MONEY Taxes

For Some Retirees, April 1 is a Crucial Tax Deadline

If you recently reached your 70s and aren't yet drawing money from your tax-deferred retirement accounts, you need to act fast.

For anyone who turned 70½ last year and has an individual retirement account, April 15 isn’t the only tax deadline you need to pay attention to this time of year.

With a traditional IRA, you must begin taking money out of your account after age 70½—what’s known as a required minimum distribution (RMD). And you must take your first RMD by April 1 of the year after you turn 70½. After that, the annual RMD deadline is December 31. After years of tax-deferred growth, you’ll face income taxes on your IRA withdrawals.

Figuring out your RMD, which is based on your account balance and life expectancy, can be tricky. Your brokerage or fund company can help, or you can use these IRS worksheets to calculate your minimum withdrawal.

Failure to pull out any or enough money triggers a hefty penalty equal to 50% of the amount you should have withdrawn. Despite the penalty, a fair number of people miss the RMD deadline.

A 2010 report by the Treasury Inspector General estimated that every year as many as 250,000 IRA owners miss the deadline for their first or annual RMD, failing to take distributions totaling some $350 million. That generates potential tax penalties of $175 million.

The rules are a bit different with a 401(k). If you’re still working for the company that sponsors your plan, you can waive this distribution rule until you quit. Otherwise, RMDs apply.

“It’s becoming increasingly common for folks to stay in the workforce after traditional retirement age,” says Andrew Meadows of Ubiquity Retirement + Savings, a web-based retirement plan provider specializing in small businesses. “If you’re still working you can leave the money in your 401(k) and let compound interest continue to do its work,” says Meadows.

What’s more, with a Roth IRA you’re exempt from RMD rules. Your money can grow tax-free indefinitely.

If you are in the fortunate position of not needing the income from your IRA, you can’t skip your RMD or avoid income taxes. You may want to reinvest the money, gift it, or donate the funds to charity, though a law that allowed you to donate money directly from an IRA expired last year and has not yet been renewed. Another option is to convert some of the money to a Roth IRA. You’ll owe income taxes on the conversion, but never face RMDs again.
Whatever you do, if you or someone you know is 70-plus, don’t miss the April 1 deadline. There’s no reason to give Uncle Sam more than you owe.

 

MONEY Taxes

How to Make Tapping a $1 Million Retirement Plan Less Taxing

adding machine printing $100 bill
Sarina Finkelstein (photo illustration)—Mike Lorrig/Corbis (1); iStock (1)

With a seven-figure account balance, you have to work extra hard to minimize the tax hit once you starting taking withdrawals.

More than three decades after the creation of the 401(k), this workplace plan has become the No. 1 way for Americans to save for retirement. And save they have. The average plan balance has hit a record high, and the number of million-dollar-plus 401(k)s has more than doubled since 2012.

In the first part of this four-part series, we laid out how to build a $1 million 401(k) plan. Part two covered making your money last. Next up: getting smart about taxes when you draw down that $1 million.

Most of your 401(k) money was probably saved pretax, and once you start making withdrawals, Uncle Sam will want his share. The conventional wisdom would have you postpone taking out 401(k) funds for as long as possible, giving your money more time to grow tax-deferred. But retirees must start making required minimum distributions (RMDs) by age 70½. With a million-dollar-plus account, that income could push you into a higher tax bracket. Here are three possible ways to reduce that tax bite.

1. Make the Most of Income Dips

Perhaps in the year after you retire, with no paycheck coming in, you drop to the 15% bracket (income up to $73,800 for a married couple filing jointly). Or you have medical expenses or charitable deductions that reduce your taxable income briefly before you bump back up to a higher bracket. Tapping pretax accounts in low-tax years may enable you to pay less in taxes on future withdrawals, says Marc Freedman, a financial adviser in Newton, Mass.

2. Spread Out the Tax Bill

Taking advantage of low-tax-bracket years to convert IRA money to a Roth can cut your tax bill over time. Just make sure you have cash on hand to pay the conversion taxes.

Say you and your spouse are both 62, with Social Security and pension income that covers your living expenses, as well as $800,000 in a rollover IRA. If you leave the money there, it will grow to nearly $1.1 million by the time you start taking RMDs, assuming 5% annual returns, says Andrew Sloan, a financial adviser in Louisville.

