TIME Accident

2 Die in Small Plane Crash Near Pennsylvania Airport

The FAA will investigate the cause

(WEST CHESTER, Pa.) — Authorities say a small plane crash near a southeastern Pennsylvania airport has left two people dead.

Emergency officials say the crash was reported near Brandywine Airport just after 1:30 p.m. Sunday.

Dispatchers said two people were found dead following the crash. An official said they were the only people on board.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the Piper PA28 had taken off from the airport located about 20 miles west of Philadelphia. The aircraft then went out of control and went down in a field about two miles away.

Emergency crews reported that the plane burst into flames following the crash.

The FAA will investigate the cause of the crash.

TIME Accident

Two Bodies Found in Rubble 3 Days After NYC Blast, Police Say

Firefighters continue to hose down the site of a seven-alarm fire that caused the collapse of two buildings a day after the blaze took place on March 27, 2015 in New York City.
Nancy Borowick—Pool/Getty Images Firefighters continue to hose down the site of a seven-alarm fire that caused the collapse of two buildings a day after the blaze took place on March 27, 2015 in New York City.

Two men are missing, but no identification was immediately released

(NEW YORK) — Emergency workers found a second body Sunday in the mass of rubble left behind by an apparent gas explosion three days earlier in Manhattan’s East Village, police said.

The names of the two dead were not immediately released; a medical examiner was to determine the identifications.

Authorities had been looking for signs of two missing men, both believed to have been inside a ground floor sushi restaurant at the time of the explosion: 26-year-old Moises Lucon, who worked at the restaurant, and 23-year-old Nicholas Figueroa, a bowling alley worker who had been there on a date.

During the day, workers raked through piles of loose brick and wood; rescue workers sent search dogs over debris where three apartment buildings once stood.

Several members of Figueroa’s family visited the blast site Sunday, holding flowers and crying.

Figueroa’s brother, Neal, leaned over barricades and shouted pleas to emergency workers: “He’s a strong man, I know he’s in there! Don’t give up, please find my brother.”

Authorities, however, acknowledged the chances of finding anyone alive were slim.

Mayor Bill de Blasio said someone may have improperly tapped a gas line before the explosion that injured 22 people, four of them critically.

Consolidated Edison said utility workers had discovered in August that the gas line to the restaurant had been illegally tapped. The discovery led Con Edison to shut down gas service to the building for about 10 days while the building owner made repairs. Gas service was restored after the utility deemed it safe, the utility said.

Inspectors from Con Ed had visited that building about an hour before Thursday’s explosion and determined work to upgrade gas service didn’t pass inspection, locking the line to ensure it wouldn’t be used and then leaving, officials said. The work underway was to put in a bigger line to serve the entire building, Con Ed President Craig Ivey said.

Fifteen minutes later, the sushi restaurant’s owner smelled gas and called the landlord, who called the general contractor, Chief of Detectives Robert Boyce said. Nobody called 911 or Con Ed.

The contractor, Dilber Kukic, and the owner’s son went into the basement and opened a door, and then the explosion happened, burning their faces, Boyce said.

Kukic —who’s facing unrelated charges of bribing an undercover investigator posing as a housing inspector —declined through his lawyer to comment on the circumstances surrounding the explosion. City records show Kukic got a permit last June for plumbing, flooring, removing partition walls and other work at the building.

The explosion echoed through the city’s arts community, destroying “Sopranos” actress Drea de Matteo’s apartment — she posted photos on Instagram of “a hole where my NYC home of the last 22 years once stood” — and spurring the cancellation of five performances of the propulsive show “Stomp,” which is at a theater near the site.

The blast happened a little over a year after a gas explosion in a building in East Harlem killed eight people and injured about 50. A gas leak was reported shortly before that blast.

TIME Canada

Jet Skids Off Halifax Runway, Sending 25 to Hospital

Air Canada
Andrew Vaughan—AP Air Canada flight 624 rests off the runway after landing at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax, Canada on, March. 29, 2015.

After a "hard landing" in Nova Scotia

An Air Canada passenger jet skidded off the runway after a “hard landing” at the Halifax airport in Nova Scotia, authorities said, sending 25 people to the hospital.

The airline said that Air Canada Flight 624 from Toronto — an Airbus A320 — “exited the runway” upon landing. It said a preliminary count showed 133 passengers and five crew were on board when the incident took place just after midnight local time.

Halifax Stanfield International Airport said its airfield was closed and 25 people were taken to the hospital. The airline said later that 18 had been treated and released.

“We are thankful no serious…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME Accident

Watch the Building Collapse in Manhattan’s East Village

In a video provided to TIME by Dan Bowens, a Fox5 reporter, a building in New York’s East Village neighborhood collapsed Thursday after witnesses reported hearing an explosion, sparking a fire that spread to several other buildings. At least 12 people were hurt.

