TIME Books

A New Dr. Seuss Book is Out Today

what pet should i get
Random House

"What Pet Should I Get?", a recently discovered Dr. Seuss work, is on sale starting July 28.

What’s that, you say? A new book out today? Why yes, it’s here! Seuss‘s first book in years.

What Pet Should I Get? a recently discovered, unpublished children’s book by beloved author Dr. Seuss is being released on Tuesday, July 28. The book is believed to have been penned at some point between the late 1950s and early 1960s, according to USA Today, and publishers at Random House explain the book’s discovery in its final pages.

The book centers around a brother and sister who set out to a local pet store in search of a furry friend to call their own. The story reportedly features the same brother and sister pair from One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish.

USA Today gives the new tale “three stars out of four” for “mundane” rhymes and a less-than-fantastical plot.

But, parents don’t fret. Kids will surely love “pet.”

 

TIME

27 Kids’ Books That Became Major Movies

From Harry Potter to Paper Towns

The young adult book-to-movie adaptation trend is anything but new. As John Green’s Paper Towns hits theaters Friday, check out some of the best books that went from page to screen.

  • Harry Potter

    harry potter
    Warner Bros.

    The seven Harry Potter books were adapted into eight movies, kicking off the trend of splitting a series’ final book into two films. The final film, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2, raked in more than $1.3 billion worldwide.

  • The Fault in Our Stars

    A Fault In Our Stars
    James Bridges—20th Century Fox

    John Green’s first book to head to theaters captured audiences with the love story of Augustus and Hazel, two terminally ill teenagers who taught readers and viewers that a short life can still be a good life.

  • Paper Towns

    paper-towns
    20th Century Fox

    Green’s second book to be adapted, by the same screenwriters who took Fault to the movies, follows Quentin as he tries to track down Margo Roth Spiegelman, his elusive crush who goes missing after the two spend a night together pranking their high school classmates.

  • The Spectacular Now

    the-spectacular-now
    Andrew Lauren Productions

    Tim Tharp’s The Spectacular Now, a 2008 National Book Award Finalist, earned Sundance buzz in 2013 thanks to Shailene Woodley and Miles Teller’s on-screen chemistry and the film’s realistic portrayal of teenage tragedy.

  • The Book Thief

    the book thief
    Jules Heath—20th Century Fox

    Markus Zusak’s 2005 novel of the same name told the story of Liesel Meminger, who witnesses the horrors of the Nazis and learns to read from the Jewish man her foster parents are hiding in their basement.

  • The Hunger Games

    hunger games mockingjay part 2
    Color Force

    Suzanne Collins’ trilogy hit bookshelves in 2008 and catapulted to box office success in 2012 when Jennifer Lawrence took on the role of Katniss Everdeen, who fights against a totalitarian government in a dystopian society.

  • If I Stay

    if i stay
    Doane Gregory—Warner Bros.

    Chloe Grace Moretz starred as Mia in the 2014 adaptation of Gayle Forman’s 2010 novel about a 17-year-old girl who watches herself in a coma after her family is in a fatal car accident.

  • Holes

    holes
    Walt Disney Pictures

    Louis Sachar wrote the screenplay for the movie based on his 1998 novel about a young boy named Stanley Yelnats who attends a juvenile detention camp with a secret history.

  • Matilda

    matilda
    Francois Duhamel—Tristar Pictures Inc.

    Roald Dahl’s 1988 book hit theaters eight years after publication, starring Mara Wilson, Rhea Perlman and Danny DeVito, who also directed and narrated the movie.

  • The Outsiders

    the-outsiders
    Warner Bros.

    S.E. Hinton’s 1967 novel about Ponyboy Curtis and the gangs of his hometown was published went the author was just 18 years old. The 1983 adaptation starred Rob Lowe, Emilio Estevez, Matt Dillon, Tom Cruise and Patrick Swayze.

  • The Giver

    the giver
    David Bloomer—The Weinstein Company

    Lois Lowry’s 1993 novel is an early example of young adult fiction tackling dystopian themes. Despite being optioned for the screen in 1995, it took five screenplays and nearly 20 years before the 2014 film, starring Meryl Streep, Jeff Bridges and Taylor Swift, finally hit theaters.

