TIME 2016 Election

Hillary Clinton Campaigns at Small Events in Iowa

Hillary Clinton Begins Presidential Campaign In Iowa
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images MONTICELLO, IA - APRIL 14: Democratic presidential hopeful and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) speaks during a roundtable discussion with students and educators at the Kirkwood Community College Jones County Regional Center on April 14, 2015 in Monticello, Iowa. Hillary Clinton kicked off her second bid for President of the United States two days after making the announcement on social media. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

She met with students and teachers at a community college

(CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa)—The big rallies and massive fundraising blitzes have to wait. Hillary Rodham Clinton is getting her 2016 campaign for president started with a few caffeinated beverages and says she’s ready to “drink my way across Iowa.”

“Hi, everybody,” Clinton said Tuesday after popping into the Jones Street Java House, a coffee shop in the Mississippi River town of LeClaire. “I’m happy to be here.”

Fresh from a two-day road trip, Clinton’s coffee shop stop Tuesday morning is the first event in her return to presidential politics. It sticks with her strategy to hold small “retail” style events that allow her to speak to individual voters. She doesn’t plan to hold a large kickoff rally for several weeks, and will tour a community college and hold a roundtable discussion with students and teachers in Monticello, Iowa, later Tuesday.

It’s a debut reminiscent of the “listening tour” that opened her campaign for Senate in 2000, when she ventured into small upstate towns to convene meetings with voters and local leaders. At the coffee shop, she asked for recommendations on what to order, and decided on a Masala chai and a Carmela latte, along with some water with lemon. Her total: $6.96.

Among those she spoke with was LeClaire Mayor Bob Scannell, an independent. “I always vote for the person who I think will do best for the country, and she has my vote,” he said.

In a fundraising email to supporters on Monday, Clinton promised not to take anything for granted and to “work my heart out to earn every single vote.”

Clinton is taking that same low-key approach to fundraising, forgoing the celebrity-studded fundraisers that marked her husband’s presidency, as well as the high-dollar private events put on this year by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, a potential GOP rival. Instead, Clinton’s initial appeals for money will be for small-dollar donations collected over the Internet instead of in swanky fundraising blowouts in New York, Los Angeles and Silicon Valley.

Advisers have set a modest goal of raising $100 million for the primary campaign and will not initially accept donations for the general election.

“Everyone knows that over time Hillary Clinton will raise enough to be competitive,” said Tom Nides, a top Wall Street supporter and former State Department adviser to Clinton. “Her objective is not to raise money to prove that she can. It’s to build the grassroots organization.”

Clinton retains deep ties to the party’s top fundraisers, including those cultivated by her husband, former President Bill Clinton, during the 1990s. During its first call with donors Monday, Hillary Clinton’s team noted that some of those listening in helped President Barack Obama’s campaigns, while others had raised money for Clinton’s own White House bid in 2008. Others, they said, were new to the fundraising circuit.

With those relationships well established, her aides on Monday outlined steps to cast their net as widely as possible to broaden their list of potential contributors, according to several donors who took part. They spoke on condition of anonymity to describe a private conference call.

In the fundraising email, Clinton asked supporters to “chip in what you can,” asking for donations ranging from $5 and $25 to the maximum of $2,700 per individual during the primary. Her campaign intends to slowly ramp up its fundraising efforts, focusing first on online fundraising and building a network of donors whom the campaign will be able to return to in the weeks and months ahead.

“It’s not going to be the big event rollout right now. The idea is to get people involved,” said Miami attorney Ira Leesfield, a longtime Clinton friend and fundraiser.

Clinton wrapped up a roughly 1,000-mile road trip from her home in New York City’s suburbs to Iowa. Riding aboard a van nicknamed “Scooby,” after the cartoon character Scooby-Doo, Clinton surprised fellow travelers Sunday at a gas station in Pennsylvania and then made a lunch stop Monday at a Chipotle south of Toledo, Ohio.

