TIME 2016 Election

Voters Open to Joe Biden Presidential Bid in New Poll

joe biden presidential run
Jason Davis—Getty Images Vice President Joe Biden speaks at a memorial service to honor those killed in the shooting at the University of Tennessee on August 15, 2015 in Chattanooga, Tenn.

Hillary Clinton still leads the race for the Democratic nomination

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden may still be mulling his 2016 chances, but many voters appear open to his potential candidacy, a new survey finds.

A Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday finds Biden with the highest favorability rating in either the Democratic or Republican field among all voters, and leading head-to-head match-ups against hypothetical GOP rivals. But Biden, whose numbers are boosted by his near-universal name-recognition, trails former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in the race for the Democratic nomination.

Clinton commands the support of 45% of Democrats nationally, down from 55% a month ago, followed by Sanders at 22% and Biden at 18%.

On the Republican side, Donald Trump maintains a commanding lead of the GOP field with 28% of Republican support, followed by retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson at 12%. No other GOP candidate breaks double-digits, with a large cluster in a statistical tie filling out the top 10. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz are tied for third place with 7% each, representing a significant drop in support for Bush, who has raised more than $120 million for his presidential run.

The survey is one that will be used to determine eligibility for next month’s CNN debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, in which polls since July will be averaged and the top 10 placers fill the prime-time stage. Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina, whose performance was well regarded in the Fox News debate, merits 5% in the Quinnipiac poll, a significant jump. But her campaign complained Wednesday that a relative lack of polling before the second debate could still keep her out of the debate. Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul fell to 2%, as his campaign has faltered this summer.

Trump remains deeply disliked by the majority of voters who are not his supporters; 26% of Republicans say they would never vote for him and 54% of all voters view him negatively. Clinton, who is still dogged by questions about her use of a private email server, now has 61% of Americans viewing her as untrustworthy and 51% viewing her unfavorably.

Asked an open-ended question about the first word that pops into their minds when they hear a candidate’s name, “liar” topped the list when the 1,563 registered voters were surveyed about Clinton. “Arrogant” was the top word for Trump and “Bush” for Bush.

The nationwide survey was conducted from Aug. 20-25 and has a margin of error of ±2.5 percentage points, with 666 Republicans polled for a margin of error of ±3.8 percentage points and 647 Democrats for a margin of error of ± 3.9 percentage points.

TIME 2016 Election

Trump Proud of Kicking Jorge Ramos Out of Press Event

Donald Trump
Charlie Neibergall—AP Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in Dubuque, Iowa, on Aug. 25, 2015

"I think I handled that well. I got a lot of credit for it"

(PENSACOLA, Florida) — Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said Wednesday he’s proud of kicking one of the country’s best-known Spanish-language journalists out of an Iowa news conference — the latest in a series of clashes with the media.

“I think I handled that well. I got a lot of credit for it,” Trump boasted to conservative radio host Laura Ingraham a day after his bodyguards escorted Univision’s Jorge Ramos out of the event.

The latest spat for Trump comes as his rivals continue to grapple with how best to compete against the unpredictable billionaire businessman, who has skyrocketed to the top of summertime polls.

At a campaign event Wednesday in Pensacola, Florida, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush sighed when a member of the town hall audience uttered Trump’s name.

“Do we have to talk about this guy?” Bush asked.

Bush went on to criticize Trump’s immigration plan, specifically his proposal to build a massive border wall, calling it impractical and out of step with conservative principles because of its cost.

Trump has said he’ll get the Mexican government to pay for the wall, without specifying how he would do so.

“It is not feasible to build a wall as the sole solution,” Bush said. “It’s a simple thing to say and I’m sure it’s great for our friends in the press, but it’s not practical and it’s not conservative.”

He also criticized Trump’s clash with Ramos, saying all journalists should be treated with “dignity and respect.” He added that Trump needs to be held accountable by reporters.

“Go through these questions,” Bush said, “and what you’ll find is this guy doesn’t have a plan.”

Ramos was ultimately allowed back into Trump’s news conference, and they quickly resumed their argument over his immigrations proposals, interrupting each other during an extended back-and-forth.

