TIME technology

Teens Hack Into ATM Just to Let Everyone Know They Can

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Getty Images

They don't steal any money. Instead, they kindly inform the bank that it should tighten up its security

A pair of Canadian high schoolers decided to spend their lunch hour finding out if they could successfully hack into a nearby Bank of Montreal ATM. Turns out they totally could.

“We thought it would be fun to try it, but we were not expecting it to work,” one of the hackers, Matthew Hewlett, told the Winnipeg Sun. “When it did, it asked for a password.”

But the boys were so polite that once they gained control of the machine, they didn’t steal any money — instead, they went inside to inform the bank about the little security problem. Staff members didn’t believe them, so they went back to the machine to get proof. They printed off documentation about withdrawals, and even changed the surcharge amount to one cent.

The boys did manage to have a bit of fun, though. They changed the ATM’s home screen greeting from “Welcome to the BMO ATM” to “Go away. This ATM has been hacked.”

Eventually, the branch manager came out to chat with the teens and essentially treat them as one-time security consultants. Then he sent them back to school with a note excusing their tardiness because oh yeah they’re in high school and yet they’re so much smarter and more helpful than most adults we know.

(h/t Betabeat)

TIME Canada

3 Men Commandeer Chopper in Daring Prison Escape

Prisoners escape
Police cars are seen in front of the Orsainville Detention Center near Quebec City on Saturday, June 7, 2014. Three inmates have escaped from the center with the help of a helicopter, police said late Saturday. Francis Vachon—AP

The men were arrested on drug charges in 2010 and escaped in a helicopter parked in the detention center's courtyard

Three men hightailed out of a Canadian prison Saturday night via helicopter in a daring stunt that could only have been inspired by a Hollywood action flick.

Yves Denis Yvon Lamontagne, 35, Denis Lefebvre, 53, and Serge Pomerleau, 49 were being held in a detention center in Quebec City at the time of their flight, CNN reports.

“A helicopter touched down briefly in the courtyard before taking off with the three prisoners,” Ann Mathieu, a spokeswoman for Quebec Provincial Police, told CNN.

The men were arrested in a 2010 drug bust and were awaiting trial at the time of their escape. Weapons, dozens of cars and a plane were found during the bust. A massive manhunt is underway to find the three men.

[CNN]

TIME Canada

Canadian Boy Found Locked in Filthy Bedroom for Up to 2 Years

His caretakers, and aunt and uncle, have been arrested

A 10-year-old Canadian boy was found imprisoned in a filthy bedroom where he had been kept for at least a year-and-a-half, police said Friday.

The boy was discovered by police in the city of London, Ontario, after authorities acted on a tip. Upon investigation, police said they believe the child was kept locked in the room for between a-year-and-a-half to two years.

“The master bedroom had an ensuite bathroom so the child had access to a toilet and shower however the room, and the entire house, was in squalid condition,” a police statement said.

The 10-year-old was diagnosed as being underweight and malnourished, and turned over to the care of the Children’s Aid Society.

The boy’s guardians, his aunt and uncle, have been arrested. Their biological child has been taken into custody as well, though there is no indication, police said, that that child had been locked away in the house.

TIME Canada

Kidnapped Baby Found ‘Thanks to Facebook’

A woman has been arrested for kidnapping a newborn baby from a Canadian hospital after a Facebook user recognized the suspect from an alert that went viral on social media

A baby that was kidnapped Monday in Canada has been found thanks to four Facebook users.

Newborn infant Victoria was abducted from hospital in in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, by a young woman disguised in a nurse’s uniform. Alerts by the local police, featuring details of the suspect’s vehicle, together with a security image of her, went viral on Facebook and Twitter. A Facebook user thought she recognized her former neighbor in the picture and decided to drive, together with three friends, to the former neighbor’s apartment building. They found the wanted car parked outside and called the police.

One of the friends, Mélizanne Bergeron, told Canadian public broadcaster CBC, “The patio door was open. The lights were on. It was clear that she was there.”

The police arrived on the scene within minutes and found the suspect and the unharmed baby.

In an emotional Facebook update, the mother of the child described how she and her husband lived through “the worst time of their lives” until their baby was found.

“Four wonderful people, who we’ve had the chance to meet, identified this woman thanks to Facebook. It is the only reason that explains why Victoria is in my arms at this time,” Mélissa McMahon wrote in a Facebook update that has been shared more than 20,000 times, before going on to thank people who shared and retweeted the police alerts.

“In less than an hour, the photo [of the suspect] was everywhere … You were among the more than thousands of people who shared the photo of this woman on social media … Know that it was this that saved her, our little Victoria. Every click, every share made the difference.”

The suspect is in custody and has been hospitalized for mental evaluation. The hospital where the baby was kidnapped has issued a statement saying risk-assessment experts will analyze the incident to prevent similar cases in the future.

