TIME Apple

Apple Is Offering Classes to Learn How the Apple Watch Works

Apple Watch Goes On Display At Apple Inc. Stores Ahead Of Sales Launch
ChinaFotoPress—ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images A customer touches an Apple Watch smartwatch at an Apple Store at Lujiazui in Pudong District on April 11, 2015 in Shanghai, China.

It's time for school

Some Apple Store locations will be offering workshops to teach new and prospective Apple Watch owners how their new device works.

The classes, first spotted by MacRumors, are being offered at some Apple Store locations in the U.S. and elsewhere beginning April 24, the day the Apple Watch first becomes available.

It’s unclear, however, how many customers will get an Apple Watch on April 24. Preorders for the device started April 10, and many shoppers received shipping dates in May, June and beyond for their device. A recent memo to Apple Store employees from Apple’s head of retail operations suggested Apple Stores won’t be stocked with Apple Watches until June at the earliest. Meanwhile, a page on Apple’s website listing the Apple Watch as available on April 24 has since been changed to remove that exact date.

TIME Gadgets

Jawbone’s New Fitness Tracker Lets You Buy Stuff While You Exercise

Jawbone UP4
Jawbone Jawbone UP4

Assuming you have an American Express card

Ever get a craving for a protein shake at the gym only to realize you left your wallet at the office? Jawbone’s newest fitness tracker, the UP4, has you covered.

Jawbone’s UP4 fitness tracker syncs up with your American Express card and uses Near-Field Communication (NFC) to let you make purchases via the device, no wallet needed. The UP4 is a result of a partnership between AmEx and Jawbone, so Visa and MasterCard users might be out of luck when the UP4 first goes on sale for $199.99 later this summer.

NFC is the same technology that powers Apple Pay, Apple’s mobile payment software found on the iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus and the Apple Watch. Apple is positioning the entry-level, $349.99 and up Apple Watch Sport as a fitness device. Jawbone including one of the Apple Watch’s best features — mobile payments — in a cheaper wristband may help it compete with Apple’s new wearable, which goes on sale April 24.

Mobile payments aside, the UP4 is similar to the $179.99 UP3, Jawbone’s recently-released fitness tracker that tracks your activity levels, heart rate, sleep patterns and more. Both the UP4 and UP3 also offer what Jawbone calls “Smart Coach,” software that’s supposed to make fitness recommendations based on what it learns about your activity levels.

Along with the UP4, Jawbone is also introducing a lower-cost fitness band called the UP2. The UP2 packs many of the UP3’s features into a smaller wristband that costs $99.99 and is available now.

TIME Television

Ellen DeGeneres’ Popular Game App Heads Up! Is Coming to Television

Executive Producer Ellen DeGeneres speaks about the NBC television show "One Big Happy" during the TCA presentations in Pasadena, California, January 16, 2015
Lucy Nicholson—Reuters Executive Producer Ellen DeGeneres speaks about the NBC television show "One Big Happy" during the TCA presentations in Pasadena, California, January 16, 2015

Quick! Guess what channel you'll have to flip to

The popular game app Heads Up!, created by The Ellen DeGeneres Show, is now set to become a game show on the HLN cable channel.

Hosted by comedian Loni Love, the show will feature contestants attempting to identify what has been written on cards based on clues from a teammate, according to a press release.

“I’m so excited that Heads Up! is going to be a game show,” DeGeneres said. “I play it on my show all the time. I play it at home. I played it last night at Jennifer Aniston’s house. She wasn’t home, so please don’t print that part.”

Apple’s top paid app of 2014, Heads Up! involves one player putting a smartphone or tablet up to their forehead so they cannot see the word they are meant to guess. Another player then gives clues, and if the correct guess is made, a point is awarded.

HLN said the show will air sometime in early 2016.

MONEY Tech

Lots of Apple Watch Listings on eBay Are Attracting Zero Bids

Apple Watch
David Paul Morris—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sellers are asking extremely high "Buy It Now" prices at eBay to take advantage of strong demand for Apple Watches. But in many cases, consumers aren't biting.

By most accounts, the Apple Watch did a terrific business on the first day customers could place preorders. Apple reportedly received roughly one million orders last Friday, and demand has been so high that orders placed now won’t be delivered until June or even later in the summer.

