TIME Gadgets

You Won’t Get Your Hands on Apple’s Giant iPad Any Time Soon

Apple iPad Tablet Suppliers
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images Apple CEO Tim Cook holds the new iPad Air 2 during a special event on Oct. 16, 2014 in Cupertino, Calif.

Apple has reportedly told suppliers to delay until the second half of 2015

Bad news for those awaiting Apple’s rumored 12.9-inch iPad — you’ll have to wait even longer.

Apple has told suppliers to delay the iPad’s mass production from the first quarter of 2015 to the second half of the year, the Wall Street Journal reported Thursday, citing people familiar with the matter. Apple hasn’t officially announced the bigger iPad, which would be its largest ever, but several leaks from the supply chain have suggested since last fall that the “iPad Air Plus” or “iPad Pro” is in the works.

The delay will reportedly allow Apple more time to finalize the iPad’s design, which may include USB ports and better synchronization software as Apple tries to break into the fast-growing enterprise market.

Apple’s tablet sales have struggled lately, with 2014 marking the first year in which worldwide iPad shipments declined, according to a report by IDC. But it’s not just Apple: the global tablet market has seen a “massive deceleration” in growth as big-screen smartphones cannibalize tablet sales, IDC said. In other words, the number of tablets shipped worldwide is still going up—but less and less each year.

Here’s a closer look at IDC’s tablet market forecast:

iCharts

[WSJ]

TIME Apple

If You Want an Apple Watch This Is the Only Website For You

Apple Apple Watch

No, it's not Apple's own website

Apple’s smartwatch is nearing launch. More information about the device is likely to be revealed on Monday, March 9, during a press event. Details have trickled out slowly since the Watch’s unveiling last year. CEO Tim Cook has reportedly said he thinks it could possibly replace your keys, for example. Unsubstantiated reports have suggested everything from its expected battery life to how much the most high-end versions might cost (a lot).

But until more concrete information is available, Mixyourwatch.com may be the next best thing. The site allows users to mix and match styles of the Watch and straps, something not currently possible on Apple’s own website. The Watch is likely the most customizable product the company has ever launched. Hence the utility—and addictiveness—of the site’s configurator. You can try it out here.

TIME technology

More Proof That Steve Jobs Was Always a Business Genius

Jobs & Wozniak At The West Coast Computer Faire
Tom Munnecke—Getty Images Steve Jobs (left) and Steve Wozniak at the first West Coast Computer Faire, where the Apple II computer was debuted, in San Francisco, April 16th or 17th, 1977

The Homebrew Computer Club first convened on Mar. 5, 1975

By now, it’s become part of the Steve Jobs mythology that, while he wasn’t as skilled at the tech side as some of his co-workers might have been, he was the one with the business acumen to turn personal computers into the mega-industry it is today.

But, unlike some after-the-fact creation myths, this particular bit of received wisdom has been around since the beginning — the very beginning. The Homebrew Computer Club, which first convened on this day, Mar. 5, in 1975, was where Apple’s Steve Wozniak and others would trade tech ideas and parts. In a 1983 TIME profile of Steve Jobs, Wozniak revealed that his friend Steve Jobs would occasionally come to meetings, but not for the same reasons everyone else did:

Wozniak and some other friends gravitated toward an outfit called the Homebrew Computer Club in 1975, and Jobs would occasionally drop by. Wozniak was the computer zealot, the kind of guy who can see a sonnet in a circuit. What Jobs saw was profit. At convocations of the Homebrew, Jobs showed scant interest in the fine points of design, but he was enthusiastic about selling the machines Wozniak was making.

“I was nowhere near as good an engineer as Woz,” Jobs freely admits. “He was always the better designer.” No one in the neighborhood, however, could match Jobs’ entrepreneurial flair and his instincts for the big score. It was Jobs who badgered local electronics suppliers for credit; Jobs who arranged for payment (“They’d say, ‘Well, how’s 30 days net?’ We said, ‘Sign us up.’ We didn’t know what 30 days net was”); Jobs who attracted a first-class industrial p.r. firm and a team of experienced managers; Jobs who organized the early manufacturing; Jobs who finally persuaded Wozniak to leave Hewlett-Packard; and Jobs who gave the fledgling company a name (“One day I just told everyone that unless they came up with a better name by 5 p.m., we would go with Apple”).

Read the full story, here in the TIME Vault: The Updated Book of Jobs

TIME Apple watch

See How Your Favorite Apps Will Look on the Apple Watch

Apple Watch Apps WatchAware
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images The new Apple Watch is displayed during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on Sept. 9, 2014 in Cupertino, Calif.

