MONEY cell phones

Americans Spend More on Mobile Service Than the Rest of the World

Person using iPhone at night
Yiu Yu Hoi—Getty Images

We're not only spending more, unlike most countries', our wireless bills aren't going down.

Americans are spending more for wireless services than users in 17 other countries, according to a new report from a UK regulator.

The 2014 International Market Communications Report, published by the UK’s Office of Communications (known as Ofcom), measured the average monthly revenue per mobile connection in 18 different countries across six continents. The report shows that last year, the average mobile customer in the United States paid roughly $47 (£30, in the chart below) per connection, more than cell users in any other nation surveyed.

Only Japanese customers paid close to that amount in 2013, while users in most countries had monthly bills of less than $31 for their service. Mobile users in China, Brazil, Russia, Nigeria, Poland, and India paid less than $16 per month.

Screenshot 2014-12-15 10.30.17

Why are Americans paying so much more for wireless service? One reason is that we tend to use more data than people in other nations. According to data from Cisco, U.S. mobile customers used an average of 1.3 gigabytes of data per month in 2013. In comparison, Europeans used 700 megabytes of data per month—roughly half the American average—and mobile customers in the Middle East and Africa used just 185 megabytes.

But while increased data usage might explain the higher prices overall, it’s less clear why America is one of the few countries where the cost of wireless service isn’t declining. Despite global growth in data use, the United States is one of just five countries Ofcom analyzed (the others are the Netherlands, Sweden, Brazil, Russia, and the U.S.) where revenue per connection isn’t declining. Between 2008 and 2013, the average American customer saw wireless bills rise almost 1% per connection. Countries like France, Spain, and Italy saw cost reductions between 7.5% and 10% during that same time period.

TIME Smartphones

It’s Suddenly Super Easy to Buy The Most Exclusive Android Phone

OnePlus One
OnePlus One OnePlus

The OnePlus One is now available without an invite

The Chinese-made OnePlus One is widely considered one of the best Android phones on the market — but it’s also been incredibly difficult to purchase. If you wanted one, you needed an invite from somebody who already owned one. OnePlus has said that’s because it wanted to “cut out the middlemen” and “let our fans do the talking.”

Now, that’s no longer the case.

As part of a holiday promotion, OnePlus is shipping the One to anybody who wants it while supplies last. It’s $299 for the 16GB white version and $349 for the 64GB black version, both unlocked. As TIME pointed out in a review of the One, that’s remarkably cheap for a phone with its specs: A 5.5-inch display, 13- and 5-megapixel rear and front cameras, respectively, and a Snapdragon 801 processor with 2.5GHz Quad-Core CPUs.

From TIME’s review:

It’s easy to see why Android geeks are clamoring for the OnePlus One. It has all the hallmarks of a high-end Android phone, including a 5.5-inch 1080p display, a 2.5 GHz quad-core processor, 3 GB of RAM, 64 GB of storage, a 13-megapixel rear camera and a 5-megapixel front camera.

But at $350 unlocked, it’s roughly half the price of an unlocked iPhone 5s or Samsung Galaxy S5. While you can get subsidized phones for cheaper, an unsubsidized plan from AT&T or T-Mobile would save a lot of money in the long run when paired with a OnePlus One.

OnePlus promises any orders placed will be delivered in time for Christmas Day, though it makes an exception for delays caused by situations like bad weather.

TIME Gadgets

You Can Now Use Pac-Man As Your Android Watch Face

Dozens of custom Android Wear watch faces will soon be available for download on the Google Play store. Google

Users can now download custom watches from the Google Play store

Months ahead of the Apple Watch’s launch, Google is making moves to diversify the smartwatches of its own.

A new software update will allow Android Wear users to download and install custom watch faces from the Google Play store, Google announced Wednesday. Android Wear is Google’s software that powers several smartwatches already on the market, including Motorola’s Moto 360 and LG’s G Watch R.

Designs based on brands as varied as Porsche, Pac-Man and Rebecca Minkoff will now be available to give each user’s watch its own look. The faces will be functionally distinct as well, with some presenting additional data such as weather forecasts, altitude readings and calendar information.

There will be 46 new faces available at launch. That number should increase quickly, however, as Google is also releasing a Watch Face API that will let developers create custom faces and offer them on the Google Play store for free or for a fee. A new Android Wear companion app will let users easily download and switch between faces.

