TIME boston bombing

Boston Bombing Suspect’s Alleged Accomplices to Face Trial

Dias Kadyrbayev, Azamat Tazhayakov, Robel Phillipos
This courtroom sketch shows defendants Azamat Tazhayakov, left, Dias Kadyrbayev, center, and Robel Phillipos, right, college friends of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, during a hearing in federal court Tuesday, May 13, 2014, in Boston. Jane Flavell Collins—AP

A federal judge set a trial date for alleged Boston bombing accomplices Dias Kadyrbayev and Azamat Tazhayakov, both Kazakh nationals, who are charged with aiding Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to get rid of incriminating evidence and flee authorities

Two Kazakh nationals will stand trial for allegedly helping Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev evade authorities and jettison incriminating evidence.

USA Today reports that Federal Judge Douglas Woodstock rejected the defense team’s request to have all charges against Dias Kadyrbayev and Azamat Tazhayakov dropped, saying he would not weigh the evidence and act as “fact finder” before the trial dates.

Woodstock also rejected the defense team’s request to relocate the pair’s trials outside of Boston, where emotions might not run as high among selected jury members. Woodstock argued that the defense team’s concerns could be resolved through the usual jury vetting process.

Kazakh nationals Kadyrbayev and Tazhayakov stand accused of obstructing police investigations by removing a laptop from the Boston bombing suspect’s dorm room and taking a backpack filled with firework shells emptied of explosive powder in the days after the April 15, 2013 bombings.

Tazhayakov will stand trial on June 30, and Kadyrbayev on Sept. 8. A third suspect, Robel Phillipos, will stand trial on charges of lying to investigators on Sept. 29.

[USA Today]

TIME cities

Newlywed Boston Marathon Bombing Survivors Finish Race Holding Hands

Patrick Downes and Jessica Kensky each lost a leg in the bombings last year, only six months after getting married. One year later, they crossed the finish line together

Boston Marathon husband and wife bombing survivors Patrick Downes and Jessica Kensky, who each lost a leg in last year's bombings, roll across the finish line in the 118th Boston Marathon Monday, April 21, 2014 in Boston.
Boston Marathon husband and wife bombing survivors Patrick Downes and Jessica Kensky, who each lost a leg in last year’s bombings, roll across the finish line in the 118th Boston Marathon, April 21, 2014 in Boston. Elise Amendola—AP

Patrick Downes and Jessica Kensky lost limbs as victims of the Boston Marathon bombing last year. One year on, they rolled across the finish line in wheelchairs, hand-in-hand.

After the first explosion on Boylston Street in 2013, the couple, watching the race together, suffered matching injuries: They each lost their left leg below the knee. Patrick’s memories of the crisis are murky but Jessica remembers the trauma clearly. In an interview with the Boston Globe, she recalled trying to block Patrick’s view from his own severed foot while a passerby extinguished her flaming clothes.

The couple recovered together, and returned to the marathon in 2014, side by side. “We’ve been married a year and a half,” Patrick told the Boston Globe, “but it’s like we have the knowledge of a couple that’s been married 10 years.”

TIME Boston Marathon

Boston Will Commemorate Tragedy Before Running Another Race

Boston must pay its respects to the victims of last year's tragedy while putting on another race

BOSTON—While survivors and others gather for a solemn ceremony to mark the anniversary of the bombings at last year’s Boston Marathon, runners from around the world will be arriving in brightly-colored running gear just outside to prepare for this year’s competition.

It’s a disconnect that exemplifies a rare, if not singular, challenge: the need to commemorate a tragedy that coincides with an iconic annual event. And it means planners have to balance grieving about the past with staging an athletic spectacle that’s all about positive emotion.

“It really is a huge pendulum sweep,” says Dusty Rhodes, who is in charge of the tribute.

A unusual calendar quirk will help: The Boston Marathon is always run on the third Monday in April. Last year’s marathon was on April 15, the earliest possible date, while this year’s will be on April 21, the latest. That gives organizers six days between the anniversary of last year’s bombings and the runners’ gathering at the starting line.

“What we really want to have happen on Tuesday is the appropriate focus on the victims and the community and the enormity of the impact and the sadness and the challenge, and then move forward,” says Rhodes. “Come Wednesday morning after the tribute, let’s go and have the world’s best marathon that we can have.”

