TIME Android

Nearly 1 Billion Phones Can Be Hacked With 1 Text

The Latest Mobile Apps At The App World Multi-Platform Developer Show
Chris Ratcliffe—Bloomberg / Getty Images Google's Android platform is vulnerable to the attack.

"Stagefright" is one of the worst Android vulnerabilities to date.

So listen: Can I have your number?

Can I have it? Can I? Have it?

Um…maybe not. Actually, you should think twice before giving away your cell phone number—especially if you happen to own a phone that runs on Google’s Android operating system.

That’s the only thing a hacker needs to compromise a handset.

A mobile security researcher has uncovered a flaw that leaves as many as 95% of Android devices—that’s 950 million gadgets—exposed to attack. The computer bug, nicknamed “Stagefright” after a vulnerable media library in the operating system’s open source code, may be one of the worst Android security holes discovered to date. It affects Android versions 2.2 and on.

Should a hacker learn someone’s cell phone number, all it takes is for that person to send a malware-laced Stagefright multimedia message to an affected phone in order to steal its data and photos or to hijack its microphone and camera, among other nefarious actions. Worse yet, a user might have no idea that his or her device has been compromised.

Joshua Drake, vice president of research and exploitation at the mobile security firm Zimperium zLabs, says an attacker can delete the message before a victim has any idea.

“These vulnerabilities are extremely dangerous because they do not require that the victim take any action to be exploited,” he writes on his company’s blog. “Unlike spear-phishing, where the victim needs to open a PDF file or a link sent by the attacker, this vulnerability can be triggered while you sleep. Before you wake up, the attacker will remove any signs of the device being compromised and you will continue your day as usual – with a trojaned phone.”

When Drake reported the severe vulnerabilities along with potential fixes to Google in April (as well as another set May), the company, he writes, “acted promptly and applied the patches to internal code branches within 48 hours.” That doesn’t mean the problem is resolved, however.

As Forbes reporter Thomas Fox-Brewster writes, device manufacturers will still need to push the updates out in order to safeguard their customers. Google’s major Android partners, which include phone-makers like LG, Lenovo, Motorola, Samsung, and Sony were not immediately available to comment. (Fortune will update this when we hear back.)

An HTC spokesperson responded: “Google informed HTC of the issue and provided the necessary patches, which HTC began rolling into projects in early July. All projects going forward contain the required fix.”

Drake praises the security firm Silent Circle, based in Geneva, Switz., which makes the Blackphone handset, for its quick response protecting users since it released PrivatOS version 1.1.7. He also praises Mozilla, maker of the Firefox web browser, for including fixes since version 38. “We applaud these vendors for prioritizing security and releasing patches for these issues quickly.”

“This is Heartbleed for mobile,” said Chris Wysopal, chief tech and information security officer at the application security firm Veracode. These vulnerabilities “are exceedingly rare and pose a serious security issue for users since they can be impacted without having clicked on a link, opened a file or opened an SMS.”

Drake plans to present his research at the Black Hat and Def Con security conferences in Las Vegas next month.

So, um, can I have your number?

TIME Earnings

Google Stresses Mobile and YouTube in Stellar Earnings Report

Google Offices in Berlin
Adam Berry—Getty Images The Google logo is seen inside the company's offices on March 23, 2015 in Berlin, Germany.

Google’s overall profitability exceeded experts' expectations for the quarter

Even though Google owns Android, the world’s most-used mobile operating system, mobile remains a critical risk for the search giant. Google’s web search engine is a money-printing machine, but mobile advertising hasn’t been the same home run for Google or any ad-based company.

Mobile phone usage is dominated by apps (85% of time spent) and users tend to go to the appropriate app to find the information they need, rather than conduct a Google search in a mobile Web browser like they do on a desktop computer. For example, if a person wanted to buy movie tickets, instead of searching for movie times on Google (as they would on a laptop), they’d open the Fandango mobile app. If they needed to make a purchase, they might go straight to their Amazon app. If they wanted some information, they’d open the Wikipedia app.

Shoppers still prefer to make purchases on desktop computers, which hurts any mobile ad platform that only gets paid when shoppers convert. It’s not all Google’s fault: The ad industry hasn’t shifted its budgets to be commensurate with the amount of time people spend on their phones. “We know mobile activities are influencing offline behavior,” chief business officer Omid Kordestani said in the company’s second quarter earnings call. He noted that Google is working on ways to “close the gap” between online ads and brick-and-mortar sales.