This focus on “increased diversity,” as Android Wear product manager Jeff Chang puts it, echoes a recent “be together, not the same” marketing campaign Google launched for the Android brand as a not-too-subtle dig at Apple’s uniform gadgets. There are currently six different Android Wear devices on the market, with more in the works.

“We want to enable users to have a lot of hardware choices,” Chang says. “That’s what we’re focused on. Letting people wear what they want.”

Chang wouldn’t disclose any sales figures for the Android Wear devices, but a recent report by research firm Canalys estimated that Motorola’s Moto 360 is the best-performing of the bunch, selling around 750,000 units during the third quarter of 2014.

In addition to custom watch faces, the new update brings some functional improvements to Android Wear. Recently used apps will now appear on the watch face, and users will more easily be able to bring back info cards they accidentally dismiss from the screen. There are also some new lighting modes for different situations, including a theater mode that keeps the screen off while you’re at the movies and a sunlight mode that temporarily boosts maximum screen brightness.

Users will also be able to customize the app notifications that appear on the watch if the device is paired with an Android phone running the new Android Lollipop operating system.

The updates will hit Android Wear devices over the coming week.

TIME Google

Google Android Is Getting This 1 Awesome New Feature

Android Apps
Bloomberg / Getty Images

Location, location, location

The Android version of Google Hangouts, Google’s video chat app, is getting some helpful new features today. If a friend you’re talking with through the video chat app asks “where are you,” Google will recognize the phrase and allow you to immediately share your location with the press of a single button. The app is also adding “last seen” timestamps to users so it’s easier to tell whether friends are available to talk or not.

The visuals of Hangouts are also getting an update with 16 new sticker packs that feature penguins, koalas and cats, among other creatures. New video filters like sepia and black and white have also been added.

The Hangout changes are exclusive to Android for now, but an iOS update is also in the works.

[The Verge]

TIME apps

4 Apps for Healthy Eating This Holiday Season

Cooking with digital tablet
Getty Images

Apps to help give you a reality check of what you’re putting in your body

The holidays usher in the most challenging time of year for people trying to make healthy food choices. Calorie-laden food and drinks are the star attraction at every holiday gathering. With the advent of sweater season, it’s easy to eat what we’d like and still hide it well until next spring. If you want to avoid the stress of showing skin next summer, though, it’s wise to watch what you eat now.

It’s just plain smart to be mindful of what you’re eating, and there are plenty of apps to help give you a reality check of what you’re putting in your body during all of the merriment. From social networking to scanning barcodes, here are some fun tools to support your quest to eat healthy over the holidays and beyond.

Fooducate

Put the smartphone you’re carrying around to good use the next time you’re at the grocery store. Fooducate leverages your phone’s camera to quickly scan the barcode on food items you’re looking to purchase or eat, and quickly grades the food from A through D, based on the health content of the item.

Additional notes about that food are provided, including alternative healthier choices that you could be buying instead. For instance, my Ghiradelli Dark Dream chocolate bar received a D+; however Fooducate noted that it was also a good source of iron (bonus!) and then recommended alternatives including a banana.

Overall, the clean design of the app makes finding the info you need easy to read, and provides some alternative healthy choices. The app is free and available for both the iPhone and Android platforms with in-app purchases that give you special information for those with allergies and gluten intolerance.

Price: free with additional in-app purchases on iTunes and Google Play

Meal Snap

The premise is simple, use your mobile device to take a picture of the food you’re eating with Meal Snap, and the app will determine the rough amount of calories for it. Each meal can be tagged when you eat it (lunch, evening snack, etc), along with any notes that you want to post. You can then share out your meal on Twitter, Facebook and Foursquare if you so choose.

We recommend scanning pictures of individual items/plates as it can take up to a minute for Meal Snap to determine what it’s looking at and calculate a range of calories. While testing the app, we took a picture of a plate of cupcakes and MealSnap had trouble identifying it (perhaps others don’t eat entire plates of cupcakes?), but then snapped a pic of a single cupcake and it returned an appropriate amount of calories. This is an easy to use and clever app that can make you more aware of the calories you consume on a daily basis. Meal Snap is available on Apple devices for $0.99.

Price: $2.99 on iTunes

Pic Healthy

MedHelp in conjunction with GE Healthyimagination brings you the crowdsourcing equivalent of healthy eating with this purely social app. Take a photo of what you’re eating, rate its healthiness, and then share it out for your friends and family to see. They can either support your healthy eating choice, or boo your poor decision by voting on what you ate.

