TIME Art

Miley Cyrus Is Now a Visual Artist, Too

Her debut collection, aptly titled "Dirty Hippie," was presented at New York Fashion Week during designer Jeremy Scott's show

Miley Cyrus never ceases to amaze. On Wednesday, the 21-year-old pop star debuted her newest artistic venture: an art collection, aptly titled “Dirty Hippie,” as a part of avant-garde designer Jeremy Scott’s New York Fashion Week Show. Models in Scott’s show reportedly wore some of the pieces, which will also be on display at V Magazine‘s New York offices starting on Sept. 11. Details of the collection were also presented in V, whose cover Cyrus graces this month.

The collection features a five-foot-bong, a vibrator with a joint attached to it, and a party hat the singer told V she saw and thought “it might be fun to glue some sh-t onto it.” There is also a piece featuring a pineapple, because Cyrus says the fruits make “yummy c-m.” Sure!

Cyrus is not a formally trained artist, and though the pieces — which the singer has been teasing on her Instagram account — give off a high-DIY-project vibe (mainly because it was a high DIY project), Scott told V that’s what drew him to her work. As for Cyrus, the project was about exploring other artistic avenues so she doesn’t have to “die a pop pop dumb dumb.”

Cyrus’s main inspiration for her work was her fans and her tour, from which many of the pieces (including the vibrator with the joint attached to it) were derived. In the interview, Cyrus said her creations were like therapy, given the rough start she had to 2014.

“At the beginning of this year, I hated 2014 because everything that could go wrong kept going wrong. Being in the hospital, my dog dying…Everything just kept sh-itting on me and sh-tting on me. So then I started taking all of those sh-t things and making them good, and being like, I’m using it. My brother and my friends all said that’s what they felt I was doing. So, that’s how I started making art. I had a bunch of f-cking junk and sh-t, and so instead of letting it be junk and sh-t, I turned it into something that made me happy. “

Welp, so long as she’s happy.

 

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: September 4

1. The results of the NATO summit and the alliance’s stance on ISIS and Ukraine will define President Obama’s foreign policy legacy.

By Jonathan Alter in the Daily Beast

2. Intense boot camps for highly skilled careers may displace costly graduate degrees and get more people working.

By Kevin Carey in Washington Monthly

3. To make a splash in the mobile market despite poor sales of its Windows phone, Microsoft is selling apps to iPhone and Android users.

By Dan Frommer in Quartz

4. The street children of India are publishing a quarterly newspaper, finding a purpose and a passion in telling their stories.

By Mariah Wilson, Chander Bhan and Paul Ewen in Vocativ

5. Harm reduction – versus a law-enforcement focused “war on drugs” – could reduce overdose deaths.

By Josh Eidelson in Bloomberg Business Week

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Arts

Reddit User Makes Greco-Roman Statues Look Like They’re Taking Selfies

The future of art?

In case you were curious, that is the face of a Greco-Roman statue, modeled after those at the Vatican Museum, “posing” for a selfie.

Thanks to some careful camera angling, Reddit user “jazsus_ur_lookin_well” took these photographs of statues at the Crawford Art Gallery in Cork, Ireland, as a way to join old art with new… art. (Is a selfie art? What would Kim Kardashian say?)

“The staff in that art gallery were giving me some strange looks,” the user wrote on Reddit.

At least this person didn’t break any of them.

(h/t Bored Panda)

TIME technology

Remote-Controlled Robots Let You Explore Tate Britain at Night Without Leaving Home

After Dark project robot with Jacob Epstein's The Visitation (1926) at Tate Britain Alexey Moskvin—Alexey Moskvin

Great way to beat the crowds

Fancy a trip to the Tate but can’t cross the pond anytime soon? No worries, the venerable British museum is letting anyone with a (Chrome) browser roam its galleries without the pesky crowds or security guards dampening the experience.