The dispute didn’t go unnoticed on the Democratic side of the campaign, as front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton seized on Trump’s immigration rhetoric to argue his positions aren’t all that different from those held by the long list of other Republican candidates.

Speaking at an event in Ankeny, Iowa, she said Trump and his rivals don’t support a path to citizenship for the millions of immigrants living in the country illegally. She said calls from some, including Trump, to repeal the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, which guarantees birthright citizenship, are “out of touch” and “out of date.”

“Don’t get distracted by the flamboyant front-runner,” she said. “Most of the other Republican candidates are just Trump without the pizazz or the hair.”

Trump’s confrontation with Ramos, an Emmy Award-winning anchor who hosts the evening news program on the biggest Spanish-language network in the U.S., came a day after he resumed his feud with Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly.

Trump welcomed Kelly back from a vacation Monday night by tweeting that he liked her show better while she was away. Fox News chief Roger Ailes called on Trump to apologize.

Ramos and Kelly commiserated a bit on Kelly’s TV show Wednesday night.

“What is it like to be caught in the crosshairs of a billionaire presidential front-runner?” Kelly asked.

“Well, you know exactly how it feels,” Ramos replied.

During his conversation Wednesday with Ingraham, Trump toned down his attacks against Kelly, saying their spat was “not a death struggle, not a big deal.”

“Actually I watched her show last night. She was very nice and I appreciated it,” he said.

He said he and Ailes had just gotten off a phone call together, and praised the executive as “a good friend of mine” and a “special guy.”

Asked if he was going to continue his Twitter campaign against Kelly, Trump said, “No, I have much bigger things to think about, honestly.”

___

Colvin reported from Newark, New Jersey. Associated Press writer Catherine Lucey contributed to this report from Ankeny, Iowa.

TIME 2016 Election

Hillary Clinton Wants Joe Biden to Do ‘What’s Right for Him’

Biden has been meeting with key Democrats

Hillary Clinton said Wednesday that Joe Biden should have “space” to make his own decision about running for president, telling reporters she has “a great deal of admiration and respect” for her one-time colleague and potential adversary for the Democratic presidential nomination.

“Vice President Biden is a friend of mine. He and I were colleagues in the Senate, I worked with him as first lady, I worked with him in President Obama’s first term, and I have a great deal of admiration and respect for him,” Clinton said Wednesday in Ankeny, Iowa. “I think he has to make what is a very difficult decision for himself and his family, and he should have the space and opportunity to decide what he wants to do.”

Biden has been openly considering running for president for weeks, reaching out to donors and supporters and thinking ahead to a run. He’s spoken with Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a key leader of the progressive wing of the Democratic party, and President Barack Obama’s former counsel Bob Bauer.

His son, Beau, who died earlier this year of brain cancer urged him for years to run for president, but Biden would face a tough frontrunner in Hillary Clinton, as well as the disadvantage of jumping into a presidential contest late and without an experienced staff or organization.

TIME language

Why Dropping ‘Anchor Baby’ Is a Problem for Politicians

Dictionary
JGI/Jamie Grill—Getty Images/Blend Images

Language experts share their thoughts on how politicians and dictionaries have treated a heated term

Jeb Bush’s recent references to “anchor babies”—meaning certain children of undocumented immigrants, who are granted American citizenship by virtue of having been born within the nation’s borders—have landed the 2016 candidate in hot water, even after his attempt this week to clarify that was referring to isolated cases of Chinese “birth tourism” rather than to Hispanic immigrants. The outraged response was swift. “No matter which ethnic group you’re referring to, ‘anchor babies’ is a slur that stigmatizes children from birth,” California Rep. Judy Chu said in a press release.

Crucial to Bush’s defense of the term is the idea that it’s simply what you call the phenomenon he’s talking about. “You give me a better term and I’ll use it, I’m serious,” he told reporters. But, in fact, the phrase is a relatively recent coinage and, though it might seem cutesy—the type of thing that Stephen Colbert can use to make puns about children who steal microphones from newscasters on live TV—its history is anything but.