You get points when your friends or family rate your meal as healthy. Or, you can earn honesty points for owning up to eating something “bad” and rating the food appropriately. Similar to Instagram, you can follow and rate other member’s food choices or make note of a particular picture of a meal that you like.

Price: free on iTunes and Google Play

Weight Watchers

While often thought of as a dieting site, this app makes understanding your food choices easier by tracking your daily food consumption and assessing how much of the good and the bad that you’re eating on a daily basis. There’s a community aspect to the app so you can see how others are doing and feel a sense that you’re not tracking your food alone.

For those of you with iPhones updated to iOS 8, the app can draw from the integrated Health app for activity and movement tracking. This replaces you having to manually enter your daily physical activity. For all users, you must be subscribed to Weight Watchers Online to use the app’s weight loss tools.

Price: free on iTunes and Google Play

This article was written by Heidi Leder and originally appeared on Techlicious.

More from Techlicious:

9 Steps to Making Your Smartphone Secure

What’s Draining Your iPhone Battery?

4 Apps That Will Save You Time

TIME apps

Google Says These Are 2014’s Best Android Apps

Check out Google's list of the best of the best

With more than 1 million apps available, parsing through the Google Play Store can be a challenge. Google has provided some help by offering a list of the best Android apps of 2014. Whether you’re looking to stream a movie, learn a new language or manage your business calendar, chances are there’s an app that will fit the bill.

Here’s a look at what Google has highlighted as the best of the best:

Productivity

  • Wunderlist: To-Do List & Tasks
  • SwiftKey Keyboard
  • IFTTT (If This, Then That)
  • Sunrise Calendar
  • Todoist: To-Do List, Task List
  • Mailbox
  • Offtime – Life Unplugged
  • Rundavoo
  • Money Tracker by BillGuard
  • SlideShare Presentations
  • Strive

Education

  • TED
  • Lumosity
  • Duolingo
  • Craftsy Classes
  • Monki Chinese Class
  • Child Mode & Time Education
  • Amazing World Atlas

Entertainment

  • Hulu
  • Comedy Central
  • Disney Movies Anywhere
  • DramaFever
  • 5by
  • Dailymotion

News

  • Yahoo News Digest
  • BuzzFeed
  • The Economist
  • CNN
  • New York Times
  • Watchup: Your Daily Newscast

Music & Audio

  • Shazam
  • Pandora
  • iHeartRadio
  • Afterlight
  • Musixmatch Music Player Lyrics
  • djay 2
  • TuneIn Radio
  • Soundhound
  • edjing – DJ Music
  • Equalizer + MP3 player volume
  • Ultimate Guitar

Sports & Fitness

  • Onefootball – Pure Soccer!
  • Golfshot: Golf GPS
  • Univision Deportes
  • 7 Minute Workout
  • Google Fit

Shopping

  • Wish
  • Groupon

Photography

  • Over
  • EyeEm: CAmera & Photo Filter
  • Facetune
  • Carousel – Dropbox Photos
  • Video Collage Maker
  • Camera Zoom

Personalization

  • Locket Lock Screen
  • Link Bubble Browser

Social

  • Timehop
  • OKCupid
  • Secret
  • LINK – with people nearby
  • Frontback
  • Obscure
  • Lettrs
  • Telegram
  • Samba: Videos + Reactions
  • Bitmoji
  • Skype Qik: Group Video Chat
  • Viadeo

Travel

  • Expedia
  • Maps.ME
  • Anywayanyday
  • Minube
  • Windfinder
  • Uber

Read next: 50 Best Android Apps for 2014

MONEY Tech

Why the War Between Apple and Android is Over

A visitor looks at Apple's website on the new Samsung Galaxy Note 4, in a Samsung pop-up shop in Soho in New York.
Richard Levine—Alamy

This is Tim Cook's Apple now—and Cook vehemently disdains litigation.

I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, and I will spend every penny of Apple’s $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong. I’m going to destroy Android, because it’s a stolen product. I’m willing to go thermonuclear war on this.

– Steve Jobs

You’ve undoubtedly heard this infamous quote by now from the late Apple APPLE INC. AAPL 2.4966% co-founder, which was included in his official biography that was published shortly after his death in 2011. Steve Jobs’ loathing for Google GOOGLE INC. GOOG 1.9177% Android was perfectly captured in this quote.