Get a sneak peek before Apple dishes more Apple Watch info

Can’t wait to get your Apple Watch? A new website is making it easier to pass the time until the device’s April release.

WatchAware has rounded up mockups of over 20 Apple Watch apps, allowing you to get an interactive feel of how each app might look on the device. Most of the mockups are Apple fans’ best guesses at what the apps will look like, but others—like Twitter and Facebook—are the official app designs as shown during the Apple Watch’s unveiling last fall.

More information about the Apple Watch will likely be revealed during Apple’s March 9 event, which is expected to focus on how apps function on the device.

TIME Apple

This Is How Terrifying It Was to Pitch Steve Jobs a New Idea

Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivering a keynote address to the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco on June 6, 2011.
Paul Sakuma—AP Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivering a keynote address to the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco on June 6, 2011.

“Are you smart? Are you going to waste my time?”

“The first time we met he walked into the room, looked around, realized that I was new, walked up to me and asked (all in one breath), “Are you smart? Do you know what you are talking about? Are you going to waste my time?”

So begins Brett Bilbrey’s 715-word response to the question “What was it like to deliver a presentation to Steve Jobs?” on the crowd-sourced Q&A site Quora.

It’s a response that has drawn some attention—315,000 views, 4,800 upvotes—since it was posted last month because Bilbrey was not just any third-party developer pitching a new app. He was a prolific Apple inventor and a key team manager whose name appears on more than 50 patents and whose engineers developed, among other products, Apple TV and the Mac Mini. From 2008 until his retirement in February he headed the company’s top-secret Technology Advancement Group charged with developing forward-looking technology for products of which he cannot speak.

But he can talk about what it was like to deal with a notoriously difficult boss.

Steve was wicked smart,” he writes. “I was always amazed at how sharp he was and how quickly he could focus on what was important. I don’t know ANYONE that even comes close to how good he was at being able to do that.”

“Don’t just read the story,” says The Loop’s Jim Dalrymple. “Read the comments too.”

Follow Philip Elmer-DeWitt on Twitter at @philiped. Read his Apple AAPL coverage at fortune.com/ped or subscribe via his RSS feed.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

MONEY road to wealth

How I Made $100,000 Teaching Online

Meet Nick Walter, a programmer who makes a living seated at his kitchen table.

TIME apps

The Best iPhone Apps of the Week

Momentum, Fresh Air, Vurb and more are our favorite iPhone apps of the week.

It seems like hundreds of new iPhone apps pop up every week, but which ones should you bother trying? We explored the App Store and found some apps actually worth downloading.

  • Momentum

    Momentum
    Momentum

    We all know how hard it can be to develop positive habits — most people are still trying to find a way to fit flossing into their bedtime routine. Momentum uses iOS 8’s Today feature to help track your habits. You can use it to set goals for yourself and program reminders so that you can proactively work toward your goals.

    Momentum is free in the App Store

  • Fresh Air

    Fresh Air
    Fresh Air

    Fresh Air creates a handsome graph that tracks developing weather patterns, giving you a better sense of how the day will develop — just because it’s sunny when you roll out of bed doesn’t mean your suede shoes will be safe from those afternoon showers. Moreover, Fresh Air sends notifications to your phone in the mornings, which feels a lot like having a butler on your phone to help you plan accordingly.

    Fresh Air is available for $1.99 in the App Store

  • Nat Geo View

    Nat Geo View
    Nat Geo View

    National Geographic’s app breaks down the magazine’s best stories, images and video of the day with a sleek interface to make it easier to digest — ideally as you watch lions digest some prey. And because it’s all National Geographic content, the app gives you access to some of the most fascinating stories and stunning photos in the world. In short, it’s a good way to keep up with the other, oft-overlooked side of the daily news machine.

    Nat Geo View is free in the App Store

     

  • Vurb

    Vurb
    Vurb

    Vurb is sort of a preemptive Foursquare. Instead of tracking where you’ve been, you can use it to organize a list of places you’ll go on any given day — from restaurants to bars, movies, and events. Vurb’s most useful feature, though, is the ability to share your agenda with your friends. It makes the whole restaurant-to-bar-to-bar-to-bar-to-late-night-eatery debacle a whole lot easier to keep track of if someone wants to meet up with you later in the evening.

