TIME Auto

Smartphone Driver’s Licenses Could Be Coming to This State

Chances are, less people with forget their licenses at home

Iowa will soon allow citizens to use a mobile app on their smart phone as their driver’s license.

The free app will be available for Iowans in 2015, Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) director Paul Trombino announced during a state budget hearing, the Des Moines Register reports. The digital license can be used at airports and during traffic stops. The app would require a pin number to maintain security.

The new app is part of the Iowa DOT’s shift toward a variety of transportation-related technology advances, like cameras in snowplows and online bridge-building support.

The Register reported that Trombino is asking for $14.8 million for the license project: “We are really moving forward on this. The way things are going, we may be the first in the nation,” he said.

[Des Moines Register]

MONEY Autos

The $64,000 GMC Sierra Denali Shows How Pickups Have Gone Crazy Luxe

A powerful engine, a moon roof, USB ports and comfortable seating for five are all signs of booms in agriculture and construction.

Even in the darkest days of the American automobile industry, pickup trucks came through. Detroit couldn’t build profitable cars to save its soul, but pickups always delivered sales and profits.

In the last couple of years, with agriculture booming and construction recovering, the auto companies have been outdoing themselves to hang on to this lucrative turf. Ford is about to launch a new, aluminum version of its top selling F-150. Chrysler has had to increase production of its Ram 1500 to keep up with demand. Meanwhile, GM is about to debut two middleweight contenders, Canyon (GMC) and Colorado (Chevy).

GMC also rolled out new versions of its heavy duty 2500 and 3500 Sierra HD models that highlight another trend: the pickup gone crazy luxe. For the successful farmer who now pilots a climate-controlled, $325,000 John Deere 9370R tractor with mission-control computer display terminals, the fully-equipped Sierra Denali 2500HD that we tested might be no less than the minimum required. This diesel-driven, high-waisted brute feels more like a working Escalade, and at $64,000 for the crew-cab, diesel version, it’s priced in the neighborhood.

Who would drop $64,000 on a pickup? Look, I’m a car guy so I really can’t answer that question, but if I had to get up at 4 a.m. every day and do actual labor on a farm or ranch, or at construction sites, I’d like to think I’d earned a cushy ride. And in the Sierra Denali you’ll get one. Once you adjust to sitting a mile high and towering over mere cars — and in Manhattan (New York, that is, not Kansas) it’s kind of a cool perspective — you realize that the Sierra doesn’t feel like a truck. On the highway, it’s one of the quietest vehicles on the highway that I’ve tested this year.

That’s even more surprising considering that this particular Sierra Denali is powered by a 6.6 L V8 Duramax diesel tied to a 6-speed Allison Transmission. But this combo, odd to say, doesn’t shout its 397 h.p. worth of trucky-ness. Because the diesel delivers bigtime torque at low revs, (765 lb. ft. @ 1,600) the pickup’s power sounds more oceanlike as it gathers force. You’ll pay for that power, with the diesel package adding $8,845 to the standard price of $53,740. Since you are already in luxury car territory, why not throw in a power sunroof ($995), aluminum rims ($850), and 20-inch tires ($200)?

You are now styling in four-wheel drive and your buddies will appreciate it: You can fit four of them in the Sierra Denali 2500HD, and they will be properly seated in the more-than-roomy-enough crew cab. You, though, will have the best seat, one that’s heated and air conditioned and equipped with its own alarm system: The seat shimmies to keep you alert in slow traffic or if it senses you are drifting out of your lane. And because this is a work truck, the center console is loaded with storage for files, laptops, or even power tools; there’s also a power panel that includes USB ports, a couple of 12-volt ports, and a standard electrical outlet.

It would be silly of me to try to tow a trailer around New York City, but the Sierra Denali 2500HD can haul one weighing up to 13,000 lb. On the other hand, we did manage a brief four-wheel drive test on a rough patch of Harriman State Park about 50 miles north of New York. The fall foliage was beautiful and the pickup handled the high brush easily given its substantial ground clearance. I’d be looking forward to winter driving in this thing if I worked outside. Although I wouldn’t be looking forward to working outside.

MONEY Autos

Corvette Stingray: All American Muscle

TIME's Bill Saporito test drives the new Corvette Stingray and finds it's as fast and powerful as advertised.

The guy standing on the traffic island seeking donations didn’t want one from me. He just walked over to the car, gave the thumbs-up and then moved on to the unremarkable vehicle behind me.