Over the years, this “thermonuclear war” has raged on, with Apple primarily targeting rival Android OEMs as opposed to Google itself. Naturally, the highest profile case was against Samsung, but Apple has also conducted its patent warfare through The Rockstar Consortium, a joint venture owned by 5 prominent tech companies. Apple and Microsoft are two of the main backers.

Rockstar was the entity that outbid Google in the 2011 auction to acquire Nortel’s massive patent portfolio, winning out with a $4.5 billion offer. Apple put up $2.6 billion of that total, presumably making it the majority owner of Rockstar.

That portfolio included important intellectual property surrounding Wi-Fi networking and cellular connectivity, among many other areas related to mobile technology. Rockstar proceeded to sue Google and numerous Android OEMs like Samsung and HTC with said patents a little over a year ago.

Well, Rockstar and Google just settled their differences, which could signal that Apple’s “thermonuclear war” is over.

War changes

No dollar terms for the settlement were disclosed, but the bigger story here is an underlying strategic shift for Apple. Cisco CISCO SYSTEMS INC. CSCO 0.8463% was also on the receiving end of patent litigation, and similarly just announced a settlement with Rockstar that will result in a $188 million pre-tax charge.

The patent wars have raged on for years, with little effect on the underlying competitive dynamics of the smartphone industry. From a financial perspective, litigation is unlikely to be worth the trouble, and it now seems that Rockstar’s shareholders (the 5 tech companies) are wary of the distraction and want to exit the consortium. Chances are that Rockstar will never come out ahead compared to the $4.5 billion it paid.

Apple also settled its litigation with Motorola Mobility earlier this year, while the handset maker was still officially under Google’s multi-colored flag (Lenovo’s acquisition of Motorola closed in October). At the time, Apple and Google said they would work together in advocating for patent reform. In August, Apple and Samsung settled all of their outstanding patent disputes outside of the U.S. as well. Neither of these settlements includes any cross-licensing agreements.

Why the sudden change of iHeart?

A changing of the guard

There are a handful reasons why Apple’s war on Android would never bear fruit and why it may be giving up.

Apple’s primary goal was never to make money from these patent suits (it makes plenty of money as it is). It was trying to block popular Android devices from the market. But the underlying strategy of trying to preclude Android devices from the market was inherently doomed, considering the open-source nature of the platform and the sheer number of OEMs making Android devices.

Perhaps most importantly, the strategy was implemented under Steve Jobs. As you can see from the quote above, he had rather strong feelings on the matter. So strong, in fact, that they weren’t pragmatic. Not only would spending Apple’s $40 billion in cash (at the time) be an obvious breach of fiduciary responsibility to shareholders, but the company would have no chance of succeeding at keeping Android off the market. Naturally, Jobs was probably just being a little melodramatic.

But this is Tim Cook’s Apple now, which is very different than Steve Jobs’ Apple in more ways than one. Specifically, Cook vehemently disdains litigation. Here’s Cook on the Q2 2012 earnings conference call, less than a year after becoming CEO:

I’ve always hated litigation and I continue to hate it. We just want people to invent their own stuff. So if we could get some kind of arrangement where we could be assured that’s the case in a fair settlement on the stuff that’s occurred, I would highly prefer to settle versus battle. But the key thing is that it’s very important that Apple not become the developer for the world. We need people to invent their own stuff.

Philosophically, Apple just doesn’t want its rivals to continue copying its hardware and software designs. Legally, the company has limited options on how to stop it, particularly as it’s become painfully obvious that patent suits aren’t effective. That’s especially true for a Chinese competitor like Xiaomi, which mostly operates outside the jurisdiction of U.S. patent courts while China is notorious for weak intellectual property rights.

Fighting words

Without a doubt, Apple is just as upset about Xiaomi’s copying ways as it is about Samsung’s copying ways. Design chief Jony Ive has spoken twice in recent months regarding the Chinese smartphone maker. Here’s Ive at a Vanity Fair conference in October:

I’ll stand a little bit harsh. I don’t see it as flattery. When you’re doing something for the first time, you don’t know it’s going to work. You spend seven or eight years working on something, and then it’s copied. I have to be honest, the first thing I can think, all those weekends that I could have at home with my family but didn’t. I think it’s theft, and it’s lazy.