The commemoration will recognize the three people killed by two bombs placed on Boylston Street during last year’s marathon, an MIT police officer fatally shot by the alleged bombers three days later, the 264 who were hurt in the blasts, many of them gravely, and the firefighters, police, hospital employees and others who responded to the emergency.

Participants will file out of a local convention hall behind an honor guard and place a wreath at the freshly painted blue-and-yellow finish line. They will observe a moment of silence at 2:49 p.m., the exact moment when the first of the bombs exploded.

Church bells will ring citywide at 2:50 p.m. along with the horns of boats in the city’s famous harbor. The finish-line flag familiar from the photographs of last year’s chaos will be raised, and church bells will play Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy.”

“By the time we get to the end of the tribute program, it’s about hope,” Rhodes says. “We’ve done well, we’re a team, we’ve been a strong team, and we will be a strong team. And that’s the tone we close with. It’s a microcosm of what the whole week will be.”

For all of that, officials say they can’t predict, and don’t presume to dictate, how people will remember the events of last year while also watching this year’s race unfold.

“That’s not for us to reconcile,” said Tom Grilk, executive director of marathon parent the Boston Athletic Association. “It’s for us to provide people with an opportunity to do what they do and to remember and react the way they wish.”

As for the marathon itself, Grilk hopes it “will be what it has always been, an international athletic event and a day of celebration and joy for the runners and spectators along the way and volunteers,” he says. “What we have heard from people is that we along with them have to move forward, have to display that determination, colored by that history that happened before.”

TIME boston bombing

Man Who Lost Legs In Boston Bombing Will Be A Father

Jeff Bauman, Erin Hurley
Jeff Bauman, who lost both legs in the Boston Marathon bombings and then helped authorities identify the suspects, poses with his expectant fiancé, Erin Hurley, in their home in Carlisle, Mass., Friday, March 14, 2014. Charles Krupa—AP

Jeff Bauman became a double amputee after being caught in the blasts at the finish line of last year's Boston Marathon. But less than a year later, he and his fiancé are expecting their first child

A man who lost both his legs during the Boston Marathon bombings and helped police identify the suspects is expecting a baby with his fiancé.

“My mom loves it. My dad’s going crazy,” Bauman said. “I just want to be a good dad.”

Jeff Bauman, 28, was standing near the finish line of the Boston Marathon last year waiting to cheer on his girlfriend Erin Hurley, 27, as she finished the race, when the two bombs went off. A photograph of an ashen-faced Bauman being wheeled away by rescuers became an iconic image of the horrifying attacks.

Bauman told the Associated Press that his child with Hurley is due July 18. The couple, who got engaged in February, has opted not to find out the gender of the baby. Hurley said that they plan to marry next year. “We’ve got a lot going on. So we don’t need to do everything all at once,” she said.

Bauman wrote a book about his experiences called Stronger; it’s due in bookstores on April 8, one week before the one-year anniversary of the attack.

[AP]

TIME

Bionic Limb Helps Boston Marathon Bombing Survivor Dance Once Again

Adrianne Haslet-Davis, Christian Lightner
Adrianne Haslet-Davis, left, performs on stage with dancer Christian Lightner at the 2014 TED Conference March 19, 2014, in Vancouver. James Duncan Davidson—AP

Adrianne Haslet-Davis performed on stage at the 2014 TED Conference in Vancouver

A dance instructor who lost part of her left leg in last year’s Boston Marathon bombing performed publicly for the first time since the attack Wednesday night with the help of a specially-designed bionic limb.

Outfitted with a computerized prosthetic, 33-year-old Adrianne Haslet-Davis performed “Ring My Bells” by Enrique Iglesias with dance partner Christian Lightner, Mashable reports. She received a standing ovation from the capacity crowd at the 2014 TED Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, which included former Vice President Al Gore.

The man who designed Haslet-Davis’ high-tech prosthetic, Massachusetts Institute of Technology associate professor Hugh Hugh, was also in attendance. A double-amputee himself, he designed the bionic limb after meeting Haslet-Davis last year with the specific intent that it could be used for dancing.

[Mashable]

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