Indeed, Google has been amping up its mobile advertising efforts to address these challenges, touting new products such as a “buy button,” which allows people to shop directly within Google products on mobile, as well as mobile-friendly YouTube ads and elaborate, conversion-friendly search results for things like hotels and cars.

Google CFO Ruth Porat said the company is continuing to narrow the gap between mobile and desktop search. The quarter was Porat’s first-ever earnings report on the job, having recently joined Google from Morgan Stanley.

The company also touted strong performance on YouTube, which has been under increasing pressure as competitors,most notably Facebook, gain traction. “Watch time,” YouTube’s metric for measuring usage, grew 60% over the second quarter of last year, and on mobile, watch time has more than doubled. The company has never announced how much revenue YouTube contributes to its top line, even though, as noted at Fortune‘s Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen last week, CEO Susan Wojcicki said she wishes she could.

Google’s overall profitability exceeded Wall Street’s expectations in the quarter, earning $4.8 billion in GAAP operating profit on $17.7 billion in revenue. The operating profit represents a 27% increase over the same last year and quarterly revenue grew 11%. Investors responded positively to the report, trading Google stock up more than 10% in after-hours trading.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

TIME Advertising

Apple’s Very Different New Ads Throw Shade at Google

"If it's not an iPhone...it's not an iPhone"

Apple’s commercials have been renowned for decades, but every company misfires once in a while. That may be the case with the tech giant’s latest iPhone campaign, which breaks away from the heartwarming spots the company has become known for.

In the new commercial, Apple points out that it designs the “hardware part” and the “software part” of its phones. It’s a clear shot at Android phones, most of which run software designed by Google and hardware from a variety of manufacturers. “If it’s not an iPhone, it’s not an iPhone,” the spot concludes.

A second commercial in the same campaign points out that the iPhone comes with something “different.” The difference is that 99% of customers “love their iPhone”—implying that a smaller percentage of Android phone owners are satisfied with their devices.

The spots are unusual because Apple usually focuses on the functionality of its own devices, not putting down competitors. But with iPhone sales reaching record highs in recent quarters, the company seems eager to boast a bit.

TIME apps

Try These Apps and Sites for Selling Your Old Stuff

messy-closet
Getty Images

Garage sale goes online

Looking to get rid of some old junk? Your unused stuff could be someone else’s treasure.

Depending upon what you’re trying to sell, some services are better than others. We scoured online markets big and small, looking for the best ways to help you unload anything from your fridge to your Fendi bag.

Regardless of the service, selling your old stuff isn’t exactly a get-rich-quick scheme. Well-lit photos that show different angles of an item are key to drawing interest, as are setting fair prices and crafting descriptive titles with keywords buyers are likely to search for.

We considered the following factors while researching services:

  • Ease of use: Is the website or app interface newbie-friendly?
  • Amount of work: From settling on a good starting price, to responding to buyers, to shipping items, some apps make selling stuff online more work than the profit is worth.
  • Fees: Expect to pay at least 10% of an item’s selling price to the marketplace you use – and up to 40% if you use a concierge service that takes care of listing and shipping the items for you.

eBay

Since its launch in 1995, the online-auction kingpin has steadily added features to its marketplace, attracting professional e-sellers and real-world store owners to its original base of regular folks looking to clear out their junk.

A comprehensive selling interface lets you experiment with different selling models – the $1 auction is unbeatable for attracting interest, while setting a specific Buy It Now price can help shift items that the buyer may prefer to get immediately, such as clothing. You can also add in a Best Offer feature if you’re up for some haggling, or put a reserve on auctions so that items won’t sell unless they hit particular prices.

Best for: eBay works for just about everyone, although its listings policy officially rules out “intangible items,” specifically noting that souls can’t be sold. At any given time, there are around 110 million worldwide listings spanning clothing, furniture, antiques, collectibles and more.

Ease of use: While listing an item on the desktop site involves a lengthy form that asks for time-consuming (but not mandatory) details such as the length of a shirt sleeve, posting via the eBay app is much quicker.

How much work do I have to do? Just posting an item for sale is pretty quick when using the app. Snap a few good photos of the item, find a keyword-friendly title, and type up a couple descriptive sentences. If you’ve got a lot for sale, eBay offers features for more experienced sellers, including estimated prices and in-depth analytics for tracking your sales. The flip side is that you can end up spending an inordinate amount of time trying to craft the perfect listing.

If you just want to get rid of your things, the eBay Valet service lets you mail in certain types of items — including like-new designer clothing — for eBay staff to sell. The service commands a fee up to 40% of an item’s selling price. However, eBay is waiving the fees through June 30, 2015. So if want to give the service a try, do it now.

