TIME Business

Watch Johnny Manziel Dancercize in New Snickers Ad

Meet Johnny JamBoogie

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As the Snickers tagline goes, “You aren’t you when you’re hungry.” So what does Cleveland Browns backup quarterback Johnny Manziel turn in to when his tummy is growling? According to a new commercial, Johnny Football transforms into Johnny JamBoogie, an aerobics instructor jazzercising his way into our hearts.

While the entire point of the commercial is that a bite of a candy bar has the power to get his football helmet-wearing head straight and turn his back on florescent leotard-wearing older women, we must ask — does Manziel have to choose? Dance can be an important part of any pre-game or post-touchdown routine.

Signature steps can get you new endorsement deals, Manziel. Embrace the JamBoogie.

TIME Television

Infamous Ex-Pitcher John Rocker to Star in Newest Season of Survivor

Washington Nationals v Atlanta Braves
Former Braves player John Rocker participates in a pre-game ceremony honoring many Braves alumni at Turner Field on August 8, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia. Kevin Liles — Getty Images

Series kicks off on Sept. 24

The newest season of Survivor will feature none other than former Major League Baseball pitcher John Rocker, according to CBS Sports.

The retired pitcher, who played portions of six seasons in the MLB, will compete in Survivor: San Juan del Sur — Blood vs. Water, which will debut on Sept. 24, CBS says.

Rocker is notoriously remembered for the bigoted comments he made about New Yorkers during a widely publicized interview in Sports Illustrated in 1999.

“I was raised in a professional baseball clubhouse and still carry a lot of that idiocy with me,” said Rocker in a trailer released by CBS.

The former reliever will appear on the show alongside his girlfriend Julie McGee.

TIME

USC Football Player Suspended Indefinitely for Fake Drowning Story

Southern California cornerback Josh Shaw lines up against California defensive back Isaac Lapite during the first quarter of a NCAA college football game in Berkeley, Calif.
Southern California cornerback Josh Shaw lines up against California defensive back Isaac Lapite during the first quarter of a NCAA college football game in Berkeley, Calif. Eric Risberg—AP

Shaw has been suspended "indefinitely" from the Trojan athletic program

University of Southern California’s cornerback Josh Shaw said Wednesday he lied when he told his coaches he sprained his ankles while attempting to save his drowning nephew. In response, the USC Trojans suspended Shaw indefinitely from the athletic program as a result of what he referred to as a “complete fabrication.”

“We are extremely disappointed in Josh,” USC coach Steve Sarkisian said in a statement. “He let us all down. As I have said, nothing in his background led us to doubt him when he told us of his injuries, nor did anything after our initial vetting of his story.”

USA Today reports that members of the school’s athletic department doubted Shaw’s story from the beginning. The investigation into Shaw’s injury had been ongoing since Monday when the school posted the initial story in which Shaw claimed to have sprained his ankles after jumping onto concrete from an apartment balcony in an attempt to save his drowning 7-year-old nephew.

In a statement issued through his lawyer, according to USCTrojans.com, Shaw apologized saying, “I made up a story about this fall that was untrue. I was wrong to not tell the truth. I apologize to USC for this action on my part.” The statement did not include any information about the real reason behind Shaw’s injuries.

Shaw is a fifth year senior at USC where he was a team captain on the football team.

TIME Soccer

Parents File Concussion Lawsuit Against FIFA, U.S. Soccer and Youth Soccer

Mascherano Head Injury FIFA Concussion
Argentina's midfielder Javier Mascherano (R) clashes heads with Netherlands' midfielder Georginio Wijnaldum resulting in Mascherano being taken off during the semi-final football match of the 2014 FIFA World Cup between Netherlands and Argentina at The Corinthians Arena in Sao Paulo on July 9, 2014. Gabriel Bouys—AFP/Getty Images

The plaintiffs want to change soccer's rules to limit headers and increase substitutions

A group of American parents filed a class-action lawsuit Wednesday against six national and international soccer organizations they claim have mishandled concussion treatment at all levels of play. The plaintiffs are not seeking financial damages, but rather they hope to change the rules of the sport to better protect both children and professional players from injury.

The suit, filed in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, levies negligence charges against U.S. Soccer, the American Youth Soccer Organization (AYSO), U.S. Youth Soccer, U.S. Club Soccer, the California Youth Soccer Association and FIFA, soccer’s international governing body. The plaintiffs say the organizations have done little to detect and treat head injuries even though they have been aware of the medical community’s years-long calls for change.

The suit seeks an injunction that would fundamentally change the way soccer is played. Currently, professional soccer leagues only allow three substitutions per game. Under the proposed new rules, professional leagues would add temporary substitutions during which an injured player could be examined for concussion symptoms. Parents also believe the rules should be changed in youth leagues so that children under 17 would only be allowed to head the ball a certain number of times per week.

