TIME Know Right Now

Know Right Now: Here Comes the Apple Watch

Apple is hosting a live Apple Watch event on Monday, March 9th at 10am PT in Cupertino, Calif., and fans of the company are already buzzing about what CEO Tim Cook will have to say.

Watch #KnowRightNow for a preview of what you can expect from the big event.

TIME medicine

Chain of Kidney Transplants Begins at San Francisco Hospital

Kidney donor Zully Broussard speaks at California Pacific Medical Center on March 4, 2015 in San Francisco
Leah Millis—AP Kidney donor Zully Broussard speaks at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco on March 4, 2015

This is the largest kidney-donation chain in the transplant center's history

(SAN FRANCISCO) — Zully Broussard thought she was going to help one person by donating a kidney.

Instead, she helped six.

The Sacramento woman’s donation to a Benicia man set off an organ swap that resulted in five more sick people getting new kidneys at a San Francisco hospital. Three transplants were completed Thursday, and the remaining three will be done Friday.

“I thought I was going to help this one person who I don’t know. But the fact that so many people can have a life extension, that’s pretty big,” Broussard said.

Domino-like kidney swaps are still relatively new, but they are becoming increasingly common.

With a total of a dozen patients and donors, this week’s surgeries at the California Pacific Medical Center represent the largest kidney donation chain in its transplant center’s 44-year history, hospital spokesman Dean Fryer said. The patients at are between 24 to 70 years old, and most of them are from the San Francisco Bay Area.

Transplant chains are an option when donors are incompatible with relatives or friends who need kidneys.

In this case, six donors are instead giving kidneys to strangers found through a software matching program developed by 59-year-old David Jacobs, a kidney recipient whose brother died of kidney failure. Its algorithmic program finds potential matches using a person’s genetic profile.

Jacobs, of San Francisco, said he understands firsthand the despair of waiting for a deceased donor.

“Some of these people might have waited forever and never got the kidney,” he said. “But because of the magic of this technology and the one altruistic donor, she was able to save six lives in 24 hours.”

Fewer than 17,000 kidney transplants are performed in the U.S. each year, and between 5,000 and 6,000 are from living donors, considered the optimal kind.

Kidney swaps are considered one of the best bets at increasing live-donor transplants, and they are becoming more common as transplant centers form alliances to share willing patient-donor pairs. The United Network for Organ Sharing has a national pilot program underway.

In 2001, Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, performed a transplant chain that started as a two-way kidney exchange and grew to 30 pairs.

Jacobs’ kidneys failed in early 2000 from a genetic disease. In late 2003, a living unrelated donor provided an organ for a transplant.

A new chance at life got him thinking.

“I talked to my doctor about kidney-paired donation. He was excited about the idea but didn’t know how to do it,” he recalled. “I was a tech person. I’ve been in technology my whole professional career. I thought of it as an enterprise software problem I could solve.”

He said the two months he imagined it would take to take to develop the software stretched into six years.

The National Kidney Foundation reports more than 100,000 people in the United States are awaiting kidneys, and 12 people die a day while waiting.

Broussard said her son died of cancer 13 years ago and her husband passed away 14 months ago, also from cancer.

Asked why she volunteered to donate a kidney to a stranger, the 55-year-old said: “I know what it feels like to want an extra day.”

TIME Education

California Teacher Found Hanging Knew Suicide’s Devastation

A photo of El Dorado High School teacher Jillian Jacobson is displayed near a gate, March 3, 2015, at the school in Fullerton, Calif.
Nick Ut—AP A photo of El Dorado High School teacher Jillian Jacobson is displayed near a gate, at the school in Fullerton, Calif., on March 3, 2015

Teacher's father also committed suicide four years ago

(PLACENTIA, Calif.) — The Southern California teacher whose students found her hanging from her classroom ceiling knew the devastating effects of suicide: Her own father went missing and was found dead with a bullet wound to his head after committing suicide nearly four years earlier.

Jillian Jacobson, 31, had spoken with students about her father’s suicide and had counseled one class of students just a few weeks ago, saying if they ever felt down, they should ask for help.

Jacobson did a weeklong unit on depression for freshmen, emphasizing that suicide wasn’t the answer to anyone’s problems and it affected many people greatly.

On Monday, students arriving to their morning photography class found the door to Jacobson’s room locked. Thinking their teacher was late, the students asked another teacher to unlock the door. When they opened it, they found Jacobson hanging from the ceiling.