If you convert $50,000 a year to a Roth for eight years instead, paying $7,500 in income taxes each time, you can stay in the 15% bracket. But you will end up paying less in taxes when RMDs begin, since your IRA balance will be only $675,000. Meanwhile, you will have $475,000 in the Roth. Another benefit: Since Roth IRAs aren’t subject to RMDs, you can pass on more of your IRAs to your heirs.

3. Plot Your Exit from Employer Stock

Some 401(k) investors, often those with large balances, hold company stock. Across all plans, 9% of 401(k) assets were in employer shares at the end of 2013, Vanguard data show—for 9% of participants, that stock accounts for more than 20% of their plan.

Unloading those shares at retirement will reduce the risk in your portfolio. Plus, that sale may cut your tax bill. That’s because of a tax rule called net unrealized appreciation (NUA), which is the difference between the price you paid for the stock and its market value.

Say you bought 5,000 shares of company stock in your 401(k) at $20 a share, for a total price of $100,000. Five years later the shares are worth $50, or $250,000 in total. That gives you a cost of $100,000, and an NUA of $150,000. At retirement, you could simply roll that stock into an IRA. But to save on taxes, your best move may be to stash it in a taxable account while investing the balance of your plan in an IRA, says Jeffrey Levine, a CPA at IRAhelp.com.

All rollover IRA withdrawals will be taxed at your income tax rate, which can be as high as 39.6%. When you take company stock out of your 401(k), though, you owe income tax only on the original purchase price. Then, when you sell, you’ll owe long-term capital gains taxes of no more than 20% on the NUA.

Of course, these complex strategies may call for an accountant or financial adviser. But after decades of careful saving, you don’t want to jeopardize your million-dollar 401(k) with a bad tax move.

MONEY 401(k)s

How to Build a $1 Million Retirement Plan

$100 bricks and mortar
Money (photo illustration)—Getty Images(2)

The number of savers with seven-figure workplace retirement plans has doubled over the past two years. Here's how you can become one of them.

The 401(k) was born in 1981 as an obscure IRS regulation that let workers set aside pretax money to supplement their pensions. More than three decades later, this workplace plan has become America’s No. 1 way to save. According to a 2013 Gallup survey, 65% of those earning $75,000 or more expect their 401(k)s, IRAs, and other savings to be a major source of income in retirement. Only 34% say the same for a pension.

Thirty-plus years is also roughly how long you’ll prep for retirement (assuming you don’t get serious until you’ve been on the job a few years). So we’re finally seeing how the first generation of savers with access to a 401(k) throughout their careers is making out. For an elite few, the answer is “very well.” The stock market’s recent winning streak has not only pushed the average 401(k) plan balance to a record high, but also boosted the ranks of a new breed of retirement investor: the 401(k) millionaire.

Seven-figure 401(k)s are still rare—less than 1% of today’s 52 million 401(k) savers have one, reports the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI)—but growing fast. At Fidelity Investments, one of the largest 401(k) plan providers, the number of million-dollar-plus 401(k)s has more than doubled since 2012, topping 72,000 at the end of 2014. Schwab reports a similar trend. And those tallies don’t count the two-career couples whose combined 401(k)s are worth $1 million.

Workers with high salaries have a leg up, for sure. But not all members of the seven-figure club are in because they make big bucks. At Fidelity thousands earning less than $150,000 a year have passed the million-dollar mark. “You don’t have to make a million to save a million in your 401(k),” says Meghan Murphy, a director at Fidelity.

You do have to do all the little things right, from setting and sticking to a high savings rate to picking a suitable stock and bond allocation as you go along. To join this exclusive club, you need to study the masters: folks who have made it, as well as savers who are poised to do the same. What you’ll learn are these secrets for building a $1 million 401(k).

1) Play the Long Game

Fidelity’s crop of 401(k) millionaires have contributed an above-average 14% of their pay to a 401(k) over their careers, and they’ve been at it for a long time. Most are over 50, with the average age 60.

Those habits are crucial with a 401(k), and here’s why: Compounding—earning money on your reinvested earnings as well as on your original savings—is the “secret sauce” to make it to a million. “Compounding gives you a big boost toward the end that can carry you to the finish line,” says Catherine Golladay, head of Schwab’s 401(k) participant services. And with a 401(k), you pay no taxes on your investment income until you make withdrawals, putting even more money to work.