Just one catch: you can only do it in the dark. Starting tonight at 5 p.m. Eastern (10 p.m. London time), visitors around the globe can log on to the Tate After Dark website and explore the Tate Britain’s collection using internet-controlled robots. (Think Roomba with a webcam at eye level). The four robots — which were designed and engineered by the London-based consultants The Workers with help from space research firm RAL Space — let remote users explore five centuries worth of British art, ranging from Elizabethan portraiture to video works by Gilbert & George, currently on display.

“It’s about getting lost in the museum,” says Tommaso Lanza, who co-created the five-night interactive event, which runs through Sunday. “It’s also about fun.”

Each of the four robots has seven sonar sensors on board, an off-the-shelf webcam and a hardware encoder. The bots have no sense of direction, so it will be up to the users to navigate the dimly-lit space. “The whole point is that you control it,” using nothing but the arrow keys on your keyboard, says Lanza.

Even if you don’t get a chance to “drive,” you can still join in via a livestream on the Tate website here.

TIME cities

Mystery of Who Placed White Flags on the Brooklyn Bridge Solved

ODD Brooklyn Bridge Mystery Flags
A white flag flies atop the west tower of the Brooklyn Bridge, in New York City, on July 22, 2014 Richard Drew—AP

The culprits appear to have been German artists who are mystified by the reaction the act got in the U.S.

Two Berlin-based artists have taken credit — and provided evidence to back up their claim — for swapping out two giant American flags over the Brooklyn Bridge earlier this summer and replacing them with all-white versions.

After the flags suddenly appeared over the bridge on July 22, numerous people rushed to claim credit for the stunt. But German artists Mischa Leinkauf and Matthias Wermke have produced videos and pictures apparently taken from the Brooklyn Bridge that indicate they were, in fact, the culprits, the New York Times reports.

Many in New York City saw the flag stunt as a security breach, and embarrassed authorities rushed to launch an investigation. But Leinkauf and Wermke say they were shocked that the flags were perceived that way. Their actions weren’t supposed to be provocative, they said, but merely intended to celebrate “the beauty of public space.” They pulled off the caper on the anniversary of the 1869 death of John Roebling, the German engineer who built the bridge.

“We saw the bridge, which was designed by a German, trained in Berlin, who came to America because it was the place to fulfill his dreams, as the most beautiful expression of a great public space,” Leinkauf said. “That beauty was what we were trying to capture.”

The pair said that between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m. on July 22 they carried the homemade white flags in backpacks while climbing the cables to the top of the bridge, where they replaced the American flags with the all-white versions. They did not see security cameras. They ceremonially folded the American flags, they said, and promise to return them.

[NYT]

TIME animals

Aspen Art Museum Facing Backlash for Exhibit Featuring Tortoises Wearing iPads

A Seychelles giant tortoise walks through its enclosure at the zoo in Duisburg, Germany, on March 31, 2014.
A Seychelles giant tortoise walks through its enclosure at the zoo in Duisburg, Germany, on March 31, 2014. Roland Weihrauch—AFP/Getty Images

“Since when is animal abuse art?” reads an online petition to stop the exhibit

The Aspen Art Museum in Colorado plans to celebrate the grand opening of its newest building on Saturday with an exhibit featuring tortoises with iPads strapped to their backs, but an online petition hopes to stop the installation in its tracks.

At the time of this post’s publication 1,181 people had signed the petition calling New York-based artist Cai Guo-Qiang’s “Moving Ghost Town” exhibit “animal abuse.”

“Since when is animal abuse art?” the Change.org petition reads. “We must all rise and stop this now!! There is no excuse for this!”

In the exhibit, three African Tortoises (who go by the names Big Bertha, Gracie Pink Star, and Whale Wanderer), wear iPads strapped to their shells, which flash images of Colorado “ghost towns.” The Denver Post, which reported this story earlier on Wednesday, says the animals are set to roam throughout a part of the museum during a 24-hour event on Saturday. The petition’s authors say the tortoises’ shells are sensitive to impact and they should not be forced to carry the weight of two iPads for entertainment’s sake.

The petitioners also worry the conditions of the turtles’ habitat aren’t comfortable for the animals.

“Please stop this unnecessary exploitation of animals now and do the right thing by getting these iPad of the Tortoises’ backs,” the authors write.

