TIME awards

Cartoonist Alison Bechdel, Who Created ‘Bechdel Test,’ Wins MacArthur Prize

"Fun Home " demonstration at College of Charleston
Alison Bechdel at a rehearsal as cast members of the musical of her memoir, "Fun Home", prepare for a performance of selected songs to be delivered in support of protesters at the College of Charleston after proposed state budget cuts were approved in response to "Fun Home" being offerred as summer reading at the College of Charleston, at the Meminger Auditorium on April 21, 2014 in Charleston, SC. The Washington Post/Getty Images

The cartoonist and graphic memoirist who upended the way we think about women in film has just won the prestigious genius award

The MacArthur Foundation has announced the 21 recipients of this year’s fellowships, often referred to as the “genius grant,” and among the honorees is cartoonist and graphic artist Alison Bechdel, who is known for her graphic memoirs Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic and Are You My Mother?

The prestigious fellowships, which are awarded based on achievement and potential, come with a stipend of $625,000, spread over five years, which can be spent in any way the honorees see fit.

Bechdel, who is currently at an artist residency in Italy, told the Los Angeles Times that when she received the call announcing she won, “It was crazy.” She added, “It was a little garbled, then I heard the person on the other end say the words MacArthur Foundation and the world started spinning.” Bechdel is only the second graphic novelist to win the fellowship after Ben Katchor won in 2000.

Even those who aren’t familiar with her cartoons or graphic memoirs have likely heard of the 54-year-old Bechdel, whose work has inadvertently upended the way we think about movies with her now famous Bechdel Test. The test, which the cartoonist coined in 1985 in a strip called “The Rule,” asks three questions of a film as a way to demonstrate the very basic level at which gender biases operate in movies: 1) Does the movie have two female characters?; 2) Do they speak to each other?; 3) Do they speak about something other than a man? Sadly, many movies — even today, almost 20 years after the test was created — don’t pass. Yet the very fact that the Bechdel Test has become a mainstream concept, rather than a niche, radical feminist idea, proves how much influence it has had.

Out of the 21 prizes awarded, eight other women were also honored. The New York Times reports that the oldest fellow this year is 71-year-old Pamela O. Long, a historian of science and technology in Washington, and the youngest is 32-year-old Danielle S. Bassett, a physicist at the University of Pennsylvania.

The other honorees this year are a mix of artists, filmmakers, social activists, poets, historians and scientists that include John Henneberger, Mary L. Bonauto, Sarah Deer, Jonathan Rapping, Jacob Lurie, filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer, Ai-jen Poo, Rick Lowe, Samuel D. Hunter, Steve Coleman, Terrance Hayes, Yitang Zhang, Jennifer L. Eberhardt, Tami Bond, Mark Hersam, Craig Gentry, Khaled Mattawa and Tara Zahra.

When asked about the stipend, Bechdel told the LA Times, “It will give me a lot of security that I don’t have. Pay off some debts, save for retirement — really boring stuff.” But she also added that it will allow her to “take some risks, do something new — to really plunge into my work. It’s an incredible gift.”

TIME Music

Chuck Berry Honored at Polar Music Prize Ceremony in Stockholm

Chuck Berry In Concert - January 1, 2011
Chuck Berry performs at the Congress Theater on January 1, 2011 in Chicago, Illinois. Barry Brecheisen/FilmMagic

Think of it as the Nobel of the music world

Polar Music Prize laureate Chuck Berry has been honored at an awards ceremony in Sweden.

Poor health prevented the rock ‘n’ roll legend, now 87, from leaving his home outside of St. Louis to attend the event in Stockholm. But the ‘Johnny B. Goode’ singer had Welsh musician Dave Edmunds read his acceptance speech at the ceremony.

“My heart is in Sweden,” he said. “I understand what a great honor it is to be a recipient. I am sorry that I am unable to travel and receive this personally.”