You can save $18,000 in a 401(k) in 2015; $24,000 if you’re 50 or older. While generous, those caps make playing catch-up tough to do in a plan alone. You need years of steady saving to build up the kind of balance that will get a big boost from compounding in the home stretch.

Here’s how to do it:

Make time your ally. Someone who earns $50,000 a year at age 30, gets 2% raises, and puts away 14% of pay on average will have $547,000 by age 55—a hefty sum that with continued contributions will double to $1.1 million by 65, assuming 6% annualized returns. Do the same starting at age 35, and you’ll reach $812,000 at 65.

Yet saving aggressively from the get-go is a tall order. You may need several years to get your savings rate up to the max. Stick with it. Increase your contribution rate with every raise. And picking up part-time or freelance work and earmarking the money for retirement can push you over the top.

Milk your employer. For Fidelity 401(k) millionaires, employer matches accounted for a third of total plan contributions. You should squirrel away as much of the boss’s cash as you can.

According to HR association WorldatWork, at a third of companies 50% of workers don’t contribute enough to the company 401(k) plans to get the full match. That’s a missed opportunity to collect free money. A full 80% of 401(k) plans offer a match, most commonly 50¢ for each $1 you contribute, up to 6% of your salary, but dollar-for-dollar matches are a close second.

Broaden your horizons. As the graphic below shows, power-saving in your forties or fifties may bump you up against your 401(k)’s annual limits. “If you get a late start, in order to hit the $1 million mark, you will need to contribute extra savings into a brokerage account,” says Dirk Quayle, president of NextCapital, which provides portfolio-management software to 401(k) plans.

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Money

2) Act Like a Company Lifer

The Fidelity 401(k) millionaires have spent an average of 34 years with the same employer. That kind of staying power is nearly unheard-of these days. The average job tenure with the same employer is five years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Only half of workers over age 55 have logged 10 or more years with the same company. But even if you can’t spend your career at one place—and job switching is often the best way to boost your pay—you can mimic the ways steady employment builds up your retirement plan.

Here’s how to do it:

Consider your 401(k) untouchable. A fifth of 401(k) savers borrowed against their plan in 2013, according to EBRI. It’s tempting to tap your 401(k) for a big-ticket expense, such as buying a home. Trouble is, you may shortchange your future. According to a Fidelity survey, five years after taking a loan, 40% of 401(k) borrowers were saving less; 15% had stopped altogether. “There are no do-overs in retirement,” says Donna Nadler, a certified financial planner at Capital Management Group in New York.

Even worse is cashing out your 401(k) when you leave your job; that triggers income taxes as well as a 10% penalty if you’re under age 59½. A survey by benefits consultant Aon Hewitt found that 42% of workers who left their jobs in 2011 took their 401(k) in cash. Young workers were even more likely to do so. As you can see in the graphic below, siphoning off a chunk of your savings shaves off years of growth. “If you pocket the money, it means starting your retirement saving all over again,” says Nadler.

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Money

Resist the urge to borrow and roll your old plan into your new 401(k) or an IRA when you switch jobs. Or let inertia work in your favor. As long as your 401(k) is worth $5,000 or more, you can leave it behind at your old plan.

Fill in the gaps. Another problem with switching jobs is that you may have to wait to get into the 401(k). Waiting periods have shrunk: Today two-thirds of plans allow you to enroll in a 401(k) on day one, up from 57% five years ago, according to the Plan Sponsor Council of America. Still, the rest make you cool your heels for three months to a year. Meanwhile, 40% of plans require you to be on the job six months or more before you get matching contributions.

When you face a gap, keep saving, either in a taxable account or in a traditional or Roth IRA (if you qualify). Also, keep in mind that more than 60% of plans don’t allow you to keep the company match until you’ve been on the job for a specific number of years, typically three to five. If you’re close to vesting, sticking around can add thousands to your retirement savings.

Put a price on your benefits. A generous 401(k) match and friendly vesting can be a lucrative part of your compensation. The match added about $4,600 a year to Fidelity’s 401(k) millionaire accounts. All else being equal, seek out a generous retirement plan when you’re looking for a new job. In the absence of one, negotiate higher pay to make up for the missing match. If you face a long waiting period, ask for a signing bonus.