Two school staff members got her down while another worker called 911.

“We have a teacher that’s down,” the caller said in a hurried voice.

“Do you know if they’re breathing?” the 911 dispatcher said.

“All I know is another teacher called crying and security is just saying, ‘Get them down here fast,'” said the caller, identified only as Melanie.

Paramedics arrived to find Jacobson in full cardiac arrest, and they were unable to resuscitate her. Police are calling Jacobson’s death a suicide, though no note was found and detectives are not releasing any information on what may have troubled the popular teacher.

Jacobson’s stunning death stood in stark contrast to the teacher students said they knew. They described her as someone cheerful and trusted who inspired in many a love of photography. She lived in nearby Anaheim in a quaint, gray home with a white picket fence.

Yet Jacobson had also experienced significant hardship in recent years. In 2011, her father went missing after leaving his job. Richard Prisbrey, 55, was found two days later, near his car in an isolated desert area more than an hour away. A coroner’s report ruled his death a suicide.

It was an event that students said clearly troubled Jacobson, but she kept her composure and didn’t get emotional when she talked about it with her class. No one could point to any recent warning signs that she was distressed, though one student noted that she lost a lot of weight.

After Monday’s stunning discovery, shock emanated throughout the school.

Alexandra Sanchez, 18, recalled how her teacher left the room and then came back, flustered, and told the class, “Mrs. Jacobson just hung herself.” The classroom went numb.

“It was silent,” she said. “A shock and silence.”

Later, students were escorted into the gym and a police officer told them Jacobson had committed suicide, but that there was no other information.

Monday evening, 500 students gathered outside the school’s gate, lighting candles and leaving written tributes for their teacher. On Tuesday, the candles remained at the site, a few still burning.

Assistant Superintendent Candy Plahy said the students who saw the hanging scene are being closely monitored and provided special counseling.

“These are kids who were particularly close to this teacher,” Plahy said. “Coming in and finding your teacher is no longer alive is traumatic. They need support.”

In their first-period class Tuesday, a school administrator delivered an announcement on the loudspeaker, saying they would all miss Jacobson and had to stay united.

Several students said they were confused and didn’t know how to process the information. Others couldn’t stop replaying the events in their heads. Later, in classes, teachers told students it was OK to feel mad or upset and encouraged them to talk with counselors.

Some students asked questions. Others remained silent.

“Everybody was sad,” Sanchez said.

Jillian Jacobson’s classroom door was locked, a picture of the smiling brunette placed out front along with notes and flowers.

Plahy said the classroom is expected to remain closed for the rest of the year.

Read next: Feds Raid California ‘Maternity Hotels’ for Birth Tourists

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Crime

Feds Raid California ‘Maternity Hotels’ for Birth Tourists

Federal agents walk past the Carlyle Apartments, the location of a suspected "baby tourism operation," in Irvine, Calif. on March 3, 2015.
Bob Riha Jr.—Reuters Federal agents walk past the Carlyle Apartments, the location of a suspected "baby tourism operation," in Irvine, Calif. on March 3, 2015.

The crackdown marked the first large-scale federal probe of birth-tourism in the U.S.

Southern California apartment complexes that doubled as “maternity hotels” for Chinese women who want made-in-America babies were raided early Tuesday, capping an unprecedented federal sting operation, officials said.

NBC News was on the scene as Homeland Security agents swept into The Carlyle, a luxury property in Irvine, California, which housed pregnant women and new moms who allegedly forked over $40,000 to $80,000 to give birth in the United States.

“I am doing this for the education of the next generation,” one of the women told NBC News.

None of the women were arrested; they are being treated as material witnesses, and paramedics…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

MONEY Gas

Where Gas Prices Shot Up Nearly $1 Per Gallon in One Month

A cyclist rides by a sign at a gas station in Los Angeles posting the latest gas prices on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. Gas prices in California soared overnight as a result of a combination of supply-and-demand factors worsened by the shutdown of two refineries that produce a combined 16 percent of the state’s gasoline.
Nick Ut—AP A cyclist rides by a sign at a gas station in Los Angeles posting the latest gas prices on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015.

Everyone is paying more at the pump lately. But California drivers have seen gas prices soar at an unbelievably fast pace.