The Polar Music Prize is the so-called “Nobel of the music world,” awarded annually to one recipient each from the fields of modern and classical music. The award was established 25 years ago by the manager of ABBA, Stig Anderson. Previous laureates include Joni Mitchell, Stevie Wonder, Bob Dylan and Led Zeppelin.

Keith Richards paid tribute to Berry in a video that was played at the award ceremony. “Chuck Berry, he just leaped out of the radio at me. I ate him basically, I mean I breathed him,” he said. “If I listened to Chuck Berry, I was full for the day.”

In a statement made when announcing Berry’s award in May, the Polar Music Prize Foundation said: “Chuck Berry was the rock ’n’ roll pioneer who turned the electric guitar into the main instrument of rock music. Every riff and solo played by rock guitarists over the last 60 years contains DNA that can be traced right back to Chuck Berry.”

Berry was recognized alongside theatre and opera director Peter Sellars, who is known for bringing controversial flair to the stage. Sellars received Tuesday’s prize from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden.

TIME

See All the Winners From the 2014 Video Music Awards

2014 MTV Video Music Awards - Roaming Show
Katy Perry accepts Best Female Video for "Dark Horse" during the 2014 MTV Video Music Awards at the Forum on Aug. 24, 2014, in Inglewood, Calif. Kevin Winter—Getty Images

Up-to-the-minute updates of all the hardware being handed out at the 2014 VMAs

Here’s the full list of winners from the 2014 MTV Video Music Awards. Check back throughout the evening for updates after each award is handed out.

Best Female Video: Katy Perry — “Dark Horse [ft. Juicy J]”

Best Male Video: Ed Sheeran — “Sing”

Best Pop Video: Ariana Grande — “Problem [ft. Iggy Azalea]”

Best Hip-Hop Video: Drake — “Hold On (We’re Going Home) [ft. Majid Jordan]”

Best Rock Video: Lorde — “Royals”

Artist to Watch: Fifth Harmony — “Miss Movin’ On”

Video of the Year: Miley Cyrus — “Wrecking Ball”

TIME celebrities

Teen Choice Awards Bring Surfboards to Shailene Woodley

Teen Choice Awards 2014 - Show
Actress Shailene Woodley, winner of Best Actress: Action onstage during FOX's 2014 Teen Choice Awards at The Shrine Auditorium on August 10, 2014 in Los Angeles. Kevin Winter—Getty Images

The Fault in Our Stars cast members were among the night's biggest winners

The 2014 Teen Choice Awards brought fan-driven accolades to the stars teens couldn’t get enough of this year, including the cast of the hit film The Fault in Our Stars.

Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort took home several surfboards at the fun-filled show Sunday, in categories like “Choice Lip-Lock” and “Choice Movie: Drama.” The two stars were also the top picks for Breakout Movie Star (Elgort) and Choice Movie Actress: Adventure (Woodley).

In Woodley’s Choice Actress acceptance speech, according to US Weekly, the actress who once told TIME she doesn’t consider herself a feminist said she felt “pretty honored to be accepting this award on behalf of women.” Adding, “the truest form of bravery and of courage is to be ourselves.”

Some 165 million votes were cast for the 16th annual awards show where teens and the stars they lust over typically take home the most awards. Another choice moment from the show: Donald Sutherland, voted Choice Villain for his role in the Hunger Games series, had a special treat for the crowd of team from the film’s dystopian nation.

“I have brought you souvenirs from Panem. They’re berries,” Sutherland said, tossing berries like the lethal one’s featured in the Hunger Games into the crowd. “I wouldn’t eat them if I were you.”

TIME Music

Beyonce Leads the 2014 VMAs With Eight Nominations

"On The Run Tour: Beyonce And Jay-Z" - East Rutherford
Beyonce performs during the "On The Run Tour: Beyonce And Jay-Z" at MetLife Stadium on July 11 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. Kevin Mazur—2014 Kevin Mazur

Eminem and Iggy Azalea each scored seven nominations for MTV's biggest award show

MTV announced its nominees for the 2014 Things They Don’t Show Anymore Video Music Awards this morning, and because the network knows their demo, they did it via Snapchat (last year they used Instagram and Vine, which apparently are totally outmoded). The awards, which are on Sunday, Aug. 24 at 9 p.m. ET, will feature performances by Usher, Ariana Grande and 5 Seconds of Summer.

