TIME beauty

See Kelly Clarkson’s Perfect Response to Body-Shaming Tweets

Kelly Clarkson visits SiriusXM Studio in New York City on March 3, 2015.
Robin Marchant—Getty Images Kelly Clarkson visits SiriusXM Studio in New York City on March 3, 2015.

The singer is keeping a positive outlook

News flash: Kelly Clarkson doesn’t care what you think about her weight.

After the singer showed off a fuller figure during an appearance on Graham Norton Live last month, British personality Katie Hopkins Tweeted several negative comments about her size.

“What happened to Kelly Clarkson?” Hopkins wrote. “Did she eat all of her backing singers? Happily I have wide-screen.”

As the Twitterverse began to attack Hopkins, she took aim at Clarkson several more times.

“Look, chubsters,” she Tweeted a few days later. “Kelly Clarkson had a baby a year ago. That is no longer baby weight. That is carrot cake weight. Get over yourselves.”

But Clarkson remains unfazed by what Hopkins – or anyone else, for that matter – thinks about her size.

Asked by Heat magazine about the fat-shaming Tweets, Clarkson was initially puzzled.

“I don’t have a clue what you’re talking about,” she said. “Someone Tweeted something nasty about me?”

When the reporter explained who Hopkins is and what she had written, Clarkson laughed. “That’s because she doesn’t know me,” she said. “I’m awesome! It doesn’t bother me. It’s a free world. Say what you will.”

For the uninitiated, Hopkins rose to fame as a villainous contestant on The Apprentice UK, where she drew attention for her acerbic, insulting comments. An outspoken conservative, she parlayed her infamy into a career as a perennial reality contestant and political pundit. (Think Omarosa meets Ann Coulter.)

Despite the critical lashing, Clarkson is keeping a positive outlook.

“I’ve just never cared what people think,” she told Heat magazine. “It’s more if I’m happy and I’m confident and feeling good. That’s always been my thing. And more so now, since having a family – I don’t seek out any other acceptance.”

This article originally appeared on People.com.

Read next: Watch Kelly Clarkson and Jimmy Fallon Sing the History of Duets

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME fashion

Watch How Iran’s Beauty Trends Have Evolved Over 100 Years

A model transforms ten times in just one minute

In just one minute, a model transforms to reflect the changing beauty trends in Iran over the last 100 years.

But the evolution doesn’t only reflect Iran’s hair trends, but its history — from the 1936 hijab ban to the headscarf’s reemergence to the recent Green Revolution.

Screen Shot 2015-02-19 at 12.09.07 PM

This is Cut Video’s third installment of its “100 Years of Beauty” series. The first two videos look at American trends for both white and black women in the last century.

Read next: Bye, Bye, Barbie: 2015 Is the Year We Abandon Unrealistic Beauty Ideals

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME beauty

Unretouched Photo of Cindy Crawford Leaks Online

An apparent image of the supermodel in lingerie is generating a lot of online discussion about what “real” women look like

An unretouched photo of 48-year-old supermodel Cindy Crawford has leaked online, reigniting the social-media debate about photoshopping women’s bodies.

The photo, which was initially attributed to an upcoming issue of Marie Claire, is actually a leak from a 2013 cover story of Marie Claire Mexico and Latin America. “No matter where the photo came from, it’s an enlightenment,” Marie Claire writers wrote in a web post about the leaked photo. “We’ve always known Crawford was beautiful, but seeing her like this only makes us love her more.”

Social-media commentators are rallying around the leaked photo as a way to celebrate natural aging.

Crawford has not yet made any public statement about the leaked photo, but she did share some thoughts on aging gracefully. “I really think — at any age — it’s learning to be comfortable in your own skin,” she told Marie Claire at the premiere of her new documentary, Hospital in the Sky. “For me, that’s doing the kind of work I like, being in a good relationship, being the kind of mother I want to be — and taking care of myself.”

TIME beauty

5 Ways to Improve Your Skin Through Food

honey-cup-cotton-sticks
Getty Images

Yes, you are welcome to use food on your skin

As anyone who’s broken out after a late-night drinking and pizza binge can attest, diet is clearly linked to skin condition. But there’s so much conflicting information about how to manage your diet for the most beautiful skin possible, as well all kinds of wacky DIY recipes (we’ll pass on the mayonnaise face mask, thank you very much). To get some clarity, FWx spoke to nutrition expert and esthetician Britta Plug, who helps clients overhaul their diets and skincare routines at Brooklyn’s Treatment by Lanshin. Here, she debunks beauty myths and calls out natural health trends to look for in 2015.