The first customers who preordered Apple Watches, however, will have their shiny gadgets in hand starting on April 24 or soon thereafter. Part of the draw of being an early adopter is the opportunity to get one’s hands on the newest tech before everyone else, and a certain group of consumers is sure to be too impatient to wait until summer to get their hands on the new Apple Watch.

Naturally, this combination of strong demand and limited short-term supply led Apple Watches to begin appearing for resale on eBay almost as soon as Apple started accepting preorders. As ReCode noted over the weekend, most eBay listings for Apple Watches were of the “Buy It Now” variety, in which sellers post a flat price for the item rather than putting it up for an online auction. We probably shouldn’t be surprised that some sellers appear to be exceptionally opportunistic and greedy, occasionally posting “Buy It Now” prices that are 200% to 600% higher than retail.

Mind you, anyone can place an order and pay the retail price at the Apple Store for these exact same watches; the only reason anyone would pay a premium for an Apple Watch via eBay is that—assuming the listing is legitimate—you’d be able to show it off a few weeks sooner.

OK, so people selling stuff online are trying to make a quick buck by taking advantage of impatient Apple fans: Nothing new here. Are people actually paying up?

In some cases, they are indeed, but often not to the extent that sellers might hope. In one eBay auction that closed on Monday, a 42 mm Stainless Steel Apple Watch with link bracelet that retails for $999 was purchased for $1,400. Another Apple Watch, a 38 mm with a Black Sport Band, received 20 bids and sold for $561, barely over the retail price ($549). The results of some of the online auctions ending on Monday were puzzling: In one auction for a 38 mm Stainless Steel with Black Classic Buckle Apple Watch, the final bid was $610 (original price: $649), while a 42 mm version of the same Apple Watch (original price: $699) went for $910 in an auction that ended at almost the exact same time on Monday afternoon. Yet another Apple Watch auction that ended Monday, for a 38 mm model that retails for $349, wound up selling for $480.

It’s hard to draw many conclusions about the height of Apple Watch demand and the state of consumer patience from such all-over-the-map results. One thing that’s particularly interesting is that dozens of listings with “Buy It Now” prices and many with side-by-side “Buy It Now” prices and high starting bid prices came and went on Monday after attracting no bids whatsoever. For instance, no one bid on a 42 mm Milanese Loop Apple Watch listed at a “Buy It Now” price of $1,499, which shouldn’t be surprising considering the gadget can be purchased at retail for just $699.

Obviously, some sellers are trying to test the market with the hopes of making as large a profit as possible on their timely device purchase. In general, buyers are paying only moderate premiums in Apple Watch resales. For now at least, it looks like consumers aren’t going completely overboard in the quest to slide an Apple Watch onto their wrists a few days before their neighbors and coworkers.

TIME apps

How Your iPhone’s Music App Is About to Change

536992281
Cultura/Matt Dutile—Getty Images Portrait of young woman listening to headphones at beach, Coney Island, New York, USA

Changes could be paving the way for new streaming service

Apple is planning a big redesign for the Music app on your iPhone and iPad.

The new version featured in a preview version of an upcoming update is based heavily on the current design of iTunes for the Mac, according to a hands-on preview by 9to5Mac. Like iTunes, the new Music app is putting a big emphasis on visuals, with album art taking up half the screen on the player user interface. A mini-player also sticks to the bottom of the UI throughout the app, meaning users can always easily pause a song currently playing.

The overhaul also brings other useful updates, such as the ability to add songs to a play queue and a robust search feature that can trawl a user’s library as well as iTunes Radio.

The new features may signal that Apple is indeed preparing to roll out a new on-demand streaming service under the iTunes brand, as has been rumored for several months. The service could be unveiled at Apple’s developers conference, which starts June 8.

YouTube user DetroitBERG has a video walkthrough of the new app:

Read next: How to Save Stories To Read Later On Your Phone

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Apple

5 Reasons You Should Update Your iPhone Immediately

Apple iPhone 6 Debuts in Prague
Matej Divizna—Getty Images A seller poses with iPhone 6 during a midnight sale of the new iPhone 6 and 6 Plus at Apple Premium Reseller store on October 24, 2014 in Prague, Czech Republic.