In mid-January 2015, the national average for regular gasoline was $2.03 per gallon, and there seemed to be a strong possibility that gas stations would average under $2 nationally within weeks, or even days. Instead, that period marked what appears to be the bottoming out of the cheap gas era. After four months of consistently plummeting fuel costs, drivers began seeing gas prices inch up steadily—and then spike very recently.

Over the past week, the national average has crept up 2¢ daily, from $2.33 to $2.47 as of Monday, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. AAA data indicates that gas prices have risen 35 days in a row, for a total rise of 39¢ nationally.

While all drivers are paying more for gas than they did in the very recent past—more than a dozen states were averaging under $2 per gallon a month ago, but none are today—California has experienced an extraordinarily fast hike in prices at the pump. Apparently, an explosion at one oil refinery in the state brought about enough of a decrease in supply to send gas prices skyrocketing.

As of Tuesday, the average in California for a gallon of regular was $3.41, a rise of 96¢ over the past month and 43¢ during the last week alone. Nationally, gas prices are averaging a full $1 less than they were one year ago, even after the recent pricing surge. But in California, prices are only 45¢ cheaper than they were exactly 12 months ago, when the average was $3.86.

All signs indicate that drivers in California and all over the country will continue to be hit with rising gas prices. GasBuddy analysts forecast that prices will increase steadily during the next six to eight weeks, and AAA is predicting, “the national average price of gas could rise by 20 cents per gallon or more in March” alone.

Still, to put things in perspective, let’s not forget that gas prices averaged well over $3 nationally for entire years, and it seemed like a very big deal when the average dipped under $3 last fall.

“The good news is that most U.S. drivers should still pay less than $3 per gallon to fill up their cars this year,” AAA spokesperson Avery Ash said this week.

Not if you’re in California though.

TIME Crime

Parents Sue County, Landlord Over Santa Barbara Rampage

In this May 25, 2014 photo, images of Christopher Martinez are displayed during a memorial in in Isla Vista, Calif.
Chris Carlson—AP Images of Christopher Martinez are displayed during a memorial in in Isla Vista, Calif., on May 25, 2014

Parents of three victims of a deadly rampage are suing the county, the sheriff's department and an apartment building company where the killer lived

(LOS ANGELES) — The parents of the first three victims of a deadly rampage in Santa Barbara last year are suing the county, the Sheriff’s Department and the apartment building where the killer lived, contending they ignored numerous warning signs that he was violent and unstable.

The lawsuit filed Monday in federal court alleges negligence and violations of the victims’ constitutional right to due process under the law.

Elliot Rodger, 22, stabbed, shot and ran down people in the community of Isla Vista on May 23. He killed six University of California, Santa Barbara, students and injured 14 other people before shooting himself as authorities closed in.

His first three victims were his roommates, David Wang and James Hong, and a friend, George Chen, who were stabbed dozens of times with a nearly 9-inch boar-hunting knife. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of their parents.

It contends that authorities, and the apartment building and its owners, ignored numerous warning signs that Rodger was dangerous, including failing to check his online postings in which he spouted venomous comments about women and others and bemoaned his virginity.

After Rodger killed himself, police found three semi-automatic handguns and nearly 550 unspent rounds in his car. All were purchased legally.

The lawsuit names Santa Barbara County, the Sheriff’s Department, Capri Apartments and Asset Campus Housing, a Texas-based company that provides student housing around the nation.

The suit said that since Rodger moved into the Capri complex in 2011, he insulted and clashed with a string of roommates and exhibited bizarre behavior, yet the apartment owners failed to conduct reasonable background checks before assigning Hong and Wang as his roommates, and failed to warn them that “Rodger had had serious conflicts with his previous roommates and was not only racist but also potentially violent and dangerous.”

It also contends that the county and its Sheriff’s Department violated the victims’ rights to due process by ignoring repeated “red flags” that Rodger was violent and unstable, even after a mental health worker saw YouTube videos that Rodger had posted and contacted authorities to say that Rodger appeared to be a danger to himself and others.

Messages seeking comment from representatives of the county and the Sheriff’s Department were not immediately returned Monday night. The offices of Capri and Asset Campus Housing were closed and messages could not be left there seeking comment.

TIME Drugs

Officials Seize 15 Tons of Pot in Second-Largest Border Drug Bust

US Pot Bust
AP More than 15 tons of marijuana hidden in a truck was seized by the Border Patrol at the Otay Mesa border crossing with Mexico in San Diego, Calif., Feb. 26, 2015.