TIME World

Memorial Day, Remembrance Sunday and Armed Forces Day: How 9 Other Countries Remember Their Fallen Troops

Fields Of Remembrance Poppies Ahead of Sunday's Service
Crosses with Remembrance Poppies, worn during Remembrance Day in Britain. Cate Gillon—Getty Images

As America observes Memorial Day, here’s how other countries around the world honor their fallen.

Americans remember the men and women of its armed forces who have died in service every year on Memorial Day, always the last Monday in May. Heralding the beginning of summer in the U.S., Memorial Day is an official national holiday that has its roots in the memorials for fallen soldiers in after the American Civil War, still the country’s deadliest conflict.

In other countries around the world, Memorial Day-style observances are rooted in an even deadlier fight — The First World War. World War I, which began a hundred years ago and became one of the deadliest conflicts in history, spawned national memorials throughout the British Commonwealth and elsewhere (in the U.S., the end of the war is commemorated with Veterans Day, formerly Armistice Day). In still other countries, a memorial holiday remembers the war dead of more recent conflicts.

Here’s how countries around the world honor their fallen:

Britain

The United Kingdom observes Remembrance Sunday with ceremonies across the country on the Sunday nearest to November 11, the day Germany signed the armistice ending World War I hostilities. Today, the day memorializes fallen British soldiers in all conflicts since the Great War. On November 11 at 11 a.m.—the time of the signing of the armistice—the UK holds a two-minute silence. “Remembrance poppies” are worn and displayed as per a tradition inspired by the Canadian poet John McCrae’s “In Flanders Fields:”

In Flanders’ fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place: and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

South Korea

South Koreans observe Memorial Day on June 6, the same month that the Korean War began, to honor servicemen and civilians who have died for their country. The nation holds a one-minute silence at 10 a.m.

France

Armistice Day in France is solemnly observed on Nov. 11 with ceremonies, special church services and poppy adornments. In recent years, the holiday has come to recognize all of the country’s war dead in addition to the 1.4 million people killed in the First World War.

New Zealand and Australia

Anzac Day on April 25 commemorates New Zealand and Australia’s servicemen and women who have died. The day, which stands for “Australian and New Zealand Army Corps,” falls on the anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli, the first major military action by both forces in the First World War in a campaign that would fuel the building of a national consciousness in both countries.

Turkey

Turkey observes Martyrs’ Day on March 18, the anniversary of a major victory against the Allied Powers during the Gallipoli Campaign. The day is used today to commemorate Turks who have died for the country.

Nigeria

Nigeria formerly observed Armed Forces Remembrance Day on Nov. 11 as a member of the commonwealth. But it has since moved the date to Jan. 15, 1970 to commemorate the end of the country’s civil war.

Italy

Italy observes National Unity and Armed Forces Day on November 4, the date Austria-Hungary surrendered to the Italians in 1918. The day is accompanied by ceremonies commemorating members of the armed forces killed in action.

Canada

Remembrance Day in Canada, a national holiday on Nov. 11, commemorates Canada’s servicemen and women. At 11 a.m., the country holds a two minute silence in memory of those who perished.

TIME animals

Watch a Mama Bear Rescue Her Baby Cub From a Busy Freeway

Fulfilling all stereotypes

This video shows a Mama Bear doing what Mama Bears do best: saving her cub.

Tornado hunter Ricky Forbes doesn’t only have your new dream job, but he also captured pretty incredible footage of a black bear cub getting pulled off the highway outside of British Columbia’s Kootenay National Park.

TIME celebrities

Justin Bieber is Being Investigated for Attempted Robbery

Justin Bieber performs at Staples Center on June 24, 2013 in Los Angeles.
Justin Bieber performs at Staples Center on June 24, 2013 in Los Angeles. Jeff Kravitz—FilmMagic/Getty Images

Authorities in Los Angeles are investigating an attempted robbery claim levied against Canadian singer Justin Bieber, whose run-ins with the law frequently make international headlines, over an allegation that he attempted to steal a cell phone

Beliebe it or not, but Canadian pop star turned bad boy Justin Bieber appears to be enmeshed in another brush with the law.

The LAPD is investigating an allegation that the singer attempted to steal a mobile phone in the Los Angeles area on Monday, according to MSN.

Police confirm that they have interviewed the victim of the alleged incident; however, Bieber has so far not been taken in for questioning.

Monday’s episode is just the latest in a long string of scrapes with law enforcement Beiber has been involved in during the past year.

In February, the pop sensation was charged with assaulting a driver in Toronto and is set to appear in a Miami court this summer on charges of driving under the influence.

TIME Canada

Rob Ford: Rehab is Like Football Camp

CANADA-VOTE-FORD
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford speaks during the kick off of his re-election campaign at a rally in the city's north end April 17, 2014. Ford, who made worldwide headlines last year after admitting binge drinking and smoking crack, has been stripped of most of his powers. AFP PHOTO / GEOFF ROBINS GEOFF ROBINS—AFP/Getty Images

Rob Ford loves rehab and can't wait to get back and run for another term as mayor

Rob Ford thinks “rehab is amazing.” It reminds him of football camp.

