TIME Bizarre

Spice Up Your Morning Routine with Wasabi Toothpaste

When Crest just doesn't cut it.

Crest, the American standard of toothpaste brands, has started to get a little wacky lately. Its Be Adventurous line offers brushers the chance to swap out basic mint flavored paste for “Chocolate Mint Trek,” “Lime Spearmint Zest” or “Vanilla Mint Spark.” Not included in Crest’s lineup? Wasabi-flavored toothpaste.

Luckily, for spice loving fans who crave the idea of adding some sushi flavoring into their daily oral hygiene routine, wasabi toothpaste is coming to Japan thanks to the Village Vanguard shop.

While Seattle retailer Archie McPhee has sold a gag (and probably gag-inducing) wasabi toothpaste for years, Japan is getting the real deal. According to Kotaku, “The toothpaste smells like wasabi, it has a wasabi-like texture, and most importantly, it tastes like wasabi.”

So if you’re looking to put a little hair on your chest while keeping your teeth squeaky clean, be really adventurous and step away from the mint.

TIME Bizarre

Top European Court Tells Nude Activist to Put Some Clothes On

Naked Rambler Stephen Gough Makes His Way South Following Release From Saughton Prison
Stephen Gough the naked rambler makes his way south through Scotland following his release from Saughton Prison yesterday after serving his latest sentence on Oct. 6, 2012 in Peebles, Scotland. Jeff J Mitchell—Getty Images

European Court of Human Rights tells "Naked Rambler" that refusing to wear clothes does not represent freedom of expression

Britain’s “naked rambler” does not have a fundamental human right to ramble through the English and Scottish countryside in the buff, the European Court of Human Rights ruled on Tuesday.

Stephen Gough, a.k.a. the “Naked Rambler,” argued that he was wrongfully convicted (30 times) and jailed (for 7 years) for his nude treks through the British countryside, which he said should have been protected under his right to privacy and free expression, NBC News reports.

The Strasbourg-based justices, however, ruled that “he had plenty of other ways of expressing his opinions” and determined that his particular form of expression constituted “deliberately repetitive antisocial conduct.”

Gough first started making headlines in 2003 for his insistent determination to remain nude on the streets, in court, or even in prison, where, according to the BBC, he was sequestered from the rest of the prison population because of his refusal to wear clothing.

[NBC News]

TIME Bizarre

Cockroach Interrupts Chicago Pest-Control Chief’s Testimony

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Getty Images

The official in question called pest control soon after the hearing concluded

A cockroach with impeccable timing (or terrible timing, depending on how you look at it) scaled the wall of Chicago’s City Council chambers on Thursday during a testimony by the official in charge of pest control.

Fleet-and-facilities commissioner David Reynolds was testifying at a budget hearing in City Hall, but was interrupted by an alderman’s observation that there was a large cockroach on one of the walls of the room they were in, according to the Associated Press.

“Commissioner, what is your annual budget for cockroach abatement?” the Chicago Tribune quoted alderman Brendan Reilly as asking, setting off a chorus of laughter among all the hearing’s attendees and an embarrassing few moments for Reynolds.

Reynolds, who had to call in a private extermination company right after the hearing ended, told reporters he was “mortified” when Reilly pointed out the large insect, its dark color in sharp contrast to the chamber’s white walls.

TIME Bizarre

Shia LaBeouf Doesn’t Mind Being Called a Cannibal

He's 'lurking in the shadows,' according to a new song

Some might be taken aback if accused of being a cannibal, but not a one Shia LaBeouf.

In a new video by singer-songwriter Rob Cantor, dancers and singers fly across the screen in a dramatically recounted battle between an unnamed character and Shia LaBeouf. The 28-year-old is “lurking in the shadows,” “killing for sport” and “eating all the bodies,” the song goes. But if that weren’t weird enough, the music video ends with LaBeouf giving the performance a standing ovation.

It’s all very strange, but then again so is Shia LaBeouf.

TIME Bizarre

Dallas Man’s Halloween House Decorations Look Like Ebola Patients’ Quarantined Apartments

Too soon?

A Dallas man’s Ebola-themed Halloween decorations are going viral.

Dressed in a protective suit, James Faulk set up biohazard barrels and bags of “biowaste” surrounded by yellow caution tape in front of his University Park house and wrapped the second-floor balcony in white tape that says “quarantine.” The decorations are supposed to mimic the scene outside the apartment complex where Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to die of Ebola in the U.S., stayed when he fell ill.

