TIME Television

Watch John Oliver Take a Bite Out of Food Waste

Oliver also took a moment to slam Donald Trump and discuss Iran

John Oliver turned his attention from politics to the plate on Last Week Tonight on Sunday to discuss food — specifically, food waste. “Food waste is like the band Rascal Flatts: it can fill a surprising number of stadiums even though most people consider it complete garbage,” said Oliver.

According to a report by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Americans waste about 40% of food that’s produced every year, which is enough grub to fill 730 football stadiums — and we all know how Oliver feels about stadiums. That fact alone is alarming, but it’s especially so when taken in consideration with the fact that in 2013, close to 50 million people in the U.S. experienced food insecurity and worried about being able to put food on the table.

Oliver also noted that food waste is appalling due to the amount of resources put into creating that food, which are also wasted when the food is chucked. “At a time when the landscape of California is shriveling up like a pumpkin in front of a house with a lazy dad, it seems especially unwise that farmers are pumping water into food that ends up being used as a garnish for landfills,” said Oliver, noting that landfills can lead to methane, a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. Or in Oliver’s words: “When we dump food into a landfill, we’re essentially throwing a trash blanket over a flatulent food man and Dutch-ovening the entire planet.”

Oliver ended with a call to arms: “We all have to address our relationship with food waste.”

Oliver also discussed the new deal between the U.S. and Iran, which can be summed up perfectly in this tweet:

TIME Congress

13 Reasons the Government Could Shut Down Again This Fall

Congress Convenes On Columbus Day As Government Shutdown Continues
Mark Wilson—Getty Images The U.S. Capitol in Washington in 2013.

Democrats and Republicans don't see eye to eye on spending

Do you miss the government shutdown? Don’t worry, another one could be coming as soon as this fall.

You might have thought the threat of another shutdown was shelved last year when congressional Budget Committee Chairs Rep. Paul Ryan and Sen. Patty Murray came to a two-year bipartisan deal to fund the government.

But the new Republican Congress blew up that deal, and a shutdown could be part of the fallout.

Republicans are now attempting to undo controversial cuts to military spending in the 2013 sequester. Democrats are having none of that: if the Pentagon gets its money, they argue, so too should entitlements, as was part of the original deal. Unless Republicans relent on this point, Democrats have vowed to block all 13 appropriations bills from coming to the Senate floor.

But even if those bills were to get voted on, odds are they won’t pass since they have dozens of provisions that Democrats object to — and which President Obama has threatened to veto.

If some sort of funding isn’t passed by the end of September, the government will shut down. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell swears that will not happen on his watch, but for now the two sides aren’t even talking.

So what could cause a shutdown? Here’s a look at the 13 most controversial provisions, any one of which could trigger a partial or total government shutdown if Democrats and Republicans can’t come to an agreement.