  • Little Women

    Little-Women
    Columbia Pictures

    Louisa May Alcott’s novel, published in two parts in the 1860s, follows four sisters from childhood to adulthood. It’s been adapted six times total, twice as silent versions. The most recent, out in 1994, starred Winona Ryder, Kirsten Dunst, Susan Sarandon, Christian Bale and Claire Danes.

  • The Hobbit

    the-hobbit-the-battle-of-the-five-armies
    New Line Cinema

    J.R.R. Tolkien’s 1937 fantasy novel was adapted as a trilogy, starting in 2012 with An Unexpected Journey. Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson concluded Bilbo Baggins’ saga with The Desolation of Smaug in 2013 and The Battle of the Five Armies in 2014.

  • The Lord of the Rings

    Lord of The Rings: The Return of The King
    Pierre Vinet—Wingnut Films

    Tolkien’s three-part follow up to The Hobbit was adapted in 2001, 2002 and 2003, with the final film, The Return of the King, winning all of its 11 Academy Award nominations, including Adapted Screenplay and Best Picture.

  • The Wizard of Oz

    the wizard of oz
    Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

    L. Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was published in 1900 and became wildly popular thanks to the 1939 film adaptation starring Judy Garland as Dorothy. Though it lost out to Gone with the Wind for Best Picture at the Academy Awards, it did win Best Original Song for “Over the Rainbow.”

  • Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

    ALICE IN WONDERLAND
    Walt Disney Pictures

    The 1865 novel by Lewis Carroll has graced the silver screen more than 10 times, most recently in 2010 when director Tim Burton retold Alice’s story as a 19-year-old who returns to the fantasy land from her childhood to dethrone the Red Queen, played by Helena Bonham Carter.

  • Harriet the Spy

    harriet the spy
    Nickelodeon Movies

    Michelle Trachtenberg starred in the 1996 film adaptation of Louise Fitzhugh’s 1964 novel about an 11-year-old girl whose notebook is stolen by classmates, revealing every honest thought she has about her peers.

  • The Princess Bride

    the-princess-bride
    20th Century Fox

    The 1972 fantasy novel is often forgotten as a book, thanks in part to the eminently quotable 1987 cult classic starring Robin Wright and Mandy Patinkin.

  • Ender’s Game

    enders-game
    Chartoff Productions

    Orson Scott Card served as a producer for the 2013 film based on his 1986 sci-fi book about the gifted Ender Wiggin, a child being trained to fight an alien species.

  • Hugo

    hugo
    Jaap Buitendijk—GK Films

    Martin Scorsese adapted Brian Selznick’s 2007 illustrated novel into the 2011 Academy Award-winning film Hugo, which starred Asa Butterfield, Chloe Grace Moretz, Sacha Baron Cohen, Ben Kingsley, Jude Law and Richard Griffiths.

  • Divergent

    DIVERGENT
    Jaap Buitendijk—Summit Entertainment

    Veronica Roth’s Divergent trilogy was first published in 2011 and then adapted into an ongoing four-part film series in 2014. Shailene Woodley stars as heroine Tris Prior, who, like other protagonists in similar dystopian novels, fights against an oppressive government.

  • Twilight

    twilight
    Summit Entertainment

    Stephenie Meyer’s vampire-romance saga was adapted into a series of five films starring Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner, grossing more than $3 billion worldwide.

  • Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants

    the-sisterhood-of-the-traveling-pants
    Warner Bros.

    Ann Brashares’ series about an ordinary pair of pants that magically fits four very different girls was adapted into two films starring Blake Lively, Alexis Bledel, America Ferrera and Amber Tamblyn. The movies also inspired real-life friendships between the actresses, which they’ve documented on social media.

  • The Princess Diaries

    the-princess-diaries
    Walt Disney Pictures

    Meg Cabot’s 2000 novel was adapted into a movie in 2001 that was produced by Whitney Houston. The film, which starred Julie Andrews and a young Anne Hathaway, even spawned a sequel.