In Iowa, Clinton aims to overcome her disappointing third-place finish in the 2008 caucuses. Her team says they want to build a grassroots campaign that will help rebuild the state’s Democratic Party, which suffered losses in the 2014 elections.

Her events Tuesday and Wednesday will focus heavily on pocketbook economic issues in small-town Iowa, and Clinton was expected to connect with local officials, community leaders and Democratic activists.

TIME Equal Pay

Female Politicians Say Transparency Is Key to Equal Pay

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Matt Herrin—Getty Images/Ikon Images Unequal pay

With women making 78 cents to the dollar for men performing the same work, there’s still a long way to go before equal pay becomes a reality. But, as several female politicians noted on Tuesday, one of the biggest barriers to equal pay is a lack of transparency.

Speaking on a conference call hosted by EMILY’s List, a group working to elect more Democratic women, female lawmakers talked about the steps they’ve taken towards equal pay. Even once gender-based discrimination laws are passed, they can be hard to enforce in the private sector where wages aren’t publicly available.

Gina Raimondo, the first female governor of Rhode Island, established an equal pay tip line this year for people to confidentially report employers that aren’t complying with Rhode Island’s equal pay law. The tips then allow the state Department of Labor and Training, which runs the line, to investigate the employers and enforce the law.

“Equal pay for equal work is good for women, but it’s good for our economy and it’s good for all hardworking families,” Raimondo said. “Families are increasingly relying on a mom’s wages and work to make ends meet.”

Erin Murphy, a Minnesota state representative, also worked to pass measures that would increase transparency to enforce equal pay. As Majority Leader in her state legislature in 2014, she helped pass the Women’s Economic Security Act, aimed at improving working conditions for women. Among other measures, the act contains a provision that allows employees to “voluntarily discuss their compensation without fear of retaliation from their employers.”

Murphy says this communication is a key component of achieving equal pay. “We made headway in Minnesota. But we have many, many steps to go, and one of the important ways we can continue to make progress is talking together,” she said.

Read next: Here’s the History of the Battle for Equal Pay for American Women

TIME Foreign Policy

Obama Removes Cuba From State Sponsor of Terror List

PANAMA-AMERICAS-SUMMIT-CUBA-US-OBAMA-CASTRO
Mandel Ngan—AFP/Getty Images Cuba's President Raul Castro, left, speaks during a meeting with President Barack Obama on the sidelines of the Summit of the Americas at the ATLAPA Convention center on April 11, 2015 in Panama City, Panama.

The countries still on the list are Iran, Sudan and Syria

(WASHINGTON) — The White House says President Barack Obama is removing Cuba from a list of state sponsors of terrorism, a key step in President Barack Obama’s bid to normalize relations between the two countries.

The White House says on Twitter that Obama has submitted to Congress required reports and certifications indicating his intent to take Cuba off the list.

Obama made the final decision following a State Department review of Cuba’s presence on the list.

The U.S. has long since stopped actively accusing Cuba of supporting terrorism.

Cuba was one of four countries on the U.S. list of nations accused of repeatedly supporting global terrorism. The countries still on the list are Iran, Sudan and Syria.

Obama announced in December that the U.S. and Cuba were ending a half-century of hostilities.

Read next: Cuba on the Cusp

TIME Foreign Policy

White House Backs Compromise Iran Bill in Senate

Josh Earnest
Carolyn Kaster—AP White House press secretary Josh Earnest speaks during the daily news briefing at the White House in Washington, April 14, 2015.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest says the Obama administration is withholding final judgment

(WASHINGTON)—The White House abruptly agreed Tuesday to a compromise bill that would ensure that Congress has a say in an emerging nuclear deal with Iran.

Just a few hours after news of a compromise trickled out on Capitol Hill, the White House said that President Barack Obama, who has threatened to veto the bill for weeks, would sign the revised version. The compromise measure, which the Senate Foreign Relations Committee is expected to approve Tuesday, would shorten the time that Congress would have to review details of the bill and approve or disapprove of its provisions.