Ive’s comments at London’s Design Museum last week echo the same notion:

We may seem a little testy when things we have been working on for eight years are copied in six months – but it wasn’t inevitable that it was going to work. It’s not copying; it’s theft. They stole our time, time we could have had with our families. I actually feel quite strongly about it. It’s funny – I was talking to somebody and they said do you think when somebody copies what you do it’s flattering? No.

Naturally, Xiaomi adamantly denies the allegations. You be the judge.

The market will work itself out

By his own admission, Ive is not a shrewd businessman; Ive is a designer and he’s justifiably angry. However, the fact still stands that Apple has little effective recourse to stop companies like Xiaomi or Samsung.

It turns out that the solution is just as easily captured in another Steve Jobs quote. Apple’s most viable strategy in beating Android is simply to compete as aggressively as it can by creating the best products. In 2010, Jobs said, “And if we succeed, they’ll buy them. And if we don’t, they won’t. And it’ll all work itself out.”

TIME Media

Google Takes Over North America’s Biggest Digital Billboard

Billed as Times Square's largest and most expensive digital billboard, a new megascreen is debuted in front of the Marriott Marquis hotel on Nov.18, 2014 in New York City.
Billed as Times Square's largest and most expensive digital billboard, a new megascreen is debuted in front of the Marriott Marquis hotel on Nov.18, 2014 in New York City. Spencer Platt—Getty Images

And it's even higher-res than 4K displays

The lights of Times Square just got a little bit brighter, as Google is taking over a massive new digital billboard that spans an entire city block in the heart of New York.

The new screen is more than 25,000 square feet in size and has a pixel density even greater than high-definition 4K displays. Clear Channel, the company that built the ad space, says it’s the largest digital screen in North America.

Google is taking over the space just in time for Black Friday and the holiday shopping season. The search giant will use the screen to present an interactive mobile game this week in which people can “Androidify” themselves, becoming cartoon characters similar to the ones in Google’s new Android marketing campaign. Google hopes to present 25,000 personalized Android characters on the screen each day. In addition to pushing products like Android, Chrome and Nexus, Google will offer some billboard screen-time to nonprofits such as Charity Water and Khan Academy.

The new screen is located on Broadway between 45th Street and 46th Street. The price of the ad wasn’t disclosed.

 

TIME Smartphones

Review: Lollipop Makes Your Android Phone Way More Beautiful

Google Nexus 6 Google

Android is getting a massive visual overhaul

This review originally appeared on Trusted Reviews

Android 5.0 Lollipop is the latest version of the Google mobile OS. It takes over from Android 4.4 KitKat and is likely to be the last major revision we see of the system until well into 2015.

Lollipop is the future, in other words, but is it really worth getting worked-up about? We’ve been using Android 5.0 with the Nexus 9, one of the devices launched alongside the software. Here’s what we think.

Android 5.0 Lollipop: Material Interface

Having used Android 5.0 Lollipop for a while now, we think perhaps the most significant change for now is the way the software looks. Not every change made offers a dramatic shift in the way Android feels, but the interface design does.

Google calls it Material, and aside from freshening-up the look, it’s meant to add “responsive, natural motion, realistic lighting and shadows.”

First, let’s take a look at the new design. Here are your home screens:

 

Android Lollipop Home Screens Trusted Reviews

You’ll notice everything is looking familiar, but a little different. Google has redesigned the soft keys — which now have a PlayStation-like flavor— and the Google app icons are different now.

It’s innocuous stuff, but tells you a lot about the aesthetic direction in which the system is heading. Android 5.0 Lollipop is all about friendly curves and shapes that have no intrinsic or obvious relationship with technology. They’re a circle, a square and a triangle: you don’t get much more basic than that.

Android Lollipop Soft Keys Trusted Reviews

We assume the idea is that they’re friendly compared with the rather more complicated soft keys of Android 4.4 KitKat. Despite their simplicity, the functions of two are pretty obvious even to relative technophobes.

The triangle already forms an arrow sign, and the circle is just like the Home button on an iPhone. When in doubt, copy Apple. The one on the right is called Overview these days, but it has much the same function as before: it brings up the multi-tasking menu.

The movement of the homescreens has changed. The animations are a bit less severe, with greater variance in their speeds and a greater sense of inertia. Android 5.0 Lollipop is all about shaving off that geeky exterior Android is still seen as having in some quarters.