3) Keep Faith in Stocks

Research into millionaires by the Spectrem Group finds a greater willingness to take reasonable risks in stocks. True to form, Fidelity’s supersavers have 75% of their assets in stocks on average, vs. 66% for the typical 401(k) saver. That hefty equity stake has helped 401(k) millionaires hit seven figures, especially during the bull market that began in 2009.

What’s right for you will depend in part on your risk tolerance and what else you own outside your 401(k) plan. What’s more, you may not get the recent bull market turbo-boost that today’s 401(k) millionaires enjoyed. With rising interest rates expected to weigh on financial markets, analysts are projecting single-digit stock gains over the next decade. Still, those returns should beat what you’ll get from bonds and cash. And that commitment to stocks is crucial for making it to the million-dollar mark.

MONEY retirement planning

The Growing Divide Between the Retirement Elite and Everyone Else

empty and full transparent piggy banks
iStock

Americans are on track to replace 60% of income, but only one in five pre-retirees report good health. That's likely to prove costly.

There’s a growing retirement savings gap between workers with 401(k)s and those without.

Overall the typical American worker is on track to replace about 58% of current pay through savings at retirement. That’s according to a new Lifetime Income Score study, by Empower Retirement, which calculated the income workers are on track to receive from retirement plans and other financial assets, as well as Social Security benefits.

“Those who have workplace plans like 401(k)s aren’t doing too badly, but there’s a big savings deficit for those who don’t have them,” says Empower president Ed Murphy. (Formed through a recent merger, Empower combines the retirement services of Putnam, Great-West and J.P. Morgan.)

Those with access to a 401(k) or other retirement plan had lifetime income scores of 74%, while those lacked plans had an average score of just 42%. It’s one reason this year’s overall score of 58% is a slight dip from last year’s score of 61% .

Living well on just 58% of current income is certainly possible—many retirees are doing just fine at that level. But financial planners typical suggest aiming for a 75% to 80% replacement rate to leave room for unexpected costs. And for many workers, it’s possible to close the savings gap by stepping up 401(k) contributions by staying on the job longer.

But truth is, most workers end up retiring well before age 65, and few have enough saved by that point. The least prepared workers, some 32% of those surveyed, were on track to receive just 38% of their income in retirement, which would be largely Social Security benefits.

By contrast, an elite group of workers, some 20%, are on track to replace 143% of their current income, Empower found. And it’s not just those pulling down high salaries. “The key success factors were access to a 401(k) and consistently saving 10% of pay, not income,” Murphy says.

Access to a financial adviser also made a big difference in whether workers were on track to a comfortable retirement income. Those who worked with a pro were on track to replace 82% of income vs 55% for those without. And for those with a formal retirement plan, their lifetime income score hit 87% vs the average 58%.

For all retirement savers, however, health care costs are a looming problem. Only 21% of those ages 60 to 65 reported having none of six major medical issues, such as diabetes or tobacco use. For the typical 65-year-old couple, health care expenses, including Medicare premiums and out-of-pocket costs, might reach $220,000 over the course of retirement, according to a Fidelity analysis. Those in worse health can expect to pay far higher costs, which means you should plan to save even more.

Here are other key findings from the Empower study:

  • Nearly two-thirds of workers lack confidence about their ability to cover health care costs in retirement
  • Some 75% say they have little or no concern about job security, vs. 60% in 2012.
  • Some 72% of workers are somewhat interested or very interested in guaranteed income options, such as annuities.
  • The percentage of workers considering delaying retirement is falling—some 30% now vs. 41% from a peak in 2012.
  • Many are hoarding cash, which accounts for 35% of retirement plan assets. For those without advisers, that allocation is a steep 55%.

Clearly, estimating your retirement income is crucial to achieving your financial goals—and studies have shown that going through that exercise can help spur saving. More 401(k) plans are offering tools and other guidance to help savers estimate their retirement income and help you choose the right stock and bond allocation. For those who aren’t participating in a 401(k) plan, try the T. Rowe Price retirement income calculator, which is free.

MONEY 401(k)s

Here’s How to Tell If You’re Saving Enough for Retirement

This month's MONEY poll looks at our habits when it comes to retirement savings. Click through the gallery to see how you compare with your fellow readers.

  • Men Have Bigger Balances

    Money

    But women are 10% more likely to enroll in a workplace plan, and they save at higher rates (up to 12%) than their male colleagues.