“Maybe they saw the handwriting on the wall,” House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said about the White House decision to drop its opposition.

It was a reflection of the strong Republican and Democratic push for a congressional review and the skepticism in both parties of an emerging deal. International negotiators are trying to reach a deal that would prevent Iran from being able to develop nuclear weapons. In exchange, Tehran would get relief from economic sanctions that are crippling its economy.

Republicans and Democrats on the committee reached a compromise on the bill as Secretary of State John Kerry and other members of the Cabinet visited Capitol Hill for a second straight day to sell lawmakers on details of a possible final deal and plead for time to reach an accord with Tehran by the end of June.

“This legislation is exactly the congressional review that we’ve been working on from day one,” Chairman Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., said in opening remarks in the committee meeting. “I think this puts Congress in its rightful role.”

Obama, whose foreign policy legacy would be burnished by a deal with Iran, has been in a standoff for months with lawmakers who insist that Congress should have a chance to weigh in and remain skeptical that Iran will honor any agreement.

An earlier version of the bill sought to put any agreement by Obama to lift sanctions on Iran on hold for up to 60 days while Congress reviewed it. The compromise before the committee Tuesday would shorten that delay to 30 days. During that time, Obama would be able to lift sanctions imposed through presidential action, but would be blocked from easing sanctions levied by Congress.

If lawmakers rejected an Iran agreement, the president could still use his veto then.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest said the White House would withhold final judgment on the bill while it works its way through Congress, wary that potential changes could be made in committee that would render it unpalatable. But he said the White House could support the compromise its current form.

“Despite the things about it that we don’t like, enough substantial changes have been made that the president would be willing to sign it,” Earnest said.

If a deal is submitted after July 9 — a short time after the final agreement is to be reached on June 30 — the review period would revert to 60 days. Under the compromise bill, the president would be required to certify to Congress every 90 days that Iran is complying with terms of any final agreement.

Meanwhile, there was evidence that GOP senators were backing off their anti-Iran amendments.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., who announced his candidacy for president on Monday, had proposed an amendment that would require Iran’s leaders to accept Israel’s right to exist. Rubio said his amendment probably could pass in the committee, but ultimately “could imperil the entire arrangement.”

Rubio said the new version has language on Israel that “is better than not having it at all” but that his original amendment “is something we’re going to have to talk about on the floor” during a debate by the full Senate.

Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., said he felt confident that the compromises will hold, but said Democrats would withdraw their support if Republicans successfully push amendments that would pull the bill “sharply to the right.” He was referring to amendments proposed by Republicans to make the administration certify that Iran is not supporting terrorism and had publicly renounced its threat to destroy Israel — two hurdles that would be nearly impossible to scale.

Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., said she opposed the bill in its original form, but now supports it.

“There’s no longer language in the bill tying extraneous issues (to the bill). That would be a deal breaker,” Boxer said.

TIME Congress

The Republican Senator Who Is Key to the Iran Deal

Sen. Bob Corker
Bill Clark—CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images Sen. Bob Corker, Senate Foreign Relations chairman, arrives for a briefing on Iran nuclear negotiations with Secretary of State John Kerry and President Obama's chief of staff Jack Lew in the Capitol on April 14, 2015.

Over the next 10 weeks or so, Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker can’t afford a mulligan. Lucky for him, according to occasional golfing buddy and Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson, he “doesn’t need ‘em.”

In that time, Corker will be “one of the most important people in the world,” as my colleague Massimo Calabresi writes in a magazine profile this week, as he attempts to ensure congressional oversight into a global debate on Iran’s nuclear program the Obama Administration would rather wage on its own.

As chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Corker has the delicate task of crafting a 67-vote supermajority to beat back a veto threat on his bill, which the Administration has worried could imperil the chances of reaching a final deal by a June deadline. Corker struck a major agreement Tuesday, when the committee will take up his bill and introduce a series of amendments that could endanger consensus. But senators on both sides of the aisle are confident that Corker is well suited to the challenges ahead.

