1. Plan Your Outfit Carefully

Rather than going with your gut or an outfit that has worked for previous summer job interviews, research what type of interview attire is considered standard for the industry you’re looking to break into. Even if you know your industry or this company is more jeans and T-shirt than suit and tie, err on the conservative side with your fashion picks.

If you are working with a recruiter, ask for her advice. “Say: ‘I’m excited for the chance to interview and want to make the best possible impression, do you have any recommendations on interview attire?'” Cohen suggests. Alternatively, you can always seek guidance from your college’s career services center on how to prepare. You can even wear the outfit you’ve got in mind to your meeting with career services as a way of vetting it beforehand.

(For more tips on how to avoid making work-wear mistakes, see our summertime office ensemble guide.)

2. Be On Time

Just because a recruiter or company suggests an interview time does not mean you are beholden to it. If other engagements, say class or another job, conflict or overlap with the time they’ve slotted, simply explain why that time will not work and suggest an alternate time during typical business hours, Cohen recommends. Don’t hurt your prospects unnecessarily by scheduling the interview too closely to other engagements either. Give yourself space to deal with a traffic jam or whatever else life may throw at you.

3. Stay Off Social Media

It’s OK to post in celebration of landing a new gig. But ranting about a rejection or unfairness could lead you to make a career-destroying blunder as these social media users did.

If an interview experience goes poorly or you receive criticism from an employer or recruiter, keep your venting offline. Tell it to a friend. Write it in a journal. “No matter how the interview goes, if you post about an organization, you need to keep it positive. If you have nothing nice to say, it’s better to say nothing at all,” says Cohen. “Venting in that kind of public way could easily tarnish your reputation and raises issues concerning your temper, judgment, and loyalty in the eyes of future employers who fear a similar treatment.”

If you’ve already posted such a rant, purge it from your history. Hiring managers and the Internet have a way of uncovering your entire online identity, even those stupid offhand comments you may have made six years ago. If you don’t remember whether your web history includes such a venting session or something more offensive, a new app called Clear promises to search your social media accounts and flag anything questionable, then delete it.

4. Bounce Back from Rejection

“Feedback is always valuable. We can use it to become smarter interviewers and gain insight into how we are being perceived,” says Cohen. “We can’t personalize every rejection, it would distort our own value. After all, companies have to reject someone.”

But if you do feel the company misjudged you, maybe because of an outfit or a timing issue beyond your control, respond by sending the appropriate person at the company a thoughtful note expressing your disappointment at not being selected. Don’t challenge them on the reasons they or the recruiter might have given for the decision. Instead, outline the value you can add to the company once more and request another interview opportunity. You can also always ask to be kept in mind for any future openings.

Read Next: 5 Ways Women in Tech Can Beat the Odds

 

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