1. Eat Less Inflammatory Foods
The biggest culprit are inflammatory foods like dairy, gluten and sugar. If you’re having issues with your skin, those are foods to experiment with eliminating. Try taking them out for two weeks and see if that has any effect. Also, when you bring those foods back in your body will have a more heightened reaction, so you can see how they affect you—gas, bloating, headaches, whatever the symptoms are for you. If you’re eating them all the time, your body has more of a low-grade reaction. We all have varying tolerance levels, but those foods are the general culprits.

2. Only Eat High Quality Dark Chocolate
I used to think the advice about chocolate [making you break out] was a myth, but since I’ve started working with an acupuncturist, I’ve been incorporating a lot of Chinese medicine into my practice, and there is something behind the idea that chocolate can be inflammatory. But we’ve also been exploring the benefits of high quality dark chocolate for cystic acne. It depends on the person.

3. Invest in a Good Probiotic
Gut health and skin health are really tightly linked. Probiotics are huge. High quality probiotics, in capsule form, are great, as are fermented foods like kimchi. People often say to me, “Well I eat a lot of yogurt.” But you have to be eating whole milk, low sugar yogurt to get the benefits, and you first want to make sure you’re not sensitive to dairy. That’s why I really recommend sauerkraut and kimchi.

If you start taking a high quality probiotic, you’ll usually notice a pretty big difference—you will go to the bathroom more often! You want to start with just once a day, and then work up to the recommended dosage. All probiotics are labeled by what they contain, but it can be tricky to make sure you’re getting quality ones, even from a health food store. It’s best if you can pay a visit to a functional medicine practitioner. I don’t officially endorse them, but I use Dr. Mercola probiotics often in my practice.

4. Use Food on Your Face
While eating yogurt can by iffy if you’re sensitive to dairy, it’s great for using as a mask. It’s a little acidic and it’s nourishing, plus strengthens the flora of the skin.

I am a huge fan of using honey on the skin. It’s an amazing cure-all. Any honey is great, but Manuka honey in particular just works miracles for any skin type. It’s full of vitamins so it’s great for acne and anti-aging. I especially love it for after sun-care. To make a mask, mix about half a teaspoon of honey and mix it with half a teaspoon of warm water, and just spread it onto your skin and leave on for as long as you can before rinsing off. I’ve definitely fallen asleep with honey mask on and woken up stuck to my pillowcase. Manuka honeys are all labeled with a UMF rating, the Unique Manuka Factor. The higher the UMF, the better. I think 16+ is the highest I’ve seen.

5. Experiment with Charcoal and Sandalwood
Charcoal has always been big for the skin, but I’ve been seeing a lot of charcoal drinks coming out, like charcoal lemonades. It can be helpful if you need a detox. For example, if you’re gluten intolerant and accidentally ingest gluten, you can take a charcoal capsule to rebalance your gut.

Sandalwood is also something we’re going to be seeing a lot more of, in things like skincare oils. All essential oils are healing, and sandalwood is especially helpful for getting circulation going for healing. In Chinese medicine it’s referred to as a “blood mover,” so it can be great for congested or acne prone skin.

One Important General Tip: Don’t Strip Your Skin
I think one of the biggest mistakes I see people making is overwashing and scrubbing their skin. I recommend just cleansing once a day, at night, to remove any makeup and pollution from your skin. Then, just rinse with water in the morning. And keep your routine fairly simple.

This article originally appeared on FWx.com.

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TIME beauty

Instagram Admits ‘Mistake’ After Pulling Pubic Hair Photo

FRANCE-US-IT-INTERNET-TELECOM-INSTAGRAM
Lionel Bonaventure—AFP/Getty Images The Instagram logo is displayed on a smartphone on December 20, 2012 in Paris.

"We don’t always get it right"

Instagram faced immediate criticism three weeks ago when it disabled an Australian magazine’s account after the publication posted a picture that showed female pubic hair. The Facebook-owned photo-sharing app restored the Sticks and Stones’ account Thursday and released an apology.

“We try hard to find a good balance between allowing people to express themselves creatively and having policies in place to maintain a comfortable experience for our global and culturally diverse community,” according to the statement. “This is one reason why our guidelines put limitations on nudity, but we recognize that we don’t always get it right. In this case, we made a mistake and have since restored the account.”