Fees: Your first 20 listings are free to post whether you go for auction or fixed pricing (though upgrading with bigger photos or premium visibility in search results costs extra), after which each listing costs 30 cents. eBay also takes 10% of the final selling price of each item (before shipping costs). If you use PayPal – and eBay makes it a requirement for certain listings – it charges an additional 3% onto that.

eBay is waiving all fees on its eBay Valet service through June 30, 2015.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? There’s a good market for broken electronics, so if you have a smartphone with a busted screen, or a laptop older than your niece, chances are another eBayer will want to strip it for parts.

Overall: Selling on eBay takes the most effort, but can turn the most profit. However, the site has gotten some flack for its seller-unfriendly buyer protection policy, where sellers foot the refunds for items that don’t arrive or are claimed to be significantly different from the description.

Find it here: ebay.com, iTunes, Google Play

Gone

This iOS app sits between sellers and buyers to take care of the entire listing process, including determining the highest selling price based on similar products and sending you boxes with prepaid mailing labels for a UPS pickup. If you live in Austin or San Francisco, you can arrange for a real live person to come over, pack your item, and ship it.

Gone works with online marketplaces including Amazon and eBay, using algorithms that analyze transactions on these sites to determine the highest price for your item before posting it on the most profitable site. Users can track the progress of their items through the app.

Best for: If you prize convenience over profits, Gone works well for selling electronics in good condition.

Ease of use: Getting your stuff into the marketplace is all done via the app. You snap at least two — and up to four — photos or videos of the item to be sold, add a quick description, and upload it to Gone for price appraisal.

How much work do I have to do? Not much. Once you upload items to Gone, you’ll get an estimated earning (minus packing, posting, and other costs), at which point you can either reject or accept the listings. After that, you’ll receive boxes and mailing labels to ship items to the Gone warehouse, where they’ll be inspected then put up for sale within a day. If you allow it to access your email, the app can scrape your inbox for receipts of stuff you bought online in order to automatically populate the items’ description boxes with the pertinent details.

Fees: Convenience comes at a cost: a 32GB iPad Air received an estimate of $235, compared to $317-$370 for Buy It Now listings on eBay. Once your item sells, you receive your earnings as a PayPal transfer or check, minus 7%-15% in fees, depending on the final value sold.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? No. Gone only takes on consumer electronics – think computers, tablets, smartphones, or headphones.

Overall: If you don’t want to go through the laborious process of spit-shining your gadgets, photographing them, and stressing out over how much to sell them for, Gone does it all for you through in an easy to use interface – and charges less in fees than eBay’s similar Valet service.

Find it here: thegoneapp.com, iTunes

OfferUp

If Craigslist is an online version of the classifieds, OfferUp is a tech-savvy version of Craigslist. It sports a gorgeously intuitive, picture-heavy interface for buyers to find anything from appliances and antiques to clothing to electronics in their respective locations.

Like eBay, both buyers and sellers are rated after transactions, and like Airbnb, both can opt for additional validation through real-world ID scanning, as well as linking Facebook and email accounts. The service encourages sellers to stay local with face to face transactions, and avoid shipping items without the buyer seeing them first.

Best for: Just about anything in your home, from heavy appliances to small decorative items.

Ease of use: Modern, fresh-looking Android and iOS apps make it especially easy to stroll around taking pics of all the things you don’t want before uploading each with a keyword-friendly title and short description. Buyers can then browse by neighborhood – which can give you an edge when hawking an old electric kettle that could sell simply because it’s the nearest one to a prospective buyer. Buyers can message you from within the app – a good idea in case of disputes.

How much work do I have to do? It takes about half a minute to post a listing, and you don’t need to bother with shipping. As with Craigslist, for the sake of staying safe when meeting with virtual strangers for the transaction, it’s a good idea to meet buyers in a public location.

Fees: Selling can be more profitable for certain items than other sites, as there are no fees, and you can be paid cash in hand.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? Yes. With thousands of new posts every day – compared to eBay’s hundreds of thousands – there’s less competition for your old stuff, and many neighborhood buyers may pick your everyday junk over someone else’s simply because it saves them gas or shipping fees.

Overall: OfferUp is like a cross between eBay and Craigslist, with no-fuss, in-person transactions, and trust features such as seller ratings and user validation.