Many people trace the idea’s origins to the 1980s, when the term “anchor people” or “anchor children” was used as an epithet for Vietnamese youth whose families sent them to the U.S., with the hope that they could make money and then sponsor relatives back home for citizenship. (When these kids arrived in shabby vessels in Hong Kong, seeking asylum before traveling across the Pacific, locals called them “boat people.”) However, those early uses were not expressing the same idea that’s up for discussion today: the “anchor children” of that era were relatively older refugees, following in the footsteps of countless young people throughout American history who have set up homes in their new nation before helping their families immigrate.

It was years later that the new model of “anchor baby” started to take off, with a new meaning: infants conceived specifically so that their families could somehow benefit from their birthright citizenship. In the mid-2000s, proponents of strict immigration laws used the phrase to make arguments for keeping the doors closed tighter. Mainstream usage was spread by outlets like Newsmax and Fox News giving a larger platform to those voices, according to research documenting that spread. (The anchor baby’s more extreme cousin is the “terror baby,” the hypothetical kid who is birthed in America to more effectively carry out home-grown terrorism later on.)

The term really took hold in 2011, when the American Heritage dictionary sparked a controversy by adding an update with this definition:

anchor baby, n., A child born to a noncitizen mother in a country that grants automatic citizenship to children born on its soil, especially such a child born to parents seeking to secure eventual citizenship for themselves and often other members of the family.

The dictionary’s editor said on NPR that they had attempted to “objectively” define the phrase. And it’s true that the two words on their own are each innocuous. Being an anchor can even be a compliment. “There’s nothing specifically about the words themselves that makes them offensive,” says linguist Ben Zimmer, executive producer of Vocabulary.com, “but the idea that people are trying to find a devious way to get into the country by having children here basically dehumanizes everyone involved.” Advocates at places like D.C.-based Immigration Policy Center called the dictionary’s entry “poisonous and derogatory” for lacking the “offensive” label that is attached to definitions of taboo words.

In a few days, the definition was updated:

anchor baby, n. Offensive Used as a disparaging term for a child born to a noncitizen mother in a country that grants automatic citizenship to children born on its soil, especially when the child’s birthplace is thought to have been chosen in order to improve the mother’s or other relatives’ chances of securing eventual citizenship.

This about-face stirred debates about who should decide what’s offensive and who shouldn’t. Was an American institution kowtowing to liberals? Or was a dictionary being descriptive about how a word is truly perceived among English-speakers? When Oxford Dictionaries quietly added their definition after that controversy settled, they tagged it with a bright orange offensive label. Those signs are, Oxford editor Katherine Martin says, not chosen by lexicographers making emotional decrees but affixed as guidance for people who want to use the language intelligently.

Often when language gets accused of being offensive, public figures and media shift to more neutral ground, which can lead to some exhausting phrasing. (When the AP banned their journalists from using undocumented immigrant and illegal immigrant, for instance, standards editor Tom Kent suggested to TIME that a more precise description might be “foreigners in the United States in violation of the law.”) Martin says one problem with anchor baby is that there is no natural alternative, overwrought or otherwise—and not for the neutral reason suggested by Bush, whether or not he meant to insult anyone. “There is no neutral term for this because it is a term that is intended to be derogatory,” she says.

One indication of that intention, as the Washington Post‘s Amber Phillips points out, is that the idea it describes doesn’t entirely make sense in practice. As TIME explained in 2011, “the law says the parents of such a child must wait till she is 21 for her to be allowed to sponsor them to live and work legally in the U.S., and research shows that the vast majority of children of illegal immigrants are born years after the mother and father have arrived in the U.S.”

Regardless, the phrase has stuck. And, while debate over its use can actually lead to discussion of important issues like candidates’ positions on birthright citizenship (Bush is for it; Donald Trump, who also uses the term, is against it), that stickiness is just one more reason for conscientious politicians to steer clear of it, says linguist Zimmer. “The difficulty is that those pithy words and phrases are much more memorable and work their way into the public consciousness,” he says. “And once they’re there, they are difficult to dislodge.”