    Vurb is free in the App Store

TIME Security

Apple, Android Browsers Vulnerable to ‘FREAK Attack’

Apple iPhone 6
Roman Vondrous—AP Apple iPhone 6

Millions of people may have suffered a "FREAK" attack

(SAN FRANCISCO) — Millions of people may have been left vulnerable to hackers while surfing the web on Apple and Google devices, thanks to a newly discovered security flaw known as “FREAK attack.”

There’s no evidence so far that any hackers have exploited the weakness, which companies are now moving to repair. Researchers blame the problem on an old government policy, abandoned over a decade ago, which required U.S. software makers to use weaker security in encryption programs sold overseas due to national security concerns.

Many popular websites and some Internet browsers continued to accept the weaker software, or can be tricked into using it, according to experts at several research institutions who reported their findings Tuesday. They said that could make it easier for hackers to break the encryption that’s supposed to prevent digital eavesdropping when a visitor types sensitive information into a website.

About a third of all encrypted websites were vulnerable as of Tuesday, including sites operated by American Express, Groupon, Kohl’s, Marriott and some government agencies, the researchers said. University of Michigan computer scientist Zakir Durumeric said the vulnerability affects Apple web browsers and the browser built into Google’s Android software, but not Google’s Chrome browser or current browsers from Microsoft or Firefox-maker Mozilla.

Apple Inc. and Google Inc. both said Tuesday they have created software updates to fix the “FREAK attack” flaw, which derives its name from an acronym of technical terms. Apple said its fix will be available next week and Google said it has provided an update to device makers and wireless carriers.

A number of commercial website operators are also taking corrective action after being notified privately in recent weeks, said Matthew Green, a computer security researcher at Johns Hopkins University.

But some experts said the problem shows the danger of government policies that require any weakening of encryption code, even to help fight crime or threats to national security. They warned those policies could inadvertently provide access to hackers.

“This was a policy decision made 20 years ago and it’s now coming back to bite us,” said Edward Felten, a professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton, referring to the old restrictions on exporting encryption code.

TIME technology

New Report Says Apple Is Now the World’s Biggest Smartphone Maker

Apple Samsung Sales
Chris McGrath—Getty Images The Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus at their launch at the Apple Omotesando Store on Sept. 19, 2014 in Tokyo, Japan.

According to data from research firm Gartner

Apple is now the world’s biggest smartphone maker in terms of worldwide sales at the end of last year, according to a new estimate that puts its fourth quarter figures ahead of rival Samsung’s numbers.

While Apple reported worldwide sales of 74.8 million smartphones during the fourth quarter of 2014, a report by research firm Gartner published Tuesday estimates Samsung sold 73 million units during the same period. If accurate — Samsung doesn’t report out its smartphone sales — that would mean Apple overtook Samsung as the world’s top smartphone maker by global sales for the first time since late 2011.

The new figures come on the heels of a recent report by Strategy Analytics that said Apple tied Samsung in worldwide shipments during the fourth quarter, which includes sold and unsold smartphones.

Apple’s strongest sales tend to occur during Q4 due to its fall iPhone releases. Last year’s iPhone 6 and 6 Plus offered the sales push Apple needed to beat out Samsung, per Gartner’s data:

But Apple still has a ways to go if it wants to beat Samsung in annual global smartphone sales — a goal that seems possible given how Apple’s annual sales are rising faster than Samsung’s:

Here’s a look at the history of Apple’s iPhone:

TIME Apple watch

The Apple Watch Might Actually Cost a Fortune

Apple Watch PRice Cost
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images The new Apple Watch is displayed during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on Sept. 9, 2014 in Cupertino, Calif.

Some estimates are much higher than previously thought

Better start saving up if you want to buy an Apple Watch.

Investment firm Piper Jaffray estimated Monday that the entry-level Apple Watch (called “Apple Watch Sport”) might actually cost most people around $450 instead of the $349 that Apple has officially said—when you take into account customizable features like the watch case, data storage and wrist strap.

Apple hasn’t yet announced a price for the mid-range Apple Watch (called simply “Apple Watch”), which is stainless steel and features a sapphire crystal screen, but Piper Jaffray estimates it could start around $499 to $549 and go up to $650, again depending on customizable features.

The heaviest price speculation has been around the high-end, 18-karat gold Apple Watch (dubbed “Apple Watch Edition”). Analysts have previously estimated these watches could start around $4,999, but Piper Jaffray estimates they could actually cost around $7,500, taking into account luxury wrist straps made from precious metals.

Most of Apple Watch’s specifics—but not all—have remained unknown since the device was unveiled last September. More information about the gadget is expected to be revealed at Apple’s March 9 event, while the watch will go on sale in April.

 

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