TIME cybersecurity

The Guy Who Hacked Jeep’s Truck Just Quit Twitter

Chrysler Issues Recall On 850,000 Sport Utility Vehicles
Joe Raedle—Getty Images

He used to work for the NSA

Last month, Wired magazine filed a report in which two hackers detailed how they were able to take control of a Jeep Cherokee SUV over the Internet. One of the hackers, Charlie Miller, was also an engineer at Twitter.

Not anymore.

Miller, who used to work at the National Security Agency and is considered one of the world’s leading experts on cybersecurity, has left the social media company, according to Reuters. He didn’t comment on what he is planning to do next.

The hack on the Cherokee caused a recall of 1.4 million vehicles. Cybersecurity for connected cars is quickly becoming one of the most important issues facing automakers.

TIME car age

Here’s Why Lots Of Cars On The Road Probably Still Have Tape Decks

Toyota Opens Hybrid Engine Factory
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

The average U.S. vehicle age has hit a record

You know that slot in the middle of your center-console that you sometimes use as an iPhone holder? Well, that’s actually a tape deck—an ancient artifact once used to play cassette tapes. But what’s it doing in your car?

According to IHS Automotive, a consulting firm that provides insight into the automotive industry, the average age of vehicles in the U.S. has reached an all-time high of 11.5 years. Cars have become much more reliable throughout the years, so they can endure the road for a significantly longer period of time. With new smartphones and other devices being released every couple of years, cars far outlive the technology that comes with them; thus, tape decks.

IHS has been tracking this data since 2002. The average car age has gradually increased each year, with an even more dramatic boost during the recession due to a 40% drop in new car sales from 2008 to 2009. The climb has since slowed, and it has started to plateau. IHS predicts that the number will reach 11.6 in 2016 and remain stagnant until 2018, when the company thinks it will hit 11.7.

In case you’re wondering, the last new car to be factory-equipped with a cassette deck in the dashboard was a 2010 Lexus, according to the New York Times.

And here’s one caveat about owning and older car: make sure it has electronic stability control, and side curtain airbags — two key safety features introduced a little over a decade ago.

TIME Tesla

Tesla Shareholders Want a Vegan Car

But they probably won't get one

Some owners of Tesla Motors shares want the electric car company to make its cars more ethical — by taking out the leather seats.

Two shareholders, Mark and Elizabeth Peters, made a presentation at the company’s annual shareholder meeting Tuesday, asking Elon Musk and the rest of Tesla’s leadership to stop using animal products in the interiors of Tesla cars, and to go completely vegan by 2019, according to Bloomberg.

Right now, the Tesla Model S is available without leather seats, but not without leather trim. The couple said it was extremely difficult to get a vegan Model S.

Mark and Elizabeth Peters seem unlikely to get their wish, however, as the board of directors recommended against implementation of their plan.

For more details, head to Bloomberg.

TIME Automobiles

Audi Wants to Deliver Amazon Packages to Your Car

Couriers would track your car with GPS and open the trunk with a one-time access code

Is it a car, or a mobile mailbox? One car manufacturer wants to make it both.

The German carmaker Audi said Wednesday it will begin testing a delivery system in Munich that will allow people to order products from Amazon and have them delivered to the trunk of their car.

The idea is to make it easy for people to receive packages when they’re not at home.

An Audi spokesman told the New York Times that the pilot project would be the first auto delivery system involving an online retailer. Volvo has already tested package delivery to cars and will roll out the service soon in Sweden.

The Audi service would involve the German package delivery company DHL, who would send a delivery worker to a GPS-tracked car and open the trunk using a one-time, temporary-use code and deposit a package. The technology would have to be installed in your car, and would come with all new vehicles.

[NYT]

TIME Transportation

Golden Gate Bridge Closing for First Time in Decades

Exploring San Francisco & The Bay Area
George Rose—Getty Images The Golden Gate Bridge at Golden Gate National Park is viewed from a nearby hiking trail on April 2, 2014, in San Francisco, California. (Photo by George Rose--Getty Images)

Longest closure in the bridge's history

San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge is closing down for the weekend for the bridge’s longest shutdown ever and its first closure in more than 25 years.

The bridge will be closed from midnight Friday until 4 a.m. Monday morning so workers can install a moveable median barrier to prevent head-on collisions, according to a statement on the bridge’s website. Since 1970, there have been 128 head-on collisions that have resulted in 16 deaths, the Associated Press reports.

The bridge closed briefly in 1987 to celebrate its 50th anniversary, but the 52-hour closure this weekend will be the longest in the bridge’s history.