Find it here: offerupnow.com, iTunes, Google Play

Vinted

There are dozens of fashion reselling sites out there, but Vinted offers an additional feature: the option to swap items without incurring any fees.

If you prefer to make some cold hard cash, it’s also an easy option for putting stuff up for sale. Where high-fashion-centric sites such as Vestiare Collective require sellers to send in their prospective items for checking before sending on to the buyer – thus lengthening the time before you get paid – Vinted lets sellers and buyers conduct their own exchanges, with seller ratings and the option to follow particular sellers and brands.

Best for: Clothes that are in good condition, from mass market fashion to designer brands, though the bulk of listings seem to be for mainstream fashion.

Ease of use: You can post items for sale via the web and iOS and Android apps by simply uploading a few pictures, inputting the brand, size, and condition of an item, and then writing a short description. If you’re up for a swap, you can add that as an option, allowing other swappers to get in touch for a fee-free exchange.

How much work do I have to do? You’ll have to figure out the best price for your item, buy postage materials, and ship items yourself.

Fees: Listing items is free, but if you sell instead of swap, you’ll incur a 19% fee (which is fairly standard for fashion reselling – similar secondhand clothing sites take 20-40%). However, Vinted hangs on to payments until the buyer confirms they’ve received the order and it’s as described, so you may end up waiting a week for money to be deposited into your account. A nice feature is that if you buy an item on Vinted but don’t like it (and can’t return it), you can relist that item for sale without incurring the fee.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? If you clean, iron, and shoot good pictures of your clothing, you could turn a tidy profit, though that 19% transaction fee can make sales of less expensive items more trouble than they’re worth.

Overall: A low-fuss way to sell mainstream fashion for a teen-to-twentysomething audience.

Find it here: vinted.com, iTunes, Google Play

Tradesy

This sophisticated clothes reselling marketplace focuses on branded fashion, with items displayed in a magazine-esque design that showcases editor’s picks and categories such as “unique and surprising shoes.”

Sellers can compile a personalized homepage or “closet” showing items for sale as well items they’ve liked from other sellers. Users can follow sellers and brands in order to keep track of new items.

Best for: Designer bags and accessories, with somewhat lesser demand for high-end clothing and shoes.

Ease of use: The site and iOS app are streamlined and stylishly designed, with a simple interface for uploading photos, noting brand, size, and color, and setting the price, including a calculator to show what you’ll earn after fees. Listings are active until they sell, without the time limit that some other sites impose.

How much work do I have to do? It’s minimal. You take a few photos of each item (which Tradesy edits and cuts out onto a white background for that pro storefront look), select the brand and category, and either choose Tradesy’s proposed price for the item or set your own. When a sale goes through, you’ll be sent a prepaid, pre-addressed mailing label and box to mail items directly to the buyer.

Fees: Items can sell for anywhere from under a hundred bucks to thousands of dollars. There are no listing fees, but the site charges an 11.9% commission (or 9% if you keep your earnings on Tradesy to spend on-site). Its refund policy is seller-friendly – if a buyer returns your item because it’s the wrong fit or style, you’ll keep all your earnings and Tradesy takes care of the refund.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? Only if it’s branded and in good condition.

Overall: It’s great for selling your pricier items to fashion-savvy shoppers, however Tradesy has a smaller user base than eBay, so you may get fewer interested buyers.

Find it here: tradesy.com, iTunes

Chairish

This beautifully designed site and iOS app focus on the reselling of unique or designer homeware, as well as antiques and jewelry. The site’s homepage shows timely curations of the available products, such as barware in time for Father’s Day, or items from “New Miami Sellers.” A couple hundred new items are posted each day, with the site’s catalog filtered by designers, styles, and cities, so that buyers can hunt down anything art-deco in Chicago, for instance.

Best for: Vintage or antique furniture, house accessories, or jewelry in good condition.

Ease of use: The online form for posting items contains helpful fields for first-time sellers, with options for noting the condition of your item (anywhere from “excellent” to “needs work”), its dimensions, your description of it, and whether you’ll allow local pickup – handy for minimizing the odds of fickle buyers returning items for no good reason.

How much work do you have to do? You’re the one to set an asking price, as well as a minimum price, but if you can’t decide, Chairish can suggest a price that’s likely to help you sell your item quickly. You can’t just list any old item, either: Chairish must approve the listing based on your pictures and whether there’s demand for the item’s particular style. After that, the listing will be live within five working days. If an item doesn’t sell after 30 days, you’ll be encouraged to drop the price.