Read next: A Dozen Injured in Manhattan Building Explosion

TIME

How the Germanwings Co-Pilot Was Able to Lock Himself In

Safety measures brought in after 9/11 may have helped the co-pilot barricade himself in the cockpit

The fatal crash of a German airliner in the French Alps, apparently a deliberate act by the plane’s co-pilot, seems to have been made possible by security measures brought in following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks intended to make air travel safer.

On Thursday, French officials said it appeared as if co-pilot Andreas Lubitz had deliberately downed Germanwings Flight 9525 by locking the cockpit door and refusing to allow the captain back inside. The crash killed all 150 on board.

If that is what happened, it would be an indirect result of tightened security measures implemented by airlines in the U.S. and around the world in the aftermath of 9/11, when 19 hijackers overcame crew and passengers and flew the planes into buildings in New York and Washington D.C.

In 2002, the FAA announced higher standards to protect pilots. Cockpit doors in airliners were made stronger while remaining locked throughout the flight. The FAA also mandated internal locking devices inside the cockpit to preventing someone from entering. But those restrictions, meant to prevent similar hijackings, may also have allowed Lubitz to prevent someone else from entering the flight deck as he piloted the jet into a mountainside.

“The procedures put in place to prevent one bad thing from happening facilitated another bad thing happening,” says Jeff Price, an aviation management professor at Metropolitan State University of Denver.

On an Airbus A320, a locked cockpit door can be opened through a nearby keypad—as shown in this Airbus video—but that can be overridden by an individual still inside the cockpit via a switch that can keep the cockpit door locked. “That act of fully locking the system down has made this event possible,” says aviation expert Chris Yates. “Pilots use that access keypad to wander into the cockpit anytime they choose, but it can be overridden from inside, and that seems to be the problem.”

Yates says one way to potentially avoid a similar situation would be to take out the locking mechanism altogether. But a simpler fix might be for all airlines to do as the U.S. has done since 9/11 and require a flight attendant to be inside the cockpit if one of the pilots is away. While some carriers have already begun doing this since the crash, many in Europe and across the world still don’t mandate it.

“U.S. airlines have been doing this since 9/11,” Price says. “And if the pilot decides to commit mass murder, there’s somebody else up there to open a door or notify somebody or take some sort of action.”

MORE How Pilots Are Screened for Depression and Suicide

Thomas Anthony, the director of the University of Southern California Aviation Safety and Security program, says there’s no one fix that would help prevent a similar incident. For any aviation mishap, he says, there are always four or five contributing factors, citing the Airbus’s strengthened cockpit doors as well as less interchange between the cabin crew and the flight crew, which he says has created a more isolated environment inside the cockpit. And he thinks any investigation into the downing of the German airliner will attempt to address this sort of insider threat.

“Every security measure that is taken has a price and often an unintended consequence,” Anthony says. “But I expect this will be a watershed event.”

Read next: Germanwings Plane Crash: We Could Be Doing Much More To Prevent Pilot Suicide

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Accident

19 Injured in New York City as Apparent Gas Explosion Results in Multiple Building Collapse

Four civilians are reportedly in critical condition

Three buildings in a heavily residential area of New York City collapsed as a fire broke out in a fourth, leaving 19 injured in what is suspected to be a gas-related explosion.

Four of the injured are in a critical condition, a spokesman for the city’s fire department told reporters late Thursday.

The blast took place just after 3 p.m. in the highly residential East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, and about 250 firefighters and EMS workers responded to the scene around 3:20 p.m., local time. Firefighters searched the buildings before the first one collapsed 15 minutes later, forcing them out.

The fourth building “is still involved with some pockets of fire, it’s still an active scene,” he said. “Investigation is still ongoing.”

In a news conference, Mayor Bill de Blasio said preliminary reports suggest that plumbing or gas work was being done in a building on Second Avenue before the explosion took place.

The buildings near the corner of Second Avenue and 7th Street contain both residences and businesses, including a sushi restaurant and a popular late-night Belgian fry shop called Pommes Frites.

Ben Mackinnon, 28, heard an explosion while sitting in a cafe across the street from the buildings. He then reportedly saw several men covered in blood emerge from the sushi restaurant, and said one of them fell onto the sidewalk.

“The explosion was big enough that the door of the cafe blew open,” Mackinnon told Reuters.

Other eyewitnesses corroborated his account, with nearby bakery-owner Moishe Perl saying he saw the lower floors of a building starting to crumble after hearing the explosion.