Here’s the list of this year’s nominees:

Video of the Year
Beyoncé ft. Jay Z, “Drunk In Love”
Iggy Azalea ft. Charli XCX, “Fancy”
Miley Cyrus, “Wrecking Ball”
Pharrell Williams, “Happy”
Sia, “Chandelier”

Best Hip-Hop Video
Childish Gambino, “3005″
Drake ft. Majid Jordan, “Hold On (We’re Going Home)”
Eminem, “Berzerk”
Kanye West, “Black Skinhead”
Wiz Khalifa, “We Dem Boyz”

Best Male Video
Ed Sheeran ft. Pharrell Williams, “Sing”
Eminem ft. Rihanna, “The Monster”
John Legend, “All of Me”
Pharrell Williams, “Happy”
Sam Smith, “Stay With Me”

Best Female Video
Ariana Grande ft. Iggy Azalea, “Problem”
Beyoncé, “Partition”
Iggy Azalea ft. Charli XCX, “Fancy”
Katy Perry ft. Juicy J, “Dark Horse”
Lorde, “Royals”

Best Pop Video
Ariana Grande ft. Iggy Azalea, “Problem”
Avicii ft. Aloe Blacc, “Wake Me Up”
Iggy Azalea ft. Charli XCX, “Fancy”
Jason Derulo ft. 2 Chainz, “Talk Dirty”
Pharrell Williams, “Happy”

Best Rock Video
Arctic Monkeys, “Do I Wanna Know?”
Black Keys, “Fever”
Imagine Dragons, “Demons”
Linkin Park, “Until It’s Gone”
Lorde, “Royals”

Artist to Watch, Presented by Taco Bell
5 Seconds of Summer, “She Looks So Perfect”
Charli XCX, “Boom Clap”
Fifth Harmony, “Miss Movin’ On”
Sam Smith, “Stay With Me”
Schoolboy Q, “Man of the Year”

Best Collaboration
Ariana Grande ft. Iggy Azalea, “Problem”
Beyoncé ft. Jay Z, “Drunk In Love”
Chris Brown ft. Lil Wayne and Tyga, “Loyal”
Eminem ft. Rihanna, “The Monster”
Katy Perry ft. Juicy J, “Dark Horse”
Pitbull ft. Kesha, “Timber”

MTV Clubland Award
Calvin Harris, “Summer”
Disclosure, “Grab Her!”
DJ Snake & Lil Jon, “Turn Down For What”
Martin Garrix, “Animals”
Zedd ft. Hayley Williams, “Stay the Night”

Best Video With A Social Message
Angel Haze ft. Sia, “Battle Cry”
Avicii ft. Dan Tyminski, “Hey Brother”
Beyoncé, “Pretty Hurts”
David Guetta, “One Voice”
J. Cole, “Crooked Smile”
Kelly Rowland, “Dirty Laundry”

Best Cinematography
30 Seconds to Mars, “City of Angels”
Arcade Fire, “Afterlife”
Beyoncé, “Pretty Hurts”
Gesaffelstein, “Hate Or Glory”
Lana Del Rey, “West Coast”

Best Editing
Beyoncé, “Pretty Hurts”
Eminem, “Rap God”
Fitz and the Tantrums, “The Walker”
MGMT, “Your Life is a Lie”
Zedd ft. Hayley Williams, “Stay the Night”

Best Choreography
Beyoncé, “Partition”
Jason Derulo ft. 2 Chainz, “Talk Dirty”
Kiesza, “Hideaway”
Michael Jackson ft. Justin Timberlake, “Love Never Felt So Good”
Sia, “Chandelier”
Usher, “Good Kisser”

Best Direction
Beyoncé, “Pretty Hurts”
DJ Snake & Lil Jon, “Turn Down For What”
Eminem ft. Rihanna, “The Monster”
Miley Cyrus, “Wrecking Ball”
OK Go, “The Writing’s On The Wall”