“There’s not a better horse to bet on in the United States Senate than Bob Corker,” says Isakson, a Republican member of the committee.

At first glance, Corker is an unlikely player in international affairs. A successful construction company owner, former Chattanooga mayor and head of Tennessee’s finances, Corker had no foreign policy experience before coming to the Senate in 2007. While a student at the University of Tennessee, Corker wasn’t even interested in politics, according to his roommate, Jimmy Haslam, who used to call Corker “Thor” because he “looked like a little Viking.” But his interests eventually evolved and after an introduction from Haslam, Corker met with Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander in 1993. The pair talked for an hour and a half as they walked down the beach at Hilton Head, South Carolina, discussing whether Corker should run for Senate or governor.

“He’s never been afraid of big jumps,” says Alexander, who thinks the two-term senator would be “terrific” as Secretary of either the State or Treasury departments. “In a way he’s perfectly named—Corker.”

Corker popped to the ranking Republican position on the committee in 2013 and became chairman when Republicans took the Senate this year. To overcome his initial lack of expertise, Corker has engaged in policy discussions with numerous foreign policy experts, including former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, who has breakfast with him every two or three months. Corker also travels extensively; he told TIME in February that he had traveled to over 63 countries. Haslam, now the owner of the Cleveland Browns, says his longtime friend flies commercial on his trips to the Middle East with usually one staff member. “Bob’s not a hot dog,” says Haslam. “He gets the job done.”

Corker’s temperament may serve him well as debate over U.S. foreign policy no longer ends at the water’s edge. Democrats are still smarting from Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton’s direct letter to Iranian leaders and House Speaker John Boehner’s invitation of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to speak to Congress. One of seven Republicans who didn’t sign Cotton’s letter, Corker has garnered praise from Democrats. Maryland Sen. Ben Cardin, the top Democrat on Corker’s committee, calls Corker a “serious legislator” and an “ideal fit” for the panel’s chairmanship.

“I think that he is trying to use that position in the best tradition of the U.S. Senate to bring as much unity on behalf of foreign policy as possible,” Cardin told TIME last week. “And recognizing that’s challenging today, I think he’s done a really good job on his bill on the congressional oversight of the nuclear agreement. It’s one in which I hope we can find common ground. I think we’re very close to that.”

Introduced with Democratic Sens. Bob Menendez and Tim Kaine and Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham as cosponsors, Corker’s bipartisan bill threads the needle by establishing an order of review, preventing the president from waiving Congress’ economic sanctions against Iran for 30 days, according to a Corker aide, and up to 52 days if Congress passes a bill and the president vetoes it. If the deal is submitted late, after July 9, the review period reverts to 60 days, according to the aide. If President Obama accepts it, the Administration would be required to tell Congress every 90 days if Iran is still keeping up its end.

“We have reached a bipartisan agreement that keeps the congressional review process absolutely intact and full of integrity,” said Corker on MSNBC’s Morning Joe Tuesday. “On behalf of the American people we want to make sure that if a final deal is reached it lays before Congress, so we have the opportunity to go through every detail.”

Corker has worked for months to bring Democrats on board. The bill originally had called for a vote to approve or disapprove of the deal—now there is the option to not act, Menendez told TIME. Another priority—pushed by New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, according to the New York Times—was ensuring a 60-vote rather than a 51-vote threshold for any resolution of disapproval or agreement, ensuring that Congress spoke in a bipartisan manner. Kaine claims credit for limiting the bill to only sanctions imposed by Congress, rather than the Administration or international bodies. Still, just last week Cardin said he had three major areas of concern: “the time for review, the limitation of presidential powers during the review, and to the statute issues that are not directly related to the nuclear agreement.”