  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower

    the-perks-of-being-a-wallflower
    Summit Entertainment

    Stephen Chbosky wrote and directed the 2012 film version of his 1990 book that follows Charlie through his turbulent freshman year of high school. The film starred Emma Watson in one of her first post-Harry Potter leading roles.

MONEY Kanye West

The 5 Best Money Quotes From the New Kanye West Book

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West shop at Sport Store in Los Angeles
IRA/ZOJ—Wenn.com/Newscom

No pun intended.

A 200+ page ebook filled with Kanye West quotes recently debuted on the Internet, and — unsurprisingly — it’s replete with colorful commentary on finances, success, and celebrity.

The World According to Kanye, an unauthorized book compiled by writer Herbert Lui, specifically mentions money 24 times.

Here are some of Yeezy’s more insightful and/or pointed musings about finances from the book.

1. “Anyone that’s creative understands that there’s no amount of money that can be given to them to make them not want to, or have to, create. There’s no check out and there’s no cheque to stop you from [sic] creative. No pun intended when I’m saying no check.”

2. “We don’t run anything; we’re celebrities. We’re the face of brands. We have to compromise what we say in lyrics so we don’t lose money on a contract.”

3. “So many people talk about their investments or how much money they have but there’s so many rich people who spend a lot of that trying to buy a piece of happiness.”

4. “One of my courses was piano. I actually went to college to learn how to play piano. Talk about wastin’ some money.”

5. “The only luxury is time. The time you spend with your family.”

Well said, Kanye, because your $880 tattered sweaters definitely don’t look like luxury items to us.

TIME China

Is Chinese President Xi Jinping’s Book of Speeches Really a Best Seller?

A newsstand vendor returns change to a customer near a book titled "Xi Jinping: The governance of China" displayed on sale in central Beijing
Jason Lee—Reuters A newsstand vendor returns change to a customer near a book titled Xi Jinping: The Governance of China displayed on sale in central Beijing on Dec. 10, 2014

The publisher claims Xi's book has already sold 4 million copies since last year, including 400,000 overseas

This September, China’s President Xi Jinping will travel to the U.S., the confident leader’s first state visit there since taking helm of the world’s second largest economy in late 2012. Americans who wish to know Xi better will get a chance next month when his book will be formally launched in the U.S. during a New York City book fair.

The first book to be published by a sitting Chinese President, Xi Jinping: the Governance of China is a 516-page collection of 79 of Xi’s speeches, interviews, instructions and correspondence — all clarified by notes on China’s history and culture. The book’s plain white cover features Xi’s disembodied head floating above the title. Readers can peruse 45 biographical pictures inside. Chapters look at China’s economic development, ecology and the unfolding anticorruption campaign. An English-language hardcover edition is listed at $32.56 on Amazon.

The book’s U.S. launch in late May will occur at BookExpo America (BEA), according to its Chinese publisher, which is sending a delegation to attend the trade fair. This year, BEA will be focusing on China. The China-related books that will be on offer tend to hew to a version of Chinese history that will surely please the Chinese Communist Party. Events at the New York book fair include sessions on a 25-volume collection that gives a “panoramic view of the crimes committed to the Chinese people by Japanese militarists” and a study of the time Xi’s father Xi Zhongxun spent as a communist revolutionary in the caves of Yan’an.

During the British launch of Xi’s compendium earlier this month at the London Book Fair, China’s Ambassador to the U.K. Liu Xiaoming described it — and the man himself — in glowing terms. “Readers will appreciate President Xi’s wisdom, charisma and leadership style,” Liu said on April 15. “President Xi has a literary style that is sincere, candid, unadorned and vivid.” Late last year, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, whose social-media site is currently banned in China, was quoted by Chinese media saying he had bought the book for his employees so that they could understand China’s political system.

The Xi book’s publisher claims it has already sold 4 million copies since last year, including 400,000 copies overseas. Foreign-language editions have been published in English, French, Russian, Arabic, Spanish, Portuguese, German and Japanese.

Yet on Amazon, the hardcover English edition of Xi’s book is 420,914th in the website’s April 20 sales rankings. Xi’s speeches and other musings are not included among this year’s top 100 best sellers on Dangdang, a leading Chinese online bookstore. (The book, however, is listed as the 53rd most popular book on Dangdang over the past 30 days.) Currently, Dangdang’s top-selling book is a Chinese translation of The Kite Runner.