Best Art Direction
Arcade Fire, “Reflektor”
DJ Snake & Lil Jon, “Turn Down For What”
Eminem, “Rap God”
Iggy Azalea ft. Charli XCX, “Fancy”
Tyler, the Creator, “Tamale”

Best Visual Effects
Disclosure, “Grab Her!”
DJ Snake & Lil Jon, “Turn Down For What”
Eminem, “Rap God”
Jack White, “Lazaretto”
OK Go, “The Writing’s On The Wall”

[MTV]

TIME Television

Why Orange Is the New Black Stars Were Nominated for “Guest” Actress Emmys

Laverne Cox on OITNB
Laverne Cox in a scene from Netflix’s “Orange is the New Black” Season 2. Jojo Whilden—Netflix

Why several of the nominees in "guest" categories don't seem to fit the description

The nominations for this year’s Emmy awards — which were announced this morning — may surprise some viewers, and not just because Orphan Black got snubbed. In the guest actor/actress categories, there are a few people who seem pretty much the opposite of “guests” on their shows. For example: Orange Is the New Black‘s crucial Laverne Cox (as Sophia Burset), Natasha Lyonne (as Nicky Nichols) and Uzo Aduba (as Crazy Eyes), and Masters of Sex‘s Allison Janney and Beau Bridges (as Margaret and Barton Scully).

How are those actors in the same category as guests who show up in one or two episodes (like Paul Giamatti, who briefly appeared as Harold Levinson on Downton Abbey) or stop by to host for a night (like SNL‘s Jimmy Fallon, Louis C.K., Tina Fey and Melissa McCarthy)? After all, unlike those more obvious guests, the actors in question appear throughout the show’s run and interact regularly with the main characters, determining the way the plot will play out. Shouldn’t they be in the “supporting” category instead?

The reasons are invisible to many TV viewers.

First, there’s a contractual issue. According to the Emmy rules and procedures, the distinction between “supporting” and “lead” is one of character and the distinction between “guest” and “supporting” is one of contract. When signing on for a show, one of the questions an actor must consider is whether the role is officially regular or recurring, which can determine things like whether your name is mentioned in the credits. A guest or recurring role might be just as important as a regular role, but there are differences behind the scenes. In other words, the producers get to decide based on an actor’s role whether a regular character is supporting, but a guest is a guest is a guest. The rules specify that if the performer’s contract is a guest-star contract, he or she must enter the guest category “without regard to the number of episodes he/she appeared in.” No matter how much of a star someone may seem within the show’s context, “star” has a legal definition too and they don’t fit in.

And then there the Emmy eligibility dates. This year’s Emmys are looking at June 1, 2013 – May 21, 2014. In the case of Orange, that means we’re talking about the long-ago first season, during which a mere half dozen of the actors and actresses from the show were series regulars.

So there you go. Calling Crazy Eyes a guest on Orange Is the New Black isn’t an insult to her importance to the show, but rather a necessity that was set in motion as soon as Aduba signed her contract with Netflix. However, in the case of Orange, that also means next year’s nominations might look a bit different: Uzo Aduba and Natasha Lyonne were both already promoted to series regulars for season two, and this summer has seen several more actresses promoted in advance of season three.

TIME Television

As TV Keeps Changing, the Emmys Stay a Few Steps Behind

Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany BBC America

There were some pleasant surprises in this year's nominations, but it looks like Emmy voters still have a big DVR backlog to get through.

Thursday morning’s live announcement of the Emmy nominations began with a statement about how dramatically the business of TV is changing. And it’s true–Emmy nominees can come from broadcast TV, premium cable, basic cable, streaming and public TV. I watched the announcements on Yahoo TV, which next year could be a (theoretical) contender with the sixth season of Community. In December, a live-action drama, Powers, will premiere on a video game platform, the Sony Playstation Network. It was almost quaint that the major awards nominations were announced by Mindy Kaling and Carson Daly, two broadcast TV personalities.