So over the past few days and up through Monday night, Corker has worked to close the gaps with Democrats, reportedly softening requirements that Iran isn’t directly sponsoring terrorism against the United States and loosening restrictions on the original timetable for a 60 day congressional review period.

The negotiations have appeared to assuage Democratic concerns. On Tuesday, White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said that Obama’s veto threat would be revoked—a stunning turnaround—if some of the changes the White House has proposed, including the timetable and terrorism language, make it through committee.

“We have to see what comes through the committee process,” said Earnest. “What we have made clear to Democrats and Republicans is that the President would be willing to sign the proposed compromise that is making its way through the committee today.”

Corker’s immediate challenge now is to navigate a series of controversial amendments from Democrats and Republicans alike. One from Connecticut Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy would allow President Obama to waive sanctions during the 60 days if a “failure to do so would be a breach of the final comprehensive agreement,” according to Murphy spokesman Chris Harris. Another by Isakson would make a condition of sanctions relief “fair and appropriate compensation” to Americans who were terrorized in the 1979 Iranian hostage crisis. And Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio will introduce an amendment making approval of the deal dependent on Iran’s recognition of Israel’s right to exist, according to the New York Times.

Some of those amendments are nonstarters with the Administration, which has launched a full-scale lobbying effort on Capitol Hill. Secretary of State John Kerry, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew and Moniz briefed House members in a classified session Monday and are expected to hold another for senators on Tuesday, according to the Times. They are trying to convince lawmakers to agree to a framework agreement that couldn’t be subject to a wider divergence of opinion. Critics like Cotton, a foreign policy hawk and Iraq combat veteran, believe the deal could eventually lead to a nuclear confrontation. The Administration argues it could lead to a safer world, lengthening the time it would take for Iran to produce such a bomb over the next decade from three months to a year, giving America’s allies more time to forcefully respond.

Corker’s knack for jumping into the hairiest policy debates hasn’t always been a success, including in his early efforts to negotiate the auto company bailout and Dodd-Frank financial regulation reform. “He’s a guy who views things without the partisan lens and from a very practical approach,” says Josh Holmes, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s former chief of staff. “I think in some ways early on it made him a target for Democrats to try to wedge the best deal out of.”

“I will say that Corker is amongst the most intelligent senators on the Hill,” adds Holmes. “He learns a great deal from each one of these interactions.”

Corker did seal a deal during the 2013 immigration reform debate, helping craft border security legislation that the Senate incorporated and passed before it died in the House. Menendez told TIME he “swallowed” Corker’s “odorous” amendment because he agreed with his colleague that it would “guarantee us a big vote and that the greater good was better served by accepting what he could bring along with him.”

Corker’s goal is essentially the same now: to convince a wide swath of Congress to get to “yes” despite their reservations. Menendez, who has “tag teamed” members on the bill on the Senate floor, says Corker is a dogged negotiator.

“He’s tenacious going to anyone on either side of the aisle making his case,” says Menendez. “And he won’t stop. If you say no to him, he’ll ask you why and then try to argue away the concern. If you say I’m thinking about he’ll probably come back to you another 10 times.”

With reporting by Maya Rhodan and Massimo Calabresi/Washington, D.C.

TIME 2016 Election

Ohio Gov. Kasich ‘Seriously Considering’ Presidential Run

Benjamin Netanyahu Address
Tom Williams—CQ-Roll Call,Inc./Getty Images Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) talks with the press after Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's address to a joint meeting of Congress in the House chamber, March 3, 2015.

"If it makes sense, you know I'll do it"

Ohio Gov. John Kasich says he is “seriously considering” a presidential run, joining an already crowded field of contenders for the Republican presidential nominee.

“If it makes sense, you know I’ll do it,” Kasich said Monday during a luncheon at the Detroit Economic Club, CBS Cleveland reports.

Kasich highlighted his opposition to deficit spending and illegal immigration as two issues that would shape his campaign platform if he decided to run. But he said he still needed to discuss the decision with family and friends.