The 2015 Corvette Stingray ZF1 convertible I was driving is the type of car that can do that. You park it at Home Depot and guys start circling, taking pictures. Parking lot attendants, who see everything on wheels, nod in admiration. New cars that attract this kind of attention are relatively few: The awesome Audi R-8 comes to mind, as do the recently remade Camaro and the old Jaguar XK8. Even that funky little Fiat 500 was a head turner when it first landed.

For Chevrolet, the Corvette is an iconic automobile and you redesign it at your peril. Yet as Ford proved with its Mustang this year, and Chevy itself with Camaro, you can remake trophy cars without denting their heritage. This Vette is a perfect example of heritage brought smartly—and swiftly— forward.

The Stingray did show up with a surprise: an eight-speed automatic with paddle shifters. The automatic trans adds $1,725 to the base price of $58,000, and the other goodies on the car I drove—including a performance data and video recorder—pushed the price up to $71,255. Who would want to drive a Vette with an automatic? Turns out, lots of people, and fully 65% of new Vettes being sold are automatics, according to the company. And it’s not just Corvette owners. Manual transmissions simply can’t match the efficiency of a new generation of 8-, 9-, and 10- speed automatics now being introduced into high performance cars. (In fact, the new Porsche GT3 isn’t available with a manual transmission. It rides a dual-clutch automatic called a Doppelkupplungsgetriebe.) The manual transmission is going the way of the manual window. Do you miss cranking?

Although I absolutely doppelkupplungsgetriebed at the thought of a stickless Corvette, any disappointment disappeared when I stomped on the pedal at a highway on-ramp. Very instant gratification. Chevy has equipped this Vette with its LT1 6.2 liter V-8 engine, the latest version of a famous power plant known as the small block V-8. In GM lore, this engine actually saved the Corvette when it was introduced in 1955, because sales had been languishing with the underpowered 150-hp engine then in use. The small block V8 put the muscle in muscle cars. This updated one has variable valve timing that deactivates cylinders when you don’t need them—say cruising when the tachometer’s barely pushing 1,500 r.p.m.—which helps the car’s impressive 29-m.p.g. highway fuel rating.

But when you want’em, all eight cylinders snap to attention and report for duty, ready to throw out 455-to- 460 h.p. —the higher figure if you get the optional multimode exhaust option ($1,195) that is exquisitely tuned to zoom. This Vette will get you from here to there—0 to 60 mph—in a throaty 3.7 seconds. The eight-speed automatic is even a tick faster than the seven-speed manual, although the thrill of rocketing up the speedometer is very much the same. And if you insist on shifting the gears yourself, go right ahead and use the paddles. Automatic or no, this thing is still low, wide, and nasty. The two competition seats in the Z51 version come with adjustable side bolsters to lock yourself in on tight turns.

It’s not all about speed, I guess. The Stingray includes a 5-position Drive Mode selector (Sport, Track, Tour, Eco, Weather) that adjusts the performance to suit conditions or your whims. And on nice days, there’s that drop-top, which can be popped while moving at up to 30 m.p.h. if you’d like to really show off.

Chevy is also making the convertible available on a supercharged Z06 racing model rated at 650 h.p. that it will introduce next year. Which is going to provide a whole new definition of driving with the wind in your hair. You are probably going to need that automatic. Because you’ll be too busy hanging on to your hat to work a stick.

Correction: a previous version of this story stated the Corvette has a dual-clutch transmission.

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TIME Companies

Lyft Is Giving Rides to Baseball Fans During the Playoffs

Lyft Gives Up Pink Mustaches To Challenge Uber In New York City
The Lyft Inc. application (app) is demonstrated on an Apple Inc. iPhone 5s for an arranged photograph in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, July 9, 2014. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Lyft will offer rides during the playoffs

Lyft announced Thursday that it will partner with Major League Baseball as the official ride for fans, just in time for the playoffs.

The ride will offer car-sharing services to 74 million fans for safe transport to and from ballparks during the 2014 Postseason, which begins Tuesday, Sept. 30, through the entire 2015 MLB season, according to a press release. During that time, Lyft and MLB will offer free ride giveaways and special promotions for the playoffs in October.

MLB hosts over 2,000 baseball events per year, more games than any other professional league. The partnership will give Lyft, which has rapidly expanded across the U.S. this year as a competitor to Uber and other rival services, a shot to further establish greater traction in the ride-sharing industry as it and other players navigate complex regulatory hurdles to entering new markets.