MONEY cars

7 Simple Ways to Winterproof Your Car

jeep driving through snowy wood scene
Burazin—Getty Images

The weather outside may be frightful, but your driving experience can still be delightful. All it takes is a little preparation to set yourself up for a safe and sound winter driving season.

Of course, the best advice is always this: When the roads are slick and unsafe, stay home. But if you must go out, you’ll be glad you planned ahead.

1. Check the Battery

Your vehicle’s battery loses 33% of its power when the temperature dips below freezing and as much as 60% of its juice when the mercury falls below zero. So it’s wise to give the battery and its charger a once-over to ensure they’re performing optimally. A quick trip to your local car technician will quickly reveal whether the battery is winter-ready, or corroded and otherwise not performing well.

2. Switch to Winter Wiper Blades and Cold Weather Washer Fluid

Windshield wipers are crucial to a clear view from the driver’s seat — but a nasty winter storm makes their job many times harder. That’s why you should consider investing in a pair of winter blades, which are built to withstand precipitation and freezing cold. Most winter blades are encased in a protective rubber shell that prevents ice and snow from hardening on the wiper. The going rate for a pair ranges from less than $20 to about $40, depending on size and quality.

While you’re attending to windshield issues, car safety experts also suggest switching over to cold weather washer fluid, or any brand containing antifreeze.

3. Store a Shovel in the Trunk

You’re driving down the road when your tires hit a patch of ice that sends you sliding into a snow bank. It’s a gentle spinout that causes no injury or damage, but now your front tires are sunk in a heap of fresh snow. You’re not going anywhere for awhile — unless you packed a shovel and have the muscle to dig yourself out. The shovel needn’t be a humdinger, just something sturdy that fits in the trunk.

4. Check the Tire Pressure

For every 10 degree change in temperature, car tires lose a pound of pressure. That’s why it’s wise to make sure the pressure in all four tires is in check at the outset of the winter season. In cold weather, any pressure imbalance will be made that much worse.

5. Evaluate the Tire Tread Depth

Car tires in any season need a tread depth of at least 6/32-inch to get adequate traction, according to Tire Rack. If yours fall short, you’re going to need to go tire shopping. Wintry road conditions necessitate even more depth than normal to help the tire grooves compress and release snow as they roll. Without sufficient tread depth, spinouts are more likely.

Should you opt for new winter tires, be sure to get a full set. Mounting winter tires on the front of a front-wheel-drive car can prompt sliding while putting winter tires only on the back of a rear-drive car will make turns more difficult.

6. Switch to Thinner Oil

Cold weather thickens the engine oil, which forces the car battery to work double time to get your car running smoothly. But you can give your battery a break and prevent potential engine trouble by switching over to a thinner oil. Most vehicles are served well by a 5W-20, 5W-30, or 10W-30 oil formula, but be sure to check your owners manual for notes on compatibility. It’s also wise to have the oil filter changed to maintain fluidity.

7. Pack a Blanket

Should you get stranded on the side of a highway during a temper tantrum by Jack Frost, you’ll be much less likely to run the risk of frostbite, hypothermia, or plain old cold weather discomfort if you’ve got a warm blanket stowed away in the trunk. While you’re at it, it’s not a bad idea to add a set of hand warmers, gloves, a wooly hat, a flashlight, bottled water, and a non-perishable snack to your winter weather emergency survival kit. Here’s hoping you never have to use it.

Read more articles from Wise Bread:

56 Life Hacks to Help You Win at Winter

12 Cheap Ways to Make Your Car Look Awesome

Five Reasons Why I Love Public Transportation

 

TIME Transportation

What Happened to the Car Industry’s Most Famous Flop?

A 1958 Edsel Convertible
Underwood Archives / Getty Images A 1958 Edsel convertible made by Ford

Market researched failed in a major way

Any crossword puzzler knows there’s a five-letter word for a Ford that flopped: Edsel.

At the heart of any big flop–like when Ford ended the Edsel 55 years ago, on Nov. 19, 1959–lies high expectations. The Edsel was named after Henry Ford’s son, no small honor, and it had its own division of the company devoted to its creation. As TIME reported in 1957 when the car debuted, the company had spent 10 years and $250 million on planning one of its first brand-new cars in decades. The Edsel came in 18 models but, in order to reach its sales goals, it would have to do wildly better than any other car in 1957 was expected to do. The September day that the car first went on the market, thousands of eager buyers showed up at dealers, but before the year was over monthly sales had fallen by about a third.