Other than avoiding that constant reminder to upgrade

Averaging more than an update per month, Apple’s iOS 8 is getting to be nearly as annoying as Adobe Flash when it comes to keeping software up-to-date. But at least users are getting something for their power-cycling and downtime. In fact, the newest iOS 8.3 update is loaded with some rather delightful goodies for iPhone and iPad users who keep their systems up to speed.

Here are five reasons why you should update your Apple iPhone or iPad’s operating system right now:

1. CarPlay Gets Unplugged

After updating their handsets, Apple users with newer-model cars (or whom have installed cutting edge, aftermarket car stereos) will get a pleasant surprise when they turn their key: CarPlay no longer requires that iPhones be plugged into a USB port to control your car radio.

Working like AirPlay does with Apple TV and wireless speakers, the CarPlay in-car user interface is now beamed directly from the phone to the car’s head unit, untethering phones and making this feature much more convenient. Now, if only Apple could do something about the price of CarPlay-compatible systems…

2. Siri Takes A Better Tone

If you’ve noticed that Siri seems to have relaxed recently, it’s not you, it’s her. iOS 8.3 made some tweaks to the way Siri speaks, giving her a much more conversational tone, even if her words are the same. It’s a nice, subtle touch that you may not notice unless someone pointed it out to you. And it makes her corny jokes sound almost funny, too. (I said almost.)

But Siri’s isn’t the only voice to get some elocution lessons. The Maps app’s turn-by-turn navigation has improved its street name pronunciation as well.

3. Wi-Fi Gets Some Wins

Whenever there’s a big software update, it seems like there are always some users who get left out in the cold with strange, unexplainable bugs. With iOS 8, many users experienced intermittent Internet connectivity issues, including signal degradation and repeated requests for passwords. One tech-savvy user got so frustrated looking into the glitches that he outlined the problems online, coining the term WiFried.

Apple heard these complaints and, with this update, (hopefully) addressed an issue where devices intermittently disconnect from Wi-Fi networks, as well as nipped the continuous login issue. Speaking from personal experience, the password problem can be crazy-making, as you wonder if you’re always getting your Wi-Fi password wrong.

But the Wi-Fi update is not only about patches and band-aids. It also brings Wi-Fi Calling to Sprint customers, letting them join T-Mobile subscribers (and EE users in the U.K.), as the few who can talk on the phone without eating up their plan’s minutes. Hopefully other carriers will allow this feature in future updates.

4. Family-friendly Fixes

Family Sharing is a feature that was released with iOS 8, and 8.3 helps to iron out some of its bumps. For instance, the update fixed a snafu where some apps wouldn’t launch on certain family members’ devices, but it would launch on others. Likewise, it also patched an issue that blocked some family iOS devices from downloading free apps already downloaded on another family-owned Apple gadget.

But in particular, parents will be happy to hear that the update made “Ask to Buy” notifications more reliable, letting account holders grant permission on App Store and iTunes purchases. iOS 8.3 also now lets parents set their kids’ phones to filter out iMessages from people who aren’t in their Contacts app — a great security feature to make sure strangers aren’t chatting with their kids.

5. Emojis Aplenty

And a big thumbs up to Apple for adding more than 300 new emojis to its iOS keyboard. The emoticons that have everyone all a-smiley-face in particular are the ethnically diverse icons that allowing people the world over to express themselves in ways that match how they look. And Apple’s designers didn’t stop with Earthlings — they even slipped in a secret Vulcan salute emoji. So, live long and prosper, iOS 8.3. At least until next month.

TIME Gadgets

Apple Watch Pre-Orders Hit Almost 1 Million on First Day, Group Estimates

The cheaper Sport Watch was the most popular model

Almost one million people ordered an Apple Watch on the first day it was available, according to an estimate by a research firm, showing strong consumer demand for an Apple product that debuted to mixed reviews.

Slice Intelligence, citing an analysis of e-receipt data from 9,080 online shoppers, said that about 957,000 people in the U.S. pre-ordered an Apple Watch on Friday, with each buyer purchasing an average of 1.3 watches and spending an average of $503.83 on each one.