TIME Auto

There’s Good News About Ford’s Hardcore New Truck

Ford Aluminum Pickup
An attendee looks at the Ford Motor Co. F-150 pickup truck during the Washington Auto Show in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. Bloomberg via Getty Images

Ford’s big gamble moves into price point. Will it work?

fortunelogo-blue
This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

One of the most closely watched automotive introductions of recent years is set to unfold as Ford Motor Co. retail dealers begin placing orders for the aluminum-body F Series pickup trucks, scheduled to arrive before year’s end.

This week Ford told dealers the retail price of the new truck will increase from $360 for entry-level models up to $3,615 for high-line luxury versions. The base model 2015 XL F-150 starts at $26,615, up $395 or 1.5% while the top-end Platinum version starts at $52,155, up $3,055, or 6.2%.

Ford is taking a big gamble on aluminum. The new trucks will be up to 700 pounds lighter to improve fuel efficiency, relying on customers’ acceptance that the metal will prove every bit as durable as steel. Ford is sailing into uncharted waters with regard to the manufacturing process, since no automaker has ever fabricated aluminum vehicle bodies at high speed.

Collision shops and dealerships have had to buy new tools and undergo training to gain expertise in repairing aluminum.

Ford so far hasn’t released fuel efficiency figures, which means that the potential savings are unclear. If the numbers are dramatic, they could attract buyers – especially those who use pickups for commercial purposes – providing an advantage for Ford over Fiat Chrysler’s Ram pickups or Chevrolet and GMC models from General Motors.

For the rest of the story, go to Fortune.com.

TIME Auto

10 Cars Americans Simply Don’t Want to Buy

10 Cars Americans Don't Want To Buy
A Volvo S60 at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show in Geneva, Switzerland. Harold Cunningham—Getty Images

247-LogoVersions-114x57
This post is in partnership with 24/7 Wall Street. The article below was originally published on 247wallst.com.

The American auto industry nearly collapsed during the recession as car sales plummeted and companies struggled to stay afloat. Since then, U.S. car and light truck sales have steadily increased, reaching 1.6 million in May, up 11% from the year before.

Despite the general recovery, demand for some vehicles continues to underwhelm. According to figures from TrueCar, an auto industry information and technology platform, 15 models spent an average of at least 90 days on dealers’ lots before being sold. No car took longer to turn over than the Volvo S60, at an average of 155.5 days.

Click here to see the ten cars Americans don’t want to buy

Days to turn is useful metric for gauging inventory levels, Eric Lyman, vice president of industry insights at TrueCar, explained in an interview with 24/7 Wall St. “The clock starts when the car lands at the dealership,” Lyman said. This levels the playing field, he added, because production facilities for various carmakers are located at different points across the U.S. or even in foreign countries.

According to Lyman, several factors may contribute to rising inventory levels. Some of these are temporary factors, such as the switch to a new model year. Because TrueCar data for 2014 covers cars in their 2014 model years, it makes sense that turnover rates are lower for models such as the GM’s (NYSE: GM) GMC Yukon, Chevrolet Tahoe, and Cadillac Escalade, all of which have released newly overhauled 2015 models.

In other cases, Lyman added, “high inventory is going to be [due] to a disconnect between the sales goals of the manufacturer and the retail demand for those units.” In some instances, manufacturers overestimate demand for their brands and ship too many units to their dealers. This results in high inventory and turnover levels for the brands.

Many of the brands that take the longest to sell are unpopular with customers, Lyman explained. Both Mitsubishi and Scion have car models that take the most days to turn. Both were also two of the nation’s lowest rated car brands, according to J.D. Power’s 2013 Automotive Performance, Execution and Layout Study, which measures brands’ appeal with car buyers.

Cars from Cadillac, Ford’s (NYSE: F) Lincoln, Jaguar and Volvo, all of which ranked in the bottom half of premium brands, according to the study, also made the list. Only one of the cars with the highest days to turn, the Chevrolet Tahoe, was manufactured by one of the survey’s 10 highest rated non-premium brands.

Although there are differences in how brands are perceived, Lyman added that disparities in actual quality among various brands is often relatively small. Five of the 10 cars requiring the most days to sell were made by brands with above-average scores on J.D. Power’s 2013 Initial Quality Study. Leading these brands was GMC, maker of the Yukon, which trailed only Porsche for fewest problems per 100 cars, according to the Survey. Only three models belonged to brands with scores considerably below the industry average, although one of these, Scion, was the lowest-rated brand in J.D. Power’s survey.