In a statement posted to their Facebook page, the museum argued that the exhibit was constructed with the help of a local veterinarian and the Turtle Conservancy. The use of the iPads was also cleared with the Conservancy, the museum said.

“I have worked with the staff from the Aspen Art Museum since the initial planning phase of the Cai Guo-Qiang project. Without question, the welfare of the tortoises has taken the highest priority in every stage of this exhibition,” veterinarian Dr. Elizabeth Kremzier said in a statement. “In my professional opinion, the tortoises have adapted well to their new habitat, and the iPads have not interfered in any way with their natural behavior.”

The museum’s Facebook fans, however, aren’t buying it. “We don’t like this artwork… and to support keeping it is really bad taste,” reads one comment.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: August 4

1. Making the punishment fit the crime: A better way of calculating fines for the bad acts of big banks.

By Cathy O’Neill in Mathbabe

2. Lessons we can share: How three African countries made incredible progress in the fight against AIDS.

By Tina Rosenberg in the New York Times

3. Creative artists are turning to big data for inspiration — and a new window on our world.

By Charlie McCann in Prospect

4. We must give the sharing economy an opportunity to show its real potential.

By R.J. Lehmann in Reason

5. Technology investing has a gender problem, and it’s holding back innovation.

By Issie Lapowsky in Wired

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Art

See How Body Paint Turned Naked Women Into New York City Landmarks

City chameleons

It’s easy for New Yorkers to feel like they are invisible in such a big city. Artist Trina Merry took this concept literally by using body paint to transform topless models into New York City landscapes.

Brightly colored sneakers drew attention to their faint outline, hidden in the Guggenheim or Manhattan bridge.

Body Paint Artist NYC Landmarks
A model appears to blend into the background as she stands in front of the Guggenheim Museum in New York. Trina Merry—AP

“I wanted to engage the city and understand it and make some observations,” Merry told the AP. “So instead of a person right in front of the Empire State building or the Statue of Liberty, they’re softly in the background, and you’ve got more of a reflective view of the person within the landscape.”

Body Paint Artist NYC Landmarks
Jessica Mellow poses in front of the Manhattan Bridge after Merry, a body-paint artist, camouflaged Mellow to blend into the bridge, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Trina Merry—AP

Angle was everything when camouflaging each model into the landscape. It took six hours to complete each “work.”

Trina Merry, Jessica Mellow
Merry is a body-paint artist who seamlessly camouflages her semi-nude models into New York City’s skyline, blending them into Central Park, Coney Island and other famous landmarks. Rachelle Blidner—AP
TIME Art

Tracey Emin’s ‘My Bed’ Returns to the Tate on Long-Term Loan

Tracey Emin's 'My Bed' To Be Auctioned At Christie's
Tracy Emin's 1998 piece My Bed on display at Christie's in London on June 27, 2014 Rob Stothard—Getty Images

The piece will be displayed there for at least 10 years

Contemporary art’s most well-known bed is returning to the site where it first gained notoriety.

Artist Tracey Emin’s controversial installation My Bed — consisting of an unmade bed surrounded by piles of discarded condoms, old liquor bottles and pregnancy tests — will be exhibited at Tate Gallery on a long-term loan from its most recent owner, the Tate said in a statement on Monday.

The 1998 work, which grapples with the aftermath of a difficult breakup, has been included in discussions about what qualifies as art. It gained renewed prominence in the past month when it was slated to be sold at a Christie’s auction in London. On July 1, the piece was sold to German collector and businessman Count Christian Duerckheim for approximately $3.77 million — more than 18 times the amount collector Charles Saatchi paid for it in 2000.

My Bed was exhibited at Tate Britain in 1999, the same year it was shortlisted for the prestigious Turner Prize. Now, new owner Duerckheim will loan the work to the Tate for a period of at least 10 years. Tate director Nicholas Serota expressed gratitude for Duerckheim’s gift, which will allow museum visitors to see “a work that now has iconic status.”

Emin, the artist herself, told the BBC, “I have always felt My Bed belongs at Tate. And now it will be.”

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