When Ford announced that they were pulling the plug on the program, here’s how TIME explained what had gone wrong:

As it turned out, the Edsel was a classic case of the wrong car for the wrong market at the wrong time. It was also a prime example of the limitations of market research, with its “depth interviews” and “motivational” mumbo-jumbo. On the research, Ford had an airtight case for a new medium-priced car to compete with Chrysler’s Dodge and DeSoto, General Motors’ Pontiac, Oldsmobile and Buick. Studies showed that by 1965 half of all U.S. families would be in the $5,000-and-up bracket, would be buying more cars in the medium-priced field, which already had 60% of the market. Edsel could sell up to 400,000 cars a year.

After the decision was made in 1955, Ford ran more studies to make sure the new car had precisely the right “personality.” Research showed that Mercury buyers were generally young and hot-rod-inclined, while Pontiac, Dodge and Buick appealed to middle-aged people. Edsel was to strike a happy medium. As one researcher said, it would be “the smart car for the younger executive or professional family on its way up.” To get this image across, Ford even went to the trouble of putting out a 60-page memo on the procedural steps in the selection of an advertising agency, turned down 19 applicants before choosing Manhattan’s Foote, Cone & Belding. Total cost of research, design, tooling, expansion of production facilities: $250 million.

A Taste of Lemon. The flaw in all the research was that by 1957, when Edsel appeared, the bloom was gone from the medium-priced field, and a new boom was starting in the compact field, an area the Edsel research had overlooked completely.

Even so, the Edsel wasn’t a complete loss for Ford: the company was able to use production facilities build for Edsel for their next new line of, you guessed it, compact cards.

Read the full report here, in the TIME Vault: The $250 Million Flop

TIME Automotive

BMW Recalls 1.6 Million Series 3 Autos Over Airbag Fault

BMW 3 series Gran Turismo
Daniel Kraus—BMW BMW 3 series Gran Turismo

BMW is one of a group of automakers affected by a faulty airbag supply

BMW said Wednesday it’s recalling 1.6 million 3 Series vehicles in order to replace passenger-side front airbags on its vehicles.

The luxury car maker said the recall is a “voluntary precautionary measure” that is aimed at minimizing the risk of faulty airbag activation. BMW said the recall affects cars for the model years 2000 to 2006.

An airbag component made by one of BMWs suppliers, Tokyo-based Takata Corp., could explode under certain circumstances, the Wall Street Journal reports. The airbag defect has caused the recall of 10 million vehicles by seven affected automakers since 2009.

About a third of the BMW cars to be recalled are in the U.S.

BMW said it will bear the cost of replacement.

TIME Gadgets

How Google and Apple Plan to Invade Your Next Car

Jared Newman for TIME

Between Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, the road to smarter cars is looking less rocky.

Just plug in your phone.

That simple step is how Apple and Google will shave years off the process of getting their software into automobiles. Instead of trying to bake iOS and Android into car makers’ infotainment systems, the two tech giants have come up with a workaround: You just plug in whatever phone you have, and send the software to the car by wire.

We’ve known for a while now that Apple was going this route with CarPlay. As announced in March, users will connect their phones to supported vehicles through a Lightning cable, and a specialized version of iOS takes over the center screen. You can then ask Siri for directions, put on some music, make a phone call through the car’s speaker system or dictate a text message. It’s supposed to be just as safe as any in-car dashboard–and much safer than looking down at your phone while driving.

Last week, Google announced a similar system called Android Auto. Instead of using a Lightning cable, it uses MicroUSB. Instead of speaking to Siri, you use Google voice search. Instead of Apple Maps for directions, you get Google Maps. Both Apple and Google are also soliciting app developers so that certain apps on your phone–such as your favorite streaming music service–will show up in the car.

Naoki Sugimoto, Senior Program Director for Honda’s Silicon Valley Lab, told me during Google’s I/O conference that it can take five years to develop a new car. But since Android Auto doesn’t involve specialized hardware, Honda has figured out how to quickly integrate Google’s software.

“These are mostly software features, so the way we work is to try to decouple software architecture from hardware architecture,” he said. “So this way, in the five-year process, we can wait until the last moment to put a new feature into the production schedule.”

And here’s the kicker: Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are similar enough in their underlying architecture that some auto makers–including Honda and Volvo–are planning to support iOS and Android at the same time. So at least in some vehicles, you won’t have to pledge allegiance to a single platform when you buy your car.