Based on figures provided by TrueCar, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the car models with the highest number of days to turn. TrueCar turnover and sales data for each model reference a particular model year — figures for 2013 apply to cars in their 2013 model year, while figures for 2014 count data for 2014 model year vehicles. TrueCar also provided sales data for each of these models. Manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) data are from manufacturer’s website, and refer to the newest model year. We also relied on information from J.D. Power and Consumer Reports surveys, and the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). Safety data are from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Sales figures are from The Wall Street Journal, as well as various company press releases.

These are the cars Americans don’t want to buy.

3. Cadillac Escalade
> Days to turn: 115.5
> Jan.-May unit sales: 1,498
> MSRP: $71,695

The Cadillac Escalade is one of three full-size General Motors SUVs among the 10 cars with the longest days to turn, alongside Chevrolet’s Tahoe and GMC’s Yukon. It is also the slowest selling American manufactured car, taking an average of 115.5 days to turn in the first five months of 2014. This is up from 61.2 days to turn between January and May 2013, as sales have dropped 14.7% year-over-year. However, this may not necessarily be an issue of quality. General Motors recently released a new Escalade, which may affect sales and turnover for the 2014 model year. In fact, Cadillac was one of the top-ranked makes in J.D. Power’s 2014 Vehicle Dependability Study, behind only Lexus and Mercedes-Benz. Consumers were also happy with the brand, awarding it one of the industry’s highest ACSI scores.

2. Mitsubishi Outlander
> Days to turn: 117.1
> Jan.-May unit sales: 3,788
> MSRP: $22,995

The Mitsubishi Outlander took dealers an average of 117.1 days to turn so far this year. This was actually an improvement from last year, when it took dealers nearly 128 days to turn an Outlander. Sales of the Outlander have also been strong this year, up 37% in the first five months of 2014 versus the year before. Overall, sales of Mitsubishi cars rose nearly 34% in that time. However, the carmaker still holds just a 0.5% share of the U.S. car market. Mitsubishi’s model competes in a crowded field against some of the nation’s best selling cars, such as Toyota’s RAV4, Honda’s CR-V and Ford’s Escape.

ALSO READ: Ten States with the Fastest Growing Economies

1. Volvo S60
> Days to turn: 155.5
> Jan.-May unit sales: 1,777
> MSRP: $33,300

Volvo’s S60 had the longest average days to turn of any car model sold in the U.S., taking an average of 155.5 days to turn in the first five months of 2014. This was more than twice as long as it took to turn an S60 last year. Sales of the S60 have slid as well, with just 1,777 sold this year through May, down 13% from the same period in 2013. So far this year, total Volvo sales are down roughly 10% nationwide. As a brand, Volvo has long been considered a carmaker in need of a turnaround. Ford sold it to Chinese carmaker Geely in 2010. The brand still maintains a reputation for safety, and the S60 earned a five star safety rating from the NHTSA and was an IIHS Top Safety Pick+ last year.

For the rest of the list, go to 24/7Wall St.

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TIME Auto

This Is the State With the Most Stolen SUVs

Best States to Get SUV CUV Stolen
A Ford Escape in Maine is returned to an area dealership after a scam artist had stolen it. Portland Press Herald—Getty Images

Thieves love the Ford Escape

California isn’t just home to the worst traffic—it’s also the state with the most reported SUV/CUV thefts.

According to a report published on Monday by the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB), the Golden State had the most reports of stolen SUVs/CUVs (3,531) between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2013. Florida came in second (1,897), followed by Michigan (1,834), Texas (1,686) and New York (1,577). In total, 21,711 vehicles were stolen during this period, compared to that of the NICB’s previous report, when only 19,961 thefts occurred.

But in which states and territories would owners be most likely to recover their stolen vehicles? All stolen SUVs/CUVs in Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming were recovered, while Puerto Rico, New Jersey and New York posted the lowest recovery rates at 44%, 72% and 78%, respectively. In over half of U.S. states, over 90% of stolen vehicles were recovered.

In general, Ford makes proved to be most attractive t0 SUV/CUV thieves: the Ford Escape (1,421), Ford Edge (1,140), Ford Explorer (958) were the top three most stolen, followed by the Jeep Grand Cherokee (912) and Kia Sorento (725).

In 2012, the most stolen car of any kind was the Honda Accord, with 58,596 thefts.

TIME

Ralph Nader: GM Must Pay Big for What Was Clearly an Institutional Cover-Up

GM CEO Mary Barra Testifies To House Hearing On The Company's Ignition Switch Recall
General Motors Company CEO Mary Barra testifies during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, on April 1, 2014 in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

Top management must be held accountable for a pattern of inaction and the auto company's uncommunicative committee structures.