But have the Emmys kept up with it? The awards opened the books to some deserving new shows and performers this year–Fargo, Orange Is the New Black, Silicon Valley–but overall the inclusions and omissions in the major categories suggested that Emmy voters have a two- or three-year DVR backlog they’re still catching up on.

So the doors were open, happily, for some new faces (yay, Lizzy Caplan! alright alright alright, Matthew McConaughey!). But there are also a number of series and actors returning seemingly on the forces of momentum. House of Cards had an absolutely zooey second season, but Emmy still regards it as a top-quality drama because it has all the outward trimmings of one. Jeff Daniels in The Newsroom is up for best actor against McConaughey and the departing Bryan Cranston–and if history is a guide, he could actually win. It’s been a year of fresh comedies like Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Broad City and Review, yet Modern Family will have a permanent home in the comedy category long after it’s become Antique Family (speaking of which, Downton Abbey apparently has the same sinecure in Best Drama).

The best possible spin on the situation is that, in a strange way, it’s a side effect of how much TV has grown and how much quality TV there is to judge today. If Emmy voters were too overwhelmed to consider everything back when they gave David Hyde Pierce a permanent trophy in the 1990s, it’s that much harder now to expect them to keep completely current. So the Emmys will probably keep advancing in fits and starts, having the occasional breakthrough year for new talent, who then become the new guard of usual suspects for a few years. The more things change in TV, the more likely that one is to stay the same.

That’s the big picture. Here, in no particular order, are some of my biggest grievances, joys, and general observations:

* Orphan Black‘s Tatiana Maslany was robbed. Every one of her.

* The Americans had arguably–that is to say, I’m arguing it–the best season of TV so far this year, but except for Margo Martindale, the spies were left out in the cold. (Give Matthew Rhys Daniels’ slot and Keri Russell Michelle Dockery’s.)

* As for Masters of Sex, I’m half-happy because of Caplan’s well-deserved honor, but I had actually talked myself into believing its publicity blitz might have gotten it a best drama nod. (Sub out House of Cards or Downton, easy.) Maybe saddest, though, is Michael Sheen not being acknowledged for best actor as the achingly repressed William Masters, because apparently male performers have to bellow and blow a dramatic gasket to get Emmy’s attention.

* Of course, as usual, many of my grievances are not really surprises. One that genuinely was a surprise was The Good Wife, after its best season, since it had actually been nominated as Best Drama before.

* OK, let’s say something nice! I’m happy for Fargo, for Julianna Margulies (up for best actress despite The Good Wife‘s snub), and for even the flawed seasons of Game of Thrones and Louie. And here’s a usual suspect that actually deserved it: it would have been easy to ignore Mad Men this time out, since it aired a half-season and will get another shot next year for its finale. But it packed a lot of emotion and resonance into its seven episodes–especially the last two–and I have my fingers crossed for Christina Hendricks. (Jon Hamm? Nominated, but history shows that we could learn that he was also secretly playing Sally and Joan, and he still wouldn’t win the category.)

* I’m happy that Silicon Valley–by no means perfect but one of the season’s pleasant surprises–got a best comedy nomination. I’m perplexed, though, that Christopher Evan Welch didn’t get a posthumous nomination for the last performance of his life; if anything, I thought he’d get named and the show itself overlooked.

* In general, HBO shows again that it knows how to get Emmy nominations–not just for True Detective and Game of Thrones (which had the most of any series) but even for the final season of the underrated Treme, which snuck in with a nomination because HBO put up its shortened season in the miniseries category.

* Maybe the best-deserved Emmy nomination that Orange Is the New Black is up for is casting; the show put together a murderer’s row (so to speak) ensemble full of lesser-known actresses. It’s only too bad that TV’s best platform for actresses of color saw none of them nominated in the big categories, though Taylor Schilling and Kate Mulgrew were. (Uzo Aduba and Laverne Cox–as well as Natasha Lyonne–were nominated as “guest actresses,” because of the intricacies of the crediting and submissions process. Better than nothing.)