While China-watchers, like Zuckerberg, may be poring over Xi’s tome, the reaction at home, where the book sells for roughly $13, may be different. At the Beijing Xidan bookstore, a store manager surnamed Yang said her shop was offering a deal in which people who purchased more than 1,000 copies could receive a 15% discount. But Yang admits Xi’s book isn’t selling very well. “The book is not cheap,” she says.

Chinese Communist Party members and civil servants are regularly instructed to read up on key speeches by top officials. Perhaps that’s why there’s not as much interest in buying Xi’s book. “Why should I bother reading his book if I haven’t been asked to read it?” asks a 26-year-old health and family-planning official from Sichuan, who declined to give her name because of the sensitivity of the topic. “We are actually pretty busy.”

With reporting by Gu Yongqiang / Beijing

TIME Behind the Photos

The Mother Behind the Memoir: Camille Addario on Her Daughter’s Career as a War Photographer

Courtesy of Lynsey Addario Camille and Lynsey Addario circa 1976

As photojournalist Lynsey Addario unveils her memoir, her mother speaks to TIME

“People would say to me: ‘how do you let her do that?'” Camille Addario, the mother of Lynsey Addario, one of today’s preeminent conflict photographers, doesn’t hesitate to answer. “There was no way that I could stop Lynsey from following her passion. It’s like a drive that she has. It’s a calling that’s really extraordinary.”

Choosing a life as a photographer, one that has covered two wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and was kidnapped twice – in Iraq in 2004 and Libya in 2011, can take its toll. “I know that she suffered putting her loved ones through [the question of] ‘Why am I doing this’, but it’s a passion that just comes out of her being. And, as the mother, I’m so proud of her!”

Lynsey Addario, who just published her memoir It’s What I do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War, grew up with three other sisters in a very open and communicative family set-up in Westport, Connecticut. Her parents ran a successful hair salon until they divorced and her mother worked independently as a hair dresser. “I gave them the freedom of the creativity to express themselves,” says Camille. “I was so criticized. People would say: ‘Oh my God, this woman is really crazy, she lets them write on the walls.’ I always was considered kind of like a little unconventional as far as the freedom that I gave my girls, but I felt that the values and the love and the self-esteem that I could give them, was the most important gift. Rather than telling them, you can’t do this, you can’t do that…”

But Camille never imagined that her daughter would become a war photographer.

“I remember after 9/11 she called me and she said: ‘Mom, I’m going off to Afghanistan.’ My daughter Lisa said: ‘Don’t make her feel guilty, just encourage her.’ So I said ‘Well go, have a good time’. [I] never imagined that it was going to become her lifelong passion. But she was so enthralled in the people, the history, that she returned several times that year. Lynsey’s greatest gift, is her ability to connect with the person or people that she’s photographing.”

Of course, when the battlefield becomes your daughter’s amphitheater, life can get tough. In 2004, when Lynsey was briefly abducted in Iraq, Camille received a voice mail while driving. It was from Bill Keller, the then-executive editor at the New York Times. She remembers the moment vividly. “I got on the phone, and he said: ‘Miss Addario, I’m sorry to say I have frightening news regarding your daughter Lynsey.’ And I dropped the phone.”

One hour later, the phone rang again and it was Lynsey. “She could barely speak, and she said: ‘Mom, I just want you to know that I’m safe and I will call you back.’ That was very traumatic. That was the first time.”

The second time was in Libya in March 2011, when Lynsey went missing alongside her colleagues Anthony Shadid, Stephen Farrell and Tyler Hicks. Camille received a phone call from Hicks’ mother. “I kind of just went into shock,” she says. “And I just broke down. It [then] went from bad to worse. I got a call saying they were captured and they were being brought to prison. I just said: ‘Please God, protect my daughter’.”

“Lynsey always shared everything with me, except the things that she didn’t want me to worry about,” Camille adds. ‘[Sometimes] she would email me and say: ‘Mom, don’t get upset but I have to be fitted for a flack jacket, and I have to get a helmet,’ and I would say why? Lynsey, don’t tell me you’re going, ‘Well I’m going to be embedded, so don’t worry about it.'”