FIFA is far from the first professional sports league to be sued for mishandling concussions: The National Football League, the National Hockey League and the National Collegiate Athletic Association are all currently involved in head injury litigation. Following football and hockey, the suit argues that soccer players are among the athletes most susceptible to concussions: nearly 50,000 high school soccer players suffered concussions in 2010 alone, more than in baseball, basketball, softball and wrestling combined. And two major head injuries at this summer’s FIFA World Cup in Brazil—one dealt to Argentina’s Javier Mascherano and the other to Germany’s Christoph Kramer—have helped propel the case forward.

“There is an epidemic of concussion injuries in soccer at all levels around the world, including in the United States, from youth to professionals, from elite players to children playing for the first time, women and men, girls and boys,” the suit says. “FIFA presides over this epidemic, and is one of its primary causes.”

TIME Soccer

Landon Donovan to Play for the U.S. Soccer Team One Last Time

Vancouver Whitecaps v Los Angeles Galaxy
Landon Donovan of Los Angeles Galaxy acknowledges the fans by blowing them a kiss following the game against Vancouver FC at StubHub Center in Los Angeles on Aug. 23, 2014 Jeff Gross—Getty Images

America's most accomplished men’s soccer player is set to bow out in October

U.S. Soccer announced on Tuesday that Landon Donovan will make his final appearance for the men’s national team in the upcoming international friendly against Ecuador. The game will be an opportunity for fans to thank him for “all the memories he’s provided over the years,” said U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati.

Donovan, 32, is the most accomplished American currently playing the men’s form of the game. He holds his team’s record for most goals scored (57) and assists (58) and fans overwhelmingly see him as their nation’s greatest player to have graced the beautiful game.

But his valedictory encounter, scheduled for Oct. 10 in East Hartford, Conn., is seen by some as an attempt by coach Jürgen Klinsmann and the country’s soccer governing body to make amends after a public fallout in May.

Just a day before the World Cup tournament kicked off, Donovan was kept off the roster by Klinsmann. The decision was met by fierce criticism from U.S. soccer fans — and particularly Donovan.

“I firmly believe that not only should I be going, but I feel like I really deserved it,” he told reporters at the time. He added that not only should he be in the 23-man squad, but that he should start as well.

Klinsmann, however, held his ground, saying that his former captain was cut because, “I just see some other players slightly ahead of him.”

The Germany legend evidently wasn’t fond of the striker’s showing in the lead up to the tournament. Klinsmann told the New York Times in a June article that he was unimpressed with Donovan’s performance in 2013, when the Los Angeles Galaxy player returned from a controversial four-month sabbatical earlier that year. “I watched the games. What was I supposed to say? That he was good? He was not good. Not then. No way,” said Klinsmann.

Donovan entered the international soccer stage in 2000, and his next and final match for the national team will mark his 157 cap. He’s also set to retire from club soccer at the end of this year’s Major League Soccer season.

TIME Boxing

Pacquiao to Help Set Up Boxing Academy in China

Manny Pacquiao
Filipino boxer Manny Pacquiao speaks during a news conference in Macau, on Aug. 25, 2014 Vincent Yu—AP

Manny Pacquiao hopes the institute will foster warmer relations between the Philippines and China

(MANILA, Philippines) — Manny Pacquiao is setting up a boxing institute in China and believes the country of 1.4 billion people can produce professional world champions.

Pacquiao said Wednesday that he has partnered with a Chinese company and the Chinese government to set up an institute in his name, with the aim of imparting the experience that has seen him win eight world titles.

He was speaking from Shanghai where he is promoting his Nov. 22 fight against Chris Algieri for a WBO welterweight title in Macau. He will be defending the welterweight crown he won in a rematch earlier last year with Timothy Bradley, avenging his 2012 loss.

Pacquiao, 35, said the Manny Pacquiao Boxing Education Institute will “start in Beijing, and the plan is for the whole of China.”

While China has produced accomplished fighters and Olympic champions at amateur level, there is potential to translate that to professional ranks, saying the local boxers “just need some knowledge about boxing and should be taught the basics.”

“Of course, with 1.4 billion population for the whole China, they can produce good fighters like other champions,” he said.

Pacquiao, who is also a congressman, told ABS-CBN television in Manila he intends his new venture to also foster warmer relationships between the Philippines and China, whose territorial dispute in the South China Sea has intensified in recent months.

“This will even help in strengthening our relationship … especially since in this project, the Chinese government is involved,” he said.

Pacquiao said he would visit the academy “once a month, once in three months, to supervise them.”

On top of his duties in the academy and as congressman and boxer, Pacquiao has taken on the role of playing coach of a new Philippine professional basketball team which will see action for the first time in October.

He said the team trains every day, except on weekends. “I can handle it,” he said.

The well-loved Bible-quoting boxer is regarded as a folk hero by Filipinos, and his win over Brandon Rios in Macau last November was a boost to a country recovering from Typhoon Haiyan which killed more than 6,300 in the central Philippines.