You’re also likely to see a whole lot of the two headline backgrounds of Android 5.0. These are designed to look as though they’re made from real materials with clever use of textures. Once again, it’s a step away from the sharp technical refinement that has been more a clearer visual feature in previous Android UI elements. These backgrounds are still precise and geometric, but the textures are intended to ground them in the “real.”

It’s not so much “less geek, more chic,” but “less geek, more family-friendly.” Its no wonder Google has opted for this style, with tablets like the Tesco Hudl 2 plugging away at family buyers hard.

Is the new look good? Yes, it’s great. We already liked the Google Now interface used in some Android 4.4 phones, though, including the Nexus 5 and Moto G 2014.

The use of the real-time shadows/lighting promised on Google’s website is pretty subtle too. Those expecting jaw-dropping visual flashiness may be disappointed by this lack of bravado. Where you see the these live shadows most obviously is in the multi-tasking menu, which, as usual, is accessed using the right (square) soft key. Multi-tasking has gone 3D, folks, and each pane casts its own shadows. These are “design” shadows rather than realistic ones, mind you, and again are pretty diffuse. We like the look…

For the full Android 5.0 Lollipop Review, visited Trusted Reviews.

See more from Trusted Reviews:

Google Nexus 6 Hands-On

Google Nexus 9 Review

iPad Air 2 review

TIME apps

The Best Smartphone Apps You Can’t Miss This Week

Try 'Today,' a to-do app that helps you keep track of your hectic life

It seems like hundreds of new smartphone apps pop up every day, but which ones should you bother trying? Here, TIME offers a look at five apps for iPhone, iPad and Android that stand out and are worth a shot.

  • iCukoo Charity Alarm Clock

    iCukoo Charity Alarm Clock iCukoo Charity Alarm Clock

    For the last few years, developers have been trying to come up with foolproof alarm clocks. Users have already found ways to beat the apps that only deactivate after a phone is carried for ten steps. Instead, iCuckoo takes a moral and financial approach to the black hole of snooze button-pressing: with every snooze, the app sends a set amount of money to a charity of your choice. In short, you can sleep in and tell your boss that you were actually “volunteering,” and you’ll also feel just awful about yourself if you manage to get around the app’s parameters.

    iCuckoo is available free in the App Store.

  • Neato

    Neato Neato

    Part of the reason Apple’s Notes app has been so underused is that it makes note-taking a tedious task — better to forget the idea than to fumble through your phone and wait for a yellow pad app to open. Neato takes this into consideration by inserting itself into iPhone’s notification center, allowing users to access it with one quick swipe. Even better, Neato can save notes to a Dropbox or Evernote account, and can be used to quickly send notes as an email or tweet.

    Neato is temporarily available free in the App Store.

  • Yummly

    Yummly Yummly

    Many of us find it difficult to fully commit to culinary endeavors because good recipes are hard to find, and even harder to keep track of. Yummly—once only for iPhone users—allows you to browse a series of beautifully photographed and easy-to-follow recipes on your phone or tablet, and save them to your own digital cookbook. But like any great online service, Yummly can also recommend recipes based on the ones you’ve used. The app also takes into consideration personal preferences and needs, like allergies and special diets.

    Yummly is now available free in the App Store and Google Play store.

  • Sleep Better

    Sleep Better Sleep Better

    By placing your phone on your pillow and activating Sleep Better, the app will be able to track how long you sleep, the time you spent awake in bed and track your sleep cycles. Users can enter variables like alcohol intake, exercise, or caffeine intake to see how they affect sleep patterns. Also equipped with an alarm clock, the app will track your sleep over time, showing you how miserably and self-destructively sleep-deprived you’ve been after picking up those bad habits in college.

    Sleep Better is available free in the App Store and Google Play store.

  • Today

    Today Today

    Today is a calendar app that takes a variety of commitments into consideration. Not only does it allow you to track work schedules, but it has spaces for habits, hobbies, and down time. Today will remind you that 2 p.m. is Twix time at the office, for example, or that you’re supposed to go for a run at 7 a.m. Today will also help you set goals and keep track of them through the day, such as remembering to drink enough water to avoid 4 p.m. dehydration headaches. The app shows up in iPhone’s notification center as a clock with bars for different activities.

    Today is available for $2.99 in the App Store.

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