  • Most of Us Will Save More This Year

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    Money

    In a poll of more than 500 MONEY readers, the majority said they’d put away more for retirement this year than last year.

  • How Much We’re Socking Away

    Average 401(k) contribution in 2014
    Money

    The average 401(k) contribution last year was up 15% from 2009.

  • What We’ll Be Living On in Retirement

    For most people, Social Security will account for a substantial portion of income in retirement.

  • Trending in the Right Direction

    150318_RET_NestEgg_Slideshow_6
    Money

    401(k) balances topped out at a record $91,300 at the end of 2014, according to Fidelity.

  • But Still Not Good Enough

    150318_RET_NestEgg_Slideshow_3
    Money

    The Natixis Global Retirement Report ranks the U.S. 19th, behind Australia (3), Germany (9), and Japan (13), but ahead of the United Kingdom (22).

  • The States That Save the Most

    150318_RET_NestEgg_Slideshow_4
    Money

    San Jose—home to many well-paid high-tech workers—leads the nation in 401(k) participation. Bringing up the rear: El Paso, Texas, where workers save just 5.7% of salary.

  • Are You Saving Enough?

    150318_RET_NestEgg_Slideshow_8
    Money

    The average employee is saving just over 8%, the highest rate in the past four years.

MONEY retirement planning

Why Your Empty Nest May Be Hazardous to Your Retirement

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Alamy—© Mode Images / Alamy

You may want to live a little when your kids leave home. But what you do with that money can make or break your retirement, a new study finds.

How well prepared you are for retirement may come down to one simple question: what do you do with money that once would have been spent on your kids?

In recent years, two common models of retirement preparedness in America have begun to draw vastly different pictures. The optimal savings model, which looks at accumulated savings, concludes that only 8% of pre-retirees have insufficient resources to retire comfortably. The income replacement model, which looks at the level of income that savings will generate, concludes half the working age population is in deep trouble.

These two models incorporate many different assumptions, which is why they can reach contradictory conclusions. For one thing, the optimal savings model assumes savings are held in something like a 401(k) plan and drawn down over time. The income replacement model assumes savings are converted to lifetime income through an annuity at retirement.

Accounting for these and many other differences, researchers at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College have concluded that the key variable in retirement readiness is empty nest spending patterns. “If households consume less once their kids leave home, they have a more modest target to replace and they save more between the emptying of the nest and retirement,” the authors write. This creates a financial comfort level that those who spend the same amount—most likely on themselves—have greater difficulty achieving.

When the more conservative empty nest spending assumptions of the optimal savings model are applied to the income replacement model, the level of retirement preparedness is similarly optimistic. What the paper cannot answer, however, is which model accurately reflects the way empty nesters behave.

“Do parents cut back on consumption when kids leave, or do they spend the slack in their budgets?” the authors write. “No one really knows the answers.” How households react when kids leave the fold is not well understood, they say.

Yet that’s a problem for academics. You can control the way you act. The upshot is that if you resist the temptation to spend instead of save the money your kids were costing you, retirement readiness may be at your fingertips.

Read next: 5 Ways to Know If You’re on Track to Retire Early

MONEY Savings

Drink That Latte! Here Are 3 Ways to Save and Still Enjoy Life

hands holding latte
Mikael Nyberg—Getty Images/Flickr

It's okay to enjoy to life's little pleasures, as long you have a realistic retirement savings plan.

You’ve heard of the Latte Factor approach to saving: Eliminate small nonessential outlays—like the $5 you spend daily on lattes or other treats—and you can end up with an extra $150,000 or so over the course of 30 years. Well, I have a better idea: Enjoy life’s little pleasures—your latte, Dunkin’ or other indulgences—and focus instead on more realistic ways to build a retirement nest egg.

I’m all for being careful about spending. But the idea that you’re going to end up with a big fat sum by foregoing small treats—in my case, Boston Creme donuts—and investing the money you would have spent on them strikes me as, shall we say, impractical.

For one thing, to get that $150,000, you would have to invest $35 a week and earn a 6% return every year for 30 years. But come on, who has the discipline to sacrifice life’s little pleasures day in and day out for decades—and then follow through by setting aside that $5 every day and investing $35 at the end of each week? Even if you were able to pull it off, do you really want to live like you’re on a perpetual diet?