The photo in question showed two women wearing bathing suits with some of their pubic hair exposed. Sticks and Stones director Ainsley Hutchensce argued to the Huffington Post that Instagram was exhibiting sexism by objecting to this photo, but not others that showed male pubic hair. “From what I can gather I do feel as though men can get away with a lot more in terms of what Instagram deems to be of a sexual nature,” she said. Critics point to pictures where men’s pubic hair is exposed, like one from Justin Bieber’s recent Calvin Klein campaign, as examples of a gender imbalance in the way society views people’s natural bodies.

Instagram and Facebook have both come under fire in the last year for censoring pictures in which women’s nipples are exposed. A movement using the hashtag #FreetheNipple argues that normalizing female toplessness is a question of gender equality and that topless female photos—like ones of breastfeeding—should be allowed on social media.

MORE: Free the Nipple! The Problem With How We Think About Breasts

TIME Opinion

Dove Really, Really Wants These Little Girls to Accept Their Curls

Hair acceptance is the new body acceptance

Dove has moved on from curve-acceptance to curl-acceptance.

The beauty company’s newest campaign continues its body-positive messaging by focusing on curly-haired girls who wish they had straight hair. The little girls in this new ad are sad because they only see straight hair in advertisements and commercials! Dove claims research shows only 4 in 10 girls with curly hair think their hair is beautiful. And nobody with un-beautiful hair could possibly have a shred of happiness in their lonely little lives.

Until… they get pulled outside by their curly-haired mommies (who are dancing in public, ugh STOP IT mo-om!) and taken to a top-secret location where they have to cover their eyes for a surprise. No, there’s not a pony in there. Or a private Taylor Swift concert. Instead, when they open their eyes, every single curly-haired person they’ve ever met shouts at them: “We all love our curls!”

MORE: Hey Dove, Don’t ‘Redefine Beauty,’ Just Stop Talking About It

Instead of shrieking in terror, the girls join in and it becomes a big dance party where everybody’s curls are bouncing with a special spring that says “empowerment,” and “acceptance” and “buy Dove products.”

TIME fashion

This Smart Mirror Lets You Try On 5 Outfits at Once

The mirror also lets you share looks on social media if you want to get second or third opinion from friends

Even for people who love shopping, the effort of dressing and undressing for hours while trying on clothes can be a bit draining. (It’s not all Champagne and Pretty Woman people!). That’s why Neiman Marcus just started piloting a new “smart mirror” that lets shoppers save looks and compare styles with the wave of a hand.

Called the MemoryMirror, the system can take an image of you in one dress and then let you flip through how the item would look in other colors or patterns. It then saves the shot so you can compare it side-by-side with other outfits and only ever have to try on something once. Bonus: The imaging is so precise that there’s a zoom function—so prepare to see how your butt takes to those jeans in HD.

If you’re one of those shoppers who prefers a second, or depending on your Instagram following, thousands of more opinions before committing, you can also share looks via email or social media.

The mirrors are available to use right now at Neiman Marcus in Walnut Creek outside San Francisco and will be coming to Plano, Texas (north of Dallas) next month. If all goes well, you can look for them at a store in your city in the near future.

Now we just need an invention that can figure out whether those heels will be comfortable after the first hour.

This article originally appeared on FWx.com.

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TIME society

See How Beauty Trends Have Transformed Over 100 Years in This Mesmerizing Video

The second in a series

One model. One minute. One hundred years of iconic beauty looks.

Cut.com created a timelapse video that shows a century’s worth of beauty trends on African American model Marshay. This is the second in a series. The first video — same concept but with white model — has been viewed almost 19 million times on YouTube in less than two months.

Watch the two videos side-by-side:

TIME beauty

Plus-Size Model Ashley Graham Says Don’t Call Jennifer Lawrence Curvy

"The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1" - Los Angeles Premiere
Jon Kopaloff—FilmMagic Actress Jennifer Lawrence arrives at the Los Angeles Premiere "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1" at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on November 17, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.

Model Ashley Graham, who has appeared in Vogue and Elle, lambasted Hollywood’s treatment of women’s bodies in an essay for Net-a-Porter’s online magazine, The Edit.