Fees: There’s a 20% commission fee, and buyers have 48 hours to return shipped goods. Payment isn’t credited to your account until the return period ends. (If a buyer picks up in person, then the return period ends at the time of pickup and you’ll presumably have been paid cash in hand.)

Good for getting rid of old stuff? Not unless it’s quite valuable: there’s a minimum listing price of $75 for each item.

Overall: Good for selling high-value homeware to people who are likely to appreciate it.

Find it here: chairish.com, iTunes

Craigslist

Over 60 million people use Craigslist every month, posting anything from jobs to event listings. The buying and selling of secondhand goods represents a brisk trade on an overflowing marketplace that still looks like a 90s-era message board (the iOS and Android apps are much more polished). It’s often the place to pick up a bargain from people who just want to get rid of their stuff.

Best for: Nearly anything in your house, particularly big things such as appliances and furniture. Smaller items like clothing or accessories are better suited to other sites.

Ease of use: Without the need to fuss around with lengthy posting interfaces or a middleman to give you the thumbs-up on a listing, Craiglist is an extremely easy way to get your stuff out to prospective buyers. As long you write a descriptive title with the keywords a buyer is likely to search for and choose a fair price, you’re likely to be able to move your stuff.

How much work do you have to do? If you’re keen to sell, you’ll have to be on the ball with responding to interested buyers, some of whom may test you with low-ball offers that seem designed to insult. Choosing a fair price may also be tough for some, though you can always note that you’re open to haggling in order to draw more interest.

Fees: There are no fees for listing items for sale. You may have to price your items a little lower than you think, though, as buyers are often expecting a good bargain when they head to Craigslist. But cash in hand coupled with a no-refund policy makes a convincing case for posting here.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? Yes. And if you just want to get rid of stuff, you can list it for free.

Overall: Craigslist is still the juggernaut for getting rid of bulky items, with no listing fees and less businesslike transactions.

Find it here: craigslist.org, iTunes, Google Play

This article originally appeared on Techlicious

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TIME Microsoft

Microsoft Set to Announce Huge New Round of Layoffs

Satya Nadella Delivers Opening Keynote At Microsoft Build Conference
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella.

Hardware group employees included, report says

D-day for many Microsoft employees could come soon, as the company is said to be readying a significant round of job cuts.

The layoffs are expected to include those working in Microsoft’s hardware group, according to people briefed on the plans in a report by The New York Times.

This follows an announcement last year that the company would be letting go of around 18,000 employees, a number that represents 18.18% of Microsoft’s overall workforce, and counts as one of the largest round of layoffs by any company.

Microsoft’s management have been preparing staff members of this news for some time. In late June, CEO Satya Nadella sent a company-wide email rallying employees around a revised mission statement: “To empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more,” according to Geekwire. However, he also warned of the coming times ahead, saying that Microsoft would need to “make some tough choices in areas where things are not working and solve hard problems in ways that drive customer value,” as mentioned in the Times report.

The job cuts are a part of an aggressive restructuring of Microsoft’s business. In June, it was reported that AOL would be taking over Microsoft’s ad sales business, a move that would affect around 1,200 Microsoft employees. Last year, Microsoft acquired Nokia in a $7.2 billion deal that they hoped would make them a prominent player in the smartphone market, where their Windows Phone operating system have continued to cede ground to the two leading mobile platforms, iOS from Apple and Android from Google.

For more on the layoffs, read Microsoft braces for more job cuts.

TIME apps

Android Users, Rejoice: Microsoft Office Is Finally Here

Office for Android
Microsoft Office for Android

Word, Excel and PowerPoint are all free to download

Microsoft removed the “preview” label from its Office apps for Android smartphones on Wednesday, declaring the latest release of its productivity suite officially ready for prime time.

The announcement comes five weeks after Microsoft released the apps in preview mode to Android users, in a sort of public beta test that spanned 83 countries and 1,900 different Android phone models.

“We heard from thousands of these users,” Microsoft corporate vice president Kirk Koenigsbauer wrote in a public statement, “and over the last few weeks we were able to incorporate a lot of their feedback into the apps we’re launching today.”

The current release won’t work across every last Android device, particularly older models with tight memory constraints. But the vast majority of Android users can now download mobile versions of Word, Excel and PowerPoint for free from the Google Play store.

TIME Instagram

Instagram’s New Search Update Makes it Easier to Explore the World

"Wherever something is happening, chances are you can see it here"

Instagram’s new update makes it easier to search the 70 million photos uploaded to the photo-sharing app each day.