Fortunately, you don’t have to live like an ascetic to build a retirement nest egg. Besides, it turns out savoring rather than denying yourself little treats is the better way to go anyway. In a paper titled “If Money Doesn’t Make You Happy, You Probably Aren’t Spending It Right,” researchers conclude that many small delights make us happier than a few large ones, noting that “it may be better to indulge in a variety of frequent, small pleasures—double lattes, uptown pedicures, and high thread-count socks rather than pouring money into large purchases, such as sports cars, dream vacations, and front-row concert tickets.”

So how can you drink your lattes—or double lattes—and have your retirement nest egg too? Here are three tips:

1. Focus on big-ticket items. Asked why he robbed banks, career criminal Willie Sutton supposedly answered “because that’s where the money is.” In fact, a reporter made up the quote, but no matter. You should apply that reasoning to saving—that is, target your efforts where you’ll get the biggest payoff.

A quick look at the Department of Labor’s Consumer Expenditure Survey shows the single biggest items in the typical American’s budget is housing. So if instead of buying a $250,000 house, you go with a more modest $200,000 number, you might lower your mortgage, property taxes and insurance costs by roughly $250 a month. Assuming a 6% annual return from a low-cost diversified portfolio over 30 years, you’re talking an extra $245,000.

Other areas that can prove fertile hunting grounds for big savings, include cars, vacations, electronics, college expenses and, of course, investment fees. The actual savings you reap will depend on the particulars of your situation. In the housing example above, I assumed a 20% down payment, 4.2% 30-year fixed mortgage, property taxes and insurance equal to 1.5% of the sales price and ignored income taxes to keep things simple. But the precise number isn’t important. The idea is what matters—namely, that by cutting back on a big expense, especially one you incur regularly like a house or car payment, you can boost the eventual size of your retirement nest egg.

2. Make it automatic. Merely cutting expenses doesn’t guarantee more savings. You also need to make sure that the money you free up by buying a less expensive home or car isn’t simply diverted to new spending. The best way to do that: Lock in your savings by enrolling in your 401(k) or other company payroll deduction plan and contributing at least enough to get the full employer match. If you don’t have a 401(k) or you can also afford to save money outside your employer’s plan, sign up for an automatic investing plan that transfers money from your checking account to a mutual fund every month.

By arranging to have money go from your paycheck or your checking account every month without you having to make a conscious decision to move money to your savings or investment accounts via a phone app, an online transfer or even by writing out a check, it’s more likely that the dough no longer going to expenses will be saved rather than spent on other things.

3. Overcome your fear of commitment. One reason it’s more difficult to save than spend is that spending provides immediate gratification, while saving pays off in the distant future. But there are a number of ways to effectively trick yourself into saving.

One such technique known is a “commitment device,” which is a fancy term for getting yourself to do something you know you should but lack the discipline to pull off on your own. Go to Stickk.com, for example, and you can choose, or commit to, a savings goal of your choice—say, accumulating $500 a month, or $6,000 over the course of a year. If you fail to hit that target, you agree that you’ll pay a penalty—perhaps $100—to a person or organization you’re not especially fond of. If you’re a Republican, for example, that might mean making a contribution to a Democratic candidate. That provides the incentive for you to meet your goal. Or, you can use a carrot instead of a stick. For example, you might reward yourself with a new tablet or smartphone, if you manage to save a certain amount over the course of a year.

Ultimately, you have to find a way to save that makes the most sense for you. But you’ll increase your odds of success, by devising a strategy you’ll actually be able to stick to and thus more likely to lead to a larger nest egg down the road.

Walter Updegrave is the editor of RealDealRetirement.com. If you have a question on retirement or investing that you would like Walter to answer online, send it to him at walter@realdealretirement.com.

More From RealDealRetirement.com

How To Double Your Nest Egg In 10 Years

Should You Take Social Security Early And Invest It—Or Claim Later For A Higher Benefit?

How To Protect Your Nest Egg From Shifting Government Policies

 

MONEY IRAs

There’s Free Money for IRA Rollovers—Here’s How to Invest It

Should you take the money and run? Only if you choose the right low-cost funds.

Back in the day, you could walk into a bank to open a new account and walk out with a free toaster.

Today, you can get anywhere from $50 to $2,500 for rolling over a 401(k) into an Individual Retirement Account, or just by moving an IRA from another financial institution.

But since banks are not in the habit of giving away money, you need to ask: What is the catch?