  1. Obamacare: Of course, the bills cut funding for the implementation of Obamacare — the same law that caused the last shutdown.
  2. The environment: The bills would essentially defund or block the President’s climate change plan—including his recently issued controversial rule for coal fired power plants, a clean water rule and a bunch of endangered species listings. All told there are more than 30 riders that environmental groups are protesting.
  3. Cybersecurity: On the heels of a massive breach of personal information for tens of millions of government employees, the GOP budgets would delay installation of cybersecurity upgrades to federal agencies to protect against foreign attacks and cut funding to protect the nation’s electronic grid from cyber attacks and extreme weather by 40%.
  4. Education: The GOP bills would cut nearly $6 billion in education funding, eliminating six pre-K-12 programs, slashing Head Start by $1.5 billion, cutting 21st Century Community Learning Centers by 10% and School Improvement Grants by 11% and $300 million in Pell Grants.
  5. Labor: As the President negotiates two of the largest free trade pacts in the world, he has pledged to ensure that they will meet fair labor standards and not empower countries to abuse their workforces. But the enforcement of these provisions falls on a Labor Department office, the same office that Republicans are looking to cut by 67%. Also on the chopping block: 5% of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s budget and 8% of the budget of the office that protects workers from wage theft and abuse.
  6. Veterans: Despite the ongoing scandal plaguing the Veterans Affairs Administration, the budgets cut $255 million from veterans medical care and $105 million from maintenance for VA hospitals.
  7. Consumer protection: The GOP bills would cut $200 million in funds to implement Wall Street re-regulation, or the Dodd-Frank bill passed in the wake of the financial crisis to prevent something like that from happening again. And it attempts to defund Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s darling, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was set up in the wake of the crisis to better protect Main Street from the risks Wall Street is taking.
  8. Women’s health: The bills cut funding for Title X family planning service programs, eliminating access to birth control for the 4.7 million clients that the programs served in 2012, preventing an estimated 1.2 million unintended pregnancies. They also slash funding to prevent teen pregnancies by 81%.
  9. Infrastructure: In the wake of a fire in a Chicago radar facility that knee capped Midwest air traffic for weeks as air traffic controllers tracked planes with pen and paper, the Transportation Department asked for more money for air traffic control. Instead, Republicans are seeking to cut $255 million from the air traffic control system. Other targets include: $479 million in cuts to water infrastructure $400 million in cuts to innovation grants and $1.7 billion in cuts to transit projects across the country.
  10. Job training: The bills propose cutting $650 million from job training programs.
  11. Wildfires and disease: The GOP budgets envision cutting $1 billion from funding to fight wildfires. Also on the chopping block: $500 million for the Agriculture Department to research diseases like the avian flu.
  12. National parks and national service: The bills cut the National Park Services budget by $321 million, despite the fact that the agency has a massive $11 billion backlog. It also cuts $340 million, or 29%, from AmeriCorps, which translates into 32,000 fewer members serving their communities.
  13. Health: The GOP budgets propose cutting lead paint removal in low-income households, potentially putting more than 2,000 children at risk. And they cut funding for 9,000 scientists’ research at the National Science Foundation.

TIME Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe Is Proposing to Return a Select Number of Farms to White Landowners

Dup Muller, 59, a commercial farmer in Headlands,
AARON UFUMELI—AFP/Getty Images In this file photo from 2002, Dup Muller, 59, a commercial farmer in Headlands, 110 kilometers, (70 miles) East of Harare, stands in the burned out ruins of his farm house, which was attacked by war veterans enforcing a government order for whites to leave their farms.

The decision comes 15 years after the state encouraged violent seizures of white-owned properties

A decade and a half after the Zimbabwean government seized large swaths of land from white farmers in the country, President Robert Mugabe has tentatively declared that he will return certain properties to their original owners.

Under the suggested policy, the leaders of the country’s 10 provinces will draft a list of farms in their respective districts that they deem to be “of strategic economic importance,” the Zimbabwe Mail reports. The government will also establish a European Union–backed commission to evaluate the landgrab practices commenced in 2000, which were frequently violent.

The property-seizure policy, which sent the country into economic crisis and left a number of civilian landowners dead, was both an exercise in kleptocracy and an attempt to wrest the country from its fraught colonial legacy. Many of the 4,000 white-owned farms taken by Mugabe’s government had been operated by the same families for decades — families that had come to the British colony of Rhodesia to make their fortunes in a system built on racial hierarchy.

At present, only 300 white farmers remain on their original properties; meanwhile, a number of the farms seized in the past 15 years have ceased operations, requiring Zimbabwe — the erstwhile “Breadbasket of Africa” — to import food to stave off a hunger crisis.

In spite of his government’s failure to sustain agricultural success on the reclaimed lands, Mugabe obstinately continues to defend his original decision.

“Don’t be too kind to white farmers,” Mugabe said at a recent meeting of the Zimbabwe African National Union–Patriotic Front, the country’s ruling nationalist party, the Mail reports. “They can own industries and companies or stay in apartments in our towns, but they cannot own land. They must leave the land to blacks.”

TIME Cancer

DDT, Lindane Can Cause Cancer, WHO Says

toxic pestisides lindane ddt
Arben Celi—Reuters An Albanian specialist removes toxic pesticides near the ruins of a former chemical plant in Porto Romano, a village 3 miles from the port city of Durres, May 5, 2006.