Faulk told the Associated Press he’s trying to lighten the mood, as residents in the Dallas area are on edge after two of Duncan’s nurses contracted the virus as well — though one was determined to be free of the virus Friday morning.

The question is whether it’s too soon to make light of the virus in general.

LM Otero—AP
TIME fun

Feel Good Friday: 15 Fun Photos to Start Your Weekend

From flying off mountains to backflipping in Palestine, here's a handful of photos to get your weekend started right

TIME royals

Can You Tell the Difference Between a Royal and a Dummy?

See your favorite members of the royal family and their wax dummy duplicates, which were unveiled at Madame Tussauds in New York City on Oct. 23

MONEY

Ebola.com Purchased for $200K by Marijuana Company. And It Gets Stranger From There

Gloved hand holding marijuana leaf.
Alessandro Bianchi—Reuters

Earlier this month, we reported that Ebola.com’s owner, a disease-obsessed domain name vendor called Blue String Ventures, was hoping to sell the URL for at least $150,000. Now, according to a report from DomainInvesting.com, Ebola.com has been sold to a Russian company that is apparently focused on the marijuana business.

Filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission show Ebola.com was bought by Weed Growth Fund for $50,000 in cash and 19,192 shares of Cannabis Sativa, a Mesquite, Nevada-based recreational and medical marijuana company that trades on over-the-counter markets. Based on Cannabis Sativa’s current stock price, those shares are valued at roughly $164,000, making the overall transaction worth just over $200,000.

So to recap: Ebola.com was sold to a marijuana-related company based in Russia that paid mostly in the stock of another marijuana company.

But the story’s not over yet. As recently as September of this year, Weed Growth Fund was known as Ovation Research, which according to this BusinessWeek profile was in the business of distributing “stainless steel cookware products for retail and wholesale customers in North America.”

Then, on Sept. 19, the company filed with the Nevada Secretary of State changing its name to Weed Growth Fund. (We tried to contact Weed Growth Fund by phone and email to ask about the deal and name change, but got no answer.)

Why would a marijuana company want to own the URL Ebola.com? Elliot Silver, DomainInvesting.com’s publisher, asked Blue String Ventures founder Jon Schultz this very question. And while Schultz replied that he did not know why Weed Growth Fund wanted the domain, he did send Silver to this Marijuana.com article in which Cannabis Sativa CEO Gary Johnson (the former two-term New Mexico governor and Libertarian Party presidential candidate!) claims that marijuana can be used to treat Ebola. (You can see him do it in this Fox Business interview.) Cannabis Sativa also did not respond to requests for comment.

So there you have it. A newly renamed, Russian weed-related company bought Ebola.com using shares of a medical marijuana business run by a former Libertarian Party presidential candidate who thinks that pot should be used to treat Ebola. And no, you’re not high (as far as we know). This really happened.

TIME Bizarre

These Very Weird Portraits Are Actually Alive

Artist Seung-Hwan Oh allows mold to grow on his negatives, distorting the images.

Seung-Hwan Oh is truly dedicated to his photo project, “Impermanence.” To produce his unique portraits, the photographer covers the positive film in light-sensitive emulsion-consuming microbes before immersing them in water. Over the course of months or years the silver halides destabilize and the resulting mold obscures the portraits. For Seung-Hwan, “this creates an aesthetic of entangled creation and destruction that inevitably is ephemeral.”

Seung-Hwan has been working on Impermanence for four years but only has 15 final images to show for his hard work. He is highly selective, and there is a very low probability the mold grows in the way in which he would like. He uses only one out of every 500 pictures he takes.

Impermanence began in 2010 when Seung-Hwan learned about how fungus threatens to destroy historical film archives. For him, he uses the reaction to “. . . deliver the idea of impermanence of matter applying this natural disaster into my work.” Impermanence is an ongoing project, and can be viewed in full on his site.

TIME Bizarre

Russian Artist Cuts Off Earlobe in Government Protest

He previously nailed his scrotum to the stones in Red Square

Less than a year after nailing his scrotum to the cobblestones of Red Square, a Russian artist cut off his earlobe Sunday in protest of the Russian government’s treatment of dissidents.

The artist, Pyotr Pavlensky, was hospitalized following the incident and will be released from the hospital soon, The Guardian reported.

In a Facebook post, Pavlensky said that he was protesting the government’s alleged detention of dissidents under the false pretense of insanity.

“Armed with psychiatric diagnoses, the bureaucrat in a white lab coat cuts off from society those pieces that prevent him from establishing a monolithic dictate of a single, mandatory norm for everyone,” he wrote, according to the Guardian.

[Guardian]

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