IRA providers use cash incentives, which are cheaper than advertising or direct mail, to acquire new customers. The latest marketing twist comes from Fidelity Investments, which is offering an “IRA Match” program to new and existing customers who transfer a Roth, traditional or rollover IRA to the company. Rollovers from 401(k)s are not eligible.

Fidelity will match your contributions up to 10% for the first three years that the account is open, although you would have to roll over a whopping $500,000 or more to get that level of match.

For most people, the match will be much smaller. A rollover of $50,000, for example, would qualify for a 1.5% match in each of the next three years. That is worth $260 over three years if you max out your annual contributions at $5,500, or $290 if you are over age 50 and eligible to make additional $1,000 catch-up contributions.

Fidelity is pitching this as the way to encourage higher levels of retirement savings, the way many employers make matching contributions to workers’ 401(k) plans.

“When you look at what really works in the retirement space, you can see that the employer match is a major factor driving participation,” says Lauren Brouhard, Fidelity Investments’ senior vice president for retirement. “We wanted to take an element of what works in the workplace and bring it to the IRA.”

Similar deals abound. For example, Charles Schwab Corp frequently runs promotions offering up to $2,500 for opening a new account, including rollovers from 401(k)s. Ally Bank will pay a $100 bonus for rolling between $25,000 and $50,000, and more for larger rollovers. Just do a Web search for “IRA cash bonus” to see how pervasive the practice has become.

Should you take the money and run? Perhaps, but do not let the cash distract you from more fundamental considerations.

For starters, do not roll funds out of a workplace 401(k) plan into an IRA if it charges higher fees. You should also make sure that the new provider offers the type of retirement investments you are looking for.

If you are rolling over to a mutual fund or brokerage company, the cardinal rule is to make sure your new provider does not earn back the bonus by parking you in high-cost active mutual funds or managed portfolio services.

“It’s a free lunch, but not if you yield to the temptations,” says Mitch Tuchman, managing director of Rebalance IRA, a wealth management firm that offers low-cost IRA portfolio management. “You have to avoid falling prey to the sirens of active management.”

Instead, manage your portfolio yourself by creating a portfolio of inexpensive passive index funds or exchange traded funds, which are available through their providers’ brokerage services.

To illustrate, he suggested a portfolio of four Vanguard ETFs whose fees are each below 20 basis points: Total U.S. Stock Market, Total International stocks, Total Bond Market and Total International Bond.

You can view Tuchman’s sample portfolios here.

Read next: 5 Signs You Will Become a Millionaire

MONEY Savings

5 Signs You Will Become a Millionaire

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Martin Barraud—Getty Images

A million isn't what it used to be. But it's not bad, and here's how you get there.

A million bucks isn’t what it used to be. When your father, or maybe you, set that savings goal in 1980 it was like shooting for $3 million today. Still, millionaire status is nothing to sniff at—and new research suggests that a broad swath of millennials and Gen-Xers are on the right track.

The “emerging affluent” class, as defined in the latest Fidelity Millionaire Outlook study, has many of the same habits and traits as today’s millionaires and multimillionaires. You are in this class if you are 21 to 49 years of age with at least $100,000 of annual household income and $50,000 to $250,000 in investable assets. Fidelity found this group has five key points in common with today’s millionaires:

  • Lucrative career: The emerging affluent are largely pursuing careers in information technology, finance and accounting—much like many of today’s millionaires did years ago. They may be at a low level now, but they have time to climb the corporate ladder.
  • High income: The median household income of this emerging class is $125,000, more than double the median U.S. household income. That suggests they have more room to save now and are on track to earn and save even more.
  • Self-starters: Eight in 10 among the emerging affluent have built assets on their own, or added to those they inherited, which is also true of millionaires and multimillionaires.
  • Long-term focus: Three in four among the emerging affluent have a long-term approach to investments. Like the more established wealthy, this group stays with its investment regimen through all markets rather than try to time the market for short-term gains.
  • Appropriate aggressiveness: Similar to multimillionaires, the emerging affluent display a willingness to invest in riskier, high-growth assets for superior long-term returns.

Becoming a millionaire shouldn’t be difficult for millennials. All it takes is discipline and an early start. If you begin with $10,000 at age 25 and save $5,500 a year in an IRA that grows 6% a year, you will have $1 million at age 65. If you save in a 401(k) plan that matches half your contributions, you’ll amass nearly $1.5 million. That’s with no inheritance or other savings. Such sums may sound big to a young adult making little money. But if they save just $3,000 a year for seven years and then boost it to $7,500 a year, they will reach $1 million by age 65.