* But is OITNB really a comedy? I can’t say I really care. A lot of TV’s best shows are both dramatic and hilarious, and it’s just one of those things that doesn’t fit the dualistic comedy/drama model we’re stuck with. If I’d rather see Andy Daly as comedy actor than Ricky Gervais, for instance, it’s because he gave a better performance, not because Derek was maudlin.

* And I’ll stop here, though I’ve barely scratched the surface–the full Word document of Emmy nominations runs 43 pages, making it amazing that it’s even possible to snub anyone. But there is plenty more to parse–and a little over a month to do it before the unusually early Emmy ceremony in August. Maybe I’ll have finished reading the nominations list by then.

TIME Television

HBO and Game of Thrones Dominate Emmy Nominations

From left: Jack Gleeson as Joffrey Baratheon and Natalie Dormer as Margaery Tyrell in Season 4, Episode 2 of HBO's Game of Thrones.
From left: Jack Gleeson as Joffrey Baratheon and Natalie Dormer as Margaery Tyrell in Season 4, Episode 2 of HBO's Game of Thrones. Helen Sloan—HBO

A strong showing by the premium cable channel and its hit show

Game of Thrones received 19 Emmy nominations Thursday, fueling HBO’s 99 total nominations, including two for best drama.

FX also fared well, drawing 18 nominations for Fargo and another 17 for American Horror Story: Coven.

Netflix, with Orange Is the New Black contending for best comedy, pulled in a total of 31 Emmy nominations, more than either Fox or Comedy Central.

Here are the highlights from this year’s Emmy nominations:

Outstanding Drama Series

Breaking Bad (AMC)

Downton Abbey (PBS)

Game of Thrones (HBO)

Mad Men (AMC)

True Detective (HBO)

House of Cards (Netflix)

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series

Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad (AMC)

Jeff Daniels, The Newsroom (HBO)

Kevin Spacey, House of Cards (Netflix)

Jon Hamm, Mad Men (AMC)

Matthew McConaughey, True Detective (HBO)

Woody Harrelson, True Detective (HBO)

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series

Michelle Dockery, Downton Abbey (PBS)

Claire Danes, Homeland (Showtime)

Robin Wright, House of Cards (Netflix)

Kerry Washington, Scandal (ABC)

Julianna Margulies, The Good Wife (CBS)

Lizzy Caplan, Masters of Sex (Showtime)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Jon Voight, Ray Donovan (Showtime)

Peter Dinklage, Game of Thrones (HBO)

Mandy Patinkin, Homeland (Showtime)

Josh Charles, The Good Wife (CBS)

Aaron Paul, Breaking Bad (AMC)

Jim Carter, Downton Abbey (PBS)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Anna Gunn, Breaking Bad (AMC)

Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey (PBS)

Lena Headey, Game of Thrones (HBO)

Christine Baranski, The Good Wife (CBS)

Christina Hendricks, Mad Men (AMC)

Joanne Froggatt, Downton Abbey (PBS)

Outstanding Comedy Series

The Big Bang Theory (CBS)

Louie (FX)

Modern Family (ABC)

Veep (HBO)

Orange is the New Black (Netflix)

Silicon Valley (HBO)

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series

Jim Parsons, The Big Bang Theory (CBS)

Matt LeBlanc, Episodes

Don Cheadle, House of Lies (Showtime)

Louis C.K., Louie (FX)

William H. Macy, Shameless (Showtime)

Ricky Gervais, Derek (Netflix)

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series

Lena Dunham, Girls (HBO)

Edie Falco, Nurse Jackie (Showtime)

Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation (NBC)

Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep (HBO)

Melissa McCarthy, Mike & Molly (CBS)

Taylor Schilling, Orange is the New Black (Netflix)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Adam Driver, Girls (HBO)

Jessie Tyler Ferguson, Modern Family (ABC)

Fred Armisen, Portlandia (IFC)

Ty Burrell, Modern Family (ABC)

Tony Hale, Veep (HBO)