The Toronto mayor, who has admitted to smoking crack and heavy drinking, is taking a leave of absence to rehabilitate after one-too-many public scenes. The treatment center reminds Ford of camp, “kind of like the Washington Redskins camp I went to as a kid,” he said in an interview with the Toronto Sun.

Ford spoke about the effect substance abuse has had on him. “I think alcohol is the worst drug of all. It makes you do things that you would never do or say things that you wouldn’t,” he said.

Ford is also apparently still intent on running for a second term as mayor this year. “Of course, I am coming back and I am going to kick butt,” he said.

[Toronto Sun]

TIME Arts

Toronto Symphony Orchestra Plays a Delightful Drake Medley

The symphonic mashup of "All Me" and "Trophies" you never knew you needed

Even the Toronto Symphony Orchestra decided to get into the NBA playoffs spirit this year. A few members got together to show their support for their city’s Raptors with a special rendition of two songs by Drake, who happens to be the world’s preeminent Raptors fan and Toronto native.

The video — simply titled “Go Raptors!” — features seven musicians performing “All Me” and “Trophies.” Of course, it was recorded before the Raptors got bumped from the playoffs Sunday.

These musicians certainly put a unique spin on Drake’s songs. We can only hope that he’ll take a break from lint-rolling his pants to watch this mashup.

TIME Congress

U.S. Struggles in Building a Bridge to Somewhere

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson walks to a hearing room to answer questions before a closed meeting of the Senate Homeland Security Committee in Washington, D.C., on April 1, 2014.
Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson walks to a hearing room to answer questions before a closed meeting of the Senate Homeland Security Committee in Washington, D.C., on April 1, 2014. Cliff Owen—AP

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson will travel to Detroit on Friday to discuss a bridge to Canada that is expected to increase trade with the U.S. But infrastructure spending is a tough sell in a Tea-party influenced Congress

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson is expected to travel to Detroit on Friday, where he’ll spend the morning meeting with local groups about a bridge to Canada. An as-of-yet unbuilt bridge to Canada.

The bridge, which would augment an 85-year-old private bridge already in existence, was proposed years ago. It is expected to expand trade between the two nations. Already one-third of all goods passing between the U.S. and Canada go over the existing bridge. A second bridge is expected to boost that number and ease congestion. The Obama Administration issued the construction permit in 2013 and Canada has already said it will front most of the $1-billion price tag, with Michigan paying Canada back its share after the bridge—and tollbooth—are already opened.

So what’s the hang up? The $250-million tollbooth and customs plaza.

In an era after the Bridge to Nowhere made famous by Sarah Palin, spending on infrastructure is not the easiest legislation to get through the Tea Party-influenced Congress—even though this bridge clearly goes somewhere, and has the support of Michigan Republican Gov. Rick Snyder. Highlighting just how unenthusiastic this Congress is about infrastructure spending, there’s no deal in sight for how to fill an $8 billion to $12 billion hole in transportation funding that will run dry by the end of August.

The proposed bridge falls under the Department of Homeland Security’s budget since it would be a border connection. Johnson has discretion, to some degree, over his budget and could allocate some of the money without Congress. Meanwhile, Rep. Gary Peters, a Michigan Democrat, has introduced legislation, as part of the 2015 appropriations process, to get the tollbooth built. “I just keep trying to build support,” Peters, who has four co-sponsors thus far, though no Republicans yet, told TIME. “I’m working to have it taken up and get a hearing as quickly as possible. And with Secretary Johnson’s visit, it’s important to lay the groundwork with the Department of Homeland Security. I appreciate how important it is, not just for the Midwest but the country, in terms of our trade with Canada.”

Canada, for its part, has been aggressively pushing the bridge. And between the stalled bridge and the ever-delayed Keystone XL Pipeline, Canadians are starting to wonder if relations with the U.S. are imperiled. “The government of Canada is concerned about the vulnerability of that trade and the jobs it sustains in both our countries,” Canadian Transport Minister Lisa Raitt told a NAFTAnext summit in Chicago in late April.

Raitt warned Canadians against reading too much into the stalling of two of Canada’s top priorities with the U.S. After all, she noted, the pipeline has been stalled by Obama’s Democratic Administration, while the bridge funding has been blocked by the Republican House. “The United States tends not to link things,” she said. “And the Canadians are quick to think about linking things.”

Still, Raitt hasn’t ruled out Canada eventually paying for the U.S. customs booth if the U.S. continues to drag its feet. “We are committed to paying its fair share and we expect, as well too, that the United States pay and be responsible for its share,” she said in Ottawa last month. “But we will continue to talk with our partners in the U.S. and we will continue to work on this bridge.”

Because when America isn’t building bridges to nowhere, or somewhere, it’s burning them.

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