The model, who is a size 14, writes: “I think that you can be healthy at any size and my goal is to help and educate women on that. It doesn’t matter if you’re a size 2 or 22 as long as you’re taking care of your body, working out, and telling yourself, ‘I love you’ instead of taking in the negativity of beauty standards.”

Though she acknowledged that Hollywood starlets like Marilyn Monroe and Jennifer Lopez have worn their curves with confidence over the years, Graham said she thinks that girls need to see more women on TV and in magazines who have healthy figures. “Young girls don’t have much to look at, curvy women are not on covers of magazines, they’re not talked about on social media as much as other celebrities. Jennifer Lawrence is the media’s poster girl for curves — she’s tiny!”

Lawrence has spoken in the past about how she was told she would lose a job if she didn’t diet, to which she replied, “You can go f-ck yourself.”

Read next: Fargo’s Allison Tolman on How to Fix Hollywood’s Body Image Problem

TIME beauty

See How 6 Women Got Over Their Body Image Issues

These women decided to embrace their shapes

  • Maura Pagano

    Real Women
    Joao Canziani Maura Pagano

    Age: 24
    Occupation: Recruiter
    Home: New York City

    Maura’s hang-up: “My calves and ankles have never been proportionate to the rest of my body. I always used to hide them under long, black pants.”

    What helps her let it go: “As I get older, I’m learning that what’s more important than covering up my imperfections is how confident I am. In this dress, I feel sexy—it shows off my chest and my shoulders and highlights my waist. If every other part of me looks this good, no one will stare at my calves.”

  • Rosalie Khan

    Real Women
    Joao Canziani Rosalie Khan

    Age: 41
    Occupation: Senior digital associate
    Home: Jersey City

    Rosalie’s hang-up: “I’m self-conscious about my body, especially my stomach, so I don’t normally wear anything clingy. Because I know they’ll fit me, I stick to baggy clothes. That also means I won’t have to drag out the try-on process.”

    What helps her let it go: “Pulling on skinny pants was a revelation. They actually made me feel slimmer. The fabric of this pair is stretchy and thick, and there’s a panel to hold in my tummy, creating a nice, smooth line. I feel comfortable—and even trendy.”

  • Danielle Hamblin

    Real Women
    Joao Canziani Danielle Hamblin

    Age: 43
    Occupation: Adjunct professor
    Home: White Township, New Jersey

    Danielle’s hang-up: “I have never been thin. While I wouldn’t mind the opportunity to be so, I sometimes think it’s just not meant to be.”

    What helps her let it go: “In comparison to the more serious challenges faced by other people, I’ll take this one. Besides, I have an air of fun about me, and I like that to show in what I wear. This sheath’s mix of prints offers that, yet the shape is professional and flattering. It plays up my waist and hits right at the knee.”

  • Rushmi Mehan Soni

    Real Women
    Joao Canziani Rushmi Mehan Soni

    Age: 25
    Occupation: Senior marketing manager
    Home: New York City

    Rushmi’s hang-up: “I used to love my lean waist. Then I got pregnant, and I was all belly. After I had the baby, I still had a belly. I struggled with that for a while because the weight fell off so easily everywhere else.”

    What helps her let it go: “Now I laugh at how much I talked about bikinis in my 20s. I created my son—of course my body is different these days. I remain somewhat self-conscious, but there are clothes to address the issue. This draped top gave me a trim-looking waist again.”

  • Arielle Devay

    Real Women
    Joao Canziani Arielle DeVay

    Age: 35
    Occupation: Sales-development executive
    Home: Astoria, New York

    Arielle’s hang-up: “I’m very curvy above and below the waist. When I wear something loose, I look bigger than I am. And when I wear something formfitting, I can end up looking like a floozy. Neither is a great option.”

    What helps her let it go: “I’ve found it’s important for me to choose silhouettes that accentuate my waistline, such as a fit-and-flare dress. This provides a nice balance between showing off my waist and being work-appropriate.”

  • Kate Snyder

    Real Women
    Joao Canziani Kate Snyder

    Age: 37
    Occupation: Account executive
    Home: Brooklyn

    Kate’s hang-up: “A lack of curves. I used to feel awkward in my body—I was all legs and didn’t have much of a bust.”

    What helps her let it go: “I have grown into my body, though it hasn’t changed much. I usually dress very understated, but this style is very ‘look at me.’ The cut is fitted through the torso, so my behind seems curvier, and the hem adds visual interest. I like that I look shapelier—not so straight up and down.”

    This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

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