The ongoing and tragic General Motors debacle involving the mishandling of the fatal ignition switch defect reached its latest milestone with the release last week of a company-commissioned 315-page report by former U.S. Attorney Anton Valukas. Valukas condemned GM’s “troubling disavowal of responsibility” that led “to devastating consequences.” He declared that for more than a decade, the facts about these faulty switches that took the lives of motorists by stalling and depowering the vehicles thrashed around an “astonishing number of committees” inside GM’s sprawling silo-like bureaucracy.

What Valukas delivered for top GM management was concisely described by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), who said, “It seems like the best report money can buy. It absolves upper management, denies deliberate wrongdoing and dismisses corporate culpability.”

The Valukas Report concluded that there was no cover-up, even though GM’s new CEO Mary Barra attributed the delay to a “pattern of incompetence and neglect.” She dismissed mid-level employees, some senior level managers, disciplined five others and installed new executives to supposedly shape up the place.

In her speech to 1,000 GM employees, Barra began to get at the core problem when she declared that employees should report failures to their supervisors and, if that doesn’t work, to “contact me directly.” This is not remotely the right sequence. Few employees would expose their careers to such potential retaliation by the “cover their rear” attitude of the GM hierarchy.

The report cites what has become known as the “GM nod”: “The GM nod, Barra described, is when everyone nods in agreement to a proposed plan of action, but then leaves the room with no intention to follow through, and the nod is an empty gesture.” Other witnesses explained the “GM salute, a crossing of the arms and pointing toward others, indicating that the responsibility belongs to someone else.”

Meanwhile, year after year, nearly 3 million Chevrolet Cobalts and Saturn Ions, among others, carried this lethal but easily fixable defect, resulting in highway crashes, deaths and injuries. Not until February of this year did GM announce the recall of millions of these cars. Nor did the Department of Transportation act to compel such a recall, even though it knew about the defect for years. Finally, this year, it fined GM the maximum sum of $35 million.

How can top management not be held accountable for such a pattern of inaction, such a miasma of evasive, uncommunicative committee structures, such a malfunctioning chaos of mortal information not being passed on to the top officials of the company? Taken together, it clearly was a 13-year institutional cover-up.

Clarence Ditlow, longtime GM watchdog and head of the Center for Auto Safety, which I co-founded, called the Valukas report “little more than an elaborate whitewash that buys into GM’s arguments that it was a bunch of incompetent engineers, lawyers and mid-level managers who were fired as a result.” Ditlow argues that “GM has a corporate culture where denying safety problems has been prevalent and taking responsibility for safety defects has been rare.” He also faulted the report’s “buying into the company’s argument that this is just an airbag defect – yet stalling has been the subject of over 300 safety recalls from all companies from 1966-2013. The Valukas report ignores the 2004 death and injury Early Warning Reports (EWR) filed by GM on the models covered by the ignition switch recall through 2013.”

Incredibly, the ignition switch hazard was classified as a “customer convenience issue,” rather than an urgent safety failure. But as former National Highway Traffic Safety Administration physicist Dr. Carl E. Nash told me, GM has a long history of denial, delay, cover-ups and blaming everyone but itself for millions of serious defective motor vehicles.

GM is bracing for the results of the Justice Department’s criminal investigation, the Securities and Exchange Commission’s probe, and the two Congressional Committees’ ongoing inquiries, all of which lie ahead. But on its own, GM must act to compensate the bereaved families and the injured survivors in product-defect crashes both before and after its 2009 bankruptcy and its $50 billion government bailout. The kangaroo court of corporate bankruptcy dissolved existing personal injury claims, stripping the victims of their constitutional rights to have their day in court.

Secondly, shuffling personnel and rearranging committees will not do the job Barra says she wants done. What will be effective is if she establishes an independent ombudsman who confidentially receives complaints from internal whistle-blowers and reports them directly to GM’s CEO and President, as well as to the Department of Transportation. As Nassim Taleb wrote in his recent book Antifragile, nothing is more productive of accountability than top bosses having “skin in the game.”

Providing a monetary incentive to the reporting employee for saving the company a boatload of trouble and averting highway tragedies will also help. Companies often give money to workers who suggest dollar-saving ways to run production or distribution lines. GM can certainly do the same for internal life-saving reports by conscientious GM personnel.

Ralph Nader is a consumer advocate and author of Unstoppable: The Emerging Left-Right Alliance to Dismantle the Corporate State.