DDT was mostly banned in the U.S. in 1970, while lindane is still present in some products

Exposure to insecticides lindane and DDT can cause cancer, according to findings released by the World Health Organization (WHO) on Tuesday.

WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has now classified lindane, which has been used “extensively” for insect control, as carcinogenic to humans. DDT is now classified as probably carcinogenic to humans, based on evidence that DDT causes cancer in experimental animals and limited evidence that it does in humans.

The chemicals have been linked specifically to non-Hodgkin lymphoma, testicular cancer and liver cancer. Exposure to lindane can increase one’s risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma by 60%, according to studies conducted in Canada and the U.S.

The chemical 2,4-D, a common weedkiller, was classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans based on “inadequate evidence” in humans and “limited evidence” in experimental animals. Exposure can occur through food, water, dust or residential application, the IARC said.

Agricultural workers have had the most direct exposure to such chemicals. DDT was introduced to control insect populations on farms during World War II and widely proliferated, but most applications of DDT were banned in the U.S. in 1970. According to the study, however, exposure to DDT through food still exists in some parts of the world.

Lindane-based shampoo is also used to kill lice, while lindane lotion is applied directly to the skin to treat scabies. Both these products have been available since the early 1950s and are still approved by the FDA. Dr. Kurt Straif, head of the IARC, told the BBC that there are no studies currently available that assess the risk of these types of exposure.

DDT can still be legally manufactured in the U.S., but only sold to foreign countries.

The full study can be found here.

TIME Television

John Oliver Has Beef With the Treatment of Chicken Farmers

Many poultry farmers live below the poverty line

On Last Week Tonight, John Oliver spoke about America’s favorite food — chicken. He didn’t focus his diatribe on the treatment of chickens (although video clips of Paul McCartney and Pamela Anderson assured viewers poultry is treated abysmally), but rather on the treatment of America’s chicken farmers.

According to Oliver, to sate the American appetite for chicken, the big four poultry companies use a system of contract farmers to raise their product — which currently requires 169 million chicks a week, which is as Oliver put it, “Warren Beatty numbers.”

Despite those impressive stats, according to Oliver, a surprisingly large percentage of those contract chicken farmers live at or below the poverty line. But when asked to comment about their impoverished contract farmers, a spokesman for the National Chicken Council asked, “Which poverty line are you referring to?”

As Oliver pointed out that, it doesn’t matter, because “the poverty line is like the age of consent, if you find yourself parsing exactly where it is, it you’ve probably already done something very, very wrong.”

Oliver then asked members of Congress to enact meaningful legislation to protect chicken farmers — and a call to arms to change their Wikipedia pages if they didn’t.

TIME States

Nebraska Has Ordered a State of Emergency Over Bird Flu

In this May 11, 2015 photo provided by John Gaps III, men in hazardous materials suits load dead poultry to be buried at Rose Acre Farms, Inc., just west of Winterset, Iowa.
John Gaps III—AP In this May 11, 2015 photo provided by John Gaps III, men in hazardous materials suits load dead poultry to be buried at Rose Acre Farms, Inc., just west of Winterset, Iowa.

Over 33 million birds in 16 states have now been affected by the pathogen

Governor Pete Ricketts ordered a state of emergency Thursday after Nebraska’s Department of Agriculture confirmed the highly contagious H5N2 avian flu virus had infected a second farm.

The declaration opens up emergency funding in the hopes it can help contain the pathogen that now threatens what is, according to local officials, a $1.1 billion poultry industry in Nebraska.

“While not a human health threat, the discovery of avian influenza is a serious situation for our poultry sector, and I want to provide responders with access to all appropriate tools to address it,” said Ricketts in a statement.

The proclamation follows similar actions taken in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa. More than 33 million birds in 16 states have now been affected by the outbreak, which originated in a small backyard flock in Oregon.

The outbreak has hit Americans’ pocketbooks as, the Associated Press reports, the price of large eggs in the Midwest rose by 17% since mid-April and other price increases are being seen in turkey, boneless breast meat and mixing eggs.