Consolidated Edison is shutting down the gas in the impacted area and has sent a team to investigate the cause of the explosion, according to a Con Ed spokesman. The company’s president said at the news conference that Con Ed workers who had visited the building earlier in the afternoon to inspect work being done by a private company found that work unacceptable and recommended not introducing gas. The explosion happened about an hour later.

The city’s Office of Emergency Management sent out an alert telling people in the area to close their windows and stay away from the smoke. The smell of smoke spread at least as far as midtown Manhattan, a couple miles away.

A spokesperson for the Red Cross said a temporary shelter for displaced residents of the 49 units in the buildings has been set up at an elementary school in the area.

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

MONEY Credit

Woman Is Sent 300 Credit Reports By Accident

overstuffed mailbox
Christie & Cole Studio Inc.—iStock

A woman reportedly requested her free credit report and got 300 strangers' reports instead.

A woman in Maine came home to a funny sight earlier in March when her mailbox was stuffed with more than 300 envelopes, each containing a credit report.

Here’s what’s not so funny: None of them belonged to her.

Katie Manning contacted a local news station (WGME 13 TV in Portland, Maine) after she realized she had all of these strangers’ sensitive information, and the station put her in touch with the state Bureau of Consumer Credit Protection.

Manning had requested her credit report from Equifax earlier in the month, she told WGME, but she received others’ reports instead of hers.

“I’m not supposed to have this information, this is unbelievable, someone has messed up,” Manning told WGME.

Equifax did not immediately respond to requests for comment from Credit.com, though Equifax’s Vice President of Corporate Communications Tim Klein told WGME, “This is a high priority. Obviously this is a serious situation. I’m going to get our security and forensics teams involved.”

William Lund, superintendent for the Maine Bureau of Consumer Credit Protection, told Credit.com the bureau is sending the credit reports to Equifax attorneys so the agency can complete its investigation. Lund said his primary concern is that those affected by the breach — mostly consumers along the East Coast — are notified.

“I’ve been in touch both with in-state attorneys here and out-of-state firms for the company, and they are working hard to figure out what happened and to prevent it from happening again,” Lund said. “They have told me that they have identified the issue and that there is no evidence of an ongoing issue with this particular situation.”

Credit reports contain all the personal information someone would need to steal your identity and commit credit fraud — they include Social Security numbers, names, birth dates, addresses and employers, among various credit data.

Regularly reviewing your credit reports is one of the best ways to find out if you’ve been a victim of fraud (looking at your credit scores is another), which makes this situation a bit ironic, considering how this error could have resulted in a lot of fraud.

Despite the seriousness of what happened, it’s still important to request your free annual credit reports as part of your regular financial practices. In between those checkups, you can use your credit scores as fraud indicators, looking at the same scores periodically to see if there has been a sudden change, which may be a sign of fraud. You can see two of your credit scores for free every 30 days on Credit.com.

More from Credit.com

This article originally appeared on Credit.com.

TIME World

This Road in China Got Covered in Almost 15,000 Lb. of Live Catfish

Thousands Of Kilograms Of Catfish Scatter In Kaili
ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images Thousands of kilograms of catfish scatter across the road in the Kaili Development Zone in Qiandongnan Miao and Dong Autonomous Prefecture on March 17, 2015, in Kaili, Guizhou province of China

Bringing a whole new meaning to the term street food

When the door of a delivery truck in the southern Chinese province of Guizhou swung open, 15,000 lb. (6,800 kg) of catfish came spilling out, covering the road in a flopping, scaly mess.

Remarkably, with the help of community members and the local fire department, a two-hour rescue effort was undertaken and the shipment was not wasted, according to the Shanghaiist. Their task was arduous but simple — workers basically sprayed the fish with water to keep them alive while others picked them up and returned them to the truck.

And thanks to their efforts, these fish out of water finally made it to the dinner table.

Thousands Of Kilograms Of Catfish Scatter In Kaili
ChinaFotoPress—Getty ImagesWith the help of fire crews of Development Zone Squadron in Qiandongnan Fire Detachment and local people, the catfish were loaded on the truck again.
ChinaFotoPress—Getty ImagesThousands of kilograms of catfish scatter across the road in the Kaili Development Zone in Qiandongnan Miao and Dong Autonomous Prefecture on March 17, 2015 in Kaili, Guizhou province of China

[Shanghaiist]

TIME Accident

Man Dies Trying to Save Dog That Fell Through Ice

The dog survived

A New York City man died while rescuing his dog from a freezing lake, according to a report.

Garvin Brown, 34, was walking his dog near the Naples, N.Y. home he and his fiancee had rented, about 40 miles from Rochester, N.Y., about 1 a.m. Sunday when the pup fell through the ice on a pond, the Associated Press reports.

Brown went after his dog and also crashed through the ice. He drowned when he was unable to get out of the cold water.

According to the AP, the dog survived.

[AP]

 

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