TIME Innovation

Ralph Lauren Debuts Biometric Shirts at the U.S. Open

Fashion-Wearable Tech
Ralph Lauren's new garment offers smart technology to send heartbeat, respiration, stress levels and other data to tablets and smartphones AP

But don't get excited. You won't be able to buy them until early 2015

Fashion guru Ralph Lauren has sought to morph fashionable sportswear into wearable technology with the launch of the Polo Tech smart shirt, which is being worn by some ball boys at this year’s U.S. Open tennis tournament.

The compression garment comes with technology from a Canadian firm, OMsignal, that feeds detailed information about a wearer’s heart rate, breathing, activity and so on directly to a smartphone or tablet.

Silver-yarn-based sensors gauge athletic performance by measuring the expansion and compression of the wearer’s chest along with electrical changes associated with heart rate. The information is collected in a small black-box-type recorder, which can be removed when the garment needs to be thrown into the washing machine.

While the Polo Tech shirt is making a splash at the U.S. Open, the public won’t be able to purchase it until the spring.

TIME Basketball

Manny Pacquiao Has Been Drafted by the Basketball Squad He Coaches

BASKET-BOX-PHI-PACQUIAO
Manny Pacquiao dribbles during a practice session with the Kia Motors team in Manila on August 15, 2014. Jay Directo — AFP/Getty Images

And you thought he was just a boxing legend, politician, actor and singer

Manny Pacquiao has many titles — boxing legend, third-term Congressman, movie star, pop singer and professional basketball coach.

Wait, make that basketball player-coach.

Pacman, as he’s dubbed, was picked up as a player by the Philippine Basketball Association’s Kia Motors team in the first round of Sunday’s draft, according to Sports Illustrated. There are no firm reports on how much sway Pacquiao actually has over the team’s selections, but he has been Kia’s coach since June, according to Bleacher Report.

The Internet responded to the news in jocular fashion.

The 35-year-old icon might have seen his stint as a player coming, however. One Philippine news source claimed earlier this week that the boxer-Congressman had literally dreamed about dominating the basketball court and dunking over his rivals three years ago.

Considering the welterweight is only 5 ft. 6 in. tall, the dunking part is likely to remain a dream.

TIME Basketball

Get Ready for NBA 3.0

Is India the next international basketball hot spot?

India is renowned as a country of cricket fanatics. But that hasn’t stopped the top brass of the NBA from hoping that basketball will sink deep roots into the South Asian nation of 1.2 billion people.

The Sacramento Kings’ interest in rookie Sim Bhullar, whose parents emigrated from India to Canada, may very well prove to be the game changer the NBA is looking for. Although the 7-ft. 4-in. center is not currently on the team’s 15-player roster, owner Vivek Ranadive — the first Indian-born majority owner of an NBA team — says he’s placing big hopes on the 21-year-old.

Officials and owners are hoping that Bhullar will boost the sport’s popularity with Indians, just as the entrance of Yao Ming into the NBA in 2002 led to the meteoric rise of basketball’s popularity in the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

“What Yao Ming did for China, we hope players like Sim will do for India,” said Ranadive during an interview at an NBA summer league game in July. “I have this vision — I call it NBA 3.0 — where I want to make basketball the premier sport of the 21st century.”

According to the Kings’ website, Ranadive is planning to take NBA commissioner Adam Silver on a trip to India in the near future.

However, local sports journalists say several things must fall into place before basketball reaches the level of popularity envisaged by Ranadive. At present, the majority of the nation’s domestic basketball players are semiprofessionals.

“As of now, we can’t think of basketball as a profession,” Roshan Thyagarajan, a columnist for cricket bible Wisden India but also an avid basketball fan, tells TIME. “The boards, the associations are not well-oiled. Everything is out of place. So that needs to be addressed immediately.”

Nevertheless, there’s a ton of potential, with India already proving to be a formidable opponent. China might be considered the power to be reckoned with in Asia, but the Indian national team beat the PRC squad 65-58 during a historic win at FIBA 2014 in July.

Photographer Cathy Scholl has been working in India and taking an intimate look at the growing excitement around basketball and the hoop dreams of the men and women who play it. Her images, above, capture a sport making tentative steps in a nation forecast to become the world’s most populous in less than 15 years.

TIME Athletes

Here Are 8 Bizarre Yet Beautiful Photos of Women’s Rhythmic Gymnastics

Gymnasts are known for their incredible flexibility, but rhythmic gymnasts take it to new levels, wrapping their bodies around ribbons, clubs, balls and hoops—all with a dazzling smile.

The secret to their rubber-band like contortions? Hours and hours of training, including more time spent in splits—hanging from bars or stretched across foam blocks—than the rest of us would consider humane. These athletes, competing at the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China, represent the eight top-scoring qualifiers in mind-bending acrobatic routines in the individual all-around finals.

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