TIME Television

The Mad Men Title Sequence Is Eerily Similar to This LIFE Magazine Cover

LIFE Magazine April 21 1967 Cover
LIFE Magazine

The falling men on a 1967 LIFE cover seem to presage the falling man in the AMC show's opening credits

Analyzing the title sequence to Mad Men has become something of a sport for the show’s fans. Does the suited man hurtling toward earth foreshadow protagonist/anti-hero Don Draper’s literal death or his figurative demise? Does it echo the chilling photograph of a man who jumped from a burning World Trade Center tower? (Showrunner Matthew Weiner has said emphatically that it does not.) Whatever it represents, where did Imaginary Forces, the agency that produced the sequence, get the idea?

Here’s another idea: it’s now been pointed out that the design has many similarities to a 1967 LIFE Magazine cover, the first in a four-part series on “The Struggle To Be an Individual.” The cover, like Mad Men’s credits, features silhouetted men against the backdrop of a 1960s-era skyscraper. Both suggest a sense of helplessness, of ceding control to powerful forces beyond one’s self.

The Imaginary Forces team that produced the credits has spoken about some of the inspiration behind the design. Weiner initially approached them with the skeleton of an idea — a man walks into an office building, takes the elevator to the top and jumps — and they began developing storyboards. Those boards included a Volkswagen ad, movie stills and, as designer Steve Fuller told Print, “the design stew that’s been swirling around in our head over the last 15 years since we left college.”

Although a representative from AMC confirmed in an email to TIME that similarities between the LIFE cover and the title sequence are purely coincidental, the photo essay the cover advertises in many ways articulates the existential crises Draper faces in Mad Men. As an ad man, Draper sells access to an American dream he himself hasn’t entirely bought into. Even as he accumulates successes in the boardroom and the bedroom, the satisfaction never lasts longer than a few drags of a cigarette that might kill him anyway.

The ethos of the 1960s is, of course, omnipresent in Mad Men — and not just in its fastidious commitment to the furniture and fashions of the time. In post-WWII America, many Americans had settled into the comfort of corporate jobs that afforded them the same white picket fence and station wagon their neighbors boasted. Responding to that phenomenon, books like William H. Whyte’s The Organization Man, published in the mid-1950s, lamented how modern workers’ collectivist group-think ran in opposition to creativity and innovation. The sociological treatise The Lonely Crowd, which sits on the radiator in Don’s office, similarly observed that people’s yearning to understand their position as it compared to everyone else’s limited their potential for self-actualization.

The photos in “The Struggle To Be an Individual” suggest anonymity amidst this 1960s uniformity: an aerial view of an endless expressway, looping seemingly to nowhere; a housing development in which every unit looks identical; a geometry of office workers sitting row by row at the same typewriters, with the same hairstyles and the same stacks of paper.

“You can sign up for just about anything you want and it will be delivered with speed and polish,” one caption reads. “Everything you can get your hands on is worth having. The trick is in deciding what you want.” Draper, of course, can’t decide what he wants: the suburban life or the mistress in the city, the towering Manhattan skyline or the hazy skies and swimming pools of Los Angeles.

One caption, perhaps more than any other, seems to describe the journey Draper has undertaken as the series winds to a close. It accompanies the photograph of those looping Long Island expressways and dictates, almost like a meditation tape, how the driver might place himself in space and time:

Imagine yourself an astral body, streaking along, stable in the galaxy … before you know it, the unseen land will disappear behind you. Your turn will come to peel off, and home you’ll go, untouched by any weather.

TIME public health

Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria From Texan Cattle Yards Are Now Airborne, Study Finds

A herd of longhorn cattle stand as wildfire rages near on September 1, 2011 in Graford, Texas
Tom Pennington—Getty Images A herd of longhorn cattle stand as wildfire rages near on September 1, 2011 in Graford, Texas

Researchers say the bacteria are capable of "traveling for long distances"

A new study says the DNA from antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in American cattle yards has become airborne, creating a new pathway by which such bacteria can potentially spread to humans and hinder treatment of life-threatening infections.

Researchers gathered airborne particulate matter (PM) from around 10 commercial cattle yards within a 200 mile radius of Lubbock, Texas over a period of six-months. They found the air downwind of the yards contained antibiotics, bacteria and a “significantly greater” number of microbial communities containing antibiotic-resistant genes. That’s according to the study to be published in next month’s issue of Environmental Health Perspectives.