The comments came the same day Senator Marco Rubio announced his presidential bid. Senators Ted Cruz and Rand Paul have also entered the Republican race.

TIME 2016 Campaign

Man Repeller: Why We Care What Hillary Clinton Wears

Leandra Medine is the founder of Man Repeller, a humorous website for serious fashion, and the author of Man Repeller: Seeking Love, Finding Overalls. She almost always wears her suit lapels popped.

(It's not because she's a woman.)

The question on Sunday wasn’t whether Hillary Clinton would finally announce her 2016 Presidential bid — that has seemed a forgone conclusion, the worst-kept secret in politics. The question was what tone she would set for the next 19 months of campaigning. No matter the candidate, every detail in a campaign is carefully and strategically framed for our consumption. The devil is in them. From the specific language of talking points, to the color of one’s tie — or, Sunday, red blouse and blue blazer — these are deliberate choices made by the campaign. As a woman whose company is built on the ethos of dressing for one’s self and using fashion as an empowering medium for expression, I tend to notice things like tie pattern or the positioning of a blazer’s lapel (in Hillary’s case, tailored to pop). I marvel at such cues.

So I can sit here and wax poetic on the sort of garb I believe a Presidential candidate should wear as he or she stumps along over the next two years. (Secretary Clinton’s closet would be a medley of suits crafted by Carolina Herrera and the late Oscar de la Renta and, just to please her audience with the sartorial equivalent of the Pledge of Allegiance, a smattering of denim.) But who cares? Frankly, I do — but not because she’s a woman.

It seems inevitable, if unfair, that when a woman is vying for a prominent position in office, her outfit choices will be analyzed to a degree considerably higher than those of her male counterpart by simple existence of gender stereotypes. Name It. Change it. has found that any mention of a female candidate’s appearance — positive or negative — hurts her chances of being elected into office.

But this conversation is not about Clinton and the manifold shades of suit she has worn; it’s about the impact of fashion on society outside of its own industry. (For her part, Clinton joked about developing a television show called “Project Pantsuit” while presenting a lifetime achievement award to Oscar de la Renta at the annual Council of Fashion Designers of America ceremony in 2012.)

Fashion is used as a tool to convey a point about who we are or potentially want to be. Whether or not a civilian curates his or her own aesthetic is up that person, but it is an integral part of one’s public image. It can be used to reveal various aspects of yourself at various times, or even create something new all together. Maybe it’s feeling like a little “metallic blueberry on creamsicle” for a campaign event, rolling up shirt sleeves to suggest easy confidence, or an Air Force One “mulletting” a la Ronald Reagan, a presidential man repeller who effectively took the reputation of a hair style and turned it into a mode of dress.

Rosie Assoulin, a fashion designer who has dressed Oprah — a figure as prominently recognized as Clinton — recently asked me where the humanity is in fashion. “People use clothes as a tool, but often to lie to the world about themselves,” she said. And she’s right: fashion can be honest, it can be aspirational, and it can lie. Of course, everyone, presidential candidate or not, has the choice to engage using fashion. But that doesn’t quite detract from the voice of the clothes, which is what makes them interesting here — it’s politics.

Read next: Rand Paul Is the Most Interesting Man in Political Fashion

Leandra Medine is the founder of Man Repeller, a humorous website for serious fashion, and the author of Man Repeller: Seeking Love, Finding Overalls. She almost always wears her suit lapels popped.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Chris Christie

Chris Christie to Propose Changes to Social Security, Medicare

Chris Christie
Mel Evans—AP In this April 8, 2015 file photo, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie addresses a gathering as he announces a $202 million flood control project for Union Beach, N.J.

He'd raise the retirement age and means-test benefits

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will unveil a proposal to change Social Security and Medicare Tuesday in a speech in New Hampshire, as he seeks to inject new life into his presidential ambitions.

The outspoken Republican’s political fortunes soured after last year’s controversy over the political closure of approach lanes to the George Washington Bridge and a tough fiscal picture at home. But Christie is hoping that by embracing the third rail of American politics with two hands he can bolster his credentials as a truth-teller.