“She always let me know where she was going, but in the kindest most protective way. But I think Lynsey, she did feel kind of protective of me. She was the last one, she was single, and she wanted to make sure that I was safe and I didn’t have to worry about what she was going through.”

Courtesy Lynsey AddarioFrom left, Lukas, Lynsey, and Camille Addario

“Her communication has always been, I think, coming from her heart. She just wanted to keep me safe and assured me that I shouldn’t worry, that whatever I gave her she was giving back to me. And that again is a wonderful gift.”

When asked what it’s like to read about Lynsey’s life in her new memoir, It’s What I Do: A Photographers Life in Love and War, Camille says: “I’ve read it a hundred times now and I keep rereading it. Sometimes I laugh and sometimes I cry a little”.

Does Lynsey make her mom see the world differently? “Absolutely! It really has opened my eyes to the importance of people realizing that how lucky we are to be free, and to be here… and to see these atrocities all over the world that we don’t have any control over.”

“She doesn’t hold back!”

Lynsey Addario is a photojournalist represented by Getty Images Reportage. Her memoir, It’s What I do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War, is published by Penguin Press.

Paul Moakley is the Deputy Director of Photography at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @paulmoakley

TIME Books

9 Decent Pieces of Advice From the Worst People on TV

IT'S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA
Matthias Clamer—FXX From left: Kaitlin Olson as Dee Reynolds, Glenn Howerton as Dennis Reynolds, Charlie Day as Charlie Kelly, Danny DeVito as Frank Reynolds and Rob McElhenney as Mac in It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia

Surprising words of wisdom from the depraved characters of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia

The five main characters from the FX show It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia—Charlie, Mac, Dennis, Sweet Dee and Frank—are some of the worst people ever portrayed in a TV series.

Each is delusional and profoundly narcissistic, which serves each character well in the service of their various schemes (except for the illiterate Charlie, who is just sort of a beautiful mystery), and yet somehow, even within the context of a group of mean alcoholics running a crappy bar in nondescript industrial Philly, they are remarkably unsuccessful people. Which makes their new self-help book, “The 7 Secrets of Awakening the Highly Effective Four-Hour Giant, Today,” that much more intriguing.

Suffice to say that fans of the show will like the book. I did. But my purpose here isn’t to review The Gang’s foray into the written word. (Or drawn “word,” in Charlie’s case. Bless him). I’m here to relay the nuggets of decent advice I somehow did find in those pages. Here they are:

“When considering marriage, the first thing you need to do is create a framework for thinking about whether or not you should actually do it. The first question you have to ask yourself is “Am I totally high on crack?” If the answer is no, then the next question you should ask yourself is “Why, if I’m not totally high on crack, am I even thinking about getting married?” –Dennis

Four out of five households today don’t fit the traditional equation of mom plus dad plus two kids equals family. Divorce rates are high and being single is cool—so what’s the rush?

“If you wanna get by in this life, you better get yourself a good sidekick.” –Frank

Butch Cassidy knew this. So did Batman. So does everyone who gets elected President of the United States. Sidekicks are cool.

“Friends come in all shapes and sizes. Mostly they’re people-sized, but not always. Sometimes friends are shaped like other things. Like a bird with teeth, or a jar of glue, or a block of cheddar.” –Charlie

While I in no way recommend making friends with a jar of glue, I like this one because of the message of inclusion. Friendships come in odd forms and sometimes from unlikely places. Unlikely friends can be some of the best friends of all.

“As any exceptional actor will tell you, the most important element of acting is honesty. If you can fake that, you’re golden.” –Sweet Dee

An excellent piece of classic acting advice. Unfortunately, it honestly definitely did not come from Sweet Dee. Maybe George Burns, maybe somewhere else.

“If you steal and you don’t get caught, you don’t have to go to jail.” –Frank

I’m assuming you don’t need me to spell this one out for you. Pretty straightforward.

“Let’s face the facts: There are two kinds of people in this world: those who sweat the small stuff, and those who have the balls not to.”-Dennis

Keeping focused on the big picture and not getting bogged down in petty things takes chutzpah. Or courage. Or audacity. Or “balls,” I guess, if you’re Dennis.