Andre Braugher, Brooklyn Nine-Nine (FOX)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Mayim Bialik, The Big Bang Theory (CBS)

Julie Bowen, Modern Family (ABC)

Anna Chlumsky, Veep (HBO)

Allison Janney, Mom (CBS)

Kate McKinnon, Saturday Night Live (NBC)

Kate Mulgrew, Orange Is the New Black (Netflix)

Outstanding Miniseries

American Horror Story: Coven (FX)

Fargo (FX)

The White Queen (Starz)

Bonnie and Clyde (A&E, Lifetime, History)

Treme (HBO)

Luther (BBC America)

Outstanding Television Movie

The Normal Heart (HBO)

The Trip to Bountiful (Lifetime)

Killing Kennedy (National Geographic)

Sherlock: His Last Vow (PBS)

Muhammad Ali’s Greatest Fight (HBO)

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie

Chiwetel Ejiofor, Dancing on the Edge (Starz)

Mark Ruffalo, The Normal Heart (HBO)

Billy Bob Thornton, Fargo (FX)

Benedict Cumberbatch, Sherlock: His Last Vow (PBS)

Idris Elba, Luther (BBC America)

Martin Freeman, Fargo (FX)

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie

Cicely Tyson, The Trip to Bountiful (Lifetime)

Jessica Lange, American Horror Story: Coven (FX)

Sarah Paulson, American Horror Story: Coven (FX)

Kristen Wiig, Spoils of Babylon (IFC)

Helena Bonham Carter, Burton and Taylor (BBC America)

Minnie Driver, Return to Zero (Lifetime)

Outstanding Reality-Competition Program

The Amazing Race (CBS)

Dancing With the Stars (ABC)

Project Runway (Lifetime)

So You Think You Can Dance (Fox)

Top Chef (Brav0)

The Voice (NBC)

TIME Music

Robin Thicke Made Yet Another Plea to Win His Wife Back

Robin Thicke
Robin Thicke performs at the BET Awards at the Nokia Theatre on Sunday, June 29, 2014, in Los Angeles. Chris Pizzello—Chris Pizzello—Invision—AP

If at first you don't succeed, try again

Robin Thicke made yet another plea for his estranged wife Paula Patton during Sunday’s BET Awards, debuting a song from his upcoming album “Forever Love.”

Thicke’s plea could have been considered heartfelt, given the endless fog, breaks for tears, and the opening dedication “to my wife to say I miss you, and I’m sorry,” but the video for his single “Get Her Back” is still fresh.

Later in the evening, the “Blurred Lines” crooner turned king of sorry tweeted a picture of the couple back when they were still happy.

Keep trying, Robin. If all the singing doesn’t work, hopefully the sales from your strategically-named album, Paula, will be of comfort.

TIME movies

Mandela Scriptwriter Blames 12 Years a Slave for His Movie’s Failure

William Nicholson
British playwright, novelist and screenwriter William Nicholson at his home near Lewes, East Sussex, 13th December 2012. Eamonn McCabe--Getty Images

Screenwriter William Nicholson says that his film Mandela failed to win awards because Steve McQueen's 12 Years a Slave "sucked up all the guilt about black people"

Well, this is one way to spin defeat.

At a literary festival in England over the weekend, Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom scriptwriter William Nicholson told the audience that his film failed to make a splash and win awards because 12 Years a Slave “sucked up all the guilt about black people that was available.” Unlike 12 Years — which earned rave reviews and took home three Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay — Mandela received mixed reviews and only one Oscar nod for Best Original Song. (“Let It Go” from Frozen ultimately picked up the prize.)

Yet Nicholson — who previously co-wrote the scripts for Gladiator and Elizabeth: The Golden Age — doesn’t think Mandela‘s lukewarm reception was warranted. “I think it worked superbly,” he said of his film. But “[Americans] were so exhausted feeling guilty about slavery that I don’t think there was much left over to be nice about our film. So our film didn’t do as well as we’d hoped, which was a bit heartbreaking.”

[Guardian]

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