More than 60% of consumers bought the cheapest iteration of the Apple Watch, the Sport model.

Many of the initial purchasers are committed Apple fans: 72% purchased an iPhone, iPad or Apple computer over the past two years, and 21% ordered an iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus in the last few months, according to Slice.

The black sport band was the most popular choice, as was the larger 42mm case.

Read next: Here’s What It Was Like Buying an Apple Watch Today

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Apple

Am I Less Manly for Buying a Small Apple Watch?

Size matters, especially when it comes to timepieces

My name is John, and I suffer from Dainty Wrist Syndrome.

The plague of the creative class, DWS involves the dwindling of the wrist muscles such that the afflicted can fit into those impossibly small cuff sizes on a dress shirt. (Victims are also known have impossibly smooth, uncalloused hands.) In all honesty, I’m not quite that bad off — I can open almost any jar without help — but I do still register (just barely) on the DWS spectrum. And when I saw that the Apple Watch came in two sizes, one with a 38-mm face and the other with a 42-mm face, I panicked and couldn’t help but wonder: Would I be less of a man if I bought a smaller Apple Watch?

There have been many articles written about how to figure out which watch size is right for you (my favorite is this neat dollar bill-folding trick), but none help you deal with the side-eye you’ll get after buying the wrong one. So I texted my best friend, an investment banker who inherited a love of watches from his grandfather, a former watch repairman. Surely, he would surely set me straight. “Hold on. Eating a sandwich,” he replied. A few bites later, he explained that he works with people who wear $10,000 watches as a statement piece, so I should go big or go home.

But one thing people don’t realize about the smaller-sized Apple Watch is that it’s already quite sizable. According to Matt Bain, Miami Beach, Fla.-based antique watch dealer, the standard size of a men’s watch today, on the smaller side, is approximately 36 mm.

“Men are wearing watches all the way up to 48 mm, 48 being very large,” he says. “I think the perfect size watch for a man today is probably about a 40-mm watch.”

Which, of course, is right in the middle of Apple’s sizing, and as such, is no help at all.

In Bain’s expert opinion, the smaller Apple Watch should work perfectly fine for a man of my slenderness. In fact, when it comes to Apple’s watch, he seems to regard its face size like that of a touchscreen phone — it’s all about utility and being able to see and interact with the display.

“I have the smaller iPhone … other people don’t even care. I think on the wrist, it’s the same thing,” he says. “Thirty-eight millimeters is still a large watch — it’s not a small watch, and I don’t consider it to be a woman’s one.”

For its part, Apple claims their watches are unisex, but their bands certainly have target markets in mind. For example, the Leather Loop band, which looks rugged yet refined, will only fit the 42-mm Apple Watch. And the Modern Buckle, with its elegant, subtle styling, is only available on the 38-mm version. So, if, like me, you want a smaller watch face with the more burly leather strap, you’re out of luck, and likewise if you want a larger watch face with a demure leather band.

Still torn, I decided to get a woman’s opinion. I’ve known Andrea Lavinthal, PEOPLE Magazine’s style and beauty director, since college. It turns out she’s a watch aficionado herself, owning a small collection of treasured timepieces.

“When they say unisex for a watch, in my opinion, that means typically a woman can wear a men’s watch,” Lavinthal says. “But it almost never means a man can wear a woman’s watch.”

Funny enough, Lavinthal does make an odd exception to this rule. In contrast to my best friend’s assertion that I should go big to show off, Lavinthal thinks I should brag by going small. According to her, guys tend to size up more than is necessary on everything from cars to clothes.

“They size up in their clothing forever until they either meet a woman who gives them a makeover, or they find a really good sales person, tailor, or friend with better style who they randomly start trusting,” she says. “It almost takes an intervention to get a guy to wear the proper size clothing.”

These man-childs apparently wear large and extra-large sized clothing, when they really should be sporting mediums. “Wearing the bigger size makes you look like a little person wearing a big t-shirt,” says Lavinthal. “The medium is going to fit you and actually make you look bigger.”

And likewise, when it comes to this smart watch — which is still an awkward fashion piece, despite Apple’s design prowess — wearing the proper size is likely to make it less clunky. Heck, if you wear the right size, it might even look like a watch, and not a wrist-top computer.