“Basically, less evolved dudes tend to get weirded out if they can tell you’re wearing mascara. Go easy.” – Mac

All things in moderation. Plus there’s an implicit reminder not to be a judgmental dolt.

“A shush is the social equivalent of a slap in the face.” –Dennis

You know it, I know it, so just, if you’re going to do it, be prepared for the repercussions.

“It is illegal to keep a hummingbird as a pet in the United States of America, and any attempt to do so may be punishable by fines, imprisonment, death, or all of the above. If you have hummingbirds in your house, you should put this book down and go get rid of that bird immediately. Or suffer the consequences of the law.” –Charlie

That’s just good solid advice right there. And mostly true, actually.

Read next: The Top 10 TV Shows of 2014

TIME movies

7 Ways Mockingjay Changes from Page to Screen

Republic

Spoilers for "Mockingjay—Part 1" follow

Big-screen adaptations of books always involve changes and modifications to the original story. It’s not a new phenomenon—but it’s one we still love to pick apart when given the opportunity.

But when it comes to The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part 1, there isn’t much picking to be done. (Spoilers for Mockingjay—Part 1 follow.)

The major changes from book to screen are few and far between, perhaps mostly because the third Hunger Games book is being split into two films—which gave screenwriter Danny Strong more time to fit in more stuff from the novel. Sure, we could talk about how Prim didn’t utter the line “Whatever it takes to break you,” or how the movie didn’t mention Katniss’ new bow having voice-recognition technology, but most of those changes are tiny details omitted for time that don’t have much bearing on the actual story.

As for the big stuff—well, that we can talk about. Namely:

1. Katniss dreams of Peeta
Okay, so this isn’t a big change so much as a bigish modification, but still, Katniss dreaming of Peeta arriving and holding her at night—much like he did on their Victor’s Tour—wasn’t in the book. Yet it was a great physical representation of all of the feelings Katniss has (and goes on and on about, via her inner monologue) in the book. In other words, this was a smart move.

2. More President Coin
Going into the film, we’d been told that President Coin would have a greater presence than she did in the book—and that proved to be true. Not only did the film end with her epic speech about rescuing all of Panem—juxtaposed against a horrified Katniss watching a ruined Peeta—but the film also worked in a bit of background for her character. When she first announces that Katniss will be the Mockingjay, Prim tells us why there are so few children in District 13: an epidemic took most of them out, along with all of Coin’s family.

3. President Snow’s prep team and the other districts’ rebellion
Katniss’s first-person perspective in the books means that it’s always safe to expect more of both Snow and the other districts in the Hunger Games films. It’s not a change so much as a point-of-view adjustment—but nevertheless, the movie created a few new characters, namely Snow’s prep team of sorts. In the film, we meet his speech writer, along with another man who helps him make decisions. As for the other districts—well, who knew lumberjacks could be such badasses?

4. Effie in District 13
Probably the biggest difference from book to screen is the presence of Elizabeth Banks as Effie. In the book, her character isn’t in District 13 after the Quarter Quell. But after Banks’ portrayal made Effie a fan favorite in the films, it’s not difficult to understand the film’s desire to change that. After all, nobody’s going to complain about seeing Effie in a jumpsuit.

5. No Venia, Octavia, or Flavius
Effie’s presence in the film fills the same role Cinna’s prep team filled in Mockingjay. In the book, Katniss finds out that Venia, Octavia, and Flavius have been imprisoned in 13 after stealing food, and she frees them. They then help her find her Mockingjay look, which of course becomes Effie’s job in the film.

6. Peeta’s rescue
Because the book is from Katniss’s perspective, we don’t get any of the details of Peeta’s rescue. But the film opens it up: We follow Boggs’s team as they enter the Tribute Center and find all of the equipment that was used to torture (and hijack) Peeta and others. Another tweak to the scene: Instead of Katniss starting the distraction broadcast with the story of how she met Peeta, in the film, Finnick speaks first. It’s only after the Capitol seems to be waking up that Katniss steps in. But she doesn’t talk about Peeta. Instead, she talks directly to President Snow—who, in a twist, knows about the rescue mission in the Tribute Center.