TIME

China is Trying to Buy a Car Industry

CHINA-ECONOMY-CARS
Workers on the assembly line at the Sino-French joint venture Dongfeng Peugeot-Citroën Automobile (DPCA) plant in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province, Dec. 2013. PETER PARKS—AFP/Getty Images

Struggling Chinese automakers are turning to foreign acquisitions for a competitive edge

China has had dreams of turning Shanghai into a 21st-century Detroit – no, not a bankrupt basket case, but a major center for the global automobile industry. But those hopes have been dashed. Though China is the world’s largest car market, and Chinese have become avid drivers (as you can read in my latest TIME magazine story), the nation’s automobile manufacturers have struggled to catch up with their international rivals.

Generally lacking technology, experience and brand power, Chinese carmakers have faced hurdles even competing in their home market, where Chinese consumers think homegrown cars are of poor quality. As a result, foreign brands like Volkswagen, Buick and Hyundai, command 70% of the Chinese market, Overseas, Chinese cars tend to get exported to other developing countries where shoppers care more about price than nameplate.

What to do? Chinese car companies appear to be trying to buy the technology, know-how and market presence they have struggled to develop on their own. Recently, the global auto industry has seen a series of high-profile deals by Chinese car companies. In February, state-owned Dongfeng Motor agreed to invest some $1.1 billion in troubled automaker Peugeot-Citroen, as part of a rescue package that includes the French government. A few days earlier, Chinese car parts maker Wanxiang won an auction for the assets of Fisker Automotive, a bankrupt U.S. manufacturer of hybrid sports cars. (Last year, Wanxiang also completed the acquisition of most of bankrupt U.S. battery maker A123 Systems.) Then, earlier this month, a unit of China’s FAW inked a joint venture with Michigan-based EcoMotors, a start-up backed by Bill Gates, to manufacture the latter’s environmentally friendly engines. The FAW subsidiary is picking up the entire bill for the Chinese facility, an investment of more than $200 million.

These latest deals follow in the footsteps of the granddaddy of Chinese auto acquisitions: In 2010, private Chinese carmaker Geely bought storied Swedish firm Volvo from Ford. Recently, the two said they were expanding cooperation to develop a new subcompact model.

What’s happening here is that China’s carmakers, with ample access to financing, are using their money muscle to buy technology, market share and access to new product lines that would have been difficult and time-consuming to develop on their own. (In this way, the auto deals are similar to those recently announced by Chinese PC maker Lenovo for Motorola’s handset business from Google and IBM’s low-end servers.) That’s why China’s asset grabs have led some critics to fret that the West is handing Chinese automaker critical know-how that will help them compete with heavyweights like GM and Ford, or even worse, can be used in military applications. After Wanxiang’s purchase of A123 was approved by a U.S. government panel, one senator complained that such technology developed in America “should not simply be shipped off to China.”

Yet as the old saying goes, beggars can’t be choosers. The Chinese (for the most part) are investing in companies or buying assets that have a very troubled history. It is an open question if France’s loss-making Peugeot, for instance, could even survive without a fresh capital injection. Chinese firms like Dongfeng have the money to save the day. Buying assets, however, is much different from using them wisely. It remains to be seen if these Chinese companies can capitalize on their purchases to turn themselves into better auto companies, or if they are capable of helping to turn around their troubled new investments. China’s car industry may find that cash can buy you stuff, but not easy shortcuts.

TIME Automotives

Nissan Sees Electric-Car Sales Boom

Japan Nissan
Itsuo Inouye—AP

The Japanese car manufacturer, which has sold more than 100,000 units of its electric Leaf since its 2010 launch, says it may be able to sell more gas-free vehicles than it initially projected as more and countries embrace fossil-fuel alternatives

The market for electric cars is shifting into high gear. Or at least that’s what the automaker Nissan says.

The Japanese electric-car maker said Saturday it may be able to sell more gas-free vehicles than it initially projected, as more and more countries embrace fossil-fuel alternatives, the Wall Street Journal reports. Nissan has sold more than 100,000 units of its electric Leaf worldwide since its launch in 2010. Nissan will begin selling the Leaf in South Korea in the second half of this year and expects to sell 1.5 million units of electric vehicles by 2020 as the company looks to emerging markets.

Despite having to overcome challenges like shorter range than gas-engine cars, relatively high prices and a minimal refueling infrastructure, tougher emissions standards worldwide will help spur the growth of the electric-car market, Nissan says.

[WSJ]

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