Federal authorities confiscated more than 15 tons of marijuana en route to the United States from Mexico last week in the second-largest drug seizure at a U.S. border ever, officials said.

The attempted smuggling, which occurred Friday at a California border crossing, in some ways seems like a textbook case of how not to try to fool border patrol officers. The driver listed the contents of his trailer as “mattresses and cushions,” but instead the vehicle contained 1,296 unhidden packages of marijuana that didn’t resemble mattresses. Border officials noticed the discrepancy during an X-ray scan and opened the truck to find it overflowing with almost $19 million in pot. There were a few mattresses at the opposite end of the trailer.

“I am extremely proud of the work my officers do. Officers never give up their enforcement posture and demonstrate each and every day that they remain guardians of our nation,” said Rosa Hernandez,Director at Otay Mesa Cargo Port, where the stop occurred.

 

TIME Behind the Photos

See the World’s Largest Solar Plants From Above

Photographer Jamey Stillings takes us to some of the most impressive man-made wonders of the world

The Desert Sunlight Solar Farm in California’s Mojave Desert is the world’s largest solar plant with eight million panels producing 550 megawatts of power — or enough to supply 160,000 homes.

For the latest issue of TIME, we commissioned Jamey Stillings to photograph the plant. “I’ve had a long-term interest in the intersection of nature and human activity,” he says. “How we connect to nature; how we decide to use and modify nature for what we want to do.”

A little over four years ago, Stillings decided to marry that photographic interest with an environmental perspective, looking at the development of our species and society as we slowly move away from fossil fuels. “From a historic standpoint in the United States, we remember building the Hoover Dam, we remember building the Empire State Building. The photographs of that become our visual memories; they become part of our collective consciousness.”

With his photographs of renewable energy plant sites, Stillings is looking toward the future. “I’m interested in being involved both with the contemporary conversation and also acknowledging the fact that, not too far down the road, we’re going to start having a historical perspective on them. They will mean something different to us 10 years from now, 50 years from now and 100 years from now.”

And while Stillings wants to keep his focus on renewable energies — to produce a global study of their development — he’s considering documenting fossil fuel as well. “I want to create a visual counterpoint,” he says, “to show, for example, the differences in the environmental impact of five sq. mi. of solar panels and that of five sq. mi. of coal mining.”

Jamey Stillings is a photographer based in Santa Fe, N.M. His monograph The Evolution of Ivanpah Solar will be published by Steidl in 2015.

TIME Music

Watch the First Video from Best Coast’s Upcoming Album California Nights

Bring on the summer

Californian duo Best Coast have dropped the first video for their upcoming third album California Nights.

The single of the same name has a grown-up but still dreamy sound, matched in the video by trippy, summery landscapes.

California Nights is the band’s first major label debut after a move to Harvest Records, reports Rolling Stone. Along with the video, Best Coast unveiled the track listing and the dates of an upcoming U.S. tour that will run from March to June.

California Nights will be out on May 5.

[Rolling Stone]

TIME

Measles Outbreak in U.S. Tops 150 Cases

A single dose of MMR for Measles, Mumps, and Rubella at Kaiser Permanente East Medical offices on Feb. 3, 2015 in Denver, CO.
Joe Amon—Denver Post via Getty Images A single dose of MMR for Measles, Mumps, and Rubella at Kaiser Permanente East Medical offices on Feb. 3, 2015 in Denver, CO.

Most people with the disease are not vaccinated

The number of measles cases in the U.S. has reached 154, according to new numbers released Monday.

Between Jan. 1 to Feb. 20, more than 150 cases in 17 different states have been reported to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC). The majority of these cases are tied to an outbreak linked to Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim, Calif.

Some have blamed the latest outbreak on parents who don’t vaccinate their children for measles — or anti-vaxxers — and the CDC reports that the majority of people who got measles were unvaccinated. Travelers from other parts of the world where the disease is still prevalent could also be bringing it into the U.S., the CDC said.

There are currently three simultaneous outbreaks of the virus, the largest connected to Disneyland and the other two in Illinois and Nevada. In 2014, the U.S. experienced a major outbreak of measles that totaled 383 cases and was primarily spreading among an unvaccinated Amish community in Ohio.

Two doses of the measles vaccine (MMR) are nearly 100% effective at preventing the disease, which is highly contagious. The CDC recommends all children get their first dose of the vaccine at ages 12 through 15 months and the second dose at ages 4 to 6.

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