MONEY home improvement

10 Ways to Avoid a Kitchen Remodeling Disaster

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Erin Lester—Getty Images

Read this before you do any serious damage.

When it comes to making magic happen during a kitchen remodel, there are oodles of options you can cook up. Which means there is a lot that can go wrong.

Before you take the hammer to your old kitchen, read these 10 tips to avoid getting burned on a kitchen remodel.

1. Don’t overspend

Consider the market and decide whether a low-, medium-, or high-end kitchen remodel makes the most sense. Costs can run the gamut from $2,000 for a simple paint-and-hardware upgrade to $50,000 if you’re installing expensive countertops and luxury appliances.

Evaluate neighborhood comps to keep from overspending (or underspending). You may not get your investment back installing travertine in your tiny starter, and let’s face it, you’ll never see Formica in a high-end home. So check out for-sale properties in your area before shelling out for high-end upgrades.

2. Avoid an identity crisis

Don’t try to remodel a ’50s ranch-style kitchen into a contemporary cooking space. All homes, however humble, are built in a certain architectural style. Work with it, not against it. Otherwise, you’ll spend too much money and time on a complete overhaul, and you’ll likely end up with a kitchen that looks out of place.

3. Keep the plumbing where it is

Moving water and gas lines to reconfigure sinks, ovens, stoves, or dishwashers is extremely costly, especially in older homes. So keep any pipe-connected elements where they are — and keep some extra cash in your pocket.

4. Watch out for the wrong floor plan

If you do have the budget to rearrange appliances, make sure to keep your floor plan in mind. Does it follow the natural triangular traffic pattern between the refrigerator, stove, and sink? Is the dishwasher next to the sink? It should be. Otherwise, you create a mess every time you walk across the room with a dripping dish in your hand.

5. Don’t trash existing cabinets

If your old cabinets are quality wood and still in good working order, you’re in luck. This is one of the first things to check when sizing up a pre-remodel kitchen, since cabinet frames are the most expensive component of the entire space.

It’s quite simple to give salvageable cabinets a face-lift. Three common ways to repurpose cabinets include: adding new doors and drawer fronts, relaminating fronts and sides, or repainting.

6. Never DIY spray paint

Have the cabinets cleaned and lightly sanded, then hire a professional painter to spray them. Don’t try to DIY this one; a couple of cans of spray paint from the hardware store just won’t do the trick. A professional spray job can make ugly cabinets look factory-new. You can’t get the same look by painting or rolling the cabinets yourself.

7. Don’t scrimp on new hardware

Home remodeling superstores carry a great selection of door hardware. Choose knobs and pulls that complement your architectural style, and don’t cut corners. It’s like a nice piece of jewelry — an added touch that makes the whole outfit (or room) work.

Don’t forget to remove and replace any old, painted-over hinges with shiny new ones. It may be time-consuming, but it’s very inexpensive, and it makes a huge difference.

8. Take advantage of free advice

Check out large home improvement centers for free, computer-based design services that help lay out your kitchen. Their professionals are at the leading edge of today’s decorating trends, and their services include one-on-one client assistance as well as in-home consultations, complete project management, and installation services.

9. Don’t mismatch appliances

When buying new fridges, ranges, and dishwashers, stick with the same brand. Fortunately, appliance manufacturers have begun creating good-looking, low-priced lines with matching sets — giving your kitchen a designer look for much less. With a little research and some smart shopping, you can find affordable appliances that look very high-end.

10. Don’t forget to budget for sinks and fixtures

Get the best possible faucet, one with a pullout spray attachment or a gooseneck with detachable head. It’s a necessity — and the difference between good and great is only $50 to $75. Stick to one consistent fixture finish since mixed finishes can look patchwork.

More From Trulia:

TIME Environment

California Drought Leads to Historic Toilet Policy

The California Energy Commission mandated on Tuesday that new toilets and faucets sold in California must conserve water

California officials working to combat the state’s four-year drought are taking aim at everyday practices that use billions of gallons of water each year: flushing toilets and running faucets.

The California Energy Commission took emergency action on Tuesday by mandating that all toilets, urinals and faucets sold in the state must conserve water. That means only low-flush toilets and low-flow sinks will be allowed for sale after Jan. 1, 2016, regardless of when they were manufactured. The mandate applies to both public places and private residences.

“We’re seeing serious dry spell here in California,” says Amber Beck, a spokesperson for the commission. “And we need to make sure we are not only saving water right now but in the coming years.” These regulations come less than a week after Governor Jerry Brown imposed the state’s first-ever mandatory water restrictions, aimed at cutting the state’s usage by 25%.

The commission’s action will set historic efficiency standards for appliances in the Golden State, which are much stricter than the voluntary standards laid out in the Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense conservation program. As of 2016, all urinals sold in California can use only one pint of water or less per flush; the current standard is one gallon, while the EPA will put its WaterSense stamp of approval on any urinal that uses half a gallon or less.

The commission estimates that the new standards will save 10 billion gallons of water in the first year, and more than 100 billion gallons as old appliances are replaced by new ones over the coming years. As of January, there were more than 45 million faucets, 30 million toilets and 1 million urinals operating in California.

Read next: California’s Water Crisis by the Numbers

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TIME appliances

How to Select the Right Room Air Conditioner

There is no need to suffer through summer heat when inexpensive, energy-efficient air conditioners are widely available. Since June 1, 2014, all room air conditioners have been required to meet a new standard that set maximum power use at 10-15% less than older models following the 2000 guidelines. And, when used to provide cooling only where they’re needed, room air conditioners are less expensive to operate than central units. This guide will help you find the model that is right for you.