So I put the question to Lavinthal, point blank: If I bought a smaller Apple Watch, would she think I was less of a man? “No,” she responds. “I would say you’re cheaper.” And this is true: the smaller-sized Apple Sport Watch rings in at $50 less than the larger model. A watch that fits and almost enough extra cash to buy one of these lovely Nomad Apple Watch Stands? That is a stigma I can live with.

TIME Gadgets

Netflix Just Totally Owned Apple Watch Fanboys

'Now you can view your favorite Netflix Originals directly from your wrist.'

Netflix has “unveiled” a new, brick-sized wrist watch that “isn’t THAT inconvenient” for watching movies and shows from your wrist.

The mock advertisement was conveniently timed to poke fun at the Apple Watch, which kicked off with a rush of pre-orders on Friday.

But with high demand pushing wait times for the device well into the summer, it looks like Apple will have the last laugh.

TIME Apple

Here’s What It Was Like Buying an Apple Watch Today

You should get hands-on time with one before buying

I just bought an Apple Watch. Please don’t tell my fiancée.

I was pretty sure I wanted an Apple Watch before the presales began at a time so early in the morning there was no way my feeble brain could process it. But I couldn’t justify spending a few hundred bucks on A Very Nice Thing before getting some hands-on time with it, checking out the bands, figuring out what size I should buy and so on. All the Apple Watch permutations result in a much more complicated decision-making process than buying a new iPhone, where there’s only a small number of colors, storage spaces, and, more recently, sizes to choose from.

So instead of preordering an Apple Watch sight unseen, I headed to Apple’s flagship Fifth Avenue cube store this morning to see what the company’s demo process was like.

The first thing that caught my attention was the complete lack of a line. If you’re in New York City on an Apple launch day, you’re typically best off staying as far from The Cube as humanly possible. But because the Apple Watch wasn’t actually in stock today, there wasn’t the blocks-long line usually characteristic of Apple launches (that’s not an accident). There were plenty of other journalists on hand and a certain level of excitement to be sure, but it wasn’t nuts.

I arrived fifteen minutes before my appointment — Apple strongly recommends you have one — and right away got hooked up with an Apple Store employee named Bob, who was waiting by a table full of Apple Watches. Bob asked which models I was interested in trying. I told Bob I wanted to try the cheaper Sport model (which is what I thought I wanted to buy) as well as the mid-level Watch model with the Leather Loop bands (that band looks terrible in photos and I wanted to see if it was better in person. It was).

Bob put the various models on my wrist for me, which was a little weird — I’m (mostly) an adult and I can generally get a watch on my wrist correctly on the first try. I asked Bob if the Apple Watch came with an Apple Employee who would gently attach and remove the device every day for me. Bob said no. This was sad. I bet the people who buy the $17,000 Apple Watch get that.

The various Apple Watches I tried on were running a non-interactive demo loop. That was disappointing. I wanted to mess around with various apps and see what it was like to actually use the device, and I bet lots of other potential Apple Watch buyers do, too. Convincing fence-sitters would probably be a lot easier if they could get some true hands-on time with the device. There were kiosks set up that had more fully-featured Apple Watches, but you couldn’t wear them while you used them, so it wasn’t really the full experience of what owning one would be like.

Apple Watch
Alex FitzpatrickApple Watch Try-On

After trying a few different bands and bodies, I decided my initial guess was correct: The 42mm Apple Watch Sport was the way to go for me. The Sport “Fluoroelastomer” band is surprisingly nice and comfortable, the bigger screen will be better for interacting with the device (but could be off-puttingly large if you’re used to a small watch), and the cheaper price tag means I won’t be totally screwed when the inevitable much-improved version two comes out like three weeks from now.

I told Bob I made my decision, and he pointed me to a kiosk in the back of the store that would let me pre-order my Apple Watch online. I decided to head back to the office instead and placed my order there (see ya, tax return). The official ship day for the Apple Watch is April 28, but Apple says my device won’t arrive until June — the cost of waiting til 11:30 a.m. to order one. But I’ll get it eventually. For now, I’ll just have to keep using my iPhone every time I want to read some WhatsApp notifications. Like some kind of backwards Neanderthal. Sigh.

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