When Film Katniss realizes this, the film physically shows her mental breakdown about potentially losing both Katniss and Gale. So yes, this moment is changed, but only to further the story—and again, find a way to present Katniss’s feelings on screen.

7. “I Kill Snow”
This isn’t a huge deal, but Katniss’s list of demands for becoming the Mockingjay is very short in the film: She wants the other victors to be saved and pardoned, and she wants Prim to keep her cat. Oh, she also remembers Annie, whom she adds at the last minute in the book. So what demands were eliminated? Well, despite not showing Katniss ask for it, the film does work in Katniss hunting with Gale—so we can’t complain about that. But the biggest change is the elimination of Katniss’s final demand: “I kill Snow.” Then again, maybe the films are saving that moment for Part 2.

Final note: Whatever happened to those promos of Snow with Joanna and Peeta at his side? They were the first teasers for the film, and it would’ve been nice to see them in the final product.

This article originally appeared on Entertainment Weekly

TIME Crime

Homeland Insecurity: Hunting the First Terrorist Cell in America

Recalling a time, 100 years ago, when foreign agents were at work on American soil, blowing up buildings, sinking ships at sea and killing hundreds of American citizens in a campaign of sabotage and terror.

In a time of war, foreign agents are at work on American soil. They blow up buildings and munitions factories. They sink ships at sea with explosives hidden in the cargo. In a campaign of sabotage and terror, they kill hundreds of U.S. citizens. Spies and fifth columnists — some American-born, some recent immigrants still loyal to their native land — hold clandestine meetings in New York and other major cities, plotting violence against the United States. Overmatched police officers, unused to fighting an enemy they can’t see, struggle to identify the terrorist cell’s ringleaders before more havoc and unleashed and more innocents are killed.

Sounds like a pretty good espionage thriller, doesn’t it? Or the plot of every Die Hard movie ever made? In fact, it’s nothing less than authentic — albeit long-forgotten — American history, brought to vivid life in Howard Blum’s latest book, Dark Invasion: 1915: Germany’s Secret War and the Hunt for the First Terrorist Cell in America. A hundred years after the chilling events it describes — events that will strike an eerily familiar chord with anyone who pays even cursory attention to the vagaries of America’s War on TerrorDark Invasion reminds us, as Blum put it in a recent conversation with LIFE.com, that “the past is never past.”

“When I first read about these events in the CIA’s in-house journal,” Blum told LIFE.com, discussing how he came upon the story of German saboteurs in America in the first place, “I thought, now this is really something. New York cops hunting a terrorist cell in the midst of World War I? Here was the birth of American homeland security, in a sense. But in order to tell the story, I knew I needed to find a character who could drive the story along, and I had to get inside that character’s head. I couldn’t make up anything he said or felt or thought — but I’d still have to portray all of that in a way that keeps the reader involved.”

When he learned that a central figure in the tale, New York City police captain Thomas J. Tunney, had once written a memoir, and that the German naval officer and spy who masterminded so many of the often-deadly acts of sabotage — Franz von Rintelen, the self-styled “Dark Invader” — had penned a two-volume memoir, Blum knew he had what he needed to structure a cohesive, suspenseful and, above all, accurate story.

The number of German operatives active in America during the early years of the First World War is hard to determine with absolute accuracy; historians estimate that the core terrorist network included around 28 people. Blum points out, however, that the people who worked in concert with the key members of the cell — German loyalists who sabotaged factories, Irish stevedores who planted incendiary devices on ships carrying munitions to English troops fighting in France, and others — likely numbered in the hundreds.

A Congressional hearing in the 1920s, meanwhile, estimated that between 300 and 500 Americans were killed during the cell’s lethal sabotage spree.

The dangers posed today by a terror cell even a fraction the size of von Rintelen’s are, of course, exponentially more complex, and more destructive, than those of a hundred years ago. One example: In 1915, 375,000 people rode the New York City subway each day — “a number,” Blum says, “that amazed me when I first read it. I had no idea it was that large.”

In 2014, more than 4 million people ride the subway. Every day.