TIME Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton Calls For Greater Investment in Rural America

Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during a campaign stop at Dr. William U. Pearson Community Center on August 18, 2015 in North Las Vegas, Nevada.
Isaac Brekken—2015 Getty Images Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers remarks during a campaign stop at Dr. William U. Pearson Community Center on August 18, 2015 in North Las Vegas, Nevada.

She makes her pitch on Wednesday in Iowa

Hillary Clinton announced a multi-step plan on Wednesday to grow the economy and local services in rural areas, marking the latest effort for the Democratic frontrunner to firm up support for her candidacy in Iowa and broaden her appeal outside major metropolitan areas.

The proposal, which Clinton will officially announce Wednesday in Iowa, calls for increased investment in rural areas through a series of public-private partnerships that increase federal capital in rural areas.

“America’s rural communities lie at the heart of what makes this country great,” says Clinton’s white paper, provided to reporters. “The affordability of our food, the independence and sophistication of our energy supply, and the strength of our small communities all depend on a vibrant rural America. Despite their critical role in our economy, too many rural communities are not sharing in our nation’s economic gains.”

Several parts of Clinton’s rural agenda have already been announced in other plans, including the creation of an infrastructure bank, her goal of increasing the number of solar panels to more than 500 million in five years, as well as comprehensive immigration reform.

But the plan also includes a pitch directly to Iowa farmers: She would doubling federal loan guarantees for bio processing plants and technologies, long a boon to rural Iowa’s farming industry. Clinton also reiterated her support for strengthening the Renewable Fuel Standard, which her policy paper said “drives the development of advanced cellulosic and other advanced biofuels.”

She would also double federal funding for a program that educates beginning farmers, and build on Clinton’s “Farm-to-Fork” initiative as New York Senator by doubling funding for farmers markets and direct food sales.

Clinton’s proposal would increase the number of Rural Business Investment Companies—government-funded capital networks—that make investments in small rural businesses. She would expand the New Markets Tax Credit, which gives investors a federal tax credit for investments in businesses located in low-income areas. The program expired in 2014 but has bipartisan support in Congress.

The plan also calls for improving healthcare in rural areas by expanding telehealth and remote patient monitoring It also called for better prevention and treatment of substance abuse, noting that drug-associated deaths have grown fastest in rural areas.

Clinton has a strong lead in Iowa over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, according to recent polls showing her with 54% compared with Sanders’ 20%. She’s also earned major endorsements from key Iowa leaders in recent weeks, including former Senator from Iowa Tom Harkin, and Tuesday, from Secretary of Agriculture and former Iowa governor Tom Vilsack.

“Her strong support for the Renewable Fuel Standard and bio-based manufacturing as important parts of a revitalized rural economy makes clear she will work hard to promote meaningful economic opportunity throughout the country,” Vilsack wrote in an op-ed announcing his support.

In New Hampshire, the primary contest after Iowa, Clinton is trailing Sanders, according to recent polls.

TIME

Morning Must Reads: August 26

Capitol
Mark Wilson—Getty Images The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC.

Donald Trump‘s on-air sparring with Univision anchor Jorge Ramos became an instant classic of the 2016 presidential cycle Tuesday, and turned up the level of panic within the GOP over how Trump’s candidacy is affecting the Republican Party’s standing with Latino voters. Ramos, the most popular Spanish-language broadcaster in the country, has grown increasingly critical of the party’s rhetoric on immigration issues, potentially depriving the GOP of support among a constituency it needs to win over. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie hit former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush for his shifting rhetoric on immigration Tuesday, the latest Republican to sense weakness in the well-funded, one-time-front-runner’s campaign.

Trump, meanwhile, has until the end of September to affirm he won’t run a third party candidacy or see himself left off the ballot in the South Carolina primary, state party chairman Matt Moore announced Tuesday. It’s a move that is also being adopted by several other states, requiring the candidate to certify they’ll back the eventual GOP nominee. But it’s unclear whether the statement has the force of law, or is simply designed as a PR victory for the GOP establishment.

Joe Biden is holding a call with members of the Democratic National Committee ostensibly about foreign policy, but the timing, as he’s weighing a presidential run, betrays another motivation. Biden still has not made up his mind on a long shot bid, which would pit the popular, but gaffe-prone, VP against a massive Clinton organization that has nearly a year’s head start on building a campaign.