“To our knowledge, this study is among the first to detect and quantify antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes…associated with airborne PM emitted from beef cattle feed yards,” said the authors, who are researchers in environmental toxicology at Texas Tech University and at a testing lab in Lubbock.

Co-author Phil Smith told the Texas Tribune that the bacteria could be active for a long time and “could be traveling for long distances.”

His colleague, molecular biologist Greg Mayer, told the paper that some of the study’s findings “made me not want to breathe.”

Because antibodies are poorly absorbed by cows they are released into the environment through excretion. Once in the environment, bacteria will undergo natural selection and genes that have acquired natural immunities will survive.

The genes that have gone airborne are contained in dried fecal matter that has become dust and gets picked up by winds as they whip through the stockyards.

The Texas Tribune reported that representatives from the Texas cattle industry (estimated to control around 14 million beef cows) criticized the study, saying it portrayed the airborne bacteria as overly hazardous to human health.

But the mass of PM2.5 particles (the kind that can be inhaled into lungs) released into the atmosphere is eye opening, with the study estimating the total amount released by cattle yards in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Texas exceeds 46,000 lbs.(21,000 kg) per day.

Antibiotic-resistant bacterial DNA is already known to be transferable to humans if ingested via water or meat.


TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: March 10

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. How do we convince Americans that justice isn’t for sale — when in 39 states, it is?

By Sue Bell Cobb in Politico

2. It took pressure from customers and investors to make corporations environmentally sustainable. It’s time to do the same for gender equity.

By Marissa Wesely in Stanford Social Innovation Review

3. London’s congestion pricing plan is saving lives.

By Alex Davies in Wired

4. Libraries should be the next great start-up incubators.

By Emily Badger in CityLab

5. Annual replanting has a devastating impact. Could perennial rice be the solution?

By Winifred Bird in Yale Environment 360

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

MONEY groceries

National High-Price Bacon Nightmare Is Over

150127_EM_Bacon
Ray Lego—Getty Images

Bacon lovers, rejoice. The heartbreaking, seemingly endless rise of pork prices appears to have subsided.

After hitting record highs over the summer, bacon prices have come down to earth—and even cheaper prices are on the way.

The retail price of bacon hit an all-time high during the summer of 2014, but has since retreated, dropping 5.7% by early December, according to Bloomberg News. What’s more, all signs indicated at the time that prices for pork, ham, and bacon would keep on decreasing. “Hogs and pork are almost surely going to be cheaper, particularly compared to beef, next year,” Doane Advisory Services economist Dan Vaught said.

Sure enough, pork prices are plunging in early 2015. On Tuesday, the Wall Street Journal reported that farmers have rebounded from a virus that decimated pig herds in 2013 and early 2014, and that the nation is riding high on the hog in terms of a record number of pigs approaching slaughter weight. Forecasts call for an all-time high of 23.9 billion pounds of pork to be produced in the U.S. in 2015.

“It’s amazing. We’ve gone from ‘We’re going to run out of pork!’ to ‘What are we going to do with all of this meat?’” John Nalivka, president of the Oregon-based agriculture-advisory firm Sterling Marketing Inc., told the Journal.

Well, one thing they’re clearly going to do is cut prices. Hogs are currently trading at four-year lows on the futures market. Supermarkets are paying less for pork wholesale, and they have begun passing along the savings in the form of cheaper ham, pork loins, and yes, bacon. Last summer, the average retail price for a pound of bacon was over $6 per pound. By December 2014, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, a pound of bacon was averaging $5.53 in U.S. grocery stores, and $5.10 in the Midwest.

The funny thing about bacon is that people love it so much that demand stays incredibly high even when prices rise, and the masses are prone to panic with the slightest hint of bacon being in short supply. And when bacon prices become cheaper, that’s a justification for some bacon lovers to take their bacon consumption to the next level. Businesses that profit on bacon-aholics will surely be more than happy to help. Look for more bacon to be incorporated into restaurant menus and on sale at supermarkets in the months ahead.

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com