Ben Cosgrove is the Editor of LIFE.com


TIME Newsmaker Interview

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand Won’t Name Colleague Who Called Her ‘Porky’

Senators Discuss Legislation To Counter Sexual Assaults On Campus
Chip Somodevilla—Getty Images Sen. Kristen Gillibrand (D-NY) participates in a news conference about new legislation aimed at curbing sexual assults on college and university campuses at the U.S. Capitol.

Her book is a call for women to run for office, though she says she has no current designs on the nation’s highest office

She still considers herself the “loud mouth” and “fog horn” her father teasingly called her as a child, but Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand said Monday that she is not going to say which colleague called her “porky” after the birth of her second child, or which elderly senator told her not to slim down too much because he likes “my girls chubby.”

Those disclosures in her book, “Off the Sidelines,” which is due out Tuesday, made waves when they were printed in People Magazine last week. While taken aback by the clamor to disclose her critics’ names, Gillibrand says she knew that chapter—the one about her struggles with her weight—would be “the one every women’s magazine would excerpt,” she tells TIME. “I use these illustrations as an example of much larger point. It’s important to have a debate about how women are treated in the workplace. I’m not alone in having someone say something stupid. It’s less important who they are than what they said.”

The New York Democrat is using her book to promote her push to engage more women in politics. She holds her own life up as an example of finding a way to have it all: the big career, two young sons and loving marriage. “We need new and better policies that support women and allow all women to rise,” Gillibrand writes. “We need to end the cycle of women studying hard, starting careers, climbing through the ranks, taking time off to care for children, and never again finding a job as good as the one they left.”

Gillibrand is frank about the hardships: dispiriting credit or criticisms over her appearance, being unable even now to afford full time help and coming home from Congress to clean the bathroom when you have three men in the house (boys, apparently, don’t have great aim). But she also waxes poetic about the good she feels she has been able to accomplish: passing health care for the 9/11 first responders, tackling sexual assault in the military and on college campuses and repealing Don’t Ask Don’t Tell.

Gillibrand emphasizes that her flexible schedule in the Senate is what allows her to do it all. “These challenges that I face are common and not surprising, and I have it so much easier than working moms,” says Gillibrand, whose husband works in New York and lives up there for most of the week, leaving Gillibrand to care single-handedly for their two young sons in Washington. “I don’t have to be at work at a certain time.”

She writes about the importance of being unabashedly ambitious without the fear of seeming like, well, a bitch. “I was nicknamed Tracy Flick, the aggressive, comical, and somewhat unhinged blond high school student played by Reese Witherspoon in the movie Election,” Gillibrand writes. “It was a put down to me and other ambitious women, meant to keep us in our place. Yes, I’m competitive. I fight for what I believe in, and I drive hard toward my goals. Does that make me ruthless and crazed? No.”

Too many women, she argues, sit on the sidelines because they fear ambition. She says she timed the book to come out just before the midterm elections because she hopes to inspire more women to go out and vote, and to realize that political ambitions of their own are more achievable than they may think. But, when asked if she has further political ambitions in life, Gillibrand is clear about being happy where she is—and that her legislative plate is full with a reauthorization of the 9/11 First Responders bill and another pass at getting prosecution of cases of sexual assault in the military removed from the chain of command. Her bill fell six votes short of breaking a filibuster earlier this year.

She says she doesn’t want to run for governor and hasn’t the slightest intention of seeking the Democratic nomination for President in 2016 against presumed front-runner Hillary Clinton, her predecessor in the Senate and who wrote the glowing forward to Gillibrand’s book (“For Kirsten,” Clinton writes, “public service isn’t a job. It’s a calling.”).

But the book tour still means she gets asked questions about her future ambitions.

“Will you run for President?” I asked her on Monday.

“No,” she said.

“What if Hillary doesn’t run?”

“No.”

“Are you ruling it out?”

“Ask me in 10 years.”

“How about in 2020?”

“No.”

“2024?”

“No.”

“Which will come first, a third kid or running for President?”

“Oooh,” Gillibrand said, “That is such a hard question. I think they’re both off the table. Probably having a third—probably have a third would come first if I could convince my husband. I’d love having a third.”

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