The plug-in system doesn’t just provide more choice for users. It also allows auto makers to retain some control over the dashboard, and frees Google and Apple from having to support things like FM radio, climate control and Bluetooth connectivity. For all those things, you’d still use the car’s built-in system. But when you want your car to be a little smarter, you’ll just bring along your cable of choice–MicroUSB or Lighting–and plug in the phone you’ve got. (Both Google and Apple are letting auto makers decide how the car’s native systems should integrate with Android Auto and CarPlay. Google is also letting auto makers add some of their own features to Android Auto, such as vehicle diagnostics and roadside service requests.)

The trade-off is that performance can be a little laggy–at least that was the case in my Android Auto demo at Google I/O last week–and you’ll always have to take the phone out of your pocket to use Android Auto or CarPlay. Maybe someday we’ll see a system that connects wirelessly to your phone while still providing the entire Android or iOS interface, but doing so today would cause a huge hit on the phone’s battery life. I imagine people will still rely on Bluetooth connectivity some of the time, even if it means having no apps and no on-board navigation.

I haven’t tried CarPlay yet, but I spent some time in a Honda demo car with Android Auto at Google’s I/O conference this week. In short, it looks like a much safer way to listen to music, make phone calls and get directions while driving. Both Apple and Google claim that their software will start showing up in cars later this year; I’m looking forward to when plugging in your phone is as common as popping in a CD once was.

TIME Automotive

These Are The 69 Words GM Employees Were Forbidden from Using

Massive Ignition Switch Recall Weighs Heavy On GM's Profits
Bill Pugliano—Getty Images The General Motors world headquarters is shown April 24, 2014 in Detroit, Michigan.

A 2008 PowerPoint presentation released as part of General Motors’ $35 million settlement with the U.S. government cautioned employees against using words and phrases including "rolling sarcophagi," "Hindenberg" or "Kevorkianesque" in reports and presentations

Documents released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on Friday show that there are some things you can say if you’re an employee at the kingpin automaker… and there are other things you just can’t.

Released as part of General Motors’ $35 million settlement with the U.S. government over its faulty ignition switch scandal, the slides from a company presentation in 2008 told employees to choose their words carefully, because anything said could end up publicized.

Basically, the presentation is a 101 in how to avoid a PR disaster. It’s not hard to imagine how the meeting unfolded.

GM management appears to have asked employees not to liken vehicles to “rolling sarcophagi,” and not to compare an automobile to the “Titanic” or the “Hindenburg.” And it could have really unnerved drivers if they heard that GM engineers had called their Chevrolet Malibus “gruesome” “deathtraps.” Staying away from the whole death thing was apparently highly recommended.

Employees were asked to avoid the use of the word “inferno” (unless, perhaps they were referring to the epic poem by Dante Alighieri, or the equally classic Dan Brown tale), and they were asked to avoid language that might evoke “explosions” or “powder kegs.” Cutting imagery such as “mutilating,” “lacerating” and even the more equivocal “potentially-disfiguring” was also to be eschewed.

Apocalyptic language, particularly in reference to their vehicles, was not condoned. And no, “Kevorkianesque” was not acceptable language, unless perhaps employees were rationally discussing the merits of euthanasia.

Here’s a full list of example words employees were asked to avoid:

always, annihilate, apocalyptic, asphyxiating, bad, Band-Aid, big time, brakes like an “X” car, cataclysmic, catastrophic, Challenger, chaotic, Cobain, condemns, Corvair-like, crippling, critical, dangerous, deathtrap, debilitating, decapitating, defect, defective, detonate, disemboweling, enfeebling, evil, eviscerated, explode, failed, flawed, genocide, ghastly, grenadelike, grisly, gruesome, Hindenburg, Hobbling, Horrific, impaling, inferno, Kevorkianesque, lacerating, life-threatening, maiming, malicious, mangling, maniacal, mutilating, never, potentially-disfiguring, powder keg, problem, rolling sarcophagus (tomb or coffin), safety, safety related, serious, spontaneous combustion, startling, suffocating, suicidal, terrifying, Titanic, unstable, widow-maker, words or phrases with a biblical connotation, you’re toast

A spokesman for GM, Greg Martin, said the company’s culture has changed since the 2008 training session in which the PowerPoint presentation was shown. “Today’s GM encourages employees to discuss safety issues, which is reinforced through GM’s recently announced Speak Up for Safety Program,” Martin said in a statement to Reuters.

GM has promised to improve employee training regarding documentation practices and discussion of safety issues, as part of the government settlement. But don’t expect the automaker to name its next SUV model “Challenger” any time soon.

Here’s the list as seen on the original document:

Screen-Shot-2014-05-17-at-11.05

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