While the shooting and sharing experiences remain untouched in version 7.0, Instagram has boosted its search capabilities, offering users a new way to discover the trending and most recent photos posted from any places, cities and countries around the world.

“Wherever something is happening, chances are you can see it here,” says Instagram in a blog post published on Tuesday. “With the new Places Search, you can now peer in at just about any location on earth, allowing you to scout out your next vacation spot in the South Pacific, get a look inside that hot new restaurant or experience your favorite music festival even if you couldn’t make it this year.”

The app also has a redesigned Explore feature, which will now present trending tags and trending places. When TIME tested the new feature last week, Donald Trump had just announced his candidacy for President, and the hashtag #DonaldTrump was already trending on Instagram with photos of his stump speech.

In the past, only content that had accumulated the most Likes appeared on users’ Explore tab. In April of last year, Instagram started incorporating personalized content including photos and videos “that people you follow have liked,” the company said then.

The Explore section also includes two curated sections around photographers (the best extreme sports Instagram users, for example) and interests (beautiful bridges or natural wonders). These sections will be updated twice a week by a team of in-house editors, says Instagram.

The new features, which are only available in the U.S., are the result of a year’s worth of work, according to the Facebook-owned company. They will also appeal to media organizations that have been clamoring for an easier way to unearth newsworthy photos as they are posted to the service.

The update comes a month after Instagram co-founder Mike Krieger appeared at the Wired Business Conference in San Francisco, Ca. During an on-stage interview, Krieger professed that search would unlock the social sharing app’s full potential. “There’s a lot more we need to do to make news discoverable, to make what’s going on in the world accessible,” he said at the time.

Instagram 7.0 is available now on iOS and Android.

TIME e3 2015

Surprise, You Can Play the New Fallout Game Right Now

This is the best E3 surprise ever

Game maker Bethesda’s first E3 press conference included one very cool surprise: a new Fallout spin-off game that is available right now.

After showing off its new consoles and PC titles Doom and Fallout 4, Bethesda unveiled a new iOS and Android game dubbed Fallout Shelter. It’s not directly connected to Fallout 4, but rather something Bethesda Studios game director Todd Howard said the company wanted to build for mobile devices “because it couldn’t be done anywhere else.”

In the game, which looks a little like the diorama-style bases in Firaxis’ XCOM reboot, you craft and manage your own vault, working to keep its occupants productive and happy. Howard says the game is free, as in genuinely free, without paywall timers, Internet connection requirements or build queues.

Fallout 4 is coming out November 10, 2015. Fallout Shelter, a game no one had the faintest clue was coming, is available on the App Store.

TIME Video Games

Nintendo Says It Isn’t Making an Android Console

Super Smash Bros.
Nintendo Super Smash Bros.

Sorry, Mario: No Google for you

Nintendo is putting the kibosh on rumors that its next gaming console will run on Google’s Android operating system.

The Android-on-Nintendo rumors were first sparked by a Japanese publication earlier this week. But a Nintendo official is making it clear that the new system, codenamed NX, will not run Android.

“There is no truth to the report saying that we are planning to adopt Android for NX,” a Nintendo spokesperson told the Wall Street Journal.

Though console gaming is what made Nintendo famous, the company recently announced that it was expanding into mobile games, possibly bringing your favorite Nintendo franchises — Donkey Kong, Super Mario Brothers, and the Legend of Zelda, for example — to mobile devices.

Read more: 3 Reasons Nintendo Should Switch to Google Android

TIME Microsoft

Microsoft Bought One of the Best To-Do List Apps

6 Wunderkinder

Wunderlist, one of Google's 'best' productivity apps in 2014, reportedly sold for more than $100 million

Microsoft has once again expanded its mobile footprint with the acquisition of 6Wunderkinder, a Berlin-based startup behind popular task managing app Wunderlist.

Wunderlist, which can be used to make to-do lists and set reminders, was nominated by Google as one of the best productivity apps in 2014. Users of the app can also share to-do lists with one another, making it a useful tool for work groups, roommates or couples.

Microsoft announced the deal on Tuesday, marking the latest in a string of acquisitions that has rapidly expanded the company’s suite of productivity services for iPhone and Android users. Microsoft acquired Acompli, a critically acclaimed email app in December, followed by Sunrise, a calendar app, in February. Microsoft has since rebranded Acompli as its first true Outlook mobile app for iOS and Android.

While Microsoft has not disclosed the value of the deal, an insider familiar with the negotiation told the Wall Street Journal that the acquisition was valued between $100 to $200 million.

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