An emerging affluent who already has up to $250,000 and a big income can do this without breaking a sweat. They should be shooting far higher—to at least $3 million by 2050, just to keep pace with what $1 million buys today (assuming 3% annual inflation). But they will need $6 million in 2050 to have the purchasing power of $1 million back in 1980, when your father could rightly claim that a million dollars would make him rich.

Read next: What’s Your Best Path to $1 Million?

MONEY financial advisers

Proposed Retiree Safeguard Is Long Overdue

businessman putting money into his suit jacket pocket
Jan Stromme—Getty Images

The financial-advice regulations pushed by the Obama administration will save retirees, on average, an estimated $12,000.

When you are planning for retirement and ask for advice, whose interest should come first — yours or the financial expert you ask for help?

That is the question at the heart of a Washington debate over the unsexy-sounding term “fiduciary standard.” Simply put, it is a legal responsibility requiring an adviser to put the best interest of a client ahead of all else.

The issue has been kicking around Washington ever since the financial crisis, and it took a dramatic turn on Monday when President Barack Obama gave a very public embrace to an expanded set of fiduciary rules. In a speech at AARP, the president endorsed rules proposed by the Department of Labor that would require everyone giving retirement investment advice to adhere to a fiduciary standard.

The president’s decision to embrace and elevate fiduciary reform into a major policy move is huge.

“The White House knows that this is the most significant action it can take to promote retirement security without legislation,” said Cristina Martin Firvida, director of financial security and consumer affairs at AARP, which has been pushing for adoption of the new fiduciary rules.

Today, financial planning advice comes in two flavors. Registered investment advisors (RIAs) are required to meet a fiduciary standard. Most everyone else you would encounter in this sphere — stockbrokers, broker-dealer representatives and people who sell financial products for banks or insurance companies — adhere to a weaker standard where they are allowed to put themselves first.

“Most people don’t know the difference,” said Christopher Jones, chief investment officer of Financial Engines, a large RIA firm that provides fiduciary financial advice to workers in 401(k) plans.

The difference can be huge for your retirement outcome. A report issued this month by the President’s Council of Economic Advisers found that retirement savers receiving conflicted advice earn about 1 percentage point less in returns, with an aggregate loss of $17 billion annually.

The report pays special attention to the huge market of rollovers from workplace 401(k)s to individual retirement accounts — transfers which often occur when workers retire. Nine of 10 new IRAs are rollovers, according to the Investment Company Institute mutual fund trade group. The CEA report estimates that $300 billion is rolled over annually, and the figures are accelerating along with baby-boom-generation retirements.

The CEA report estimates a worker receiving conflicted advice would lose about 12% of the account’s value over a 30-year period of drawdowns. Since the average IRA rollover for near-retirees is just over $100,000, that translates into a $12,000 loss.

What constitutes conflicted advice? Plan sponsors — employers — have a fiduciary responsibility to act in participants’ best interest. But many small 401(k) plans hire plan recordkeepers and advisers who are not fiduciaries. They are free to pitch expensive mutual funds and annuity products, and industry data consistently shows that small plans have higher cost and lower rates of return than big, well-managed plans.

The rollover market also is rife with abuse, often starting with the advice to roll over in the first place. Participants in well-constructed, low-fee 401(k)s most often would do better leaving their money where it is at retirement; IRA expenses run 0.25 to 0.30 percentage points higher than 401(k)s, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Yet the big mutual fund companies blitz savers with cash come-ons, and, as I wrote recently, very few of their “advisers” ask customers the basic questions that would determine whether a rollover is in order.

The industry makes the Orwellian argument that a fiduciary standard will make it impossible for the industry to offer cost-effective assistance to the middle class. But that argument ignores the innovations in technology and business practices that already are shaking up the industry with low-cost advice options.

How effective will the new rules be? The devil will be in the details. Any changes are still a little far off: TheDepartment of Labor is expected to publish the new rules in a few months — a timetable that already is under attack by industry opponents as lacking a duly deliberative process.

Enough, already. This debate has been kicking around since the financial crisis, and an expanded fiduciary is long overdue.

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