Here are your must-reads:

Must Reads

Donald Trump and Univision’s Jorge Ramos Spar on Immigration
One of the campaign’s most memorable moments yet [TIME]

Joe Biden to Hold Unusual Call With Democratic Party Officials
A foreign policy call as he ponders a presidential run [New York Times]

Conservative Sting Video Goes Inside Clinton Campaign Training
No wrongdoing, but a warning of more to come [TIME]

Behind the Biden hype
Channeling the grief over his son’s death into an agonizing decision over whether to run in 2016. [Politico]

Sound Off

“I mean, the fact is that you don’t need to be pandering to one way or the other. I’ll tell you the way you don’t do it. You don’t do focus group tested trips to the border, speak Spanish and then criticize Asians.” —New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie criticizes Jeb Bush on Fox News over his comments on immigration.

“I don’t know if adultery is against the law still. In some states, there are old laws against adultery, but I think if we start going after people and locking people up for adultery we’re headed for a bizarre world.” —Sen. Rand Paul on the Ashley Madison hack to the Washington Post.

Bits and Bites

Why Bernie Sanders Won’t Add Debates Without Hillary Clinton [TIME]

The Air Force’s $25 Billion Bomber Blunder [TIME]

Carly Fiorina campaign takes issue with CNN debate qualifications [Medium]

Latino News Media, Offended by Donald Trump, Shows It in Broadcasts [New York Times]

Trump has until Sept. 30 in SC to rule out third-party run [Associated Press]

Caroline Kennedy used private email as ambassador to Japan [Associated Press]

Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren have a frosty past [Boston Globe]

Jeb Bush’s false claim that Planned Parenthood is ‘not actually doing women’s health issues’ [Washington Post]

Jeb Bush set to release ‘Reply All,” an e-book based on emails from time as governor [Tampa Bay Times]

The senator who is ‘ready for the Hunger Games’ [CNN]

State Contractors Aid Governors’ Campaigns [Wall Street Journal]

TIME Hillary Clinton

Conservative Sting Video Goes Inside Clinton Campaign Training

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Charlie Neibergall—AP Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to supporters during a rally before the Iowa Democratic Party's Hall of Fame Dinner, Friday, July 17, 2015, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

A first shot in a coming undercover series

The conservative group Project Veritas released a video Wednesday morning showing a glimpse of its long-anticipated undercover video sting inside the Clinton campaign.

“This is just the tip of the iceberg,” says James O’Keefe, the group’s founder in the clip.

Filmed by hidden camera by Project Veritas supporters posing as Clinton volunteers, the video shows a Clinton campaign staffer discussing strategies for targeting voter registration efforts. The campaign’s policy is to register all those who ask to register, a fact the staffer repeats.

But the staffer is also seen encouraging the “volunteer” to first ask whether the Iowans they encounter are Clinton supporters before asking if they are registered to vote. “We don’t want to make our focus be voter registration, because then we have to, like, register everyone regardless of whether they’re supporters or not,” the Clinton organizer is shown saying.

Nothing in the video shows the Clinton campaign violating the law, or the campaign’s own policy. But Veritas claims, nonetheless, that the campaign is “skirting the law” by first asking whether potential voters are supporters before making the registration offer. This approach to training volunteers is standard operating procedure across field campaigns, according to a Republican field staffer, who requested anonymity.

The Clinton campaign put its offices on alert nationwide last week after catching wind of the Project Veritas effort, warning about the potential for more attempts to infiltrate its campaign. Other schemes identified by the Clinton campaign included efforts to convince staffers and volunteers to accept potentially illegal contributions.

In the video, a Veritas supporter is seen greeting Clinton and posing for a photo with her, though it is not clear whether their interaction yielded anything of note. “Stay tuned Hillary, because we’re shortly going to release a stunning story of electoral malfeasance at the highest levels of your campaign,” O’Keefe says. “Check your email.”

The Clinton campaign declined to comment on the video.

Read next: Why Bernie Sanders Won’t Add Debates Without Hillary Clinton

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