“Washington is afraid to have an honest conversation about Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid with the people of our country,” Christie will say in a speech at New Hampshire’s St. Anselm College Institute of Politics. “I am not.”

Christie will propose raising the retirement age for Medicare to 67 and for Social Security to 69, arguing that entitlement programs must be fair for all Americans, including the next generation that is paying into the programs while questioning whether they will ever see benefits.

In a controversial move, Christie would means-test Social Security, reducing or cutting payments entirely for those who continue to earn income in retirement. He will argue that he wants to return the program being a social insurance program, where only those who need the outlays will receive them.

“Do we really believe that the wealthiest Americans need to take from younger, hard-working Americans to receive what, for most of them, is a modest monthly Social Security check,” Christie will say. “I propose a modest means test that only affects those with non-Social Security income of over $80,000 per year, and phases out Social Security payments entirely for those that have $200,000 a year of other income.”

To incentivize work as more Americans continue to hold jobs later into life, Christie would eliminate the payroll tax at 62.

Christie’s political identity stems from his willingness to take on powerful interests, such as his home state’s teachers unions, altering the calculus in favor of what for most other politicians would be an undeniably risky move. But Christie’s proposals stop short of radically altering either Medicaid or Social Security as some conservatives have proposed, staying away from the 2000s-era privatization debates.

TIME 2016 Election

Ben Carson Set to Answer Question of Presidential Run on May 4

Key Speakers At The Conservative Political Action Conference
Andrew Harrer—Bloomberg/Getty Images Ben Carson, possible 2016 presidential candidate, listens to a question during an interview during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland, Feb. 26, 2015.

The Tea Party favorite is making a 'major announcement' in his hometown of Detroit

Ben Carson may be throwing his hat into the race to the White House as soon as May, according to reports.

On May 4, Carson will host an event at the Detroit Music Hall Center for the Performing Arts where his campaign tells the Detroit Free Press he will make a major announcement.

The exact details of the announcement have yet to be ironed out, according to CNN. But given the retired neurosurgeon’s appearances in key primary states over the past several months, it’s likely that he’ll announce his plans to seek the Republican presidential nomination in 2016.

The location is of significance for Carson, who grew up poor in the Motor City, but later grew up to become a renowned brain surgeon and author. Despite his lack of political experience, Carson is favored among some grassroots conservative groups for being an outspoken critic of President Obama’s policies — particularly the Affordable Care Act, which he once likened to slavery.

[Detroit Free Press]

TIME 2016 Election

Poll: Chris Christie Losing New Jersey Support for 2016 Bid

Chris Christie
Mel Evans—AP A person photographs New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie during a town hall meeting April 7, 2015, in Matawan, N.J.

69% of polled New Jersey voters think he wouldn't make a good president

New Jersey voters are losing faith in their governor’s potential to be a “good president.”

About 69% of New Jersey voters in a new Rutgers University poll say Gov. Chris Christie would not make a good president, a ten point leap from a February poll. About 24% say they think he has what it takes.

Christie is one of many Republicans expected to enter the race for 2016 in the coming months, joining Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas, Rand Paul of Kentucky, and Marco Rubio of Florida who have already announced their plans to seek the nomination. Former Gov. Jeb Bush and Gov. Scott Walker are also expected to join the race soon.

Though the poll represents a relatively small sample of New Jersey voters and hosts a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points, it offers a glimpse at how voters from New Jersey feel about their governor’s potential campaign.

Though 58% of those polled don’t think the word “presidential” at all describes the governor (38% say it describes him pretty well), the majority, 57%, believes he will still become a presidential candidate. Thirty-two percent, on the other hand, do not.

And while New Jersey voters are important for Christie, the real test will come in early primary and caucus states like New Hampshire, where the governor will begin hosting a series of town-hall events with voters on Tuesday.

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