Energy Efficiency of Room Air Conditioners

A room air conditioner’s efficiency is measured by the energy efficiency ratio (EER). The EER is the ratio of the cooling capacity (in British thermal units [BTU] per hour) to the power input (in watts). The higher the EER rating, the more efficient the air conditioner. Each increase of 1.0 on the EER scale represents a 10% increase in energy efficiency.

When buying a new room air conditioner, information about the EER can be found on the EnergyGuide label for the unit. Look for an EER of at least 11 and the ENERGY STAR label. Earning the ENERGY STAR means a product meets strict energy efficiency guidelines set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  • ENERGY STAR qualified room air conditioners use at least 15% less energy than conventional models.
  • ENERGY STAR qualified room air conditioners often include timers for better temperature control, allowing you to use the minimum amount of energy you need to cool your room.

Properly Sizing a Room Air Conditioner

The required cooling capacity for a room air conditioner depends on the size of the room being cooled. Room air conditioners generally have cooling capacities that range from 5,500 BTU per hour to 14,000 BTU per hour.

Many people buy an air conditioner that is too large, thinking it will provide better cooling. However, an over-sized air conditioner is actually less effective — and wastes energy at the same time. Air conditioners remove both heat and humidity from the air. If the unit is too large, it will cool the room quickly, but only remove some of the humidity. This leaves the room with a damp, clammy feeling. A properly sized unit will remove humidity effectively as it cools. To figure out which size unit is best for your cooling needs, see the Air Conditioner Cooling Needs Calculator below.

Other Factors to Consider When Buying

Verify that your home’s electrical system can meet the unit’s power requirements. Room units operate on 115- or 230-volt circuits. The standard household receptacle is a connection for a 115-volt branch circuit. Large room units rated at 115 volts may require a dedicated circuit and room units rated at 230 volts may require a special circuit. If you are mounting your air conditioner near the corner of a room, look for a unit that can direct its airflow in the desired direction for your room layout. If you need to mount the air conditioner at the narrow end of a long room, look for models that have a “turbo” fan mode that can drive air further into the room. Other features to look for:

  • A filter that slides out easily for regular cleaning
  • Logically arranged controls
  • A digital readout for the thermostat setting, and
  • A built-in timer

Our Picks

GE

Small rooms (up to 150 square feet)

The GE AEL06LS ($179.00 on HomeDepot.com), rated at 6,050 BTU, gets high marks for its cooling capabilities. The unit, which has an EER of 11.2, has two cooling and two fan speeds, a 24-hour programmable timer and a two-way adjustable vent to direct air flow.

LG

Large rooms (up to 550 square feet)

The highly-rated LG LW8014ER ($239.00 on Amazon) delivers 8,000 BTU, enough to cool a room up to 340 square feet, with an EER of 11.3. The unit has three cooling and three fan speeds, a 24-hour programmable timer and a four-way directional vent to stream air where you want it. For rooms up to 550 square feet, we like the LG LW1214ER ($349.00 on HomeDepot.com) step-up model, which has all the same features, but delivers 12,000 BTU with an EER of 11.3.

Installing and Operating Your Room Air Conditioner

A little planning before installing your air conditioner will save you money and energy. The unit should be level when installed, so that the inside drainage system and other mechanisms operate efficiently. If possible, install the unit in a shaded spot on your home’s north or east side. Direct sunshine on the unit’s outdoor heat exchanger decreases efficiency by as much as 10%. You can plant trees and shrubs to shade the air conditioner, but do not block the airflow.

Don’t place lamps or televisions near your air-conditioner’s thermostat. The thermostat senses heat from these appliances, which can cause the air conditioner to run longer than necessary.

Set your air conditioner’s thermostat as high as is comfortably possible in the summer. The less difference between the indoor and outdoor temperatures, the lower your overall cooling bill will be. Don’t set your thermostat at a colder setting than normal when you turn on your air conditioner; it will not cool your home any faster and could result in excessive cooling and unnecessary expense.

Set the fan speed on high, except on very humid days. When humidity is high, set the fan speed on low for more comfort. The low speed on humid days will cool your home better and will remove more moisture from the air because of slower air movement through the cooling equipment.

Consider using an interior fan in conjunction with your window air conditioner to spread the cooled air more effectively through your home without greatly increasing electricity use.

Air Conditioner Cooling Needs Calculator

To determine the correct size air conditioner for your room, follow these easy steps:

  1. Determine the square footage of the area to be cooled.
  2. Using the square footage and the chart below, determine the correct cooling capacity. Cooling capacity is measured in British thermal units (BTU) per hour.
  3. Make any adjustments for the following circumstances:
    • If the room is heavily shaded, reduce capacity by 10 percent.
    • If the room is very sunny, increase capacity by 10 percent.
    • If more than two people regularly occupy the room, add 600 BTU for each additional person.
    • If the unit is used in a kitchen, increase capacity by 4,000 BTU.
    • For the purpose of this chart, rooms that are connected by permanently open entryways wider than five feet ought to be considered as one room and their square footage should be combined.
Area to Be Cooled
(Square Feet)
Capacity Needed
(BTU per Hour)
100 to 150 5,000
150 to 250 6,000
250 to 300 7,000
300 to 350 8,000
350 to 400 9,000
400 to 450 10,000
450 to 550 12,000
550 to 700 14,000
700 to 1,000 18,000
1,000 to 1,200 21,000

Information for this article comes courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy. This article was written by Josh Kirschner and originally appeared on Techlicious.

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